* Posts by localzuk

946 posts • joined 25 Jul 2011

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Article 13 pits Big Tech and bots against European creatives

localzuk

Re: Does Orlowski ever do an unbiased piece?

There's plenty of journalists out there who present an unbiased piece - hell, this site has a number of them doing a great job. Orlowski, however, puts out article after article that belittles anyone who disagrees with the over the top copyright restrictions sought by big media companies, and presents his clear contempt for some companies whilst giving others a pass.

This article could've been unbiased - without pejorative language, and framing the article in such a way as to present the law as sensible and opponents as near enough hysterical.

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localzuk

Does Orlowski ever do an unbiased piece?

This article is dripping with bias. Just look how he frames argument against the vote as "rhetoric" and not the arguments for, which are presented as being so very sensible.

This law is almost as bad as the USA's DCMA law, which has been massively abused since the day it was signed into law. There was an example just this last few days - a streamer on Twitch, Lirik, was suspended due to a DCMA takedown from UEFA. The takedown was based on nothing more than his having used the word "Streming" in his title, which UEFA claimed was a word often used by people broadcasting pirated UEFA content. They didn't actually watch his stream, or see any infringement, but they got his account shut down over a single mis-spelled word. Sure, he's in a rather unique position as he's very successful and is going to pursue UEFA via whatever legal avenues are open to him, but most small content creators aren't.

That's the sort of nonsense we can expect as a consequence of this poorly thought out law.

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A third of London boroughs 'fess to running unsupported server software

localzuk

Somerset?

I know for a fact they run more modern OS's than 2003, at least in the Education part. So, not sure that part is accurate.

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Redis has a license to kill: Open-source database maker takes some code proprietary

localzuk

Not so sure this will work

A lot of the bigwig companies have the ability to simply fork the software and move on, ignoring the original developers. Or maybe they are aiming for a different future - being bought out by one of the cloud providers? All the big ones could probably afford to buy them with their daily staff canteen take...

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You want how much?! Israel opts not to renew its Office 365 vows

localzuk

Re: I think you just put yours in the shredder

@bob - there's video footage of IDF soldiers beating children, and shooting a nurse and disabled man in a wheelchair. That isn't propaganda. That's reality.

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EU wants one phone plug to rule them all. But we've got a better idea.

localzuk

Re: EU Standard plug

13A plug on a telly? Think mine has a 5A. Not all plugs have the same fuse in them you know @heyrick. Got some with 3A in too, for those really low power devices. 13A is mostly for kettles, heaters and the like.

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Capita strikes again: Bug in UK-wide school info management system risks huge data breach

localzuk

Re: Three words

That's the thing though with SIMS - it is by no means cheap. In fact its about the second most expensive on the market.

The reason schools keep using it is that moving is a massive job and "everyone is used to SIMS". It takes a *lot* to convince management that changing how things are done would be a good thing.

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localzuk

@JohnMurray - that's not really true. SIMS was developed by a teacher (Phil Neal), and then further developed by Bedfordshire County Council thing IIRC, which became SIMS Ltd, which was later bought by Capita.

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localzuk

Gonna be one less school soon

This is the final nail in the coffin for me - adding this to my push to move away from SIMS in our 6 schools. Capita just really don't seem competent in anything they do!

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Startup bank Monzo: We warned Ticketmaster months ago of site fraud

localzuk

No other bank had reported anything

I wonder why? Is it because most other banks aren't bothered about their customer's money? Monzo is growing, so their customers and their money is the most important thing to them - if they don't behave like this, the effect of bad publicity could kill them quickly.

Whereas bad publicity for the big names? Just more to add to the pile.

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The butterfly defect: MacBook keys wrecked by single grain of sand

localzuk

Normal for Apple to be honest

There have been loads of things like this over the years.

Just look at the 360 scroll ball on the mouse they made around 2007. Constantly gunked up, and their advice was to vigorously rub on a moist micro-fibre cloth. Couldn't get the ball out to actually clean the mechanism, so it didn't really fix it at all. I had to get mine replaced twice.

Then you've got the trackpad in my MacBook Pro 2015 - the 2 buttons that you can press down to click on it get clogged by dust etc... With the "fix" being running a piece of paper through the gap to try and dislodge - doesn't really work.

