* Posts by Voland's right hand

3882 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

UK PM May's response to London terror attack: Time to 'regulate' internet companies

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Re: Book stores.

So no Mein Kampf or other Nazi propaganda at bookstores.

Which is a pity - you cannot compare her rants with that and observe the nearly 1:1 plagiarism.

IMHO, that is wrong too. We should adopt the significantly more enlightened Irish attitude to this. I was on a tour around the Dublin castle a few weeks back and the guide was asked:

Q: "Why are you preserving all this artifacts from the British rule?"

A: "We like to TURN the pages of the book of history, not to BURN them".

There is a lesson to be learned there - we should neither BURN them ourselves, nor support anyone who does so.

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EU wins approval to waste €120m on pitiful public Wi-Fi

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Wi-Fi efforts such as this, with Spain being a key problem area.

In Spain and Italy there is passable city-wide wifi in most resorts and a lot of the more "tourist-oriented" cities In fact, most of the install base dates from 7+ years back. It is also past its prime - 4G and lack of roaming fees are killing it.

It is the companies which run these which are opposing municipal WiFi, not the mobile telcos. Nothing surprising here too.

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British prime minister slams Facebook and pals for votes

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Re: If

They target Britain because we joined in an unprovoked illegal assault (not "war") on Iraq, a sovereign state.

Bollocks.

Let me spell it out for you. I am no fan of Saddam, I am no fan of Qaddafi(*) and I am definitely no fan of Assad. They, however, were keeping a lid on middle eastern lunacy for us. We "imported" democracy there and assisted in the collapse of their dictatorships. That created the fertile soil on which the always present seeds of Islamic terrorism grew and flourished. We are now harvesting what we fertilized. The legality of their rule is irrelevant. We did not sow it - we just shoveled a load of manure on top for it to grow.

What is relevant is that we went in and intervened without any plans for the "day after" and how we will control the unleashed lunatics having a free for-all.

(*)Do not wave the PanAm 103 and UTA 772 at me. You need to understand what Qaddafi was doing first. Lybia was never a state - it was and is a patchwork of clans some more fanatical and violent than the others. Qaddafi farmed out government functions to various clans to balance their power. During that period intelligence was farmed out to one of the more lunatic clans. While the results were not pretty, they were still significantly less than what would have been a free for all of all clans against each other with lunatics breeding and growing in the environment - what we have now. Also, as a result of the resulting "chess game" that clan was taken off the board and was not in play at the time we intervened to "transition them to democracy"

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It does not, it starts in the Mosque/School

And at home and in the family. It has always been a distinctly family affair - usually brothers and siblings, but generation to generation as well.

However, blaming the family is traditionally unacceptable for the political spectrum right of Attila The Hun. Family is sacrosanct and shall not be blamed. Much easier to blame social media instead.

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Boffins find evidence of strange uranium-producing bacteria lurking underground

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Re: Explosives Residues

1. It does not help you unless the Uranium is bound into a chemical form which makes it easier to recover. That may be the case. Somewhat - you can easily dissolve carbonate with acids, but on the overall it does not work out for the volumes involved.

2. An explosion site is contaminated with radioactive versions of the whole periodic table. Uranium is the least and the last of your worries.

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The Big Blue Chopper video that IBM might want to keep quiet

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Re: errr

simply because it might make other employees feel better

Ever heard about morale and what is the effect on it when the army commander is eating with the troops from the same field kitchen? Versus army commander having a lobster and foie grass in a private tent?

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Toyota's entertaining the idea of Linux in cars

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Re: I must be getting old....

I don't need my car to take photos

You do not drive in a big city. We have reached a point where having a blackbox video recorder is your last like of defence against ambulance chasers.

In any case, I do not see the point of using AGL for this. This is an infotainment system - an area where there is a boatload of existing Android based examples which do everything an AGL infotainment system does.

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Social media vetting for US visas go live

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That "When" is from today

There are quite a few countries out there which have reciprocity enshrined in law. They will have no choice but to apply this as of today.

It is quite funny to watch when US gets into a mudslinging match on the visa regime with such country (provided you are not the one applying for a visa). For example they nearly reached reciprocal 1000$ visa fees with Russia in 2000 as a result of such tit-for-tat exchange.

