* Posts by Voland's right hand

3718 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Microsoft sparks new war with Google with, er, $999+ lappies for kids

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Flexibility is a downside for non-CS educational environment

Flexibility is not a desirable feature in an educational environment with the exception of CS (even that only from a particular point onwards).

You want it to do exactly what it says on the tin and you do not want any work on it to be lost if the student sits on it, it is hit by a ball because the bag where it is was being used as a football goalpoast or is plain forgotten somewhere. From the teachers' perspective a stripped down cloud-backed device has considerable educational appeal. They will prefer it to a "proper OS" every time and it is difficult to blame them for that.

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LinkedIn chatbots to help with 'important conversations'

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Re: Linkedin

I have had a couple of offers - one off a linked in advert.

It can be useful - if you are to talk to someone and he has put Visionary (without adding W*nker) in his title you know where you stand and you can avoid wasting your time talking to them.

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Red alert! Intel patches remote execution hole that's been hidden in chips since 2010

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Re: Holy shucking fit

I had my hair rise on the back of my neck the moment I read the description of the feature back in ~ 2005-2006 when it first came out. My first thought was: "this is perfect for a backdoor, how can I disable it". Looks like I was right.

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Core blimey! 10,000 per rack in startup's cloud-in-a-box

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3.5-inch hard disk drive, draws less than 75 watt

3.5-inch hard disk drive, draws less than 75 watt

No thanks. You need either liquid cooling or the airflow of a GE or Rolls Royce engine for the A380 to keep an enclosure with 3 inch "drives" at operational temperatures.

Now, 7.5W would have been interesting. 75 for 3 inch drive-like cartridge, no thanks, that is beyond all thermal, airflow, etc design limits for a datacenter.

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Gig economy tech giants are 'free riding' on the welfare state, say MPs

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Re: A long time coming

It is a temporal pre-election anomaly while they are looking for some votes (and in the labor case money from the Unions). Do not worry, it will pass.

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Zeiss, ASML hit back at Nikon in chip-printing patent row

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Re: That last part.

Sorta...

It is an industry which likes the occasional turmoil, because only floods, hurricanes and patent wars give it the opportunity to raise prices. The rest of the time everyone is racing to the bottom.

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Just delete the internet – pr0n-blocking legislation receives Royal Assent

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Re: Who do they think they are?

The Ruling Class. They're Tories, don't you know? Born to rule over us plebs etc...

That was a good movie - one of finest Peter O'Toole performances. Any resemblance to some of the members of May's government is most likely purely coincidental.

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Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

It is a nouvelle form of a 3 line whip.

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Last year's ICO fines would be 79 times higher under GDPR

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If they are allowed to.

UK businesses will likely be holding data on EU citizens

Once the UK is outside the Eu, it is not a question of if, it is a question of when May surveillance and police state policies will bite. Once that happens it can kiss the status of an allowed destination for data exchange good bye.

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Re: Judas Priest FTFY

Yeah, I can just see the ICO Screaming For Vengeance if you are Breaking The Law regardless if this has something to do with British Steel or it is something Unleashed in the East to the British Isles.

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Nuke'em till they glow

4%? How about the same as for competition violation - 10% of Global turnover and criminal responsibility for the director, CIO and the entire board. That would be more appropriate.

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M6 crowned crappiest motorway for 4G signal

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M11 is missing

That would have won. You are looking at < 20% there (except 3 which probably would be around 40% or thereabouts).

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Well, hot-diggity-damn, BlackBerry's KEYone is one hell of a comeback

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499 units of Doctor Who Money

Screw that. Above my pay bracket.

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Facebook decides fake news isn't crazy after all. It's now a real problem

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It is a very fine line

It is a very fine line between "fake" and "non-authorized" news and any discrimination against "fake" can be applied to ensure that only the authorized opinion of Pravda is heard by the proles.

We have been here before. I still remember the days when you were put on the suspicious list in USSR for owning a good short-wave capable of picking BBC World Service or radio Free Europe. I do not think we want to go back to that.

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Flatpak and Snaps aren't destined for graveyard of failed Linux tech yet

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Re: You could of course have the same advantages _much_ simpler...

... by using static linking.

There is stuff around librt which behaves strangely if you link the executable statically. There is other stuff which will just stop working altogether.

