* Posts by DeKrow

35 posts • joined 3 Aug 2011

Five-eyes nations want comms providers to bust crypto for them

DeKrow
Big Brother

Re: "deal with the relentless threats of terrorism"

The only "threats of terrorism" I'm relentlessly exposed to are those from various governments continually threatening to erode privacy, human rights, and civilisations existence through various forms of denial of facts and paths of causation.

Things that terrify me more than the spectre of terrorism:

The trend of government control fetishism

Riding a bike alongside humans driving cars

My children learning to drive amongst said humans driving cars

Governments that use the word 'mandate'

Wilfully ignorant people with the right to vote

Skepticism of the scientific method

The weight given to anecdotal evidence

The government spending tax payer's money on a new coal-fired power station (what century is this?)

The lack of security around the electricity grid against the constant threat of squirrorists

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Australian govt promises to push Five Eyes nations to break encryption

DeKrow
Coffee/keyboard

Law hierarchy

Natural laws > Human laws

For example:

Mathematics > Legislation, in the same way that

Evolution > Creationists desire for evolution not to exist

Where's Reality's Esc key?

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Look who's joined the anti-encryption posse: Germany, come on down

DeKrow
Meh

Option 3 - Limited to...

If Option 3 is the 'solution' they're aiming for, it could be a human-rights-friendly (or at least a less human-rights-violating) solution if, and only if, a warrant is required to alter the target's phone.

From what I've read, most of the recent terrorist attacks have been committed by people already on the radar of the various agencies (and this is it's own issue and probably more pertinent than the encryption discussion, but isn't the point I'm trying to make here). That being the case, could "being on a watch list" be a valid, minimally human-rights-violating, option for getting one's phone OS modified for the purposes of spying?

(also assuming that there can be scales of acceptability for human rights violations, and the 'slippery slope' and all that).

Of course, it gets into seriously blurry grey area once you start to list people that have been on watch-lists and no-fly lists and "harass whenever they cross the border" lists who would be 0% chance of performing an actual terrorist attack. That's where "trust" is a puzzle that's very difficult to put back together.

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Five Eyes nations stare menacingly at tech biz and its encryption

DeKrow

Re: Pointless

If legitimate companies have to put back doors in all their encryption schemes doesn't that just mean terrorists will buy their encryption from criminals or roll their own?

I actually see it going a different way. If legitimate companies have to put back doors in all their encryption schemes doesn't that just mean terrorists will target these back doors, and if (when) successful, will have the keys to all the kingdoms and thus be able to cause much larger scale terror than a few suicide bombs ever could.

mumble groan law of unintended consequences grumble moan concentration of power creates a more likely target something something.

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DeKrow
Holmes

And what then?

If new laws come to pass enforcing that which goes against the advice of all the experts on the topic, what is to be done / blamed / politicised against / axe ground upon when, inevitably, there's another "terror" attack?

Will the five-eyes governments guarantee that these democracy-threatening, privacy-invading, human-rights eroding laws will banish the spectre of terrorism from western civilisation for as long as these laws are in effect? If not, then the risk is not worth the reward. I wouldn't sacrifice the very core of my being for a (slight lead in the polls) "somewhat likelihood of a reduction in terror-related events". But maybe that's just what separates politicians from worthwhile members of society.

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Let's Encrypt in trademark drama

DeKrow
Trollface

Re: Oh, they've replied now.

It sounds as if Comodo has found their avenue for 'revenge' after Let's Encrypt 'stole' the concept of 90 days from them. Trolls.

Let's Encrypt should rename themselves Komodo in return and offer 120 days free SSL certs.

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NASA's stadium-sized sandwich bag overflies Oz

DeKrow
Trollface

CC

I wonder if they'll try and manipulate any climate change statistics out of this?

amiritelester?

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Australian Federal Police say government ignorant of NBN raids

DeKrow
Holmes

Raises more questions

Does this get added to the "increased surveillance keeps us safer" ledger?

Did Australia lower it's terror threat level, justifying the Feds spending time on the campaign trail for the incumbent government?

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Supernova bubble clocked at 19,000,000 km/h

DeKrow
Trollface

Consensus?

Is there scientific consensus for any of the statistics or results mentioned in this article? Seems like a bunch of the information comes from NASA who have been promoting things like climate change. How can we believe any of this guff?

