* Posts by Voland's right hand

4098 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

FedEx: TNT NotPetya infection blew a $300m hole in our numbers

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Re: $300M!!

It is "holy crap", but from a different department - the "find excuses for a write-off/declare losses" department.

So, actually, the reaction at board level was: "Holy crap, why we did not get infected too, we should reduce the security spend".

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Amazon wants to be king of the nerd goggles

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The killer app for glass appeared several years later

Glass could have had a much different fate if it was released AFTER Pokemon Go.

Granted, as I have interest in neither this would not have made me buy one. I can see how it would have given it a massively larger market combined with a not-so-creepy use case.

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Behold iOS 11, an entirely new computer platform from Apple

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Re: Typos a Gogo!

Probably typed on an iPad using IOS 11.

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UK Prime Minister calls on internet big beasts to 'auto-takedown' terror pages within 2 HOURS

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Facepalm

Re: Competence

Reality illustrates the mash or the mash illustrates the reality: the punchline

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Re: Please start with all T May utterances

If she wasn't a woman she would be wearing a Joe Stalin moustache by now

You never know. She may be shaving it.

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History repeats

Stalin made all locksmiths and lock manufacturers register with the KGB to ensure that the population does not have access to a safe which would give the KGB search team hard time. The official reasoning was to ensure that thieves do not have access to high end tools to pick locks. This is an idea from the same songbook.

It does not work - it affects the legitimate use(rs) and the ones that it is trying to hinder find a way around it.

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Compsci degrees aren't returning on investment for coders – research

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Re: New Labour's biggest con on the young

Which is exactly why I nearly ROFL-ed at the career presentation for Junior in his high school.

There was the usual wankaton from the local apprenticeship coordinator, the teachers, a couple of 6-form reps, etc. They were extolling the pros and cons of 60K debt versus money now and so on. The same as we do in this discussion. I nearly felt asleep and seriously considered opening my laptop to do some coding.

Then, came the school deputy head in charge of this with his slides on what students do when they graduate out of the 6 form. There was a clearly visible 7% slice on his chart. Guess what did that slice say. It said:

EMIGRATED

Nothing really more to say here.

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Not necessarily

There are a few who are trying the apprentice-ship route to pick up people who can code before university. I personally found that quite entertaining - sure, you get a good code monkey, but without the knowledge of fundamentals like functional analysis, fsms, graph theory, probability and stats, etc. Not that the recent crop of "industry oriented" CS degrees do that anyway.

I decided that instead of explaining this to junior, I will simply buy "The Profession" by Isaac Asimov and let him read it to figure out the explanation himself. Pity there have been no reprints since the 70-es (I had to shell out 20 quid to an antique book seller).

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Congress battles Silicon Valley over upcoming US sex trafficking law

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In short, remove Backpage from the picture

In short, remove Backpage from the picture

In short, a new one will appear.

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Ofcom to crack down on telcos' handling of nuisance callers

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Re: Doesn't go far enough on nuisance calls

And there should be an easy way to report the last caller as a nuisance call, eg dial #7726

This will only be effective if it is forwarded to the nuclear deterrent targeting system.

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BoJo, don't misuse stats then blurt disclaimers when you get rumbled

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Re: EU must be joking

You mean like Porsche (VW) Group.

Check where Porsche obtains:

1. Gearboxes - 60%+ are contract manufactured

2. ECU - 100% contract manufactured

3. Bumpers and plastic body parts - 100% contract manufactured, some of the processing is done in UK

These are just the bits I know, I suspect it is 70%+ contract manufactured across the board.

It was not the size of the organisation,

Size != full vertical integration. What Eu has enabled (and what Leavangelicals fail to grok) is the demise of the verticals in favour of lean/contract manufacturing across the board. Leyland sucked so bad not only because of mismanagement, but because it sourced so much stuff internally including some seriously inferior parts - f.e. electrics. If you compare Leyland to today's Porsche, Leyland had 70%+ vertical integration. Porsche is the exact opposite - under 30%.

