* Posts by Uberseehandel

192 posts • joined 21 Jul 2011

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US Homeland Sec boss has snazzy new laptop bomb scanning tech – but admits he doesn't know what it's called

Uberseehandel

CT

Computed X-Ray Tomography

They have tweaked some scanners

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Stop all news – it's time for us plebs to be told about BBC paycheques!

Uberseehandel

Who cares?

Why is this site publishing this story. Why don't they wait until a 'droid presenting TV gets paid more than the humans?

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Multics resurrected: Proto-Unix now runs on Raspberry Pi or x86

Uberseehandel

Re: Anything we should steal ?

Funny as it is that you say that . . .

better not to open that particular can of worms.

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Uberseehandel

Re: "Primos, was based upon Honeywell's development of Multics for super-minis."

I was there at the time, I was the initial customer for a distributed Prime WAN deployment in my country, that went global; subsequently I was processed through Prime's internal SE course, as a "reward", and worked as part of the benchmarking team on a number of US government tenders, including classified ones.

The Honeywell origins were freely acknowledged if anybody asked, mostly, they didn't.

Quite a lot of OSes were called OS.

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Uberseehandel

Primos

Some years ago, when there was a plethora of super-minicomputer company manufacturers, one of the leading lights was Prime Computers. Their operating system, Primos, was based upon Honeywell's development of Multics for super-minis.

Primos was a class act and well ahead of its time in many respects.

I wouldn't dismiss Multics out of hand.

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Behind the scenes of Slovaks' fight to liberate their .sk domain

Uberseehandel

Re: Entirely predictable behaviour

I don't have to justify anything to somebody posting as an Anonymous Coward.

My comment is not in the least xenophobic, unless being concerned about the erosion of individual rights, restriction of democratic rights, the growth of cronyism and the revision of history is defined as xenophobic.

Ten minutes googling reliable sites will show you the extent of what is occurring.

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Uberseehandel

Entirely predictable behaviour

Slovakia is one of the Visegrád group of nations.

Sadly, such shenanigans have become commonplace in those states.

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Largest advertising company in the world still wincing after NotPetya punch

Uberseehandel

Re: Possible path for malware to attack sites without a "Ukrainian connection".

Its the "thumb down" vote that intrigues me ;-[]

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Uberseehandel

Possible path for malware to attack sites without a "Ukrainian connection".

I know of consultants specialising in ERP configuration and implementation that rely on teams of developers living in the Ukraine. With so many flavours of Open Source ERP being promoted, from a very small original code base, this could be an important vector.

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The open source community is nasty and that's just the docs

Uberseehandel

Re: Have they surveyed other groups?

Who said sociopaths don't work? Usually they are obsessive about it.

You are making up facts and are way too defensive. Probably sociopathic.

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Uberseehandel

Re: Have they surveyed other groups?

Open Source community "nasty"?

I can think of a few other Tech related groups that are positively scary by comparison. It would be superfluous to identify any in particular, but most of us know a few.

The nature of IT attracts sociopaths, always has.

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Intel pitches a Thunderbolt 3-for-all

Uberseehandel

Microsoft can't have paying attention

The MS hardware division remains largely unaware of Thunderbolt 3. The latest Surface feels three (four?) years old.

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Horse named 'Cloud Computing' finds burst of speed to beat 'Classic Empire' in actual race

Uberseehandel

Re: Take offense at "nag"

You must learn to determine when your friends are exaggerating.

Did they also tell you about the testicles hanging out the back of some of the race winning females? (They don't).

One is more likely to deliver a two headed lamb than a multi-headed horse.

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After years of warnings, mobile network hackers exploit SS7 flaws to drain bank accounts

Uberseehandel

Encryption Is Not Convenient

Much of the time, telco encryption is deliberately weakened (set the 16 leading bits of the key to 0), so that officially interested parties can freely access users and conversations they wish to monitor. It is so much more convenient that way, no warrants, no oversight.

Right from the outset, the MNOs did not wish to know about SMS, they didn't notice, in any material sense of that word, its capability when GSM was introduced, but they did shut down the (ISDN compliant) dual SIM capability (because customers use it to save costs). MNOs had to be brow-beaten into accepting that users would make use of it, especially when roaming. Believe it or not, they took the same approach to data, remaining in denial about customer take-up until too late.

There are a number of organisations which have official and court approved access to telco switches. However, the number of staff who have access to the data centres which process the telco back-end systems is huge. A number are outsourced. I know of one that outsources its data centre processing to a company that has been bought by its principal competitor. They remain quite relaxed about this, despite ample evidence that there is much to be concerned about.