Once upon a time it used to be "everything linked statically just works, link dynamically and it may not". We are now in the exact opposite situation - a lot of software has never been tested to work correctly if you link it statically. In addition to that, there are licensing issues - some stuff cannot be linked in statically without violating licenses. On top of that most interpreted languages will stop functioning if you do not have a working dynamic linker. Perl, Java, Python and anything written in them (to name a few).

So by doing static linking of everything you are preparing a massive can of worms which you really do not need to open.

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Waiter? There's a mouse in my motherboard and this server is greasy!

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Seen that one too

Some of the older power supplies in computer equipment were emitting ultrasound which was attracting roaches like sugar bait. I forgot who made the supplies, but I already knew what was the problem the moment I opened the case and saw the familiar shape and label.

It was guaranteed to be a shorted roach electrocuted between the high power transistors inside. The smell of burned roach early in the morning... It smelled like...

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thousands of mouse turds and some liquid,

Red liquid? That is mouse vomit and diarrhea after being hit with warfarine or one of the new generation "one hit" anticoagulants. I would stay very far away from that as well as from the restaurant which has used it inside the kitchen instead of traps.

Otherwise mice in a computer are not anything new. I have dealt with quite a few cases of "server mouse infestation" in the days when I ran a computer shop. They are not as bad as squirrels and/or European (edible) doormice. Those do not just nest inside equipment, they also bring their food there (including poisonous bait). Also, mice do not carry the worst from the diseases you get with the bigger rodents (the squirrel family carries leprosy). In either case, today I will just write the whole thing off. My own health and life is too valuable to try to recover equipment that has become a rodent nest.

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China launches aircraft carrier the length of 2.1 brontosaurs

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Re: Slightly disapointing

But on the other it's a copy of a flawed design - they could at least have improved it, got rid of the ski ramp and put in a catapult.

It was built to match their current fleet arm which uses a purloined blueprints clone of Su-33 which is not catapult launched. It is short take off, arrested landing.

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Re: "What will China use their new aircraft carrier for?"

That's a valid question from a nation who sort of has an aircraft carrier but no suitable aircraft to fly from it.

Bollocks. They have cloned Su-33 and they are flying the clones today off the ex-Varyag (Liaoing). So they definitely have MORE suitable aircraft than UK.

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The Chinese boat looks like purloined off Russian blueprints. Something in-between Kuznetsov class (after refurb which took the missiles out) and Ulianovsk class.

That is not surprising as they have purloined the blueprints of the fighter to fly from it and they are pretty well matched - Su-33 requires a specific ski-jump ramp config.

Their next (nuclear using stolen Ulianovsk class blueprints) carrier is more interesting. The two they have now are just to "lean how to use it".

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The carrier is not the real threat

The real threat are the 85+ missile boats with 8 missiles each as well as 120+ other surface ships with 2-8 missiles each. Mix of Sunburns and indigenous stuff. Enough to overwhelm the defenses of a typical Tier one navy carrier group by sheer numbers. That is the real danger. The carrier is mostly just to project defensive umbrella over the rest, not for offense.

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FYI: You can blow Intel-powered broadband modems off the 'net with a 'trivial' packet stream

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Re: The penalty for realtime imbecilitis

Now show me what qdisc

It is not the CPU grunt which is the issue in consumer hardware preventing good QoS at 600MB (I agree with several posters which said it does not work).

It is something NO consumer router has. Timer precision. The higher the bandwidth, the higher the timer precision required. MIPS hardware used in most consumer routers simply does not have the timers needed to do QoS at 600MBit. You may be able to police and traffic shape a couple of buckets with HTB with rough precision (in the 10s of MBits range), but definitely no proper QoS as required by high-end video conferencing, audio, etc.

Compared to that, the timer precision on x86 is more than sufficient to do policing and QoS down to 10s of Kbits range at 1Gbit.

Now, on offloads. The offloads DO NOT FIX THAT. They do stuff which absolutely not needed if you use a Linux software load like accelerated forwarding, firewall, nat (all of that with ridiculously small tables). They do not however, have the ability to run a proper Qdisc on that at least in most consumer hardware. The few attempts at QoS in that are just drivel produced by a Chinese firmware engineer which has no clue whatsoever how QoS works (and it, by the way, is rocket science).

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Super-secure Pi-stuffed nomx email server box given a good probing

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Raspberry PI and storage +/- crypto

The built in SD card interface in Razzie is not fit for purpose for any reliable storage (as expected for email). It does the job for hobby stuff, but it is not something I would trust data 24x7x365. It will simply barf after a point. Either the controller or the electrical interface or both.

