* Posts by Voland's right hand

4004 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Back to the future: Honda's new electric car can go an incredible 80 miles!

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Re: 80mile range?

40A @ 240V (9600KW), 48A @ 240V (11520KW), 72A @ 240V (17280KW).

The first two are 80% of the "budget" on a normal UK household install which is 65A fuse at delivery point. So you cannot run them and an electric shower or stove safely at the same time. The last one is above the normal UK electric supply. Other Eu countries are not much different. Depending on where you go domestic supply is standardized at 50-65A as well.

Perhaps you need to raise your standards for your domestic electrical infrastructure?

Maybe. If you buy a Tesla for most households in Europe you will need a new feed. You will need to order a proper 2 or 3 phase supply instead of the standard domestic single phase one.

Thankfully Tesla is rare and is likely to remain such for the time being. If it stops being such, the grid will need a massive upgrade.

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Drupal sci-fi sex scandal deepens: Now devs spank Dries over Gor bloke's banishment

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Re: Buytaert opened pandora's box, and doesn't know how to close it...

Even nasty little boys playing with themselves needing to be restrained by devices

That is inherited from Judaism. So is most of the other stuff.

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Google fumes after US Dept of Labor accuses ad giant of lowballing pay for women

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Slightly more complicated

USA government contracts for the time being are subject to equal opportunity compliance.

You fail compliance, you lose the contract. Plain and simple. So on that front the shareholders will not allow Google to outwait anyone.

What may change, however, is that the department of Labour can be put into line by the Great Orange Baboon to enforce all of this significantly less strictly.

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Shadow Brokers crack open NSA hacking tool cache for world+dog

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Re: "wake of a chemical weapons attack on civilians"

On the planet of unproven allegations.

The correct response by Trump and Nato would have been to put a small team of boots on the ground, collect irrefutable evidence, dare Assad to try to bomb while it is being done and work based on irrefutable evidence. If the evidence was right, Russia would have had no choice but to back off from protecting him.

Hard to do? Not really - there are US special forces in Syria already, there are advisors from other countries too. Probably in the neighbouring village - Turkish tanks are like an hour drive from Idlib inside Syrian territory and some of the forces in question are there today.

So, instead of that what do we get: amateurs collecting unverified soil samples and fragments from something which is unclear what it is. So if that was Assad, we just lost the perfect opportunity to get his head on a plate as he violated the 2013 agreement.

The important thing here is "if". There has been a multiple number of occasions when rebel fractions have lobbed weapons (including chlorine) at each other in parallel with Assad and Russian bombing runs in order to "combine the pleasant with the useful" - kill a few of the "wrong shade of black" and get the International community to react in horror at how nasty the common enemy is. If Assad did it, then a "scraped bottom of the barrel" selection of Chlorine, Zarin and several other chemicals would have been less likely.

The sad part is that we will neither know, nor be able to properly bring Assad (if it was him) to justice for this now. All of this because of a trigger happy idiot orange baboon and a totally screwed up first response (suspiciously inadequate in fact).

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TP-Link 3G/Wi-Fi modem spills credentials to an evil text message

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TP Link is OK

Once you have reflashed it with OpenWRT.

The original software is a manifestation of incompetence of pangalactic proportions. A good example is the complete idiocy of the incompetent muppet who designed the interface for the TP108 "smart switch". You can configure vlans. You cannot disable the "default" vlan on a port. So any port always remains in the default vlan making the whole vlan separation unusable. That is apparently how VLANs should work according to TP Link. It is not dumb, it is not dumber, it is dumbest.

Their other software is in the same league. The hardware however is fine and makes a fine choice once you reflash it.

I have ~ 10 of them doing various things including some primitive IoT apps predating the wide availability of the Razzie.

All are flashed with OpenWRT including two of the 3G router ones. No stupid security bugs. No stability issues. Just works (TM) - some have uptime in the hundreds of days.