MNOs should not be allowed out.

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Scratch the Surface: Slabtop sales slump takes the shine off Microsoft's 2017 so far

Uberseehandel

Old Tech

The Surface 4, Surface Book and Surface Studio were launched using old technology.

Microsoft did not plan for what would be mainstream when they launched the products, and even the revised versions are off the pace. Not only do they choose the wrong chip sets, but the wrong processors and the wrong memory. And no Thunderbolt 3.

The Surface Studio is promising, what happened to the second screen? Without it is not functional. Hybrid drives in a premium product c'mon!

Even at the eye-watering prices, I'd love to have a dual screen Studio, or even a properly equipped Surface Book or Surface 4. But paying way over the odds for yesterday's bargain bin parts, is not going to happen. Microsoft has achieved the impossible, they have made everything else look affordable, and often faster.

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Not auf wiedersehen – yet! The Berlin scene tempting Brexit tech

Uberseehandel

Re: There are more levels than that

The attractions of Munich, as a base for a Hi-tech business are considerable.

Forget the Oktoberfest, Munich is one of the most cultural cities in Germany, it has great elegance, good schools, including a choice of international schools, universities that teach degree courses in English. The night life is varied, and safe, it has an invigorating climate, and is a terrific base for outdoor pursuits and exploring Europe.

As far as start-ups are concerned, it is already one of Europe's most important research and hi-tech hubs. The sorts of services required by start-ups are on the door step. Direct connections to London, Boston, Atlanta, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Singapore and most other tech centres are plentiful, unlike Berlin (which can't even build itself an airport).

As an enviably pleasant place to live, property prices are higher than say, Berlin,which is a reflection on the comparative desirability and convenience of the two cities. To put it into context, on German reunification, a number of businesses and institution refused to move back to Berlin, despite government pressure for them to do so.

I never had any issues with bank/debit/credit cards in Germany. But then credit card debt is dumb debt, so perhaps the Germans know a thing or two about the matter. If one is not a natural planner and budgeter, then expect to be regarded as irresponsible. Cautious and thrifty German habits are easily acquired. Cash is king, use that to your advantage.

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Wait – we can explain, says Moby, er, Docker amid rebrand meltdown

Uberseehandel

Moby Dick

The title says it all - will future releases be in Ahab prior to beta? Will there be a Pequod? Is one of the developers called Ishmael?

So Docker becomes Dicker.

What a bunch of Dock-heads.

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Nuh-uh, Google, you WILL hand over emails stored on foreign servers, says US judge

Uberseehandel

Number 1's?

Generally speaking Americans and their nation are usually referred to as Number 2's.

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King Battistelli's swish penthouse office the Euro Patent Office doesn't want you to see

Uberseehandel

Re: Normal For Munich

The space is not solely for the exclusive use of Battistelli, it also has a conference room, and a hospitality suite. I have no truck with the man's behaviour, he is vile. The board of the EPO is demonstrably incompetent as their ineffectual attempts to rein-in or dispense with the man demonstrate.

Transparency is a relative concept, in much of the world. in this case, some photographs got out, that is pretty transparent by some standards.

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Virtual monopoly on UK cell towers and TV masts up for sale

Uberseehandel

Cost £4 Billion, to which add £ 3 Billion of debt = £7 Billion to get out. Not a chance.

Shrinking market - the only reason for anybody to pay more than change for this financial equivalent of a black hole is if the purchaser has an alternative use for the existing towers, such as automotive connectivity, or emergency networks.

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UK.gov still drowning in legacy tech because no one's boarding Blighty's £700m data centre Ark

Uberseehandel

How much of what is in the article is accurate

Neither of Ark's data centres is inside a "bloody great army base", in the vicinity of, yes. As far as the security goes, I've had to deal with much more secure data centres, elsewhere.

There are locations in Britain which have pretty secure and resilient redundant power supplies together with network access. These are natural locations for data centres as well as government/defence facilities.

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US Navy runs into snags with aircraft carrier's electric plane-slingshot

Uberseehandel
FAIL

Excessive anti-nuclear sensitivity

As I understand it, the UK originally wanted the new cat system for its new carriers. Then for political reasons it crippled the carriers by mandating that they would not be nuclear powered, which meant the alternative power systems could not generate sufficient electricity to operate the new cats, and the engine rooms did not have sufficient space required to generate sufficient steam to power traditional design cats . . .

