* Posts by Voland's right hand

3517 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Squirrel sinks teeth into SAN cabling, drives Netadmin nuts

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Best traps

Clearly the OP doesn't know how to safely and legally trap wildlife.

1. Who told you I have used them in the UK. There are other countries where stuff that chews on your cable is protected only if it is a protected species. If it is not it is fair game and sod the humanity of the method :)

2. As far as safety, safety of the humans first, safety of the VERMIN second.

What you forget is that story is about squirrels. Squirrels and doormice are not rats or mice. They are an infestation from hell if you get them.

You cannot safely install any trap in under-floor space or roof space. It is a recipe for removed fingers because people always end up pushing cables through by touch alone. With squirrels and the f*** edible doormice you cannot use bait safely. They will take it somewhere, eat all of it, die in an obscure but warm place (on top of a power supply usually), then rot through and leak into interesting places. Even if they do not die there, they will drop crumbs into the fan grille into that so you will be ingesting warfarin powder when servicing equipment. This is in addition to dropping their dung into it and it carries a set of diseases you rather not know. A high-end respirator becomes a necessity when working.

You cannot use normal traps. They ignore them as they move either high above or in the under-floor/ceiling space. They are not rats that scurry next to the wall. They will do it ONLY if there is no other route, otherwise you will see the f*** jumping across racks. The exception here is doormice which will come and steal the bait out of 90% of trap models in front of you completely ignoring you as an irrelevance.

Last, but not least - due to their hearing and senses being in the same range as humans they are not affected by ultrasound and EMP pet repellent equipment.

So your choices are glue or patience and a pellet gun. The second one is somewhat humane if used correctly, but you have to have no other job but to sit with it in a server room overnight. You are also limited in terms of having a clean shot in making sure there is no equipment behind the target.

Most importantly - once you got rid of them (by whatever method needed) do not hesitate to spend the money on a truck roll of chickenwire and rodentproof the whole place.

8
10
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Best traps

The best preventive traps are the glue ones. You fold them up and they form a glue tunnel. Critter of any size from field mouse to a rat goes in and there it remains.

If you put a normal trap under a raised floor there will be someone missing fingers after they have forgotten it is there and try to run cables. Either that or cables/fiber chopped in half. The glue ones are humane to the human personnel which IMHO is probably more important. You also do not get the mess with poison bait. While rats and mice eat the bait where they find it, squirrels and "edible" doormice* take it somewhere else like on top of a server or NAS grille and eat it there so the crumbs get into the machinery.

I have seen the glue ones sold in Euriope, but not in the UK. If you are setting up a new building make sure you put a few of them in critical places under the raised floor. Replace annually or when they start to stink (you could have guessed by now - I have had to deal with this one).

(*) The edible doormouse is the European vermin from hell - everything a rat does + walk on vertical walls and ceilings and dig tunnels as well as chewing through anything except steel mesh on its way as well

14
24

I've Been Moved: IBMers in same division slapped with 2nd redundo scheme in 2 months

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Interesting choice of picture

Someone exercising an immense force to chop in two what appears to be ROTTEN deadwood.

Is the article author trying to say something?

2
0

Disney plotting 15 more years of Star Wars

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

There is also this plot line

Well, not all robot plot lines have been covered. Like for example this: https://pics.onsizzle.com/are-you-sure-we-should-do-this-i-mean-youre-14754071.png

6
0

Amazing new WikiLeaks CIA bombshell: Agents can install software on Apple Macs, iPhones right in front of them

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Why??

According to Assange - Russians have their own places where they publish stuff, so do the Chinese. Now, why there are little or no French leaks - that is somewhat surprising.

1
1
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Secure by design...

No OS is secure by design brief against the agency of a top 5 nation state attacker. If CIA, MI6, GRU and their Chinese or French equivalents decide that you are to be owned, you will be owned. The amount of resources these guys have is staggering, a retail product destined for Joe Average Luser does not stand a chance.

5
0

Amazon dodges $1.5bn US tax bill: It's OK to run sales through Europe out of IRS reach – court

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: US tax liability

I don't know why we, speaking as non-citizens of the US, put up with it at all.