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US border cops must get warrants to search citizens' gadgets – draft bipartisan law emerges

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Re: As someone who experienced Soviet Bloc border controls

Not border control, the visa process. Border control in USSR and most of the soviet block was mostly harmless. It was never anywhere close to the lunacy at USA borders.

What we are observing is applying the rules and principles of pre-Gorbachev Soviet Union for issuing an exit visa, just this time for entrance. Anyone who has dealt with one of those 20 pages of questions exit visa questionnaires will probably recognize it immediately. It is history repeating, just in a mirror image.

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Free Range Routing project takes aim at Cisco with server-as-router project

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Did they fix the threading and the timers?

Quagga uses DIY threading and a DIY timers implementation. Without fixing that we are not going anywhere.

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Head of US military kit-testing slams F-35, says it's scarcely fit to fly

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Re: There have been planes like this before. -De Havilland Mosquito

Well, that's sort-of true, but it's like saying the sniper rifle is a very cost effective weapon so all our soldiers should carry them.

Very valid point and really unfair to be modded down.

£ per damage the best WW2 plane was Po2 - cost nothing, did a hell lot of damage (especially if you account for the psychological too). Mosquito and Pe2 closely followed (funny - Pe2 was also designed as a heavy fighter first and re-purposed as a bomber). On this metric the B17, Lanc and the B29 sucked bricks sidewize through a thin straw. They could, however, hit stuff which the Mosquito could not hit. Ever. Each of them had their function and replacing one of them with the other would have not worked at all.

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Re: The largest and most successful Russian covert hacking campaign is continuing as planned, then.

Model C uses licensed Russian technology. So you may be not that far off.

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US ATM fraud surges despite EMV

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Re: Speed

Another problem is the chip&pin readers are SSSLLLLOOOOOWWWW

The retard who rolled it out bought individual dialer card readers instead of rolling out a proper connection to the upstream bank via the shop network.

We do get slow in Europe too - it is inevitable that some cretin has done that too.

It is somewhat dependent on how advanced your dominant telco is. If it is someone who is "with the times" like the one in Austria even the small coffee shops will use terminals that talks over WiFi using TLS to the bank and authenticate the transaction in a second or less.

If the incumbent telco is still in the Jurassic swamp exchanging farts with the brontosaurs like BT in the UK, all the small shops will all be using a modem dialer so you will have to wait for the authorization. By the way - it is regardless of are you using chip and pin or magstripe.

A big grocery chain, however is nearly guaranteed to have a proper network connection to its bank. Anywhere in Eu.

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Trump sets sights on net neutrality

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Re: I'd equate Trump to Hitler but...

Frankly, he looks more like Mussolini. A presumptuous, incompetent buffoon.

No. You missed one important adjective. Vindictive.

Mussolini did not hold multi-year grudges. That was Joseph Stalin's speciality.

As an example, he waited for the whole war to end to pay back to Admiral Kuznetsov who told him to f*ck off on the 21st of June. Kuznetsov put the fleet and fleet aviation on red alert resulting in them taking virtually no losses when the war broke out and giving the Luftwaffe a nice bloody nose above the sky of both Odessa and Riga which were under fleet, not central command. Their performance was the only bright spot in the first 3 months of the war. Stalin did nothing to him for breaking rank. For 5 years. Then after the war he demoted him and terminated the whole fleet renovation program.

That is just one example - one can write a whole book of them.

That type of personality is closer to what we see in the Orange One.

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Re: I'd equate Trump to Hitler but...

Attila the Hun had a firm grasp of military strategy, and a clear plan of action when it came to what he wanted to achieve.

Took the words out of my mouth.

The next one is Koba. Иосиф Виссарионович Джугашвилли. Joseph Stalin.

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Reminds me of one of our old VPs

In one of my previous jobs we used to have a SVP (who has done a round of being some sort of "innovation person" in half of the Silly Valley and beyond). He used to say: "It is not important what you do, it is important what you blog about".

The modern version of this looks like "It is not important what you do, it is important what you tweet about".

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BMW chief: Big auto will stay in the driving seat with autonomous cars

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Re: Well...