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4th and 5th amendment do not apply to non-resident foreigner.

As far as American justice is concerned a non-resident foreigner has no rights.

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Trident nuke subs are hackable, thunders Wikipedia-based report

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Re: Boom

So no, not really worried about a v boat being hacked by hippies with iPads.

The current crop - agree - not a chance in hell. Now, the replacement...

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Russian search engine Yandex's Ukraine offices raided for 'treason'

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You really cannot make this up.

There is a lot going there which you cannot really make up.

They are declaring fascist collaborators which frog-marched Jews into the lime pits as heroes and suing the few surviving guys who (quite rightfully) hunted and terminated them after WW2 for murder. You should read some of the gems which are going into their new "authorized" school textbooks about the role of Hitler and other prominent "pro-Ukrainian politicians" in world history.

We should stop sponsoring this gang of lunatics. Compared to them Pinochet was a shining light of democratic enlightenment. Without us propping them financially they will collapse in a forthnight.

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BA CEO blames messaging and networks for grounding

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It smells like a store-and-forward messaging system from the dawn of the mainframe age (Shows how much BA has been investing into its IT). It may even be hardware + software. Switching over to backup is non-trivial as this is integrated into transactions, so you need to rewind transactions, etc.

It can go wrong and often does, especially if you have piled up a gazillion of new and wonderful things connected to it via extra interfaces. Example of this type of clusterf*** the NATS catastrophic failure a few years back.

That is NOT the clusterf*ck they experienced though because their messaging and transaction was half-knackered on Friday. My boarding pass emails were delayed 8 hours, check-in email announcement by 10 hours. So while it most likely was the messaging component, it was not knackered by a surge, it was half-dead 24h before that and the "surge" was probably someone hired on too little money (or someone hired on too much money giving the idiotic order) trying to reset it via power-cycle on Sat.

This is why when you intended to run a system and build on it for decades, you have upgrade, and you have to START each upgrade cycle by upgrading the messaging and networking. Not do it as an afterthought and an unwelcome expense (the way BA does anything related to paying with the exception of paying exec bonuses).

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Even if it is sourced locally

He personally is grossly incompetent.

IT is not a cost center in a modern airline. It is a key operational component and in fact a profit center. Without IT you cannot operate online bookings, notifications and most importantly you cannot dynamically price your flights. That is wholly dependent on the transactions being done electronically. All of the profit margin of a modern airline comes from dynamic pricing. If it prices statically it will be in the red.

He, however, has systematically treated IT as a cost to be cut, not as a profit center to be leveraged. So even if he hired the staff for these systems locally, they were most likely hired under the market rate and the results are self-explanatory.

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ARM talks up fresh CPUs and a GPU, all tuned for AI

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Another non-GPL GPU

It 's wonderful that they have a new GPU. How about some f*** drivers for it.

The Xorg support for Mali is so moribund it is not even funny.

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BA's 'global IT system failure' was due to 'power surge'

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Re: "Tirelessly"?

They are lying too. Their system was half-knackered the day before so things do not compute. It was definitely not a Saturday failure - it started 24hours before that.

I did not get my check-in notification until 10 hours late and I the boarding pass emails were 8 hours late on Friday.

So they are massively lying. Someone should check if there are holes in the walls in their office at Watersisde from Pinoccio nose punching through them at mach 1.

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Pirates hack was a hoax, says Disney boss

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Re: Yahoo Finance?

Most. It is till this day one of the best free aggregators out there.

It is run separately from a lot of yahoo including its own software dev team and is the only thing in Yahoo which is worth some money.

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‪WannaCry‬pt ransomware note likely written by Google Translate-using Chinese speakers

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Re: More to the point

Thet would tell you at best that the ip is from china,

Depends how stupid they were. Google cookies are very very very long lived you know.

The issue is - the likelihood that there are any logs for this one worthy of forensic examination are about nil.

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'President Zuck' fundraiser opens for business

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Re: Dear God...

First Trump then over to Zuckerberg - could it get any worse?

Yes it can. How about Travis Kalanick for president.

I am going now to wash my mouth.

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Re: It's really time to build a wall around USA...

I agree. Mexico may come to regret refusing to finance it.

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EU pegs quota for 'homegrown' content on Netflix at 30 per cent

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Re: What happens when the UK leaves?

suppose you only watch such things when they're pointlessly remade in English?