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United Nations orders plan for tackling online terror propaganda

DeKrow
Mushroom

Post WWII Foreign Policy

See icon.

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Australian Greens don't believe Silicon Valley can save the world

DeKrow
Facepalm

Re: RE: julian.smith Read the post and do a google search.

Jesus, talk about Scorched Earth. julian.smith merely asks for citations for seemingly outrageous claims and you start a politically biased rant.

Admittedly, julian.smith didn't also provide citations for his claim of "evidence based" policy from the Australian Greens, but you seem to have missed that entirely in favour of said rant.

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A modest proposal: dump the NBN mess on Telstra

DeKrow

I see what you're trying to say, but using the argument that FTTN is a stepping stone to FTTP would also allow the Libs to use that argument to say they were "on the right track" anyway. The additional and on-going expense of powering and maintaining the FTTN nodes is one of the useful arguments against the Libs version of the nbn, since it's not really a stepping stone to FTTP.

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How to evade the NSA: OpSec guide for journalists also used by terrorists

DeKrow
Pint

Re: a bloke in the pub told me that...

SPLITTERS!

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FBI's PRISM slurping is 'unconstitutional' – and America's secret spy court is OK with that

DeKrow
Unhappy

Re: Those of us in other countries may laugh now

How sad is it that we have to resort to a "yeah, but we're still better than them" argument. I might have failed maths but I didn't fail as bad as that guy!

It's a race to 2nd to bottom. And with North Korea behaving as it does, there's still a lot of scope for slippage.

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Waleed Aly's NBN intervention is profoundly unhelpful

DeKrow
Facepalm

Unhelpful? Let's call it going a small distance to balance the ledger

Whilst Waleed's comments may not necessarily be absolutely technically correct, they're at least on the correct side of the argument. I'm a bit squirmy about having this opinion because I'd prefer the whole argument to be solid, but we in Oz are in serious need of arguments, or even rhetoric, that reaches the masses on a non-technical level to balance out the even-more-technically-incorrect statements coming out of the mouths of those who actually do know better.

For example:

https://delimiter.com.au/2016/04/05/nbn-ceo-morrow-says-hfc-will-30gbps-fttn-5gbps/

https://delimiter.com.au/2016/03/22/google-fiber-shows-people-dont-want-fttp-says-morrow/

And then there's all the political posturing:

https://delimiter.com.au/2016/04/06/fifield-keeps-pressure-labor-lack-nbn-policy/

We don't want the 2016 election result to be considered a 'mandate' to avoid FTTP, and getting the message out to the mass-market, rather than just the technologically literate crowd, is what's necessary for the government to have the vague possibility of getting the message.

Good on you Waleed Aly.

9
2
DeKrow
Stop

2016 versus 2020

Who knows, had the current government continued rolling out FTTP without stopping to do six different reviews and re-negotiating contracts and re-purchasing infrastructure, then you may have had your Rolls Royce much sooner than 2020. We will never know.

Do you know what your suburb's rollout schedule was prior to the 2013 election?

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Brandis and PwC silent on Xmas Eve metadata quiz

DeKrow
Facepalm

Metadata request denied

You weren't asking for content, just data describing the intent of the content, ie. metadata. Ironically, even the metadata is obviously too sensitive to be appropriate to discuss whilst the consultation is on-going? (double-ironically, this sounds like law enforcement speak).

Go Team Australia...

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Edward Snowden: best ... security ... educator ... EVER!

DeKrow
Trollface

Re: If you're that gullible...

Amen brother. How smart was it of the NSA to have such a massive trove of false trail documents just in case of such a leak? But I guess that's why their budget is so big, they think of these things that mere mortals like us can't even fathom. They also need to fund a heap of NGO contractors to work on these documents to maintain the pretense that it's all legitimate.

Bravo to the NSA, may they continue unencumbered.

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Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights

DeKrow
FAIL

@FormerKowloonTonger Re: Lest We Forget.

Error: Irretrievable context failure, please reset completely and retry operation.