Leaving the Eu erects the small, but sufficient trade and business barrier to stop participating in this. This is jobs and LOTS of blue collar jobs - most of the few that are still around.

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Re: EU must be joking

What has the EU ever done of a positive and useful nature that could not have been done without its existence?

As a consumer or as a business? As a consumer, the only reason you have what you presently get in a supermarket it Eu.

Starting with:

1. Goods themselves - the cost is so low today only because there are no customs to ship them across. I suggest you look up what was the cost of strawberries and flowers out of season 40 years ago. Hint - it was so high that it justified shipping by air from South Africa. Try that now (even with the reduction in cost of shipment by air due to technological improvements).

2. Infrastructure to ship the goods across the continent.

3. A recurring influx of cheap labour every 5 years or thereabouts since the late-70es (first Spain, Portugal, then Eastern Europe) to harvest and process the goods. Both locally in Britain and abroad.

You will see the difference yourself next time you shop after BrExit and after the tariffs and delays at the border come up. You may hate or like BoJo, but he unintentionally said something honest recently: "Europe does not need us". That's right BoJo. There is no Prosecco and Audio pipe dream. Even you (albeit unintentionally) finally admitted that. While Mr and Mrs Meldrew may like the idea of "vegetable, how long do you boil this one", I would not be so sure about the younger generation of Joe average consumer.

As a business, Eu changed the way business is done.

It practically obsoleted verticals. Everyone is buying from everyone. That has its downside and upside. A monstrosity like British Leyland can no longer exist in this world. At the same time a small or medium manufacturer which would have never gotten any piece of the action in the age of monstrosities can compete as a supplier somewhere in the supply chain. The downside is that it has to be something high tech due to UK cost of labour. UK has chosen to exit this game. Any hopes that it will re-establish verticals are rather far-fetched. They cannot compete against a pipeline built around contract/lean manufacturing. It will, however, immediately kill all British SMBs which play the game at the moment and put all the people they employ on the dole.

As a side effect that feeds back to consumer too - the complexity and raw cost of a modern car for example is orders of magnitude above a Morris Minor. The only reason a Golf today costs LESS than a Morris Minor in inflation adjusted money is because the manufacturing is no longer vertical and Eu has allowed that to happen. Once again, the moment UK exits the game (and especially the moment it decides to "protect" whatever it has left as car industry) it will learn this one the hard way.

And so on. While for the poorer Eu countries, Eu has delivered mostly tangible improvements - roads, etc, the improvements major economies have seen are more subtle. They are however present and the only reason we can afford the standard of living we have today is exactly that - the demise of borders and the resulting demise of moribund verticals protected by the state.

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Bloke fesses up: I forged judge's signature to strip stuff from Google search

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Re: If only abit of photoshop working in all cases...

Counterfeiting U.S. currency is allegedly working well for North Korea.

It did well for Saddam as well - it was one of his real weapons of mass destruction and real reasons why he got invaded. Food for thought... On both sides...

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Microsoft's AI is so good it steered Renault into bottom of the F1 league

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Results speak for themselves.

The idea, says Microsoft, is to use the machine learning to perform calculations and analysis that would otherwise take up the time of a team of engineers.

The team position is the best demonstration that this approach is still light years away from being useful.

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RIP Stanislav Petrov: Russian colonel who saved world from all-out nuclear war

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In the US, Reagan was publicly calling the USSR the "evil empire" and Russia – a nation armed with tens of thousands of nukes and the rocket technology to deliver them – was convinced he was seriously considering nuclear war.

You need to remember the background. This was shortly before "Able Archer 83". At this point USSR military intelligence already submitted reports on the incoming exercise including that Heads of State will be participating in it and had it assessed as a likely prelude to a conflict in Western Europe.

Today, we like to pretend paranoia for public "reds under our beds" relations purposes like the current howler monkeys performance about Zapad 2017. This modern pretend-paranoia is nothing compared to the paranoia of Soviet military planners in the early 80-es after Pershing missiles were deployed in Europe. Pershing, the early Tomahawk and the pile of reports in the run-up to Able Archer, resulted in Soviet missile forces going to the highest level of alert since the Cuban crisis. The Soviet leadership of the time believed in an imminent NATO attack for real, not for pretend political purposes.