Concur. End of the day some people need La Piovra sterilized, sanitized, americanized and made into the Sopranoes to watch it. Only because La Piovra was Italian you know.

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Re: "30% of the services' catalog must be European works"

I have said it before, I will say it again.

In most Eu countries, it is trivial to hit the 30% threshold by digitizing and running old classics out of the back catalogue and people WILL watch them. Even if they are in another Eu language.

If I have a choice between Grey's anatomy and Hospital at The End of The City I will watch the latter (if I watch anything at all). Anything else aside it is FUNNY (and extremely politically incorrect by today's standards). There is a whole raft of pretty decent old German criminal shows (along the lines of UK's Midsommer Murders). Polish have a long history of doing somewhat tolerable interpretations of classics like for example their serialization of Master and Margarita. You can add some occasional spice like the old Spanish serialization of Don Quixote.

Satisfying this requirement without putting tripe on is trivial. It is also CHEAP - the rights to some of this content cost peanuts.

So frankly, I do not see what are Netflix and co complaning about. Just f*** off and do a round trip around the TV archives on the continent, they will be > 30% by the end of it.

IMHO the issue they have is that this content will be HIGHER quality and will be watched more than the force-fed idiotic Hollywood drivel which is being pushed as as steamroller through marketing and product placement agreements. That is exactly what Eu is trying to fix so good luck to them if they manage to do so.

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The revolution will not be televised: How Lucas modernised audio in film

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Beg your pardon?

Like every good director, George Lucas

I beg to differ - he is horrible director and the dog's breakfast known as Star Wars Episode 1 is a testament to that. So is the complete and utter destruction of the pace and the action in Episode 4 after he vandalized it.

He is a businessman and good at monetization of his wares through product placement and merchandising. Director - gimme a break.

The best star wars movies are the ones without him - Episode V directed by Irwin Kershner and the people Fox put to do the original IV where he should have never got the credit as he was under tight control not to damage the goods.

As far as audio, you have forgotten the Episode IV release conditions. During the first month (if memory serves me right) Episode IV was restricted to be shown ONLY in the Dolby enabled cinemas and it was the first film to fully leverage the format. The work was already done and it was not him who made the decision to force the issue and insist on the cinema having surround sound. It was Fox.

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Life is... pushing all the right buttons on the wrong remote control

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You can do all of that. Then the SWMBO will dig out the old control, the other old control, the next old control and you end up with N+1 remote controls.

Been there, tried that.

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I can feel your pain

This is exactly why I HAVE an integrated system I built myself out of a Debian box, vlc and the 2 storage servers(*) in the house (a meager total of 12TB).

However, that causes another issue. Anything and everything has to be copied there first by the Ripper man (me). That sometimes involves a lot of swearing about Disney Corp and its progeny as well as several other usual suspects like whoever used to manage Sandra Bollocks (did I spell this one right?) as they insisted every piece of bollocks produced by her has at least 3-layers of copy protection. It also involves free time to fight with the defenses erected by these idiots against us watching their content.

So in the end the SWMBO tries to smuggle some 3£ a pop bargain bin DVDs from Sainsbury and create a nice little pigsty of plastic boxes in all nooks and crannies of the living room. So instead of herds of remote controls we now have occasional platic box infestations which I have to mercilessly cull and transfer to the system.

(*)As they handle my mail and the VMs for my work from home environments, all they need is a few more drives slotted into them and put to sleep when not in use. Less than the cost of extra shelving to house the DVDs.

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Your roadmap to the Google vs Oracle Java wars

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Sour grapes of envy

Ever heard of sour grapes of envy?

Someone comes around and does with relative ease what you have failed to do for a decade. Everybody sees how badly you suck and everyone starts using what the new guy has done.

All large projects in Java outside Sun use Guava Futures and Guava Collections. They are something that makes the half-baked antisocial interfaces concocted by Sun in their concurrency utils usable in the course of normal software development.

I am not surprised about the sour grapes.

By the way - a large chunk of the 600 classes in the lawsuit are classes Google had to re-implement as part of Guava because Sun did not just put half-baked implementations of interfaces in their libs. They declared a lot of that final so it could not be extended cleanly and easily.