Someone is full of himself.

In a BMW context that is always an oxymoron. It would have been more surprising if he wasn't.

The point that the Auto industry will not allow anybody else on its turf is quite valid though. If you think that the current train crash with patents in software engineering is bad, you have not seen the IPR around cars and driving. 99% of it is surprise, surprise in the name of the usual suspects.

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Forget robot overlords, humankind will get finished off by IoT

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Pint

Priceless last line

Concur.

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Europe to push new laws to access encrypted apps data

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But creating legislation that bans the use of crypto would be within her powers.

Actually - no. Crypto nowdays is math, an Eu commissioner is not the Indiana legilsative, it cannot decree that Pi 3.00.

What she can decree and what she can refine the requirements towards providers for legal intercept to make Telegram, iMessage and Facebook chat in its current form illegal. That is perfectly achievable technically and that is something a politico can and should do.

She may try to also specify reqs to commercial software, but that is going to die on technical grounds long before it gets anywhere near becoming law.

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Yes she can. That's the big advantage to controlling the Police force and a having access to an army

Shall I refer you to the priceless clip from Shrek 1 - "You and what army?" or you will peruse it without referral. She is an Eu commissioner - she has no army and whatever she does requires a consensus of member states.

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tech companies and security experts say that if an encryption backdoor is created it will be impossible to ensure that only the "good guys" use it, and so effectively undermines the whole system.

Correct for an end-to-end encrypted system. Incorrect for a store and forward encrypt-to-provider, encrypt-from-provider system.

She cannot do anything against physical persons and corporations using end-to-end crypto themselves. That horse has bolted 20 years ago when Phil Zimmerman gave PGP to the world.

Now, provider assisted is a different story. She can do that TODAY.

The law as it stands is an ass and being a dumb ass it does not give a flying f*** about the application design disallowing legal intercept. It insists that legal intercept is provided and the way it is formulated in half of the Eu allows the law to take a big hatchet to any provider-run end-to-end encrypted messaging (once again - it cannot do anything about private persons today). By the way, by disallowing USA corporations to take any cases with them to California, Eu has already done half of the work on this one. The remaining half is a court case which will happen sooner or later (when someone finally explains the retarded politicos that the law has already taken care of this).

So all it takes is ONE court case to prove that legal intercept requirements apply to Facebook, Google, Telegram and friends. We will be back to using PGP in email on the next day after that.

So, in fact, she does not even need to legislate. She just needs to pick one of the Eu countries to start the court case.

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Silicon Valley staffing agency boss charged with H‑1B visa fraud

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Re: Don't be naive

Size matters. They look the right size for a scapegoat. Infosys is a bit big for that.

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Russian mega-telco exec: 'No business case' for 5G

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Latsanych told an investor conference in London: "There is no finalized technology, no network equipment available, no frequency allocation in any of our countries,

Spot on. It is standards and a specific subtype of university people looking for w*nkfest junkets at present. There is no substance.

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One in five mobile phones shipped abroad are phoney – report

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If the shop is not Kosher, chose a Halal one. Failing that a Vegan (warning, new "Dr Who Money" printed by the Royal Bank of England may not be legal tender), Beef-free, dog-free, gluten-free or something else free.

Humor aside, I tend to agree with you - even the stuff marked as Prime on Amazon is quite often of fairly dubious origin nowdays. If you stray outside that into the marketplace or go on Ebay it is almost like Kapalı Çarşı (Grand Bazaar) in Istanbul.

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Home Office accused of blocking UK public's scrutiny of Snoopers' Charter

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Re: Stand aside Plebes. I am on Imperial business...

Well spotted.

Do you expect anything different from a government that is openly considering Henry VIIIs powers to bypass parliament and enact legislation and is planning to set those powers in stone in a "Great Repeal Bill"?

Just in case they need it again to deploy the troops once the discontent at 10% inflation in a few years hits the streets.

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Red Hat: OpenStack big, getting bigger, OpenShift fatter than Linux

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Re: What do you expect?