USB is even worse - any serious activity on it especially combined with network (which also internally hangs off USB) - BOOM. Add to that the fact that Model 3 (which is the only one fast enough to do full disk encryption) will crash thermally if you connect a good USB drive and use encrypted LVM. Write with it for 5-10 minutes at full throttle to a good fast USB disk and BOOM.

If it was some odd job doing storage like a DIY Time Capsule equivalent or DVR, you could have replaced it with a Banana, because that has real disk interface in the form of SATA on the SoC. The Banana is still not good enough for email though - it is a cut-down AHCI, no support for port replication so you cannot hook up two drives in a RAID config even if you wanted to. So you are down to the reliability of a single drive (still better than a razzie though).

That does not mean there are no ARM SoC which can do the job - there are aplenty (used by all those SOHO NAS devices). It is not a job for a hobby SoC though - neither for Razzie, nor for Banana. You need proper disk interface for at least 2 drives and proper NIC interface on-SoC.

So anyone who is trying to sell you a Banana based production secure email device... Just turn around... slowly... walk away... then faster... then run...

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Intel redesigns flawed Atom CPUs to stave off premature chip death

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More than you think.

It is either giving it a try and having a part for 1:1 swaps or redesigning an entire piece of equipment.

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iPhone lawyers literally compare Apples with Pears in trademark war

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Re: Dear Apple.

You are holding the wrong thing.

Register a trademark with a banana and two kiwis. That should do the trick.

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Irish Stripe techie denied entry to US – for having wrong stamp in passport

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Plenty of examples to that. Unfortunately.

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Kremlin-backed DNC hackers going after French presidential hopeful Macron

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Re: The problem isn't releasing it before the election

It is digging up scandals on ONLY ONE SIDE and releasing it before the election.

USA and UK has been doing this on politicians left of the center worldwide for 60 years. When real scandals did not suffice, fake ones were created. When even that was not enough we sponsored an occasional Pinochet or Reza Pehlevi.

What is worrying is not the fact that the Russians do it. What is worrying is that they are happy to sponsor anyone and anything provided that the result is destabilization at the moment. They give money and information to the ultra-left, ultra-right and nutters of all shapes and colors. This is good for them in the short term as it weakens countries which are doing the same around their backyard (we have wasted hundreds of billions on "sponsoring democracy" around their borders). Long term... There will be a blowback and a reckoning...

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Not auf wiedersehen – yet! The Berlin scene tempting Brexit tech

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Re: There are more levels than that

One thing people are not talking about is the hoards of immigrants causing trouble, including assault, rape and murder, across Germany, which the disloyal German media

Gee... which bridge did you get from under? Definitely not from under one of those on the Spree near Tiergarten though.

I was in Berlin last year and there is something about integrating and swallowing immigrants Germans can and should teach the UK. There is no ifs, no buts, no coconuts - the only allowed answer to "Sprechen sie Deutsch?" is a choice of "Ya" or "Ya". Even after swallowing 1M refugees in less than 2 years (which as Mutter noted we are guilty of causing), Germany is still more integrated and less visible than Luton, Bradford or even parts of London like most of Barking and Dagenham. It also does not allow any form of religious justice (while UK by the way does).

I am just going to ignore the rest of your rant. You definitely need meds. Badly.

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Re: There are more levels than that

So, not waiting for the (increasingly likely) IndeyRef 2

May I remind you that the referendum has to be allowed by Westminster and the only way Josephina Vissarionovich will allow it will be if hell freezes over. While it may have started to happen (snow in late April), it has not happened just yet.

So, for the time being, Edinburgh is not a safe bet. In fact the opposite - as outside the Eu as possible and getting the funding a red headed stepchild who "voted wrong" will get.

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Re: The Berlin scene tempting Brexit tech...

Are the German authorities planning to offer a fast track citizenship programme as well?

This has been tabled by several politicians there. It was put on the backburner to see if it will be necessary (depending on the level to which Josephina Vissarionovich May will screw Britain in her quest for personal dictatorship).

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Privacy

There are plenty of other advantages:

1. Most major cities are a couple of light years ahead of UK in terms of public transport

2. The rules governing the employee-employer are not amended whenever the government sees fit (the way Cameron and Osborn defanged TUPE).

3. The education system is mostly FREE.

4 ...