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FBI boss: Apple's iPhone, iPad encryption puts people 'ABOVE THE LAW'

DeKrow

Re: @DeKrow - What a fuckbag

Not sure if my attempt at black humour fell flat or I missed your attempt at dry humour, but I can't see how the stating of obvious physical impossibilities could become the basis for any law enforcement investigation. If the situation does come to pass, however, is there a 'you didn't get the joke' clause that can be invoked to minimise the wastage of the public purse?

If not, I'm going to have to work out how to get one of those Roger Rabbit holes stuffed into my phone as well, or further protect the contents of the phone by relocating an Icelandic volcano into it.

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DeKrow
Black Helicopters

Re: What a fuckbag

@Entrope

They saw your message, enlisted the CIA to create an account, and we're now seeing 2 downvotes as standard.

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DeKrow

Re: What a fuckbag

It sounds as if what he's saying is that having a right to keeping conversations, images, home videos private is above the law. I thought a right to privacy was, precisely, "the law".

I'm getting a sense of "the lady doth protest too much, methinks" and this is part of the campaign to give users a false sense of security. As a number of commenters have already said, there are many other avenues to get metadata, or other evidence, physical or virtual, that can point towards what is likely contained on the encrypted device, or that make the contents of the encrypted device inconsequential to getting a warrant or conviction.

There's always a trail, unless you're dealing with someone at The Grugq's level of computery counter intelligence and at that level of discipline any arguments over default encryption by Apple and Google are rendered moot.

P.S. The guns, drugs, bags of fertilizer, little boys, sex workers, and my missus' bruises are all hidden in my phone, which is encrypted, so even if we're pulled over there's nothing 'the man' can do about it. Let's ride!

13
2

NBN to be built even if cost-benefit analysis shows no ROI

DeKrow
Meh

Re: Labor's plan for 50% at 12Mbps

Th reality is that Labor didn't want to run a cost-benefit analysis because the reality that their NBNCo Corporate Plan predicted that 50% would be connecting at 12Mbps and in 2028 less than 5% connected at 1Gbps would have exposed the reality that HFC and/or FTTN could meet the requirements of the majority of fixed line customers.

That argument doesn't take into account the fact the state of the copper that would be used FttN may not be up to snuff, and that HFC is owned by private enterprise and would need to be leased or purchased. It already cost NBNCo $11 billion (with a b) and that didn't include owning the copper in the ground - which is what the Liberals are proposing. MT has said, however, that the agreement with Telstra will not need to be re-negotiated for NBNCo to end up owning the copper. Some find this hard to believe.

It's also my opinion that a CBA is too limited a study for such a large and lost-lasting infrastructure project, even more-so because it's government driven and therefore if it's deemed a long term benefit to the country, then a CBA doesn't do it justice.

I think the CBN or MTM should go ahead even if the CBA isn't necessarily flattering, but only because that's the first step towards a FttP NBN, and it seems to be the closest thing we're going to get to a broadband upgrade under the current government.

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Palestinian Facebook flaw-finder getting $10,000 payday in online appeal

DeKrow
Angel

Twice vs Once

He submitted it TWICE following the rules. No dice. He went outside the rules ONCE and it got noticed. He should be paid for finding a flaw in their bug-reporting system if nothing else.

If following the rules doesn't work, most IT people I know wouldn't hesitate in bending / breaking the rules to get the desired effect if they believe it will get the right answer in the end. I know I would.

$500 is very cheap for good advertising. Withholding $500 is very expensive to look this bad.

21
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Winklevoss twins stuff $1m into social network for the FILTHY RICH

DeKrow
Facepalm

Re: has led to a global userbase that stands at nearly 1 billion people

That was a very long paragraph to explain why 1 billion 'people' should have read 1 billion 'accounts'. It was also so long that you lost your way and ended up at "Zuck behind bars". What axe are you trying to grind here?

Disclaimer: I don't have a Facebook account, but I liked the movie The Social Network and am entirely aware that it's writers took varying degrees of artistic license.

1
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Key evidence in Assange case dissolves

DeKrow
Holmes

If it's not on...

I thought one of the reasons that JA was accused of rape was that he didn't use a condom when requested. So, now, there IS a condom, but any DNA it contains doesn't match JA.

Maybe this is a slam dunk double negative proof of JA's guilt: the non-existent condom contains non-matching DNA therefore, should a condom have existed, it MUST, conversely, contain JA's DNA.