We are lucky it was him and not someone else as that could have been the day the human civilization would have been inherited by the cockroaches. RIP Stanislav Petrov. Human civilization will always be in debt to you.

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Mad scientist zaps himself to determine the power of electric eel shocks

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Re: It's been done before

Attenborough has a clip in one of his old movies as well. It was also with a big one (one big enough to kill you if you are not careful).

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DoJ: Look! Google is giving up overseas data for warrants outside Second Circuit

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So...

What happens when Moscow based employees disclose the data on all US cittizens without leaving their desks?

Or Beijing based employees?

Or Paris based employees?

Or...

Microsoft, Google, etc are also corporations registered according to the laws of these countries - they must comply with them too.

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Google sued for paying women less than men

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It's not really rocket science: ensure that people doing the same job get paid the same.

Not the issue here. The ladies claim they are given DIFFERENT jobs which are low paid just because they are ladies.

I have said it before, I will say it again. The amount of profiling against STEM as a professional choice endured by a woman in USA (and to a lesser, but still significant extent UK) ensures that only the most stubborn or the best remain. The more "basement dwelling" an area is, the more prevalent it is. Security is probably the worst here. There are a few that closely follows.

There are a few corollaries to that which follow straight out of basic probability and statistics:

1. If you are hiring off the local job market and you are hiring strictly on merit you will have a predominantly male population. You have to go global and import from countries where STEM has lesser or even inverse gender bias to offset it.

2. If you have not imported to offset the gender bias, and you have hired solely on merit and you are paying solely on merit, the "surviving" ladies are likely to have higher than average rank. That, in turn, unless you are discriminating, should be fetching higher than average salary.

The result may look paradoxical, but that is what it should be if the hiring policy is FAIR and MERIT based, because high school and university have already skewed your sample. That, however is extremely rare (especially in large companies).

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And this is a company who fired a guy for saying Google has internal problems;

He was not fired for that. I suggest you read his drivel.

It cannot be described by any other means. It is utter drivel. Especially: the "women take stress worse" and other similar stupid musings which do not have a single scientific shred of evidence to back them up. In fact, there is quite a bit of evidence to the opposite, that women are significantly better at enduring long term recurring stress.

As far as is Google discriminating or not, at this rate this will get to court and the court will have a say. IMHO, there is a significant issue with STEM outside continental Europe (and especially outside Eastern Europe and Russia) having a very significant gender bias to start off with in school and university. Kinda normal when you are indoctrinating girls that the right form for them is to be a stick insect with t*ts in a skimpy outfit which gets her way from the idiot Ken every time (I would have said dick driven idiot, but the afore mentioned character has no dick).

That creates a very interesting phenomenon - in order to succeed and prove themselves, the few ladies in the profession outside Europe (proper), Eastern Europe and Russia need to be better than the rest. I mean the ones that do not give up early and leave the testosterone driven PFYs to do chestbeating on the subject of their supremacy (quite funny to watch). That is pretty much a fact. So if their salary median is anything different from higher or equal to their male counterparts, that points to some level of bias.

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'All-screen display'? But surely every display is all-screen... or is a screen not a display?

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Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

They'll be calling for your head on a pike before noon at Greenwich

What was that about the dog which is all bark and no bite...

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AMD Ryzen beats Intel Core i7 as a heater (that's also a server)

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Re: Their latest hardware is damn good, pity there are so few models.

The model I used for tests is a HP 15-ba047na. Unfortunately, there are only 2-3 models to chose from on the market - this one is with the best video subsystem.

I would suggest replacing the ridiculously slow spinner HP put into it for it to really shine.

For instructions on how to change/add memory and replace the spinner search for "HP 15 AMD Service Manual". It is significantly easier than the equivalent Intel models which use a different case design (so make sure you have the one for AMD models). While the case design for Intel gives you easier access to the memory and WiFi modules, changing the drive on that requires complete disassembly.

