* Posts by Voland's right hand

3806 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

US Secretary of State: I will work with Russia on cyber security issues

Voland's right hand
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Re: " both sides must mutually agree and abide by the rules of engagement, "

Good luck with that.

Indeed. On BOTH sides.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Wait, what? Maybe missing irony quotes around belligerent?

Lots of quotes needed at the moment.

Most newspapers published this along with "Russian pilot unprofessionally approached a NATO aircraft over the Baltic" on the same day based on a NATO press communique which deliberately came out together with the press release for this one.

The communique missed the fact that the NATO aircraft was a RC135 SigInt airplane, that it came within several hundred of meters of Russia defense minister jet and it was while two NATO F16s were harassing that jet by coming within 5m to provoke it to use emergency comms protocols so that the RC135 can listen and record. The actual incident quoted by NATO was the escorting Su-27 jet pilot inserting itself with missiles facing the F16 within the 5m between the Russian government jet. In the meantime the other escort did the same to the RC-135. That is ... what? Flying a bloody big heavy air superiority fighter "on its side" within 2.5m from two aircraft on both sides. Insane - yes. Unprofessional, I beg to differ.

While I understand the desire of some idiots in the Pentagon and NATO HQ to get some listen in on latest Russian coded comms, can we do it without:

1. Lying in a press communique reprinted by all newspapers (El Graunidad corrected it later though).

2. Attaching the communique to a clear case of violating other country's sovereignty in at least 3 different ways as a distraction. Dunno which bit of bad news where they trying to bury in which, but it is definitely a case of "bury bad news".

3. Trying to start WW3.

I do not know who is at the wheel at the moment in the Pentagon (if anyone is at all), but they definitely need to be removed and diplomats be put to work to deescalate. Otherwise we will all end up as radioactive ash at this rate.

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Smart burglars will ride the surf of inter-connected hackability

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Re: instead, they upload malicious code from a USB stick

This is precisely why I refuse to program in "Home" on any of my GPS devices.

I do not enter it either. The miscreants can still get to within 3 houses of yours if they open the route logbook. All it takes for them to determine which one is yours after that is 5 minutes of pretending to be evangelicals.

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instead, they upload malicious code from a USB stick

Why bother - just grab the GPS details of $HOME.

Not new either - it is the traditional "treatment" cars get when they are broken in at amuzement parks, airport parking lots or anywhere else where you have a reason to believe that the occupants will be for at least a day.

By the time they get home their home is squeaky clean. And empty.

P.S. This is one of the reasons why I categorically refuse to this day to have an integrated car GPS. I should be able to chuck it in the bag when I park it for a long time somewhere.

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AES-256 keys sniffed in seconds using €200 of kit a few inches away

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Re: In effect "traffic analysis" applied at the bus level.

Basically you need to keep a constant(ish) power level in the system

Not even that - your power level should not correlate with the encryption task. That will actually be the case if the system is doing enough other things. Makes up for an interesting argument against dedicated hardware.

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Algorithmic pricing raises concerns for EU competition law enforcement

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Also, I've seen what seemed to be implausible bargains on Amazon

There is both that and putting ridiculous prices on items like 1200 grand for a bag of bolts. Both are done specifically to skew other people's pricing algos and amazon pricing assistance tools (there is a nice cottage industry brewing which helps your determine and alter pricing based on what other people are selling their goods for).

Theoretically - you can complain to Amazon about it. Practically - it is a wild East (not even West) environment.

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WikiLeaks doc dump reveals CIA tools for infecting air-gapped PCs

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Re: Who watches the watchers?

How do you know what they have been up to,

I know more than I would have preferred to know. I have multiple granduncles who have worked for one of the "firms" and I know about some of their older "handywork" which is now past its classification "window" (lots of it is still not published, it officially does not exist, just no criminal penalty if you happen to know about it without having the relevant clearance).

As far as the morals of the staff employed by the CIA, GRU, MI6, Mossad, etc, you get both sides of the coin. People who do it for their country and people who you would rather not meet in a dark alley. Both of them have little respect for the law as their job is to break the law to get the work done.

It is the job of the political control of the agency and whoever gives orders to ensure that the subject of their interests is the enemy and not their own population. Unfortunately, the 20th and the 21st century (so far) are a litany of failures as far as that is concerned. Pretty much all governments have taken a leaf out of the Stalin and Hitler's book and have deployed the secret services (along with their long list of dirty methods) against internal targets.