It used to be called gunboat diplomacy, it is now called aircraft carrier diplomacy.

14
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The reason for Blue Origin ?

Either that or "such a nice tax office you have down there, pity if something happens to it if someone's rubbish fails to reenter the atmosphere correctly"

8
0

Good news, everyone! Two pints a day keep heart problems at bay

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Probably not beer though

Most of the "health benefits of alcohol" studies are from countries which drink wine, not beer. In fact, the studies on benefits of beer are very ambivalent and most of the studies waved by opponents of alcohol are from beer drinking countries.

So more like two glasses of red at dinner, not 2 pints.

3
1

Cambridge wheels out latest smart city platform, ready for devs

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Finding a problem to solve?

The led display is not designed to show complex values. It definitely has a problem with the imaginary component which is common in the Stagecoach operated ones and mandatory in the Whippet ones.

0
1

WWE star's swiped sex snaps survey spam snares selfie sickos

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: A judge writes...

Soft porn which pretends to be wrestling.

I'd rather watch proper wrestling - especially freestyle. Some of what these guys do is amazing.

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

It is not just stupid, it is conditioning as well

I would not expect anything different when 70% of the printed press circulation contains (albeit usually less saucy) details of who shagged whom on which soap combined with explanations for retards on what happened on the last episode.

It's just zombies: More celeb pics... must see... conditioning... TV Guide... Hello... Must see...

Instead of "Brains..."

15
1

FYI anyone who codes outside work: GitHub has a contract to stop bosses snatching it all

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: UK Patent Law is quite clear

That's patents.

Does not apply to copyrights.

I do not even need to ask the family patent lawyer (my SWMBO) to tell you this - we have discussed this one a few times over the years.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: It's not just code or tech related IP

I have had similar claims in UK contracts (both UK and non-UK companies).

The issue is that companies will never allow this to come to court for a precedent because they know they are going to get slapped. Most have updated their contract to be compliant with the Patents legislation as it stands and have added appropriate renumeration and first refusal clauses as required.

Copyrights, however, because they are not covered by similar legislation continue to be the subject of a typical land grab. The most you are going to get is limiting the scope of the land grab and illegal seizure to software.

1
0

Outgoing HPE workers stripped of gym cards and cushy remnants

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Could it be that

DXC is just a parking spot on Mercury and that these jobs are soon to vapourise as it spins on its axis?

I hate to disappoint you, but Mercury is tidal locked. You have a choice of being permanently in frozen hell or boiling hell. Even if there is middle ground it stays as a limbo year-round. Either one of these is an apt description as far as the temporary parking spots of any personnel transferred from HP.

0
4

Airplane bomb fears spark America's laptop, tablet carry-on ban

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: Baggage handling...

You are not LEGALLY allowed to put it into baggage by international regulations on transportation of LiIon and LiPo batteries.

13
3

Samsung's Bixby totally isn't a Siri ripoff because look – it'll go in phones, TVs, fridges, air con...

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Firewall them all, god will know its own

Firewall eos. Novit enim Dominus qui sunt eius

Cloud? What cloud? Once again, how do you access cloud across a machine that has iptables -P FORWARD -j DROP?

There is a reason why my media center has two NICs and the TV, BlueRay, etc are all on the second one. They are sometimes allowed an occasional excursion onto the wider net. But not a long one. So they can get new firmware or fetch something they need. Then, their access is turned back off. No ifs, no buts, no coconuts. And no Siris, Alexas, Bixbys or Google.

5
0

Murder in space: NASA orders astronauts to KILL cripples – then fire bodies back to Earth

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The dark side

Indeed.

20 in each group - that is a relatively small statistic sample, especially if you consider that the breaking and especially splintering was probably not 100% reproducible in the exact manner. I hope they get good data out of it, though my (relatively educated) guess is that 100s of mice are to follow in order for this to be of any use.

2
1

In the land of Google, Holocaust denial, death threats – all fine. LGBT? Oh, no, that's sensitive

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Obviously

Will this lead to a balkanisation of YouTube?