So doubly sore grapes too - showing not just how badly you suck, but also showing exactly what you have failed to deliver.

By the way - I am no fan of Google. Guava, however, is clearly one of the places where credit should be were its due.

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Re: OTGH

It is not the OS, it is the app runtime environment which is the issue here.

You can run the Android java-like bits on top of any Unix-like OS with a minimal degree of porting.

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The fair use finding dumbfounded many legal experts. Google had copied 600 classes, 6000 methods and 11,000 lines of Java to create Android.

Business as usual in java land. When I have to write in it, I end up copying and rewriting on average 3-4 classes which are clearly half-baked, but some idiot has declared final. This is for a 5k line project (plugin in a larger system). 600 classes are LESS than the expected needed copy rate for a project of the size of Android.

A large chunk of these 600 classes is gson, guava and the common underlying google code behind them.

Let's look into those. You have abstractions which Sun once upon a time started and left decidedly half-baked like Futures. Despite the classes being utterly half-baked, their expansion was deliberately limited by liberal sprinkling of Finals here and there. So due to the way they are declared you have no choice but to re-implement them replicating 100% existing functionality (you have to comply with a defined interface), but building on top so people can use them. If you replicate something trivial like a basic wrapper class it is guaranteed to end up looking 99% the same even if you do not copy it. That is pretty well covered by copyright law (as in all the cases where judgments went against Lego). If there is only one form which satisfies the functional requirement, the copying argument simply does not fly.

On top of that, the whole argument about "Google copied from us" goes out of the window as in Java 8 Oracle pinched a large section of Google's work - Futures, preconditions, etc and included them into the core libs (with some "Titanic deck-chair re-arrangement" [tm]). It also had to do exactly what Google did as well. It just comes with the territory and unfortunately there is no way to chop the fingers of all the idiots which make a LIBRARY class FINAL. And, trust me, there are LOADS of those. Even in Google.

By the way, what Andrew missed in his shouting about 6000 methods is how many of them are accessors to a pre-defined interface. There is only ONE WAY to write them. My (very educated) guess is - 5500 or thereabouts.

AFAIK the judge DID have some software engineering background so he clearly saw the same thing all of us see and told SnOracle to go suck asteroids through a microbore and do not complain about a NATURAL SIDE EFFECT of their language syntax. You cannot write in java unless you re-implement regularly trivial sh** just because some idiot has declared it immutable or out of scope for your project.

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Walkers' Crisps pulls backfiring Tweet campaign that paired Gary Lineker and a bunch of nasties

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Re: And Yet Again

Of course no.

Such campaigns are concocted in a marketing department and never ever go anywhere near security and engineering.

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Industrial Light & Magic: 40 years of Lucas's pioneering FX-wing

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Re: And still no official HD release

Lucas does not want to allow its release and he owns the rights.

Anything else aside, it just shows how crap are both his pre-quels and the vandalism he did to the original.

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Re: Still didn't escape uncanny valley

You a being a bit unfair. Only a bit.

New Hope was filmed using very "sharp" lighting throughout most of the Death Star studio set - you can see the reflections of that off Peter Cushing's forehead, etc. As a result the mimics, emotions, etc are much clearer.

Rogue 1 Death Star and most of other indoor sets are filmed with a much fuzzier lighting and are darker overall.

The intention was probably to make it scarier and spookier and it became possible with modern lighting technology. You simply could not do that level of background lighting in the days when everything had to be done using halogens. You can now. You can stick as many leds as you want in a set, your limit is only your budget, not the technology as such. As a result the Rogue 1 team has gone a bit overboard on that in places. The ability to adjust exposure in a very arbitrary manner while filming digitally also helps.

They are not the only ones - if you compare any movie done 40 years ago to a movie done now, the indoor scenes are exactly like the New Hope ones - sharp, clear with lots of reflections of people and objects. Natural result of using those 1kw + halogen lights.

So there is some of that too - especially in the sequences shown in that youtube video.

By the way, if you have never seen the original Moff, the CGI Moff did not look very wrong. Now, Leya, that was so obviously artificial, it was not even funny - they did not get the lighting reflections on her face anywhere near right (despite this being modeled into oblivion in both films and games).

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Drones over London caused aviation chaos, pilots' reports reveal

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Drones flying outside the permitted limits (generally 400ft and within visual range for drones under 7kg in weight) is an increasing problem.