A lot of this applies to most of the EU, it is simply a matter of doing the math (and facepalming after you have tallied the numbers).

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There are more levels than that

I started sorting out our BrExit alternatives and had the person in the passenger seat (the SWMBO) yank the handbrake for the time being.

When you have two kids in school at least one of them will be within a year or two of exams either here or in the "retreat location". You really do not want to move them at that point. Though at some point a lot of us will have to - there are at present 4-8 job openings in Eu versus UK and that ratio is continuing to grow.

So if the current trends continue, the SWMBO will let go off the handbake. Leaving the politics aside it is pure economics - the businesses are voting with their feet, err R&D budgets. We will have no choice but to follow - there are families to feed.

As far as locations, Berlin is not bad by the way - they have been rebuilding it at a frantic pace for the last 20 years. There are better places though. All of them massively advertising too - Stockholm, Dublin, etc are all taking slots and spreads on both Internet and printed media. Can't blame them too - it is not personal, it is business.

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Stanford Uni's intro to CompSci course adopts JavaScript, bins Java

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Re: Is there any correlation between "popularity" and

As it's a computer science course, the actual implementation language used should have no bearing on the overall objectives.

Sorta.

I suggest reading Joel On Software: The Perils of JavaSchools. It is even more valid for Javascript. There are concepts which you simply cannot teach in either language - they do not exist.

Now, a lot of this material is not taught in "Intro to Comp Sci" nowdays (again - probably a mistake, in my days they hit you on the head with linked lists around the middle of the first semester). So in theory you can teach intro in a language which offers a reduced set of concepts - Java, JavaScript, etc. This, however, means that before teaching any of the really deep stuff which separates your average 25£ per hour webmonger from a software engineer you need to teach one more language. All of your recruits arriving at "Boot Camp Data Structures and Algorithms" will need to be retrained first. IMHO that's a waste - it would have been better to use a language which has most concepts in the first place. In fact, python is more suitable than either Java or JavaScript - it is cleaner syntactically and semantically while still giving access to all key concepts needed to teach CS.

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China 'hacked' South Korea to wreck Star Wars missile shield

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Re: action and reactiion

Same story as the similar Red Herring deployment in Eastern Europe negotiated by Shrub.

It has everything to do with pissing off Russia or China and very little to do with the stated goal. After sh*t like that, for some reason, we pretend that we do not understand why our relationships with them are at all-time low.

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Re: The obvious question is...

Who told you they attacked the system itself?

There is most likely plenty of supporting infrastructure to attack. Just take out the network used to send the order to put it on high alert and you are as good as taking out the system itself.

Some of the supporting infra is likely to be a significantly softer target.

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LinkedIn U-turns on Bluetooth-enabled 'Tinder for marketers'

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Deleted on all of my devices

The worst case of data slurp I have ever seen. Every time you start it it gives you 5+ screens where it tries to leach more data.

While you can somewhat tame the web version using nuclear winter levels of noscript and adblock, the mobile one cannot be subjected to such quarantine so it has to be eradicated with extreme prejudice.

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Hard-pressed Juicero boss defends $400 IoT juicer after squeezing $120m from investors

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Re: "people have been squeezing fruit for juice at home for a very long time."

a bucket and an old laundry mangle. How primitive...

The most sold household item on the Balkans (including what was Yugoslavia) in my childhood was the Eureka washing machine. This contraption has separate washing and centrifuge compartments with top loading for both and easily disabled safety.

Here is a modern version of the same appliance: https://iak.olx.ph/images_olxph/824890925_4_1000x700.jpg?rev=001&bucket=04

As you can see - the design has remained virtually unchanged for 40 years despite it being large, ungainly and double the size of a normal washing machine. There is a reason for this - it has an alternative application in addition to washing - Grapes into the centrifuge, output hose into the cask, power, let's rolllllllll.... As the centrifuge is top loaded you can just dump them with a bucket. There is no drain pump - it is 100% gravity drained so there is nothing to go wrong too.

By the way - it costs less than 1/3rd of the contraption discussed here too.

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Re: Juicing is bad

Sugar released is not particularly relevant as you will get it anyway.

The "bad tirade" of instant juicing are:

1. Removal of Fiber

2. Oxidation

3. Increased damage to teeth from acids and sugar

Juice it only if it is a real PITA to eat otherwise - grapefruit, wild apples and pears, etc. Otherwise just eat it. Much better for you.

