* Posts by localzuk

911 posts • joined 25 Jul 2011

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Future of Misco UK hangs in the balance – sources

localzuk

People don't upsell on iPads really - they're bought at a spec for a task. What can you sell with an iPad? A case? The margins on cases are tiny too. There's only a few models of iPad available anyway.

Compare that to a PC or laptop? There's thousands of models, upgrades etc... You can sell software with them too, can't with an iPad.

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localzuk

Sad to see them go

But, the market is different now. There's less "value add" and "upselling" that can be done. I'd blame the advent of tablets for that really - can't really up-sell an iPad or add extras/upgrades, so the profit margin is what it is.

This sort of thing happens in lots of markets when things change. Some companies are surviving by changing the way they operate (not just box shifting), Misco didn't really change.

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You may not have noticed, but 'superfast' broadband is available to 94% of Blighty

localzuk

Great

10Mbps USO, just in time to be left behind by the rest of the modern world as they speed ahead with 100Mbps... :)

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BT fined £25,000 over second unsafe London roadworks this year

localzuk

It really doesn't. £68k in 7 years? They have £5bn a year income from bus and rail fares.

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Cops shut 28k sites flogging knock-off footie kits and other tat

localzuk

Strange measurement

300 hours to get your ID back? That's an odd thing right there.

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AI vans are real – but they'll make us suck at driving, warn boffins

localzuk

Re: Obvious study is obvious

Surely that's just a regulatory issue? Don't let such a car get sold without a fully automated system in place.

No half and half. I'm pretty sure the various car manufacturers working on automation haven't indicated a desire to release such a half solution anyway.

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localzuk

Obvious study is obvious

So people not having to drive will reduce their driving skills? Shocker.

I'm sure tractor drivers have lost the key skills needed for riding a horse too.

The whole point of automated cars is that the driver doesn't need those skills, so what does it matter if they lose them?

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Brit prosecutors ask IT suppliers to fight over £3 USB cable tender

localzuk

Re: USB A, Male to Male? I don't think you really want one of them

USB A Male to Male is quite common in projector installations. For some reason, some manufacturers make the connection boxes with A female sockets to connect to. So you end up needing the A Male to Male to connect your device to the projector.

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Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

localzuk

Moving the costs

Like it or not, the pool of Linux savvy tech staff is smaller than the Windows pool. So, if you move everything away from Windows, you will end up with a few new costs:

1. Retraining for existing staff

2. Increased costs hiring new staff with the skills needed

3. Reduced availability of specialists for the big/complex issues, and therefore increased consultancy costs

So, yes, reducing dependence on Windows is a good thing, but it shouldn't be seen as just a way to cut costs.

Investing in their staff is always a good thing though too!

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Five Eyes nations stare menacingly at tech biz and its encryption

localzuk

Magical thinking

Yup, sounds like politicians to me.

They think ignoring reality is an acceptable thing to do when it comes to boosting their poll ratings.

Always comes back to bite them in the ass though.

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localzuk

Re: Whatsapp favourite for plotting

That's the thing. If politicians are using such a tool, their own communications will be open to interception. I wonder how quickly the law would be changed after their messages were made public ?

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Intel gives the world a Core i9 desktop CPU to play with

localzuk

Re: Pfft, cores. Who needs em?

The modding community is still very much Java based.

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localzuk

Pfft, cores. Who needs em?

Minecraft only uses 1 core for most things. I'm still waiting for a 10Ghz chip so I can run a modpack properly. :D

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Auntie sh!tcans BBC Store after 18 months

localzuk

They'll make archive content available on iPlayer.

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EU pegs quota for 'homegrown' content on Netflix at 30 per cent

localzuk

Typical protectionism

It doesn't work. If countries want local content, fund a state broadcaster like the BBC. Commercial entities should be able to offer the content that people want to watch, not what the government want them to watch.

On the whole, European content is generally of poor quality anyway, BBC and Sky excepted.

I suppose companies could achieve this by just adding a bunch of nonsense to a "local content" category, and leave the volume of the rest as it is though.