Or more obvious design flaws - the under-mouse charging port on their current mouse.

There are plenty more examples. They just seem to not think things through! But, and this is an important but, they aren't alone in this.

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Stern Vint Cerf blasts techies for lackluster worldwide IPv6 adoption

localzuk

Internal fun...

"Hey, yeah, can you tell me your IP address"

"Errr... Have you got 20 minutes?"

That's my only concern with IPv6 stuff. The risk of errors goes up as well. But its a minor issue.

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US government weighs in on GDPR-Whois debacle, orders ICANN to go probe GoDaddy

localzuk

Re: Some "private" data _should_ be public domain!

I think the result of that would be EU companies not using US registrars at all. So, all EU and UK businesses would use TLD's from their own countries etc...

So, no more .com for the UK, everyone uses .uk.

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You're a govt official. You accidentally slap personal info on the web. Quick, blame a kid!

localzuk

Easily defended?

Surely they can just point at the fact that every search engine would have the files indexed too? No "hacking" here. Do they list on the site that you can only access files manually by clicking on each link by hand? What if he had done exactly that? Gone through and manually downloaded each document by clicking a link?

The entire case is absurd.

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UK.gov expected to quit controversial harvesting of schoolchildren's nationality data

localzuk

Schools are there to educate. Hospitals to heal.

It is not their jobs to police immigration status, and to the school it shouldn't matter their immigration status or nationality - they just need to educate.

If there are immigration issues, other parts of government can deal with it, and the resolution applied fairly. If it means being deported, then take the child out of school as close to the deportation date. They deserve an education regardless.

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We sent a vulture to find the relaunched Atari box – and all he got was this lousy baseball cap

localzuk

Incompetence

OK. So the product is supposed to be a machine which can run the old 2600 games via emulation, and run Linux for some other games.

Where's the hard part in making that? I mean, you can do the whole thing with a Raspberry Pi in a day. The only different bit would be the controllers - and there's companies that specialise in those so could knock something out for them in no time.

Then stick the R Pi in a nostalgia fulfilling case and you're done. The software is something a uni graduate could sort in a couple of weeks!

Bizarre.

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Yorkshire cops have begun using on-the-spot fingerprint scanners

localzuk

Re: fine with it.

@stopthebollocks - sorry, but the police, as an institution, has been shown time and time again to be racist. A quick Google for "police institutional racism uk" gives you ample evidence of this.

The problem is not that all police are racists, but decisions made are made on the back of information that is itself biased and racist. Its why stop and search invariably targets young black men. Its why black men in the USA are more likely to be killed when coming into contact with police than white men are.

If you have a requirement for due process when fingerprinting, then you eliminate a type of misuse. If its as quick as forcing someone on the street to scan their fingers on the whim of a police officer, then you create a much larger chance for misuse and abuse.

And, depending on the reason I'd need to call the police, sure, I'd call them its kinda one of the things my taxes pay for. I don't hold the overall bias of the force against individuals. Or the actions of individuals against all of them.

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localzuk

Re: fine with it.

The problem isn't with the technology - it never is. The problem is with overreach. Police will find more excuses to fingerprint people - usually following their biases (which time and time again come out to show the police are institutionally racist).

It also allows the police to use this same tech for further uses in the future - registering finger prints, etc...

Being taken to a police station affords you the right to legal representation - something you don't have on the street.

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Military techie mangled minicomputer under nose of scary sergeant

localzuk

Re: Shome mishtake surely?

You can get a Quadra/Centris 650 on ebay for less than $100.

Loved the Quadra line. Was a great computer when I was growing up.

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Biker nerfed by robo Chevy in San Francisco now lobs sueball at GM

localzuk

"Regardless of who's legally in the right or wrong, a self driving car hitting another vehicle is a problem."

Problem is, in this case, the self driving car ended up with 2 choices - 1. drive into the minivan that slowed in the other lane, completing the lane change maneuver, or 2. return to its original spot, which someone had illegally ridden into.

From any point of view I can tell, this seems clear cut - the software did the right thing... You can't always prevent an accident, but you can choose which accident to have.

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Look on the bright side, Pebble fans. At least your gizmo will work long enough for you to get beach body ready

localzuk

Re: Oddly enough...