So Britain is left with carriers that it cannot afford to equip with sufficient aircraft, carriers that cannot operate with the tanker and AWACs aircraft required by a carrier battle group. A battle group that has a longer RFA tail than is ideal, as a great deal more fuel has to be dragged around the ocean by the auxiliaries, than is the case with nuclear carriers, and there are not sufficient or properly equipped warships to provide the protection a carrier in a hostile situation requires. To make matters worse, shore based reconnaissance is going to be problematic as the newly bought/leased Poseidon aircraft require air tankers with refuelling booms, rather than the drogues, which British aircraft are configured to use.

I'm reasonably confident that the new tech cats will have their gremlins solved, and most likely before either of the British carriers become operational.

I is another "for the want of a nail . . ." saga, but worse, if that's possible.

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FM now stands for 'fleeting mortality' in Norway

Uberseehandel

Re: DAB+

Channel switching is important - take too long about it and it is a show stopper.

A few years ago there were plans for DVB-H (handheld), along with DVB-T (terrestrial), DVB-C (cable) and DVB-S (satellite). Trials went well, most of the technology issues with respect to playout centres and network design were solved and costs were as anticipated. The killer was that it took too long to switch channels, from memory 4 seconds. This channel switch delay sent viewers back to streaming over the internet. Fortunately the mobile networks managed to cope, but there was a lot of serious interest from all the usual suspects across Europe.

I suspect that if changing channels takes too long on DAB, people will look for other solutions. However, I do notice when changing channels on my online radio app, the delays are irritating.

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Don't believe the 5G hype! £700m could make UK's 4G better than Albania's

Uberseehandel

This isn't a 4G/5G choice, both are required. Professor Webb is behaving like a Luddite.

R+C

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Jersey sore: Anchor rips into island's undersea cables, sinks net access

Uberseehandel

Re: "on the UK island of Jersey"

Quote - "Jersey, the island we nicked from the French,"

and there I was thinking the Channel Islands belonged to the Normans, who nicked England from the English.

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UK.gov was warned of smart meter debacle by Cabinet Office in 2012

Uberseehandel

Re: Just Say NO

traditional meters mostly have an expected lifespan of 30 years. For smart meters it is 5 - 7 years. My apartment complex has quite a time to go before it is 30 years old.

Power billing businesses will charge the consumers for the marked up cost of smart meters and their removal and installation costs at inflated rates. So they replace meters 5 times over 30 years . . . one can see why they like them.

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Uberseehandel
Stop

Just Say NO

I'm getting badgered to install a new meter. I live in a modern purpose build apartment complex with centralised heating and hot water. There is no gas. My electricity bills are between £20 and £30 per month. The amount mostly depends on whether I use the hob to prepare a stock of dishes to freeze down, or not. Modern solid state computers, network equipment and television are pretty economical to run, my "designer" lamps have LEDs, appliances were all selected with a view to being economical to run.

What is a smart meter going to to do, tell me not to pre-cook my dinners? Go out and watch a friend's television?

Despite telling the garlic-munching electricity company that there are no worthwhile savings to be made, they still want to install a new meter. They must be making money out of this.

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Behold, your next billion dollar market: The humble Ethernet cable

Uberseehandel

There is fibre in everybody's future

Europe was also tabbed as a strong market, particularly in the industrial sector where growing connectivity of appliances means larger networks and the need for cables

The industrial sector needs fibre, rather than copper. I ordered fibre 35 years ago, those sites are still running fibre, in really hostile conditions. The price of fibre to copper converters with PoE injection is dropping all the time.

Even a small switch needs 10/40 GB uplinks, and "campus" deployments should not link buildings using copper, if only to keep the insurance company happy.

I expect lots of disasters in China (not gangnam ( OK Seoul), but, Lightning Style).

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SQL Server on Linux: Runs well in spite of internal quirks. Why?

Uberseehandel

Re: Sybase ASE

As I look at my innocuous and entirely factual original post, I see that I have acquired 3 "thumbs down".

What is objectionable, apart from the fact that I might just know what I am writing about?

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Uberseehandel

Sybase ASE

People have been running Sybase ASE (where MS SQL Server came from) on Linux (RHEL and CentOS in my experience) for over a decade. I recall running ASE on various flavours of Unix for getting on for 30 years. I wonder if MS had to do a deal with SAP, the company which bought Sybase a few years ago?

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CERT tells Microsoft to keep EMET alive because it's better than Win 10's own security

Uberseehandel

Not secure

I hope it is coincidence and not prescience, but the castle in the photograph at the top of the article is Bodiam.

Bodiam was one of the last, if not the last, castle licensed to be built in England. It wasn't built to defend anything, it was built for show. The curtain walls would have crumbled as soon as an enemy looked at them.

Is Win 10 security any better than Bodiam's?