Tools needed for the AMD version are a car trim pry tool (or a plastic kitchen "knife" for baking) and a cross-head screwdriver. It is not even using hex screws or something else like that - fully serviceable as long as you know (or guess) how to open it.

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Re: I've thought of this often

Except that you really don't want the headache of water-cooling your rack-mounted servers.

You do not need to. Cool the aircon heat exchanger.

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Re: Their latest hardware is damn good, pity there are so few models.

How would you say the A12 compares to the older APUs?

Performance-wize it beats the living daylights out of old laptop models - both E and laptop A series. Tested with development - both C and Java.

Its power consumption is still not as good as Intel. Some of it can be attributed to the incomplete support for the GPU power-management in Debian stable, but some of it is for real. The equivalent i5 with the same battery (both HP 15 inch) supposedly lasts longer. Not that I care - it is a desktop replacement, if it will travel somewhere it will be where there are sockets for it.

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Their latest hardware is damn good, pity there are so few models.

I am typing this on a recent A12 crop. It is the first time ever I have a laptop which hits the 3 key points for me:

1. Proper video with full linux support

2. As fast as a decent desktop - it is within 20-30% of a desktop compiling linux kernel or openwrt.

3. Light and cold.

My previous job tried to give me a top of the line Core i7. The nvidia version simply did not work properly with Linux and the intel one was painful to work with on a 4k screen - you could see how it redraws it as if it was a 1990-es ISA VGA.

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Facebook let advertisers target 'Jew-haters'

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Re: How about some balance?

I doubt all that much; let's face it, those people were locked in Leave voters.

You are missing a couple of points:

1. Associating leave with the pet hate and keeping it that way.

2. Voter mobilization for the election day.

Especially the latter. While campaigns like this do not do a lot as far as changing voter orientation, they are essential to ensure that all that can vote for you do so. That is exactly what happened in the USA. And UK too. It will also continue happening now as everyone has wised up to this particular use of f***book and social media.

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Re: How about some balance?

Perfectly valid point.

While anti-Semitism gets all the outrage, racism is by no means limited to that and neither is the exploitation of Facebook for this particular purpose.

I wonder how much pre-election and pre-referendum advertisements used Polish haters, Bulgarian haters, Romanian haters, etc as their target audience. I bet quite a few (cheaper to do that than to use Cambridge Analytica too).

I do not wonder did Facebook make money or not on that though. It did. Racism sells (at least as far as politics are concerned). Same as sex in normal retail ads.

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What is the cyber equivalent of 'use of force'? When do we send in the tanks?

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What is the cyber equivalent of 'use of force'

That has a very simple answer. De-peer the country - mandate all ISPs to filter out any route announcements from it.

By the way, Russians with their new critical infrastructure legislation can do that. Their new laws deem peering points critical infrastructure in addition to all transit SPs. The state can order them to filter out a particular autonomous system or network range.

We should simply do the same. It is the Internet equivalent of calling in the tanks.

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123-Reg customers outraged at automatic .UK domain registration

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Someone thinking better of 123? They need to share whatever they are smoking.

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Little to do with automatic renewal

You will have to pay for them and keep them if they are used in any way.

So if, for example, your web-host-cum-DNS registrar (if you made the fatal mistake to have them both in the same place) alias your existing .co.uk entries to uk and stuff them in a few search indexes. It takes only a small percentage of your customer base to start using them for most businesses to grudgingly pay the extortion racket.

In addition to that there is the obnoxious copyright racket - defend it or lose it. if you do not "defend" your copyright by paying all extortions you may have more difficult time defending it.

The only way to deal with the domain trading low life is to boycott any of their harebrained schemes.

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Apple’s facial recognition: Well, it is more secure for the, er, sleeping user

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Re: Biometrics

Bit of paper with a full-page photo, held over the attackers own face.

Every sign printing shop has a printer which can print on vinyl sticky film.

Similarly, every sign shop bod knows how to apply said film to a curved surface. All you need is a hair drier.

Unless the phone scans in UV and IR as well I do not quite see how you can defeat that.