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Windows is now built on Git, but Microsoft has found some bottlenecks

localzuk

Monolithic

Eugh. A single 300GB codebase. That just seems inefficient in so many ways.

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Bloke charged under UK terror law for refusing to cough up passwords

localzuk

I don't know how this law still exists

Surely it breaks multiple tenets of human rights laws? How has this not been to the ECHR?

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MP3 'died' and nobody noticed: Key patents expire on golden oldie tech

localzuk

Another media outlet reporting this incorrectly?

I expect it from the non-tech media, but this not from The Register.

The "ex" owner of the MP3 patents can do whatever it wants with its licensing scheme, but it isn't killing MP3 in any way or form. They simply can't charge anyone a fee to use the technology any more.

If anything, a more accurate report would be "MP3 has now been freed from the shackles of patent protection".

Simply put - MP3 is not going anywhere.

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Why Microsoft's Windows game plan makes us WannaCry

localzuk

Re: "maximise profits" vs "thieves" (UK specifically)

Last I checked, Microsoft is a US company.

Also, Windows is a general purpose OS. It is not a medical specific OS, or a nuclear specific OS etc... The onus is on the buyer to buy the right tool for the job. Its not Microsoft's fault if you use Windows 3.11 to run the guidance system on your nuclear missile. They sold you a product for general purpose computing purposes (in fact, last time I read their EULA there were specific clauses telling you not to use it in a variety of situations).

I still find it hilarious that anyone thinks it is possible for a general purpose OS, that has to support decades of legacy software and hardware, can be exploit-proof, if only the creators put a bit more effort into it.

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localzuk

Re: Hang on a minute...

Its kinda hilarious how over-simplified people like you are making out this all is @Ledswinger.

Microsoft have a problem - on one side they need to maintain security, on the other they need to maintain legacy support. Very difficult balancing act.

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localzuk

Re: Should We Now Invest In Linux For Important Systems

Linux? Just another kernel created by fallible people. Gets just as many security advisories, and is just as prone to potential problems.

Also suffers from the same issue of support ending for earlier editions. So, not really sure how this would help anything?

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localzuk

Re: If I had a Ford vehicle...

If companies were on the hook for potential bugs in their software, they simply wouldn't make that software. The risk would just be far too high. If my blender breaks after a few years, I'm on my own, consumer protection laws or not. Cars are different because they are a life and death issue. Software, on the whole, is not.

You are also assuming that an analysis of the entire code base would actually result in fixed code. It wouldn't. You'd just end up with a bunch of new errors. The people writing Windows are not script kiddies sat in their bedrooms, they are professionals who know what they're doing. They're also human, and mistakes will always be made.

You also have to take into account that some bugs are "never before seen", so an analysis would simply not spot the possible outcome of a determined attack.

Then again, maybe that's too nuanced for someone who calls a company, legally bound to maximise profit, "thieves" for making a profit.

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Just 99.5 million nuisance calls... and KeurBOOM! A £400K megafine

localzuk

Can't pay?

So, when fined, the company just shuts down and the fine doesn't get fully paid. Fining the directors is good, but I'd hasten to add another potential punishment - ban the director from being able to run a company for 10 years or something if they can't pay.

There needs to be real consequences, rather than headlines.

Rudd can simply move and re-open shop again after his company is gone. Nothing stopping him doing it all again.

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Well this is awkward. As Microsoft was bragging about Office at Build, Office 365 went down

localzuk

Critical system?

If email is critical to your organisation, then don't outsource it to a public cloud provider. I don't really see why everyone is laughing/attacking the service. Its email, not life support.

If your business relies so heavily on email that potential uncontrollable downtime from a public cloud provider, don't migrate. Invest in your own system and sysadmins.

To the rest of us, where email being down doesn't mean the end of the world, we're quite happy with a public cloud provider.

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localzuk

Re: But like "NHSmail"

5 years is a long time in tech. That's between 1.5 and 1 server replacement cycles for most businesses I've seen.

So, 5 years of free stuff is still pretty darn good! Education is particularly well served by it!

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European Patent Office dragged to human rights court – by its own staff

localzuk

Re: And the circus continues...