Please? Pretty Please?

5
1

BlackBerry admits dying BB10 is in pain

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Depends what you are flogging it with. 600KV jump leads make even a very dead horse jump for a while.

The problem here is more of the nature that the voltage in the leads has dropped dramatically. BB OS has been dead for a while, but was still getting an occasional 600KV jolt. This is clearly visible now after RIM dropped the voltage.

1
0

Uber president quits, says company's values inconsistent with his own leadership style

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: wait...what?

A marketing bod with a conscience?

More likely a marketing bod capable of cost-benefit analysis.

14
0

Microsoft kills Windows Vista on April 11: No security patches, no hot fixes, no support, nada

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: I look back at it fondly.

Linux distros had been a perfectly usable, stable and fast desktop OS long before Vista.

Correct - I have not used a Windows in the house since 1997 (it is all-Linux including kids laptops and desktops).

What you are missing however, is the "works, do not f*** with it" philosophy. In most other households it took Microsoft shipping an unusable OS for granny to stop yelling at the grandson who installed Mint on her machine.

0
0

US military's latest toy set: Record-breaking laser death star, er, truck

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Slow moving targets only

It banned fragmentation weapons using any material that wouldn't show up on an x-ray, landmines, booby traps, and blinding laser weapons.

I am giving this ban about 15 minutes once these weapons are deployed in a supposedly anti-aircraft/anti-drone role. Same as the lunatics around the Mediterranean are using a ZPU as an antipersonnel weapon. The only good thing is that the truck carrying it will shine in IR like a supernova (the generator and the lasers emit a lot of heat), all you need will be a salvo of ancient IR guided missiles and it is history. It cannot engage multiple targets simultaneously and it will be able to kill at most two. So an educated guesstimate for a guaranteed kill is ~ 5.

5
1

National Audit Office: Brit aircraft carrier project is fine and dandy... for now

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Revert at soonest

Rather than ask our US cousins to man the ship we will probably just offshore it to India like everything else.

Not a bad idea... They actually have two working aircraft carriers today and they are planning to build a nuclear Nimitz-like type as a replacement. Their aircraft carrier also has a carrier wing and is not just a sitting target. Its escort destroyers also happen to have proper anti-ship armament - as far as anti-ship missiles go BRAHMOS is probably in the top 5, if not top 3. That is if we do not count the Sunburns and Harpoons which they have too. AFAIK, they also handed the RAF their arse on a plate last time they were visiting to have some playtime with their ex-colonial overlords.

So, for once, that may be an improvement in the "service" when outsourcing (*).

(*)In fact, it is an example of a Navy which the Royal Navy cannot take on and win - a category which is rapidly growing and it will only get worse in the future.

11
2

Ubiquiti network gear can be 'hijacked by an evil URL' – thanks to its 20-year-old PHP build

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Why?

It is just typical for "embedded development". Packages? Updates? Security Fixes to components? Following the security of components?

All of that does not fit into the viewpoint of your typical realtime embedditis damaged brain. Ubiquity is no different from most others - I have seen plenty of components 5-7 years past their "sell by" date floating around embedded trees. That is one of the reason why the first thing I do is to any wifi or home cpe is to flash it with a fresh OpenWRT build.

0
0

Hell freezes over: We wrote an El Reg chatbot using Microsoft's AI

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

First question

1. Can it generate a Register tabloid style headline?

2. Can it generate a suggestive caption with an innuendo level of 11 on a scale of 1 to 10

I suspect not. So move along ;)

24
0

User jams up PC. Literally. No, we don't know which flavour

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

It appears that the gap between the drive and the blanking plate in the front case looked just like the drive slot, she had been posting disks into the machine through this slot.”

You will not believe how many times I have seen this one :)

Still makes me chuckle remembering it

41
0

SpaceX yoinks $96m GPS launch deal from under ULA's nose

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: SpaceX Development

ULA is still gazing at its navel.

They are not - they have a contract with Bezos. A lot of the Blue Origin stuff is pre-sold to ULA already.