You are comparing apples to oranges there. Sure, mechanical items can last years, with the right maintenance. But they don't offer the functionality that modern computerised devices do.

Take the Benz Patent-Motorwagen and that Google/Waymo car. Sure, they're both 4 wheeled motorised conveyances, but they are not comparable. Not in terms of capabilities, nor safety, nor usefulness.

Sure, you can see the time on your old watch, but the other features the new devices offer have a purpose too.

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localzuk

Pebble filed for insolvency in 2016 - Fitbit bought some assets, not the company. Saying they bought Pebble would be like saying I bought Tandy as I bought some of their last stock items when they were closing down in my local town.

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Google can't innovate anymore, exiting programmer laments

localzuk

Re: Google?

@AC - you're a bit of a minority there. Google is still the most popular search engine, Android is the most popular phone OS, Chrome is the most popular browser etc...

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I thought there'd be more Instagram: ICT apprenticeships down 20% in five years

localzuk

IT is a bad career choice right now

The constant use of outsourced labour and the flooding of the market with more people, has reduced the pay prospects in IT dramatically.

I remember seeing IT jobs advertised as £30k per year, entry level jobs when I was a teen. Now, £30k is a mid-level job, if you've got a load of experience. Starting is £20k or less.

Or, people can go into engineering, construction, politics, business management etc... and earn a heck of a lot more, a lot quicker.

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Court throws out BT's plans to reduce pension rates

localzuk

"As for dividends, do bear in mind that they are repayments to investors for their money, just as interest is a repayment to a bank in return for a loan. If you stop paying dividends those investors will want their money back, i.e. they will sell their shares, which will depress the share price. That won't matter significantly to BT, but it will matter to all the other pension funds who have invested in those shares. That sort of kee-jerk "soak the rich" reaction isn't actually going to affect the people you think it is, and another £1bn for the pension fund isn't enough anyway."

If the company has a massive pensions deficit, then those investments haven't yet returned any profit for the investors... So why should the investors get dividends?

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.UK overseer Nominet abandons its own charitable foundation – and why this matters

localzuk

Who owns .uk?

Who actually owns .uk? Its a country ccTLD, so surely the ultimate owner would be the UK government? How would the rights to operate it change hands, should Nominet go all Dr Evil?

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MPs sceptical of plan for IT to save the day after UK quits customs union

localzuk

2 years, if we get the transition period

So, the government will have 2 years to implement some of the most complex government IT systems to date. Yeah. That's gonna happen. *Looks at the failed NHS IT systems*

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UK good for superfast broadband, crap for FTTP – Ofcom

localzuk

Re: Kicking the ball down the road

Your personal car is not the same as infrastructure necessary for the prosperity of the nation...

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localzuk

Kicking the ball down the road

The push for FTTC instead of FTTP simply kicked the ball down the road, allowing BT to milk every last penny from their copper infrastructure.

The UK government should have seen this and enforced FTTP rollout with the billions they handed to them.

We're just going to be hit with the same issue again in a few years when ultra-fast connections are a necessity. Then again, that'd be something for a different government to worry about wouldn't it?

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Twitter's not dreaming of a white supremacist Xmas: Accounts nuked

localzuk

Pretty sure they are targeting anyone who is associated with organisations that threaten violence. Colour/political leaning doesn't really come into it. Its just that most of the groups pushing violence, and doing so prominently at the moment, are white supremacists.

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Ofcom just told BT to up its game on fibre investment

localzuk

Re: Full fibre? Like Weetabix?

That's the thing - most of the cable network in the country appears to have come through other companies building it, going bust and the assets being acquired ever upwards until it hit Virgin.

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localzuk

Re: BT have already been paid to do this, no more just mouthing

Sadly not - they were paid to install FTTC.

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UK spy court ruled immune from judicial review – for now

localzuk

Re: What an absurd situation

Problem is, the Supreme Court in the UK is our court of last resort, and whilst we're a member, the ECJ above that.

This little tribunal is not any such thing, and appears to have the ability to make judgments which can't be appealed to either.

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localzuk

What an absurd situation

A tribunal which can determine its own jurisdiction, the extent of its own powers and cannot be appealed. Ridiculous and would be thrown out if it ended up in the ECJ.