Germany is the 7th most productive country in the world, so I don't really understand how their Union practices can be seen as bad... They obviously do something right!

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Chip design chap arrested for using photocopier

localzuk

Re: Just another normal business day in China

Seems to be. Just thrown away what turned out to be a counterfeit RS232-USB adapter, origin China. Surely there can't be enough money in silly little things like that to make it worth counterfeiting!?

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Zeiss, ASML hit back at Nikon in chip-printing patent row

localzuk

Re: That last part.

@AC - "What if it's replied with a turn-around haymaker and a counter-claim, "What are you gonna do without our PATENTED technology, hmm?""

My guess? They'd be bought up pretty damn quick. Intel and co are far bigger heavyweights in the corp world. They could buy Nikon easily, separate out the lithography patents and sell the remainder.

Actually, that'd probably be Intel's best move.

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What is this bullsh*t, Google? Nexus phones starved of security fixes after just three years

localzuk

Re: Google Product Line...

Why would it be? Cars and phones are very different markets, and have very different buying patterns.

I would actually be quite surprised if Google were to sell their cars to be honest. I reckon that once they actually have a workable commercial product, it'll be a leased/rented product only.

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localzuk

Gotta remember who Google are

Google are a data driven company. They make their decisions based on real world data.

So, all these dates show us is that they have the data to show that the vast majority of people change phones every 2 years with a smaller percentage taking up to 3 years (you know, those ones waiting for a specific phone to be released).

So, we can all feign indignation, but Google knows who their target customers are, and these dates won't affect them at all.

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Republicans want IT bloke to take fall for Clinton email brouhaha

localzuk

Re: I'm ignorant! But I'm commenting anyway!

That's quite a few accusations in one hyperbolic paragraph there @Big John. You got any evidence for any of what you've said?

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Having a monopoly on x86 chips and charging eyewatering prices really does pay off – Intel CEO

localzuk

Everything wrong with capitalism in one article

"Intel today revealed that its first-quarter earnings and sales were more or less as forecast, sending its stock down in after-hours trading."

So, they perform well, as expected, and investors are unhappy? Absurd.

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What a To-Do! Microsoft snuffs out Wunderlist

localzuk

Illogical

Why would you take a functional and popular app and aim to kill it by creating a new one copying some features from it, just so you can interact with your cloud service? Why not just add the cloud stuff to Wunderlist? Why not rename Wunderlist if they hate the name so much?

To-Do is a stupid name, as it is impossible to market as to-do is too generic.

They really seem to be losing the plot at MS.

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Nuh-uh, Google, you WILL hand over emails stored on foreign servers, says US judge

localzuk

With MS, you are using a service of their local subsidiary, and the data is in the local data-centers (well, depending on the service). With Google, you are using their global data-centers, regardless of your location, and you're bound by Californian law doing so.

For example, my Office 365 tenancy is hosted on UK servers in Cardiff and London. The service is provided by Microsoft Ireland (I believe). So, the USA isn't involved beyond developing the technology and issuing it to its subsidiaries.

The only time any data ends up in US hands is if I allow their US support team into the account IIRC.

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AWS v Oracle: Mark Hurd schooled on how to run a public cloud that people actually use

localzuk

Re: AWS infrastructure Boss is Ex-Car mechanic.. says it all.

30% overhead?! Ha. Overhead for virtualisation is single digits now. You're living in the past.

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No more IP addresses for countries that shut down internet access

localzuk

Wouldn't this just create more North Koreas?

With their own "internet"? Basically, these oppressive countries would look at it and think "does the population actually need "internet"? Or would their own network, controlled entirely by the government, do the job?

This is why infrastructure organisations really must remain neutral, and leave the politics to the politicians. The proposal sounds fair enough, but the unintended consequences could be very significant.

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Graphite core? There are other ways to monitor your operation's heart

localzuk

Interesting there's no mention of some obvious names

Tools like Nagios & MTRG/RRDTool/Cactii, the mainstay of sysadmins for years.

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'Clearance sale' shows Apple's iPad is over. It's done

localzuk

Cheaper is better

In a school, the price cut is very much welcomed. iPads in schools won't be disappearing any time soon. So, with our budgets being squeezed, cheaper is better.