0
0

NetBSD adds RPi Zero support with 7.1 release

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Variety of reasons

1. Use and development of software which is not license compatible with the Linux kernel.

2. Smaller footprint

3. While Linux documentation and code has improved over the years it is still not the right OS to teach people. If you want to teach people, BSD is a better choice as it is "written by the book" and documented properly. End of the day the primary goal of RPi is education. If it supports BSD this means its scope is no longer just kids and Scratch - it is a viable tool in a University classroom in an OS design course (if there are any universities left which try to teach things properly instead of asking the industry if it likes it with ice cubes or with hot coffee)..

23
0

Oxford Uni boffins say internet filters probably won't protect teens

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Anon for reasons - Basically to avoid the SJW'ers

I do have filters, but they are for time-wasting and viruses. Not for "naughty" content.

My primary worry as a parent is that they will spend the afternoon glued to GooTube or SilverGames instead of doing their homework.

The second is that they will drag a computer STD in.

Only the third is that they will see something inappropriate and in that case they will probably come and talk to me first.

12
0

This is where UK's Navy will park its 75,000-ton aircraft carriers

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: sea power

No, they definitely have an AWACS capability, it might even be on a modern airframe by 2018.

No, they do not. Ask any of the navies which have been using rotor based AWACS and why are they desperately trying to change to fixed wing. Even the Indians whose Kamov-31 has better endurance and higher ceiling than the UK candidates for early warning are looking to switch.

If you do not care to ask, compute the necessary flight resource, spares level and maintenance windows required - you will see that you need to use at least 3 of the very precious slots in the air wing for the rotor AWACS. More like 4. Compared to that you can get away with 2 fixed wing ones which are considerably more capable and have much better endurance too.

2
1
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: sea power

The more interesting question is: "Can you keep it open (or respectively closed) with a carrier deployment?" or there are more cost-effective ways to do this.

5
0

Scott McNealy: Your data is safer with marketers than governments

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

In fact, it is now more difficult to leave the grasp of Google+Apple+Microsoft than to leave a country.

Option A: Try getting any work done without touching any one of these or communicating with a customer which is using them.

Option B: Try finding your granddad's (Irish in McNealy's case) birth certificate and apply for a Eu passport.

Which one is easier?

5
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: No it's bloody not.

That is on this side of the pond. Scott is on the other where things are a bit different.

4
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

If the USA screws with my data, I cannot leave.”

Sure you can. Maintain a few passports. 70% of the USA population have at least one grandparent which is an immigrant enabling them to get another passport. This percentage is lower in Europe, but still quite significant.

Granted, you will have Fuhrer Wannabies like Teresa May chastize you in front of her party conference quoting literally word for word one of Hitler's most antisemitic quotes. Just ignore her and keep your options open.

And if worst comes to worst, you can BUY cittizenship. It may not be cheap, but is doable. In the specific case of Mr McNealy in about 15 minutes to transfer some pocket change to Grand Kayman.

7
1

Is that a phone in your hand – or a gun? This neural network reckons it has it all figured out

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: I note...

Is it rAIcist? Or does this reflect a bias in the training routine?

Do not think so - the guns in the background are not in focus and fairly low res. There is no way to get a high confidence rating on them using an image recognition algo. We know and understand it is a gun based on character behavior. If you take the frame from that movie (easy to do - all of us have a copy) at DVD SD standard res there are not enough pixels to work with.

Now the the higher confidence ratio on the police squad photo does look fishy. Interesting what data did they feed this.

0
0

Volkswagen pleads guilty to three Dieselgate criminal charges

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Justice for the UK?

"It's due to a difference in the law, the EU regulations the UK follows in this regard doesn't specifically state that a bypass device/software for the test is illegal, whereas the US regulations do."

Bollocks.