Drone in that category is NOT 2m in size as reported by the 777 pilot. 2m in size capable of this altitude is more like 20kg+ - something which costs an arm, a leg and a prosthetic and is operated by a commercial operator which should have been traceable. It was flying illegally by all means as it had its lights disabled according to the report.

Incidents like this has nothing to do with idiots flying their latest toy from Maplin. Professional papparazzi(*), private eyes, etc are more likely suspects. None of them gives a flying f*** about human life and the law anyway and they will continue to fly regardless of regs. They just used to do that with helicopters in the past. They now do it with drones. Everything for that priceless picture of one "starlet" kissing the wrong arse, wife, etc. Whatever pays the wages.

(*)That is why it also had its lights disabled by the way

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Orbital boffins cut four years off NASA mission to shiniest object in the Solar System

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Re: Arrggghhhh....

It could be worse.

You never know what you are going to discover trying to put yourself in orbit around an object built predominantly of high quality vacuum manufactured steel. It... may... not... like... it...

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UK ministers to push anti-encryption laws after election

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Re: As if the government had done so much...

would you really want a state where someone/anyone can be arrested BEFORE committing a crime

UK is such state - see current anti-terror legislation.

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Or simply explain that forcing HMG to abandon the centuries-long presumption of innocence

Such a thing does not exist any more in English law. Courtesy of Tony Blair. The sole place where it exists is the ECHR and this is one of the most prominent reasons for Kim Jong May wanting to remove us from it.

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Re: The encryption horse is free

Kim Jong-May. Snoopers Charter

At the time, none of her ideas passed without being extensively gutted, exactly because of Lib Dems.

I have said before, I will say it again. Come back Cleggie, everything is forgiven.

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Re: Good idea!

Perhaps Teresa Mayhem et al need a reality check on what is actually feasible before such knee jerk legislation.

What makes you think that a dictator wannabe with delusions of grandure can be influenced by a reality check. Bonus points for Vicar Offspring.

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Windows is now built on Git, but Microsoft has found some bottlenecks

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Re: GVFS sounds super dumb

It smells of ClearCase.

I frankly, do not see the point.

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AI-powered dynamic pricing turns its gaze to the fuel pumps

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Re: Also this is NOT AI

Indeed - it is a classic optimal control/game theory problem.

While it is possible to reach the same solution via a learning system/neural net, it is not worth it - there is a better and less resource hungry method available.

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EU ministers approve anti-hate speech video rules

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Re: My child ...

In my household,

Touche. Applause.

I have a suggestion - el reg should still allow the joke icon even for anonymous posts because quite clearly there are people amidst us who are so narrow minded that they cannot notice irony even if it hits them in the face like a battering ram.

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In reality, it will likely mean Netflix being legally obliged to carry millions of hours of pretentious nonsense.

Not really - it can easily satisfy this requirement by carrying old classics in the local language without buying a single bit of new content.

By the way, I would not call Death of a Corrupt Man, the original Belmondo The Professional", pretentious nonsense. In fact, both of them are very good and educational pre-election material.

Similarly, if we take another country like, let's say Czech republic, their old comedies and sitcoms will happily load up to 40% of the quota and they are definitely worth watching if you understand the language. In fact, I have educated my English and American colleagues to some of the immortal quotes from "Hospital at the end of the city". You can now hear: "If stupidity had wings, you my dear, would have flown out of the window like a dove" on both sides of the Atlantic.

And so on. The 30% is NOT difficult. Even 30%+20% (30 local, 20 rest of Eu) is not difficult - it is simply a matter of digitizing the old tapes. It is also good as it preserves existing heritage for posterity and introduces the new generation to what made us laugh :)

The only place which where the pretentious nonsense description may hold true is Scandinavia, but hey, this is what we call ART cinema, right? Everyone should LOVE Bergman, right?

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Google starts enterprise support for Chrome, including top SaaS apps

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All Hail the new IE6

I am off to dig a bunker.

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Emissions cheating detection shines light on black box code

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Re: it looks like open road testing is the way to go.

I fully acknowledge that chipping/3rd party reprogramming is possible - but is it really "very widespread" as you imply?