Disclosure: I work for Red Hat,

Let me explain this to you in simple terms. Sex and IT support have to be consensual. When they are not it never ends well in the long run.

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Samsung plans Galaxy Note 7 fire sale

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Re: why oh why?

Airlines will still not let you fly with one so why bother.

If it has the battery permanently exorcised I would not mind having it for a house control display. I am trying to hack something around an ancient 6 inch tablet for these purposes and it does not have the processing power I need - especially for CCTV :(

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Cheap, flimsy, breakable and replaceable – yup, Ikea, you'll be right at home in the IoT world

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Re: Lightswitches...

LIght switch - 1£

Dimmer switch - 5£

Presense switch - 10£.

I have had my kitchen, bathrooms and hallways wired for presence for 12 years now. It works. Saves money (both leccy and bulb runtime). Does not need an I Do IOT 85£ device from Ikea.

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Ex-military and security firms oppose Home Sec in WhatsApp crypto row

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Re: Let em do it.

Stop handing them bullets, dumbasses, and build a school.

I agree with the former. Unfortunately the latter will survive for 5 minutes before all students are mandated to become warriors of the faith and are handed some of the spare weapons.

However, we should definitely start with the former. Not arming anyone no matter are they called free wankers or free jerkihadists or free Syria army.

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Re: How to end the encryption argument

Ask them if they're okay with the other 200+ governments of the world having the same rights to your data.

Why 200? Just use the P name. The name of the Enemy.

That will be an immediate "Rrrrrrrrrrrun for the hillls".

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Re: Bravo

That sounds like a hell of an AI project

My late dad (a university professor in Optimal Control), used to say: "Ariticial Intelligence is not a suitable augmentation for Natural Stupidity". I think he had cases like this in mind.

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UK Home Sec: Give us a snoop-around for WhatApp encryption. Don't worry, we won't go into the cloud

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She is just testiculating (talking bollocks while gesticulating wildly).

I wish I could ignore her.

Unfortunately, we live in a time when testiculating idiots like her set the rules under which normal people have to live.

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Re: Same script, different face

So, if he used sms or a call before the act (like for example the Paris attackers) we would have banned SMS?

Did they have a IQ 80 selection bar on this government or something?

Also, even if the message was not encrypted - who cares. What would have been interesting would have been his communications if he was under instructions. That is clear - he was not.

If he was under instruction from IS, Al Qaeda or another similar outfit, he would have chosen a different car. Modern consumer cars even if they look big and "brutal" have significant pedestrian protection as well several other features designed to minimize damage in an accident. It is extremely difficult to kill multiple persons with most of them "on purpose" (the results of the accident show that quite clearly too).

So the fact that we cannot decrypt that ONE message which she is using a reason for pulling the speech her predecessor long prepared in the drawer for her is irrelevant. The maimed would have still been maimed. The dead would have still be dead regardless of us knowing the content.

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UK digital minister Matt Hancock praises 'crucial role' of encryption

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Why do you expect it to be big?

The pool was determined by what she sees in a mirror. Mirror, (Daily) Mirror on the wall, who is the xenophobiest of of them all? So we got the second best candidate after he own reflection in it (if we do not count the frogs),

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Re: opensource protocols

I wonder if Amber Rudd has heard anything.

She has - Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service. She just does an s/Aryan/British/g before quoting.

That however starts and concludes her political vocabulary - there is nothing more to it.

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Manufacturers reject ‘no deal’ Brexit approach

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Re: Speculating

EEA agrees to ECJ mandate.

UK cannot by May and GoveNokio's own definition of Brexit be in ECJ and have Brexited.

So any ideas that UK will get EEA treatment are in La-la-land.

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UK.gov confirms it won't be buying V-22 Ospreys for new aircraft carriers

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Re: ->The V22 has a less than stellar safety record, bring back the Fairey Rotodyne

It recently came out very well in a Red Flag competition, knocked everything else out of the sky.