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Assange movie debuts this weekend

DeKrow
Big Brother

A little background reading...

...may assist you in not going off half-cocked in future.

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AntiLeaks group claim responsibility for WikiLeaks attacks

DeKrow
Trollface

Re: The ignorance of children...

Please be doing us the favour of pointing out an example of any leaked government information that has affected the security of its populace. Pretty much all the leaks I've read about have only been classified as "secret" because they're embarassing to the government.

ie. Proof or STFU

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Stuxnet: 'Moral crime' or proportionate response?

DeKrow
Mushroom

Re: Moral Crime ?

Didn't the US recently add 'cyber' attacks to that which constitutes an act of war?

ie. Had any country sponsored a Stuxnet-style virus aimed at disabling nuclear facilities in the US, then the US would feel justified declaring war on said sponsor. And I would wager that declaring war on said sponsor would be, primarily, non-cyber attacks.

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HULK DDoS-from-one-computer is easily thwarted, say security pros

DeKrow
FAIL

re: THOR

My bad, wasn't the author of HULK that wrote / reviewed THOR. That comparison blog is here:

http://blog.spiderlabs.com/2012/05/hulk-vs-thor-application-dos-smackdown.html

Still, the above blog post is a couple of weeks old...

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DeKrow
Facepalm

THOR

Having read the HULK author's blog a couple of weeks ago, he already stated that it was easy to recognise HULK's attacks because they come in a specific order. He also went on to say that he developed THOR which recognises and nullifies HULK. What research did Prolexic do more-so than just reading the blog about HULK and THOR? Did they even get down to the THOR part? Doesn't sound like it.

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Aus business learns to love the NBN

DeKrow
WTF?

Re: BS Meter broken - argue the facts please.

Sounds like "some website" agreed with your pre-existing opinion by doing a mathematical calculation on the english language. Just because they use wanky language doesn't mean they're wrong, and it also doesn't mean you're right. Argue against the wankiness of the wording and I'd happily agree, but you've used it to indicate that the NBN is fundamentally flawed. Sorry, no such logical jump to be found here..

As for the NBN, from what I've read, both sides of the argument agree that the infrastructure upgrade and associated potential bandwidth upgrades are necessary, and that fibre is the best solution. The argument gets stuck on the overall cost, not on bandwidth or latency. There's also the whole government controlled vs commercial argument, but the proof of the effectiveness of that stance is, well, precisely what we have now.

Also, I doubt that anyone using their ADSL2+ connection to it's potential is going to choose a lower end NBN connection, so your point is moot (it's also a bit stupid as it's a matter of consumer choice, not product limitation). There is already evidence of NBN prices being comparable (if not cheaper in some cases) to equivalent ADSL connections.

In regards to your 'quango monopoly' comment, and I'll warrant this is subjective, I'd prefer the devil-I-don't-know quango monopoly to the devil-we-know-all-too-well-and-for-well-too-long Telstra.

I honestly don't know why a reader of El Reg would be against the NBN as fervently as you obviously are, other than concern that maybe the money would be better spent on something else. If it's latency, then that's a case of "get over it" because you can't fight the laws of physics, laws of physics Jim.

If you don't like the NBN, what do you propose instead? Be part of the solution, not the problem.

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Google drive cloud to rain on Apple, Dropbox parade

DeKrow
Pirate

How RapidShare does it

Torrentfreak recently published an article about how RapidShare got themselves off the 'rogue sites' list: http://torrentfreak.com/rapidshare-from-notorious-market-to-proactive-piracy-eliminator-120208/

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Spotify 'sold soul' to boy king Zuckerberg

DeKrow
Joke

You can't spell streaming

without reaming

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IT governance: a help or a hindrance for your projects?

DeKrow
Holmes

To the naysayers

The posters above with negative comments towards Project Managers obviously haven't dealt with one that's worth their salt. If you've worked with a good PM this article will appear as gospel, if you've only worked with bad PM's then this article will appear to condone the red tape that causes projects to degenerate into failure or a nightmare of moving goal posts.

To massively oversimplify things, a successful project depends on a good team, a good PM, good management above the PM and a supportive / interested board. The team is probably the least important as a good PM can work a sub-standard team to produce satisfactory results.

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