Bypassing emission control is illegal in Eu on both company and individual driver level. The issue is that the only police forces with on-the-spot roadside emission checking equipment which actually enforce it are Germany, Austria and Switzerland. They ethnically profile it - you are not likely to be stopped unless you are sporting an Eastern European number plate and driving something which is obviously modded, smoking like the Admiral Kuznetsov on a really bad day or ridiculously old. I know people who have been nailed and have had cars impounded too for removing the catalyst to replace it with a LOUD FART PIPE (they made the mistake of going to Germany after that).

As I drive in the Eu quite a bit (up to 8K miles a year), I am not going to take the risk of copping the 1000Eu+ fine for bypassing emission control despite the relatively low likelihood to be stopped with UK number plates. So - no, I have not chipped my car back and I am not going to.

Now on the subject of chipping. It will be a good idea if the muppets from the Met start checking and enforcing it. One of the reasons why the air quality in London is so shite is that that >50% of the private hire cars and taxies are chipped or with a custom map to turn off the EGR. Yeah i know - tall order. Requires work to be done.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Justice for the UK?

UK follows in this regard doesn't specifically state that a bypass device/software for the test is illegal,

There is a bit of variation on this. Chipping (which on modern diesels pretty much shuts off the EGR), reprogramming your ECU map, etc are not explicitly prohibited by EU law and are (usually) allowed by the manufacturer. While they pretend that you cannot do it and it voids warranty, you actually can (especially if you just reprogram the map).

I bought my Isuzu DMAX truck without knowing that the previous owner has had a custom map uploaded in the ECU. It was doing ~ 38.5 MPG UK motorway (67MPh) , 33.5 MPG Eu motorway speeds (85 MPh). After the ECU reset when I changed the battery it is down to 35.5 MPG UK, 29.5 MPG Eu. The mod is well known and it basically kills off most of EGR in software. AFAIK you can do this to all GM and Ford vehicles sold in the Eu (no idea about the others). The manufacturer has done NOTHING to prevent this. Not surprising - the legislation does not force them to and they do not have to undergo a NOx emission test.

What the legislation asks of them is to comply with the test. Which they do. From there on it is a matter of PR and damage control. In this particular case VW decided to admit to cheating (they are reprogramming all UK ECUs for free) as a part of their damage control exercise. So did GM after the Zaphira debacle in Germany.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Natural Law v Governmental Law

My sympathies lie mostly with the car maker

Mine do not. It was possible to comply with the regs by buying technology from another manufacturer - Mercedes. Merc is extremely reasonable in their licensing terms. They DO NOT charge at all for licensing any technology which deals with car and human safety (it is a company policy) and they used to (I need to check if this is still the case) charge RAND for tech which deals with pollution and environmental compliance. The only thing which they (quite rightfully) insist on is that the fact that the tech is licensed is clearly mentioned. If you open any modern piss-driven diesel booklet you will find somewhere in it that it contains technology by Mercedes Benz GMBh.

This is purely about idiotic "do not lose face in front of more senior managers". Not even about corporate greed.

The worst part of it is that there is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING done about it at corporate governance level. There should have been a Shogun moment here with "The battle was over, the slaughter has began. 2000 heads were cut by blunt bamboo saw that day". Did they do anything about it - NO. That is also why I am not going to buy a car from VW group - not now, not in the immediate future. They did not actually heed the lesson and they just wrote it off as cost of doing business. There will be a repeat of this.

4
0

Official: America auto-scanned visitors' social media profiles. Also: It didn't work properly

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Airstrip One

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Home of the Brave

Based on the picture - maybe. If the second referendum does not go Standartenfuhrer May's way.

Note the insignia on the trooper's sleeve.

7
0

Can you ethically suggest a woman pursue a career in tech?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: "We need to promote women disproportionately, pay them equally or better..."

So let me ask again: when these women graduate, with their new STEM credentials, can we in all honesty invite them to work in the tech industry?

This sounds and is very American oriented.

I would suggest banning ALL fraternities and sororities to start with. You cannot have a non-sexist culture if you start student higher education by "rushing" them into what is the mother of all sexist indoctrinations (I am pretty sure that this idea alone has gotten me on the no-fly list).