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Ubiquiti network gear can be 'hijacked by an evil URL' – thanks to its 20-year-old PHP build

localzuk

Price for featureset is pretty much the best out there. The pricing of UBNT stuff is amazingly low, and you get a heck of a lot for that.

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Security slip-ups in 1Password and other password managers 'extremely worrying'

localzuk

Re: '400 different passwords for a variety of different websites'

What does the regularity or location matter for the sites? The irregularly used ones are more important to keep in a PM - there's no chance I'd remember such a password. Take into account the idea of keeping control of your identity online also, ie. registering a username so that others don't, and that gives you more to keep hold of.

Everything is a target for criminals. That's why we constantly hear about hacks of Sony, Yahoo, etc... Its very rare to hear any real danger to a PM provider though.

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localzuk

Re: 'notebook on a desk isn't much bloody use'

@AC - Not sure if you've noticed but the number of sites with personalisation and login systems has grown phenomenally over the last decade or so. Before password managers, massive breaches were uncommon, and people didn't have 300 sites to access. (I think I've hit 700 sites stored in my PM at the moment).

A lot of people, before PMs used a single password for various sites. That's why the big breaches were such a problem - it allowed the attackers access to a bunch of other sites too.

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Smart meter firm EDMI asked UK for £7m to change a single component

localzuk

They should expand capacity then. No point in an electric system if they randomly run out and turn stuff off.

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localzuk

The outcome of water meters in many areas has been a big jump in water prices - as the companies found they had a much lower income using the meters, so had to compensate with prices rises.

So, you end up paying more for less eventually.

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localzuk

Numbers in the article don't add up

£11bn for the project. 53 million meters to install. That's £207.55 each.

So, how did the project cost come to £7bn originally, when they were looking at £390 extra per meter?

It doesn't compute.

Unless they mean that the £11bn is what was predicted to be charged to the government, and £390 is what they expected to get back from households to pay that off?

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$310m AWS S3-izure: Why everyone put their eggs in one region

localzuk

Re: "companies should consider building redundancy into their cloud instances "

In terms of redundancy and resilience, hosting in a single region at AWS is no different to having your own single set of servers in your own data-center. The advantage is the scalability - need to triple your capacity? Click a button and its done. Not so easy with your own servers.

Resilience-wise, you need to design your applications to use redundancy really.

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AWS's S3 outage was so bad Amazon couldn't get into its own dashboard to warn the world

localzuk

So what we now know is...

That a lot of major sites don't have redundancy built into their design, able to handle a single zone going down.

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Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online'

localzuk

Why are the Tories so obsessed?

With interfering with people's home lives? Parenting is for parents to do.

The Tories seem to be obsessed with reducing rules for business, but increasing them for individuals. They should keep their noses out of it!

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GDPR: Do not resist! Unless you want a visit from the data police

localzuk

Re: Fines for companies etc... Yes!

Fining schools or NHS etc is pointless. There should be a consequence to management, not the organisation. A fine for a school could bankrupt them, and all that'd do is disrupt the education of children.

No, make it apply directly to the person in charge - a personal fine, and loss of their job etc...

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localzuk

Re: Schools?

I'd say that neither of you understand how schools operate day to day.

Data is used by staff all day everyday. Some departments in some schools sign up to third party education sites (eg. MyMaths) and set up users within those systems (this is especially the case in smaller schools).

Also, Academies are no longer anything to do with the LEA - it has to be dealt with in house, meaning the school has to pay for legal advice and set up their own compliance systems. That's a significant cost for a small academy, especially when budgets are worth less now than they used to be (inflation, unfunded pay increases etc...).

Most schools use a catch-all agreement for data usage/processing each year on the data-checking sheet sent to parents. That will have to change, in fact most data protection procedures will have to change.

So, as I said, it will make teachers lives more difficult.

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localzuk

Schools?

This seems like its going to be a nightmare for schools. We gather, process, and transfer data every day! The bureaucracy this will generate seems like it will make the lives of teachers very difficult.

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