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Re: Who watches the watchers?

Nothing wrong with THIS abuse - these are the guys their country pays to go and get info from ANOTHER country and/or attack another country by messing with its infrastructure, planting fake news, etc. The goal is to do it by any means necessary short of causing a war (unless they have been tasked with causing a war).

Like it or not, that is a the job of the externally facing secret services - CIA, GRU, MI6, etc. They are paid to fight dirty so that we do not fight "clean" on the battlefield according to the Geneva Conventions. Historically, they have been massively overdoing it on both sides and it is long overdue for them to be reigned in exactly because of that - a dirty cloak and dagger war can always spill out in the open and become clean and nobody wants to do that.

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Re: "Suspicion Deflection"

Name already taken - by the embedded ssh server build. The one used by OpenWRT.

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Waymo: We've got a hot smoking gun in Uber 'tech theft' brouhaha

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How cute...

Now a "spontaneous" grassroots campaign.

Why do I find it difficult to believe in the spontaneity for some reason...

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In the week Uber blew up, Netflix restates 'No brilliant jerks' policy

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Re: What do Netflix staff do that requires all these not-brilliant stars?

Scaling while staying with a well defined metrics envelope for jitter, latency, etc.

It is quite tough actually. In fact, extremely tough. If it was not that tough everyone and their dog would be able to run a video service.

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worked its way into many-an-HR-person's strategies.

You mean "pretend worked", surely. Such things are not set in an HR strategy - they are set from the CEO and board down and the CEO and the board have to live by them. When an HR droid tries to imitate them within the scope of what is allowed to an HR droid the results are laughable.

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TalkTalk customers complain of being unable to load Amazon website

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Re: Rule #2

Rule #2

That is rule #0 - it goes before any other rules.

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Honda plant in Japan briefly stops making cars after fresh WannaCrypt outbreak

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The price you pay for using generic OS for industrial control

It is the price you pay for using a generic OS without stripping it down and securing it for industrial control. There will be more of that (lots more) and it will only get worse until it gets better as the I Do Internet Of Things people will continue to ship basic unsecured builds for the foreseeable future.

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Ad 'urgently' seeks company to build national e-ID system

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Enrolling children

They are already enrolled from a few weeks old - the new passports are biometric worldwide.

The "age of 5" + 4 million is interesting as it is not something I can map to any Eu country (or developed country for that matter). They all already have enrollment from the moment of first passport application.

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Debian 9 feels like home with security upgrades and a flaming vulpine warming your toes

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Re: Some rough edges

but I upgraded several server systems already in under 20 minutes each.

dpkg-query -l | wc -l

Development + office + day-to-day use desktop : 4338

Web, VPN + Mail Hosted Server with a fully blown catalyst env and a gazillion perl modules dragged in by foswiki dependencies: 858.

Single purpose server: < 400

There is nothing "wrong" to what I am doing, just a server is an easy upgrade. Very easy. Piece of cake compared to a desktop you develop on. 2.5-3h to upgrade that is actually not a very bad score.

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Re: Stop claiming that secure boot is a security advantage...

Secure boot is not about bootsector.

It is about having an uninterrupted chain of verified components starting at the BIOS/Firmware/Bootloader and all the way to the executable proven by cryptography.

Microsoft implementation of this is quite poor and relatively benign. If you want to see how really funky can this get have a look at ChromeOS on Arm ChromeBooks.

I am starting to swear at the mere thought of pushing Debian 8.8 on my Samsung Chromebook to 9.0. It took me one whole f*** afternoon to win the fight last time when I got it from 7 to 8. It is installed properly - on the internal SSD. That is something even Debian wiki claims to be not possible - it has a procedure for SD card install only and/or Crouton installs. While it is not impossible, the whole idiocy with the signed kernel makes it a form of BSDM experience. Very BDSM.

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Re: Bold Statement

A very bold statement, indeed! - Concur.

Depends on the complexity of the install. My desktops worked fine, but the machine which I use for media processing and has an ungodly amount of packages on top of the desktop build + remnants of the build reqs for them barfed twice through the upgrade. It was on 8.8.

So it can barf even from 8.8. It does, however, recover so "Keep calm and carry on apt-getting" still applies.