Elsewhere around the world there are a few remnants mostly in humanities and management related disciplines (f.e. the eponymous "fuck a pig's head" clubs in some British universities). The STEM field however is pretty much indoctrination and typecasting free and that shows - just walk into any Eastern European university CS or Math department. The ladies are at 50%+ and they are pretty ones too (Fnarr... Fnarr..). If you take a short walk to the Biology building you will find "positive action" entrance criteria to even up the ratio so that the males are not sub-20%. And so on.

66
0

Favored Swift hits the charts: Now in top 10 programming languages

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Oddness in the rankings

I still find that C and Perl do everything I could ever need.

That is their virtue and their problem. You can hang yourself in a gazillion ways.

Projects using C solved that by developing coding style enforcement tools. Some are relatively loose (Linux kernel), some are insanely strict (QEMU). Perl and major perl projects never did. When you combine that with the fact that there is at least 5 ways to write any single thing you end up with severe difficulties in building large projects.

Compared to that Python had a coding standard and a suite of tools to enforce it very early on. That is why it has superseded Perl as the tool of choice for new projects despite still being inferior in terms of both library coverage and performance(*).

(*) While CPAN pretty much guarantees you that the license of anything on it is same as Perl so you can "just use it", PiP does not. I have been burned by that more than once and have had to rewrite projects in Perl in order not to rewrite whole libraries. And do not even get me started on the subject of the global lock in the Python interpreter.

2
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: A modest proposal

In fact, how about not putting her likeness at all?

Why not. Just put the likeness from the previous articles. I kind'a liked this one: https://regmedia.co.uk/2015/02/06/taylor_swift.jpg?x=648&y=348&crop=1

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Interesting to see what people say/think is the new hottness and what's actually being used.

Ditto, Assembler. I don't even use assembler on PIC Micro Controllers."

Stock frame buffer driver for ARM written in C shipping with XOrg primitives tested on Allwinner A20/Mali 400. Unf**** usable. If you spin a window with a mouse you can end up with the window being 15 seconds behind the mouse.

A hack of the same driver (ab)using NEON in assembler using some fairly standard (pretty much lifted out of old Carmack's work) algos for bitblt. Tested on same platform. Flawless - no lag. Probably an >8 improvement in performance. You can look at the hack yourself - search for "turbo fb" on github

There is still some niches where assembler is of value - low level guts of drivers, low level memory management, etc. This is especially valid if you are (ab)using functionality for stuff which it was not intended for and hence not directly supported by the compiler. Another example are the checksumming and memory moving routines in the Linux RAID code (still mostly in ASM till this day).

2
0

Apple Watch exec Bob Mansfield 'gets into secret Apple car'

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Will they be using their usual designer?

Good, can we get Arnie to test drive it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGi6j2VrL0o

0
0

Vodafone gets less flexible on flexible working Ts&Cs for own staff

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Can someone explain to me the the issue around maternity leave?

The statement "how this is meant to suit those returning to work post-pregnancy.” leaves me baffled.

UK (and most Eu countries) law postulates:

1. That you are entitled to request officially flexible working conditions anytime while any of your children are up to 6 years old.

2. Your company must review the request and provide you with a reasonable explanation if they are incapable of accommodating it.

3. If they are being unreasonable you have a good discrimination or constructive dismissal case on your hands.

4. While there is no precedent base regarding changes in flexible working policy mid-contract you probably have a very good case to claim violation of this part of the labor code if they significantly downsize it or revoke mid-contract without going through the step 2 for each and every employee which has a child under 6.

This is the post-pregnancy angle and it will be very entertaining to watch how it bites IBM and the few other companies that have gone crazy on workhousing people lately get bitten by it.

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: "Smart working days should not be the same day each week"

Or bugger off on a holiday.

0
0

DOOM'd! Quake god John Carmack lobs $22m sueball at ZeniMax

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

You never know

Maybe a new DOOM monster - "The Suit". Think of an Archvile which produces subpoena shaped lost souls in addition to other standard Archvile capabilities - reviving stuff you thought you killed long ago, inflicting immense pain from a distance, etc.

7
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017