You mean the last year's Red Flag competition where the Indians were assigned to the aggressor squadron and disallowed to use their radars? So that anyone actually stood a chance by being able to close in with them being blind while having full visibility. Same Red Flag where they were not allowed to turn on the ECM pods which all of the Sukhoi nowdays carry?

If it is that Red Flag, I believe the F35 still sucked rocks against the Su-30 MKI and F-16 within in visual range. The odds stacking for weapon advertisement purposes was beyond odious though. So rather unsurprisingly it showed fantastic scores against an enemy ordered to fly blind from long range. Frankly, if you had an F4 with 1960-es missiles it would have shown same score in that scenario as it was stacked one mile high in its favor.

What a fecking joke of a Red Flag by the way.

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After London attack, UK gov lays into Facebook, Google for not killing extremist terror pages

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Thing is.. you don't need a manual to tell you how to use a car to kill people... you just drive at them

Not entirely true. The pedestrian safety measures in a modern car like the ix40 as used in Westminster will render it unusable after the first few hits and/or fail to produce anything like the damage you are expecting. He hit 40+ people with the desire to kill and failed to kill all but two of them.

So you actually need a manual to chose the right car and/or exactly how to mow people down with it if you want to kill people, not put a few in hospital.

That manual most likely already exist. It is also clear that this gentleman did not have access to it. He would have chosen a different vehicle and driven it differently.

His case will be used for all it is worth by the Government to push repressive legislation despite the fact that he neither operated under instructions, nor had access to them via an encrypted channel. Rudd already started doing it.

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Inside OpenSSL's battle to change its license: Coders' rights, tech giants, patents and more

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Re: no. The issue is not "the" license, nor the change of the license.

One person can not say, "I want to change the license, and if you don't respond, I'll take it as approval".

I am afraid I have to disagree. I have, several times needed to 'organise' various changes requiring 50% or greater approval.

The minor difference here is that the change is a legal issue - you cannot alter a license without 100% uniform consensus and 100% agreement. It is against copyright law.

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Yet another job menaced by AI! Uh, wait, it says here... Dance Dance Revolution designers

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Re: Easy!

My exact thought. There is music which will bend any dance designer's head in. 4.33 is not the most insane from dance perspective.

The most insane is stuff done in 3/8, 5/8, 8/8 and (yes there is even that abomination 13/8 rhythm. Give it some music from the Balkans and let's see what it makes up out of that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qYh-dJriIc - here is a good example.

If you want a workout try one of those. Just getting the steps right will get a river of sweat running off you in 5 mins or less.

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Squirrel sinks teeth into SAN cabling, drives Netadmin nuts

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Re: Best traps

Clearly the OP doesn't know how to safely and legally trap wildlife.

1. Who told you I have used them in the UK. There are other countries where stuff that chews on your cable is protected only if it is a protected species. If it is not it is fair game and sod the humanity of the method :)

2. As far as safety, safety of the humans first, safety of the VERMIN second.

What you forget is that story is about squirrels. Squirrels and doormice are not rats or mice. They are an infestation from hell if you get them.

You cannot safely install any trap in under-floor space or roof space. It is a recipe for removed fingers because people always end up pushing cables through by touch alone. With squirrels and the f*** edible doormice you cannot use bait safely. They will take it somewhere, eat all of it, die in an obscure but warm place (on top of a power supply usually), then rot through and leak into interesting places. Even if they do not die there, they will drop crumbs into the fan grille into that so you will be ingesting warfarin powder when servicing equipment. This is in addition to dropping their dung into it and it carries a set of diseases you rather not know. A high-end respirator becomes a necessity when working.

You cannot use normal traps. They ignore them as they move either high above or in the under-floor/ceiling space. They are not rats that scurry next to the wall. They will do it ONLY if there is no other route, otherwise you will see the f*** jumping across racks. The exception here is doormice which will come and steal the bait out of 90% of trap models in front of you completely ignoring you as an irrelevance.