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Tell the public how much our tram tickets cost? Are you mad?

localzuk

4%? I wish our local bus service tickets went up like that. First increased passes by around 80% recently, and normal tickets by about 30%.

Happened to coincide with the bankruptcy of the only other bus company operating here.

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Future of Misco UK hangs in the balance – sources

localzuk

People don't upsell on iPads really - they're bought at a spec for a task. What can you sell with an iPad? A case? The margins on cases are tiny too. There's only a few models of iPad available anyway.

Compare that to a PC or laptop? There's thousands of models, upgrades etc... You can sell software with them too, can't with an iPad.

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localzuk

Sad to see them go

But, the market is different now. There's less "value add" and "upselling" that can be done. I'd blame the advent of tablets for that really - can't really up-sell an iPad or add extras/upgrades, so the profit margin is what it is.

This sort of thing happens in lots of markets when things change. Some companies are surviving by changing the way they operate (not just box shifting), Misco didn't really change.

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You may not have noticed, but 'superfast' broadband is available to 94% of Blighty

localzuk

Great

10Mbps USO, just in time to be left behind by the rest of the modern world as they speed ahead with 100Mbps... :)

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BT fined £25,000 over second unsafe London roadworks this year

localzuk

It really doesn't. £68k in 7 years? They have £5bn a year income from bus and rail fares.

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Cops shut 28k sites flogging knock-off footie kits and other tat

localzuk

Strange measurement

300 hours to get your ID back? That's an odd thing right there.

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AI vans are real – but they'll make us suck at driving, warn boffins

localzuk

Re: Obvious study is obvious

Surely that's just a regulatory issue? Don't let such a car get sold without a fully automated system in place.

No half and half. I'm pretty sure the various car manufacturers working on automation haven't indicated a desire to release such a half solution anyway.

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localzuk

Obvious study is obvious

So people not having to drive will reduce their driving skills? Shocker.

I'm sure tractor drivers have lost the key skills needed for riding a horse too.

The whole point of automated cars is that the driver doesn't need those skills, so what does it matter if they lose them?

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Brit prosecutors ask IT suppliers to fight over £3 USB cable tender

localzuk

Re: USB A, Male to Male? I don't think you really want one of them

USB A Male to Male is quite common in projector installations. For some reason, some manufacturers make the connection boxes with A female sockets to connect to. So you end up needing the A Male to Male to connect your device to the projector.

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Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

localzuk

Moving the costs

Like it or not, the pool of Linux savvy tech staff is smaller than the Windows pool. So, if you move everything away from Windows, you will end up with a few new costs:

1. Retraining for existing staff

2. Increased costs hiring new staff with the skills needed

3. Reduced availability of specialists for the big/complex issues, and therefore increased consultancy costs

So, yes, reducing dependence on Windows is a good thing, but it shouldn't be seen as just a way to cut costs.

Investing in their staff is always a good thing though too!

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Five Eyes nations stare menacingly at tech biz and its encryption

localzuk

Magical thinking

Yup, sounds like politicians to me.

They think ignoring reality is an acceptable thing to do when it comes to boosting their poll ratings.

Always comes back to bite them in the ass though.

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localzuk

Re: Whatsapp favourite for plotting

That's the thing. If politicians are using such a tool, their own communications will be open to interception. I wonder how quickly the law would be changed after their messages were made public ?

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Intel gives the world a Core i9 desktop CPU to play with

localzuk

Re: Pfft, cores. Who needs em?

The modding community is still very much Java based.

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localzuk

Pfft, cores. Who needs em?

Minecraft only uses 1 core for most things. I'm still waiting for a 10Ghz chip so I can run a modpack properly. :D

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Auntie sh!tcans BBC Store after 18 months

localzuk

They'll make archive content available on iPlayer.

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EU pegs quota for 'homegrown' content on Netflix at 30 per cent

localzuk

Typical protectionism

It doesn't work. If countries want local content, fund a state broadcaster like the BBC. Commercial entities should be able to offer the content that people want to watch, not what the government want them to watch.

On the whole, European content is generally of poor quality anyway, BBC and Sky excepted.

I suppose companies could achieve this by just adding a bunch of nonsense to a "local content" category, and leave the volume of the rest as it is though.

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