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Intelligence director pulls national security BS on spying question

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Re: the Apparatus is much bigger than the US Gov

The apparatus is self-feeding and self-sustaining too.

A good example here would be the operation of said apparatus in Eastern Europe and ex-USSR in the 1990-es and 2000s. The wall, fell, mission accomplished, right?

Yes, but if mission is accomplished, then that means that agent Doe is without a job and all those precious kiddie college funds are at risk. So what does agent Doe do - continue as if nothing has happened financing any and every possible lunatic on the Russian periphery as well as recurring "regime change operations" in ex-Soviet block countries. Rinse, repeat until it backfires in the face, then more some.

Forever war is essential in feeding the monster and it will take an economic and/or political crisis of proportions USA (and other western nations) has never seen for it to be dismantled.

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Homeland Security drops the hammer on Kaspersky Lab with preemptive ban

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McCarthy Lives

And so does the House Committee on Un-American Activities.

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This article has been deleted

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Spoilsports

Puritanical spoilsports.

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Auto-makers told their autopilots need better safeguards

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Re: It is easier to automate the damn highway

Just a quick note, I'd be fine with having a single automated lane per direction

Bingo - start with the trucks too. The numbers are less and the economic and pollution benefits are staggering. There will be plenty of people willing to join in a car too despite it being 10mph headline speed slower.

In addition to that a lane under computer control can be narrower too with significantly lower safety margins under bridges, in tunnels and on overpasses, so the cost of adding it is lower than the cost of adding a normal lane.

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It is easier to automate the damn highway

Frankly, it is easier to automate the highways, then automate driving in general.

Here is an autopilot lane(s), please surrender your control to the highway computer and tell it which junction do you want to leave at. Next step - interconnect the systems. Sure, it will not be door-to-door, but it will be good enough to automate 95% of the journey.

The issue is that no country is willing to even consider investing into something along these lines at this point.

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Sacre bleu! Apple's high price, marginal gain iPhone strategy leaves it stuck in the mud

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Re: £1,149

Thats what Steve Balmer said in 2007 and we know who had the last laugh...

The difference in 2007 was that it was new and there were a number of big steps forward in hardware design (gorilla glass), ui closely mated to the new capacitive screen and usability.

In 2017 - not so much. Every "new" feature it has is already shipping in multiple android phones, some of them not even high end.

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Act fast to get post-Brexit data deal, Brit biz urges UK.gov

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Re: £240bn

EU failed to get a UK exodus of banks

Have you been to Dublin lately? I suggest to go and book a duckmarine excursion around their docklands. You can observe the exodus in motion (with the cranes hastily stacking up the new buildings) with your own eyes. Some of it is declared openly as an exodus. Some of it is "additional office capacity"

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Re: £240bn

The financial services rely on the data deal. The likelihood of any passporting for Eu in the city if there is no data deal is NIL. If you add that to "classic data economy" your number may be significantly higher than 240Bn.

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The UK is risking a data economy worth £240bn if it doesn’t secure a “simple” transition deal that minimises disruption of data flows after Brexit, the Confederation of British Industry will warn today.

To put it bluntly, as long as Generalissimus Josephina Vissarionovich May is in charge and has the same goals, the industry can forfeit all of this now and then and go straight to "plan B" (if they even have one).

The likelihood of Eu agreeing a deal which is not governed by ECJ rises above NIL only when it has someone its size on the other side of the table. Otherwise it is "take the ECJ or leave it". UK alone is NOT in this category.

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Apple: Our stores are your 'town square' and a $1,000 iPhone is your 'future'

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Bought £150 Android

Concur. My new one which is anything but a landfill (it is an XA1) cost 189. Better camera than the iPhone too.

As far as no bezel, it matters very little as you get a bezel from the case you need to put it in to keep it from damage.

1000 for a phone? You are out of your f*** mind mate.

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D-Link router riddled with 0-day flaws

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Some people by based on price only

There is plenty of idiots who will buy based solely on a price tag + claim to support a given feature. D-link always ticks both boxes.

It is cheap as manure and it claims to support all sort of kewl features. How well... that is a different story.