Last, but not least - due to their hearing and senses being in the same range as humans they are not affected by ultrasound and EMP pet repellent equipment.

So your choices are glue or patience and a pellet gun. The second one is somewhat humane if used correctly, but you have to have no other job but to sit with it in a server room overnight. You are also limited in terms of having a clean shot in making sure there is no equipment behind the target.

Most importantly - once you got rid of them (by whatever method needed) do not hesitate to spend the money on a truck roll of chickenwire and rodentproof the whole place.

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Best traps

The best preventive traps are the glue ones. You fold them up and they form a glue tunnel. Critter of any size from field mouse to a rat goes in and there it remains.

If you put a normal trap under a raised floor there will be someone missing fingers after they have forgotten it is there and try to run cables. Either that or cables/fiber chopped in half. The glue ones are humane to the human personnel which IMHO is probably more important. You also do not get the mess with poison bait. While rats and mice eat the bait where they find it, squirrels and "edible" doormice* take it somewhere else like on top of a server or NAS grille and eat it there so the crumbs get into the machinery.

I have seen the glue ones sold in Euriope, but not in the UK. If you are setting up a new building make sure you put a few of them in critical places under the raised floor. Replace annually or when they start to stink (you could have guessed by now - I have had to deal with this one).

(*) The edible doormouse is the European vermin from hell - everything a rat does + walk on vertical walls and ceilings and dig tunnels as well as chewing through anything except steel mesh on its way as well

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I've Been Moved: IBMers in same division slapped with 2nd redundo scheme in 2 months

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Interesting choice of picture

Someone exercising an immense force to chop in two what appears to be ROTTEN deadwood.

Is the article author trying to say something?

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Disney plotting 15 more years of Star Wars

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There is also this plot line

Well, not all robot plot lines have been covered. Like for example this: https://pics.onsizzle.com/are-you-sure-we-should-do-this-i-mean-youre-14754071.png

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Amazing new WikiLeaks CIA bombshell: Agents can install software on Apple Macs, iPhones right in front of them

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Re: Why??

According to Assange - Russians have their own places where they publish stuff, so do the Chinese. Now, why there are little or no French leaks - that is somewhat surprising.

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Re: Secure by design...

No OS is secure by design brief against the agency of a top 5 nation state attacker. If CIA, MI6, GRU and their Chinese or French equivalents decide that you are to be owned, you will be owned. The amount of resources these guys have is staggering, a retail product destined for Joe Average Luser does not stand a chance.

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Amazon dodges $1.5bn US tax bill: It's OK to run sales through Europe out of IRS reach – court

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Re: US tax liability

I don't know why we, speaking as non-citizens of the US, put up with it at all.

It used to be called gunboat diplomacy, it is now called aircraft carrier diplomacy.

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Re: The reason for Blue Origin ?

Either that or "such a nice tax office you have down there, pity if something happens to it if someone's rubbish fails to reenter the atmosphere correctly"

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Good news, everyone! Two pints a day keep heart problems at bay

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Probably not beer though

Most of the "health benefits of alcohol" studies are from countries which drink wine, not beer. In fact, the studies on benefits of beer are very ambivalent and most of the studies waved by opponents of alcohol are from beer drinking countries.

So more like two glasses of red at dinner, not 2 pints.

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Cambridge wheels out latest smart city platform, ready for devs

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Re: Finding a problem to solve?

The led display is not designed to show complex values. It definitely has a problem with the imaginary component which is common in the Stagecoach operated ones and mandatory in the Whippet ones.

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WWE star's swiped sex snaps survey spam snares selfie sickos

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Re: A judge writes...

Soft porn which pretends to be wrestling.

I'd rather watch proper wrestling - especially freestyle. Some of what these guys do is amazing.

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FYI anyone who codes outside work: GitHub has a contract to stop bosses snatching it all

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Re: UK Patent Law is quite clear

That's patents.

Does not apply to copyrights.

I do not even need to ask the family patent lawyer (my SWMBO) to tell you this - we have discussed this one a few times over the years.

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