I have not tried arm and ppc systems yet to see how it works there. They are next on my "menu"

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Some rough edges

The new firefox "run in a container" security tech comes close to killing a machine at times - container + new input subsystem + badly written javascript (hello screwfix) == accepting one character per few seconds. It does not get completely stuck so you can Alt-Shift away and kill the process, but still unpleasant.

The upgrade is also hellishly long, especially on SSDs. It is so big that it hits the "reclaim" twilight zone on most consumer SSDs. As a comparison - two roughly equivalent machines, one with spinning rust, one with SSD, full desktop + development environment install. The spinning rust finished in under 3h. The SSD just about managed to complete the upgrade in 8.

There are also some gremlins related to the way locking the screen now works, especially on media center machines.

Otherwise, not bad. I will chose a weekend to update my the servers though - the process is way too long to consider doing it during working hours.

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You can't take the pervs off Facebook, says US Supreme Court

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just plain opening your mouth

Yes. Have a look at the history of convictions for sedition.

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Fancy buying our aircraft carrier satnav, Raytheon asks UK

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Some 40 per cent larger by displacement than QE, the Ford is designed to support around 160 launches and recoveries per day.

That is 160 fully loaded launches off a catapult that can come home without getting read of fuel tanks and ordnance to be caught by the arrestor gear. In terms of bomb load, etc the ratio is significantly better than 108/160.

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Hotheaded Brussels civil servants issued with cool warning: Leak

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Re: That's not hot. This is hot.

his is a temperate climate we're talking about, 29C is hot.

No it is not. Temperate can be continental temperate like Hungary, Romania, Russia or Bulgaria (depending on the year - it is straddling the border between temperate and subtropical). 40C+ is quite common. The saving grace is that humidity is usually < 50%.

It can also be coastal temperate like the British isles or Belgium where 29C is a big deal. It actually is as it comes with 70%+ humidity.

The difference humidity makes is two-fold. First it is easier to tolerate heat during the day if it is lower.

Second, low humidity equates to significant radiation cooling at night so you can sleep. Even if it was 35C a few hours ago, it happily drops to 18C by 10pm making it quite tolerable (especially out in the countryside). That does not happen during a heatwave in places like Belgium or UK. It stays at 24C at night and is throughly disgusting.

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Backdoor backlash: European Parliament wants better privacy

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Re: Unintended consequences

Indeed. Frankly, the "we promote https" crusade for plain old content by the ones like Google is mostly about ad revenue preservation and prevention of injecting/removing ads. Privacy? Security? Who cares.

In any case, IMHO both the parliamentarians and the Eu ministers are in the wrong here. The issue is very plain, simple and it has been known for nearly a century - long before the days of the internet. It is called legal intercept.

If you are running a revenue generating communications service, you have to provide legal intercept facilities. So the law says in pretty much all countries. What has been happening is that Internet companies have been skipping on this in the USA for a while by using an old SCOTUS decision that they are running information services, not communication services. That is bollocks. It is used to communicate. They have also transplanted the same services worldwide (and other copied the designs from them).

Legal intercept != mass surveillance. It is used (in most countries) via a court order which in some places (Germany, Swiss) is actually hellishly difficult to obtain. It is used on an individual basis and does not cost in for the police to use en-masse, because it is CHARGED for by the provider. It costs money.

IMHO, the fight against legal intercept as a service component is both stupid and wrong. It is a legitimate ask and if it is not provided and backed up by appropriate legal constraints we will get encryption backdoors and mass surveillance instead.

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Texas says 'howdy' to completely driverless robo-cars on its roads

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And I turn to her and say, "Texas"

She says, "What?"

I said, "Texas"

She says, "What?"

They got big long roads out there

(c) Chris Rea, from the Road to Hell album.

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FOIA documents show the Kafkaesque state of US mass surveillance

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Re: To Constitute or not to Constitute...

Yes, normally in a field.

Not always, sometimes it was against a bullet pock-marked wall painted in institutional green.

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Worried about election hacking? There's a technology fix – Helios

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Re: "Because you can"

The issue US has with paper voting systems is direct democracy prevalent in several states - f.e. California. They sometimes end up with 20 + items to vote for on election day.

Adding "yet another proposition" to a paper ballot is not cheap.