I used to take my older one to a Sunday language school on an industrial estate in London. Up to around 2010-ish it was a quiet dump with a couple of unused warehouses and nothing going on.

From 2010 to 2016 it was impossible to park over the weekend. Out of 6 warehouses, 5 opened as garages - one English, two Eastern European and two of some South-West Asian variety. Any discussion of what you want - only in the right language. All were running ~ 20% normal garage business, 80% re-progamming and chipping. I can read two Eastern European languages used on the site so I can tell you they were chipping like crazy based on what they were posting and boasting. One of them even advertised in the local immigrant rag published in that language.

Most of the cars waiting to be "serviced" were either private hire or Uber with an occasional van for "variety". 2010 - is Euro 4. That was the point when parking there became difficult. 2014 is Euro 5 - that was the point when it became outright impossible as there were rows and rows of cars waiting for their turn.

The site is now demolished, but I am pretty sure that the trade has simply moved elsewhere. It did not disappear. I would not expect it to be a one-off either.

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Re: it looks like open road testing is the way to go.

It does not and cannot scale unfortunately and it does not address the problem.

At the very least in London (and other European cities), the real problem is that 90% of the diesel part of the hire car fleet (that equates to >80% of all of them) has been chipped or has had their ECU reprogrammed to turn off the EGR and other NOX emission control measures. You walk into any small garage say a couple of words in the appropriate language, wink a couple of times and your car exits the garage running with 20% higher fuel efficiency and with NOX control off.

The reason London pollutions is so bad is not the weak pollution regs, it is the fact that most of the ~1M hire and light commercial fleet in London has them disabled.

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The issue with VW and Fiat was there NO2 emissions, not fuel economy.

With all due respect NO2 is the mother of all pollutants produced by combustion.

So I suggest you lay off the neoliberal pill box before talking.

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DJI: Register your drones or no more cool flying vids for you

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Joke

Re: To all the 'experts' here

Is this what we want?

Not really.

What I WANT is the situation to get bad enough for me to be allowed to install CIWS on my roof.

It may, however, be used not only on errant drones...

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Mouse sperm kept frozen in SPAAAAACE yields healthy pups

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Re: We will Populate the Galaxy!

You need to read Stanislav Lem.

The subject of humans raised on an old arkship by robots is covered in one of the shorts from the Navigator Pirks chronicles. In that short the humans which were supposed to raise the kids died as a result of a radiation storm. The embryos were protected enough to survive, but were raised by the robot assistants after that. Many decades later instead of their target planet they orbit Earth.

The rest - you can pick it in the actual story. It is quite funny (like most of Pirks).

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Supreme Court closes court-shopping loophole for patent trolls

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any foreign country wishing to export its products to the U.S. will still have to run the East Texas gauntlet.

No, just incorpoprate a local entity in a location of your choosing. You usually have to do it anyway.

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Bankrupt school ITT pleads 'don't let Microsoft wipe our cloud data!'

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Re: Once you send your data to the cloud

I see this as like renting an apartment. After so many days of moving out and not paying rent, how long are suppose to hold on to the former tents property. They were renting space on a cloud based system and stopped paying.

That is a flawed analogy. A landlord is not allowed by law to pile up the belongings of the tenant being evicted in the condo parking lot and set them on fire. It is obliged to store them for a reasonable period of time and ONLY if the bills are not unpaid auction them.

IMHO, MSFT should do exactly that - hold off for X days and then auction the data and the "family and other bollocks act" be damned.

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Euro Patent Office staff warns board of internal rule changes

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Allow management to cut a staff member's retirement pension as a disciplinary measure.

That is probably against the labor code for the location where this outfit resides. They should not be writing to the board, they should be taking him to the German Federal Labor court.

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Go ahead, stage a hackathon. But pray it doesn't work too well

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Hackaton ideas - sure, hackaton code - no thanks

There is nothing wrong for an idea from a playground to challenge the organization.

Provided that the idea does not come attached to a pile of spaghetti code produced in a bout of junk food and caffeine induced stupor.

Unfortunately most organizations fail to realize that hackatons should produce ideas and the attached code is usually a PoC to show the idea works. Instead of discarding it and rewriting it from scratch they attempt to sanitize and productize it. In fact, this is actively encouraged at most hackatons I have seen (It is also why I refuse to participate in them).

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