As far as "sugar from 3 oranges" your burn rate at max "brain revs" is > 250 calories per hour. An orange is only 50 calories. If you get proper breakfast, lunch and dinner you are still looking at 1-2 oranges an hour to keep the thinking machine going (brain wants sugar, it could not care less about other forms of energy. If you are not getting a proper lunch as is the case in most modern offices, you are looking at cranking that up to >2 oranges per hour (either that or the cookie/choc jar which is much much worse).

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Not the droids you're looking for – worst handsets to resell

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Re: Same as with cars

Unfortunately for iPhones "use until dead", or in practice "use until battery dies" is about 2 years.

Again same as with cars. Just think of it as the extortionate amount of money the local VW garage will charge you for a timing belt chain after 75K miles. While it may be extortionate, it is still a service item you have to include in the model. I generally consider 1-2 battery changes for all devices (even the ones which need using the wife's hair-drier as a tool to open them) in the modeling. As long as the battery cost is not 50% of the cost of a new device (hello Kindle) it usually works out correctly in the cost and depreciation model.

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Voland's right hand
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Same as with cars

This goes to show that "use until it is dead" model is significantly better financially than "change shiny-shiny every 2 years". The fact that it sucks marginally less for an iPhone is just that - "sucks marginally less".

So if you run the same model till full depreciation which for a phone now stands at around 4 years you get that you have a net gain compared to selling old and getting new every 2 years.

That is not news - it is well known from other goods - cars, white goods, etc. Just there the depreciation periods are longer (up to a decade).

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Nuh-uh, Google, you WILL hand over emails stored on foreign servers, says US judge

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Re: Yeah, but...

What do you do?

You do not execute an illegal order. I have done it more than once. It is quite difficult, but usually all it takes to explain the US company the legal liability. That is a language they understand quite well.

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Re: Yeah, but...

Hmm, the two places with the highest number of wiretaps as a percent of the population

Targeted court wiretap of a person vs blanket surveillance of the entire population.

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Drunk user blow-dried laptop after dog lifted its leg over the keyboard

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Re: Back in the day...

They don't make keyboards like that any more...

They do not make fanta like that any more either. The fanta or coke of old was all sugar. It dried to a "crisp". It took time, but it happened (eventually). At that point you could just bash on the keys a bit and hoover it all up.

The obesity nectars of today do not dry - they all remain a sticky goo because it is nasty mix of sucrose and glucose/fructose. A keyboard of old will be as f*** as a modern one if it cops a cup of "become a Wall-E character" juice.

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Web celeb product whores told to put on the red light – or else

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The only solution to this is to educate your kid that the celebuwhores are NOT a role model. If your kid is following and trying to copy what a celebuwhore does, you have failed as a parent.

For example, my kids do not give a damn if something has an endorsement and are aware that "Rabid Rat" or "SpiderMoron" characters stickered over something usually mean that it is lower quality and is specifically made as bait for other kids.

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Trump's self-imposed cybersecurity deadline is up: What we got?

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Quick clue: President Snowflake is a compulsive liar

That is not news. However, I would suggest not to call it lies. Call it post-truth.

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Flaws found in Linksys routers that could be used to create a botnet

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Re: Don't hold your breath

You did check to make sure one of LEDE, OpenWRT, Gargoyle, DD-WRT, Tomato,

Do not hold your breath ^2. Linksys is the wrong router if you want any of these and has been for a very long time. The proportion of the models that are supported (since the days of the venerable WRT54) is extremely low.

You are much better off with TP Link or Buffalo.

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Silicon Valley tech CEO admits beating software engineer wife, offered just 13 days in the clink

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Re: Re:Stone Age customs

Sir, You are casting aspersions on the behaviour of dear (deceased) Queen Victoria

Search youtube for the "Queen is Indian".

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No middle ground, no compromise: VMware blocks Cisco's SDN play

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Vmware behaving like Vmware

Vmware is behaving like Vmware. Nothing new to see here - move along.

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Can you make a warzone delivery drone? UK.gov wants to give you cash

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My exact thought

There is no way in hell you can even sketch out the designs for anything even remotely innovative with that amount of money.

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Apple's zippy silicon leaves Android rivals choking on dust

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My exact thought

Java VM with specific optimizations towards footprint/multi-instance instead of performance vs Objective C compiled using a next-get compiler.

Should there be a contest in the first place?

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