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My exact thought

This is hardly something that can be called anonymous voting.

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As you head off to space with Li-ion batts, don't forget to inject that liquefied gas into them

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I thought we killed fluorinated gaseous hydrocarbons for good once and for all for most uses.

The idea otherwise is sound - just another gas is needed (if they started with what is for all purposes a freone, a lot of the freone replacements will be good candidates).

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Software dev bombshell: Programmers who use spaces earn MORE than those who use tabs

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Re: What about spaces *and* tabs?

The result of this style is Dog's breakfast in the SCCM and patches fail half of the time.

This is why it is prohibited by every project I can think of.

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Re: WGAFF??

Try submitting code with tabs to QEMU or code with spaces to Linux kernel. If you write for both you end up growling all the time because you have written something without changing the formatting config and you now need to reformat it.

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Fighter pilot shot down laptops with a flick of his copper-plated wrist

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Everyone missed the classic one

The secretary, the nylon tights, synthetic underware and the pencil skirt made out of some similarly synthetic material. Bonus points for an 1980-es office chair with synthetic fake-suede cover.

Bzzzzzzzzzt... here went another motherboard.

It is not so common nowdays as a secretary in a short skirt and nylon tights is extinct species. In the olden days not everyone managed to collect the bravery to suggest she alters her wardrobe a bit (either directly or talking to her boss) so it went from Bzzzzzt to Bzzzzt.

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Look who's joined the anti-encryption posse: Germany, come on down

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Do not think so.

If it is "via access to device" that is only on individual subjects and most likely authorized by court order or an equivalent procedure as required by the local legal intercept laws. This is not breaking encryption in general and mass surveillance. So it does not do anything to Internet banking, etc.

It is what it is: mandate phone vendors to support legal intercept. It also makes technical sense - the phones now are so smart that they are a component of the network in itself. If implemented correctly it can be locked down so it can be accessed only via the carrier device provisioning system.

It is also fairly easy to circumvent - just get a foreign phone and enjoy the abolishment of roaming fees in the Eu.

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Oh, wow, Canada: No more carrier-locked phones for Canucks

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Re: Impact will be on expensive phones

Canadian telcos will find it increasingly difficult to subsidize expensive phones, since the phone

might just up and disappear.

That is exactly what contracts are for.

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Blade Runner time: Retail replicant buys into WANdisco’s Fusion product

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Joke

"On the march"

Interesting combination - "On The March" together with the "Time To Die" frame from the movie.

Is the article author trying to tell us something...

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Small carriers aren't showing up to IPv6 standards chats, consultant warns

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Re: There are fundamental technical reasons for it

Your problem no.2 has been solved

Correct. However, when you listen to the high priests of v6 preaching us the goodness of the v6 e2e principle you will never hear the word firewall. It is not part of the holy e2e paradise. The fact that some of them also have high security clearance and consult 3 letter agencies should not surprise you either.

In any case - there is nothing wrong with v6 purely for address depletion purposes if it is obsoleted as it is today, all of the IP address autoconfig crap removed while fixing DHCP so that v6 config can be dished over v4. Some revision of the flow label semantics so they are usable would also be nice but not essential.

The problem is that the v6 fanatics insist that there is nothing wrong with the crazy mix of v6 autoconfig + v6 DHCP as well as crippling the v6/v4 DHCP interop. They perfectly understand that dealing with that is one of the "v6 way or the highway" moments for an organization and they refuse to budge on it to achieve a personal goal - promotion of v6. At everybody's else expense. Obsoleting this aspect and doing an errata on all relevant v6 RFCs is so overdue, we might as well do v7.

Ditto for the v6 aspects and the mandatory v6 support in HNCP and HOMENET (where this thread started).

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Re: There are fundamental technical reasons for it

Look at mobile devices. People cannot even transfer a file from computer A to computer B because they are likely in 2 different NATs.

If those are MOBILE devices, can we all ask it stays that way. Please? Pretty please?

E2E is a lovely idea in principle, in practice, specifically for mobile where 90% of the devices are unpatched Android with at least half of them spouting a DLNA implementation with a buffer overrun it better stay behind NAT. While NAT is by no means perfect, NAT and the deliberate filters at SP which prevent one mobile talking to each other is what is saving us from zero day worms exploiting all of these.