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Oracle to shutter most Euro hardware support teams

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The UK hardware support branch has more directors than other countries

The UK hardware support branch has more directors than other countries

Color me surprised. Very surprised.

Apologies if you need to go and fetch the bucket to clean up the sarcasm that oozed out of the monitor and onto your desk.

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Linus Torvalds' lifestyle tips for hackers: Be like me, work in a bathrobe, no showers before noon

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I found it does not quite work

I cannot get properly settled to work until I get my bathrobe off. Sure, I prefer working in the same ripped jeans or shorts I use for DIY, but not a bathrobe.

The shower thing is spot on - mine is after I have expended my useful brain charge and had my afternoon 3 mile run with the daughter. By that time USA has woken up and has started scheduling meetings so that nicely coincides with me being freshly shaven and with a new shirt when the video-conferences kick in.

The privileges of working from home I guess :)

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Boffins fear we might be running out of ideas

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Re: there's always

Those are taxpayer funded.

The examples were areas where research is 90% corporate.

What the paper shows (with numbers) is that modern corporations suck bricks sidewize through a thin straw in R&D. It is something some of us who have suffered from being Research Detention in a modern corp know all too well.

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Atlassian kills God, rebrands as a mountain, a structurally unsound 'A' or a high five

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a mountain ready for teams to scale”

"a mountain ready for teams to scale”

Sisyphean labor the agile way. Jira issue 222276: "Move the stone next 3 feet".

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Crackas With Attitude troll gets five years in prison for harassment

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Re: So being a dumbshit ...

I am not.

Looking at what he specifically did, it had nothing to do with hacking. All I see is plain harassment and should have gone under completely different paragraph of the penal code. Like it or not, that paragraph fetches considerably less.

The appeals court will have a field day with this one.

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Hi Amazon, Google, Apple we might tax you on revenue rather than profit – love, Europe

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No

VAT is to move the tax burden to the end-consumer in a transparent manner. All companies in the chain reclaim VAT so they do not pay.

As a result, as long as you allow VAT to be claimed in the country of Eu where the sale is done and not the country of residence of the end-consumer it is trivial to shift "perceived business activity" to the lowest tax jurisdiction. It costs almost nothing to add one more company so that business happens elsewhere.

This is different from turnover tax which is paid at every step and not reclaimed. It works in the opposite direction by creating vertical monopolistic conglomerates which control the path of goods from ore to the product.

Neither will do anything as far as digital goods are concerned. The only way to deal with those is to move taxation to country of residence of the end-consumer and that is nearly impossible to achieve.

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Back to the USSR

I remember, how once upon a time we pointed fingers at the Soviet Block and how backward and retarded they are to have a turnover tax instead of value added tax.

The argument by Eastern Block economists was exactly that - that VAT creates endless chains of unproductive companies leading to shifting profits out of jurisdiction.

So come 30 years and we do what? Borrow the idea. How what goes around comes around.

If we put the ideological paint aside, maybe they had a point. Having a mix of both is actually not such a bad idea. In addition to clamping down on tax avoidance, it is also good for the environment. The only people it is bad for are the gazillion of lorry haulers which carry one bumper 5 times from one end of Europe to the other until it is put into a car.

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Lord Sugar phubbed in peers' debate on 'digital understanding'

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Closing scene of "The Ruling Class"

See subj^·

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Xz88K9YJOE

I suggest decreasing the volume if you are in an office though.

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The bigger the drone, the bigger the impact

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Re: WTF?

That's not a moon... Sorry, that's not a helicopter - it is a heavy cargo drone. Making a let's say drone version of a Mi-10 will allow to dispense with a lot of surplus equipment originally designed to carry the meatware necessary to load and unload the cargo.

In any case, until it is just a "drone", it stands no chance to compete with a Holden/D-Max with an extra fuel tank. Get on the dirt track and press on the gas. Oops, 500km just went by (been there, done that, albeit not in Australia - in deepest, darkest Eastern Europe).

IMHO "the outback" is the wrong use case. The real use case is probably island hopper - you are likely to see these in the Bahamas long before you see them in the outback.

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