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There are fundamental technical reasons for it

Looking around, good, no v6 geeks or $deities in the vicinity so I am not going to look like one of those Looney Tunes "flattened character" animations after being run over by an angry rhinoceros (let's say Fred Baker or Mark Townsley).

The fundamental technical reasons for this are as follows:

1. Most of the problems of v4 in the initial problem statement for v6 have been solved. Long ago. One way or another. v6 either breaks the solution, has incomplete and complex support requiring multiple network elements or does outright incorrect and idiotic network design assumptions which have never been fixed. Example - device configuration. v6 erroneously hands out power for this to the router(s) via router advertisements, cannot be fully configured without multiple solutions present (with accompanying complexity) and all of this has been solved long ago in DHCP. The whole v6 autoconfig in this day and age is a solution looking for a problem. Instead of admitting it, revising the protocol and obsoleting all the b***cks in it, the v6 geeks deliberately crippled DHCP so you cannot get v6 config in the v4 reply and v6 version is subtly incompatible with v4.

2. The end to end principle is idiotic in the highest order. It was a jolly good idea when the machines on the Internet were in their thousands, each had an admin and there was some responsibility involved. It started looking a bit nuts when the machine count went into the millions with virus ridden 95s joining the net. It is a complete lunacy when the machines are in the billions and more than half of that are embedded builds which get no patching. YOU DO NOT WANT THESE E2E accessible.

3. The address exhaustion problem has mostly gone away as a result of developers switching from protocols which were NAT unfriendly to protocols which do not give a damn about how many NATs they traverse.

No v6 $deity will come even close to admitting any of these. They start any of their talks with "v4 is obsolete". They have made their careers on making v4 and v6 incompatible and pushing v6 at any possible occasion (v4/v6 DHCP is a prime example). You are more likely to make them commit sepuku with a blunt kitchen knife than admit that v6 NEEDS a major revision with half of the features obsoleted straight away.

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Banking websites are 'littered with trackers' ogling your credit risk

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Re: I think we need to know...

None. At least here... Looking again at the noscript console. DEFINITELY NONE.

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HPE hatches HPE Next – a radical overhaul plan so it won't be HPE Last

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Re: Another transformation movement...

But the problem is does paying some far eastern company to put Intel chips in boxes and stick an HP label on the box really count as manufacturing?

Sorta - if:

1. The company designed it

2. Holds copyright on the designs

3. The designs are innovative and not just rearranging the Intel reference design

4. There are specific differentiators which are unique to company

This is valid for any value of company. Contract manufacturing is as old as the industrial age if not older. There is NOTHING wrong with it.

The WRONG becomes when you bring in a cretin with no understanding of engineering (and the differentiators provided by it) freshly from a business school which replaces 1, 2, 3 and 4 with branding sticker on a rebadged reference design and hands off the design to the same company which does contract manufacturing. While this gives you a short term margin and operating income boost it is the best way to "package the demise of your business" in the long term.

HP has been in the WRONG since mid-2000 when it started handing off designing its servers to Asus and the like. There is no easy and short term fix for this and more importantly there is no fix which will please the shareholders as this requires to make the operating parameters significantly worse for anything up to 5 years ahead. The short-termist nature of the USA stock markets will simply not allow a company which has gone the "Branding as a replacement for Engineering" route once to recover back. They will have a set of disassemblers on the board in short order instead.

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I still haven't found what I'm malloc()ing for: U2 tops poll of music today's devs code to

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Re: Bunch of metalheads at Chez Ammabamma

Same here. With slightly different ordering and the addition of Alice Cooper to hold the poll position.

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Music helps even when you are not in the office

I have found it I need music to concentrate even when I am coding in my own home office and in my loft. I cannot go into proper "Capt'n, I do not know how much she can take. KEEP ON FIRING" mode without a set of huge fully isolating ear-cups and something blasting on them.

You need silence sometimes for debugging. Once again the cups help.

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The choice of music depends on what you are coding

Your typical startup-style, no rest for the wicked binge coding is best written to "Jesus Christ Superstar". You also find that you tend to follow the script too. You code to The Getsemane, you live by The Getsemane:

Then I was inspired, now I'm sad and tired

Listen, surely I've exceeded expectations

Tried for three years, seems like thirty

Could you ask as much from any other man?

So after you have been run like a slave for 3 years, the Getsemane commands you to get up and f*** leave. I did it at my last job - the whole project was pretty much written with Jesus Christ Superstar on the stereo 24x7x365. Then after 3 years I had enough, I got up and left.

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From landslide to buried alive: Why 2017 election forecasts weren't wrong

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Re: "'This election was won by the younger generation.'" "Well not really, Labour still lost, i"

The next election will be called for a university holiday period when the students are out of reach of both their polling stations and the students' unions exhorting them to vote.

Fair point.

I believe she would love to try. If she does, the result may be different from what she seeks. She will win the battle, but lose the war. It will solidify the young generation swing to the left for decades to come as they will see her (and the Tories) as THE enemy from now onwards.

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Getting the wrong demographics adjustments

Brexit, Trump and this election polls got it wrong because they did not perform the demographics adjustment correctly.

BrExit got the pensioners voting in droves. I will always remember a cute pair on that day. She, in a wheelchair, draped in a Union Jack blanket. He, pushing the chair and sucking on a Union Jack sticker-ed oxygen bottle in the pushchair tray. The Romanian nurse changing their nappies, the German surgeon who replaced their hips and the polish delivery driver bringing the new oxygen bottles on a weekly basis "took their jobs". The polls failed to predict the lack of engagement with the younger generation (courtesy of the fat cat club that ran Remain) and the droves of angry pensioners going to the polls.

Trump win was predicted by a couple of sociologists, but was not publicized at all prior to the vote. They quite correctly noted that the only 19% of the white males in the mid-west and rural regions elsewhere vote and it will take Trump only pushing that to ~40% to win by a landslide. No poll performed this adjustment so rather unsurprisingly the results came up as a shock.

This election was won by the younger generation. It traditionally swings left and it was most spectacular in university cities. The usual university city battles are between Tories and Liberal Democrats with engagement standing at sub <60%. Instead of that we had >75% (going into 80%+ in places) and Tory vs Labor. Students voted. They have not seen how a country run by a proper left government looks like as they were born after that (Blair's "left" is somewhere around Atilla The Hun so it does not count). It now depends if Labor manages to keep that engagement (not particularly difficult at the current tuition rates and easy to counter by rolling them back).

In all cases the demographic adjustment and the failure to correctly account for changes in voter engagement for specific demographics was that turned the cart.

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Germany puts halt on European unitary patent

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Re: Article 20 of the German Constitution strictly forbids ...

The implication of Article 20 however, is far greater: It explictily forbids most of the EU organisations incl. the EU commission, the EU (fake-)parliarment, most the EU administrations etc.

Nope, it does not. These all arbitrate in final instance to Eu court of justice which HAS German representation. In fact, I believe this has gone to German constitutional court more than once and got this answer every time.

The issue with Article 20 and the UPC is that UPC as formulated does not necessarily have German representation. There is no mandate for representation in the UPC statute, there is only mandate for national diversity - some cases require at least 2 nations represented. It does not however say "all" anywhere which means that there may be a chain of decision where German is explicitly excluded. It is illegal as per UK Bill of Rights and most Eu constitutions as currently formulated and it is only a matter of time until similar challenges are successfully raised elsewhere.

Who is the idiot who decided not to apply the relatively successful ECHR and EuCourt formula, dunno. But he is an idiot.

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AWS launches celebrity-spotting-as-a-service: What a time to be alive

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Eye will not be enough

You should start with mind bleach.

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Virgin Media resolves flaw in config backup for Super Hub routers

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I am surprised by your outrage.

End of the day it's made by Netgear. I would not have expected anything different from them.

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In detail: How we are all pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered – by online biz all day

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Re: "The Telcos are nothing compared to the Credit bureaus and lenders"

whereas your Credit bureau only knows

It knows your monthly spend on credit cards as well as all monthly purchases of bigger ticket items for the last decade. It has a sharing agreement with insurance companies and gets info from there. It has an information sharing agreement with your bank, most loyalty programs and god knows who else.

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Uh-Koh! Apple-Samsung judge to oversee buggy Intel modem chip fight

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Re: And Virgin in uk?

I haven't been able to find a great deal of information on this bug other than the artificial stuff like "my modem is experiencing jitter"

The time it took you to write your post would have been more than enough to find a test case - just start 1024+ flows (tcp connections) and it barfs

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