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Google DeepMind inks 5-year agreement with NHS for 'Streams' app

Uberseehandel

Who says Google is being given any personal information? It is normal practice to substitute meaningless identifiers, so that once the data sets have been processed, any individual cases of interest may be identified for further investigation by the appropriate clinicians.

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Uberseehandel

This project is being crawled all over by the paranoid, the conspiracy theorists, Chicken-Lickin', fanticists, and the deeply, deeply concerned looking for yet another topic to worry to death.

It is in nobody's interests that there be a breach of privacy. Everybody involved knows this. Far better than all the people getting on their hind legs and screaming about it. One has to wonder are they really concerned about people's privacy, or do they just imagine they are? Is protest what they really want to do, do they just to wreck a big project regardless of its potential benefits?

Some quite bright people get involved in this kind of research, patient confidentiality is one of their overarching principles, they know a great deal more about how to do that than the people protesting.

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Microsoft's cmd.exe deposed by PowerShell in Windows 10 preview

Uberseehandel
WTF?

MICROSOFT IS OUT OF CONTROL

The culture at MS has changed. As a result the entire organisation is in a ferment of, largely faux, or trivial innovation (does the planet need yet another chat program). Nobody is on top of what is going on. And the side effects can be alarming.

For example -

Carrying out what looks like a normal Win 10 Pro 64-bit upgrade, and, on restarting, finding that the machine is locked out. It appears that when the new version was installed, the "Do not allow (local) accounts without passwords" box was selected by default. Well the machine is in a secure place and never leaves it. It uses a password to access all remote accounts. No particular need for it to have a password, it is physically secure. The only cure for this was to install a new OS version that revealed the short comings in the remote back-up and sync strategy that is in place.

Exchange on-line server - implementing this required a comparatively high level MS tech/engineer logging onto my local machine and carrying out actions he was unable or unwilling to explain. Certainly, I have been unable to find adequate documentation on this matter. Since the incident requiring a fresh OS install, my email system (Exchange/Outlook) does not function correctly - like many people, I have a Business email address and a private email address, different domains, I can no longer send mail from my secondary private email address. Microsoft support has no answer to this problem.

The third example of how out of control MS is, and how absolutely useless their off-shored support teams are, involves access to MS mail accounts (outlook.com and live.co.uk). Office365 / Azure AD have decided that the two mail accounts no longer exist and therefore I can no longer log into them. (They do exist because they are still forwarding new emails to the exchange mail account). I have twice tried to get MS Support to solve this problem. Support appears to not understand what happens, they repeatedly ask the same questions, which I reply to, including screen shots, where required. But Support mindlessly responds by re-asking questions I have previously answered. They are out of their depth and requests the they refer the problem elsewhere are ignored. This is unfortunate, whilst I cannot access the mail accounts, I cannot access the OneDrive account associated with those private email accounts.

Documentation available on-line is confused, out of date or missing. The same goes for the various hard copy/electronic books, and MS Virtual Academy is woefully out of date.

The culture of shovelling inchoate software out the door will come back to haunt Microsoft.

And it is not just software that is stuffed. I have problems with some new expensive hardware - couldn't find an adequate support channel, so wrote a view setting out my problems - received an email saying my post did not fit with MS policy and had accordingly been deleted.

MS repeatedly tries to dodge, and deny the exist of problems.

I do hope somebody in MS with a detectable pulse reads this.

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Everest outage was caused by split brains

Uberseehandel

Re: Aww shoot

A long time ago, I was told that the name memset() is a nerdyish in joke . . . but as somebody who wrote non-compatible tape conversion systems in Fortran, I was in no position to say anything

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Post-outage King's College London orders staff to never make their own backups

Uberseehandel

Only in Britain

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Spain's Prime Minister wants to ban internet memes. No, really

Uberseehandel

As a kid we were advised by the (UK) Foreign Office not to stop and help if we saw a traffic accident or somebody in trouble whilst on holiday in Spain, let us hope we are not seeing a reversion to those days.

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Fresh Euro Patent Office drama: King Battistelli fires union boss

Uberseehandel

Re: Exactly what does he know about the members of the Admin Council?

You are full of it - you don't even know where the EPO is.

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Days are numbered for the Czech Republic

Uberseehandel

Many of my Czech friends refer to their country as Czechland - if it works for them, it works for me. Sadly, not all Czechs are Bohemians, were that so, then the name would be obvious.

Historically, Silesia would be a poor choice of name and Moravians, whose country is part of Czechland, are not Bohemians.

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Apple wants to buy Formula 1 car firm McLaren – report

Uberseehandel

Mistaken Identity?

When McLaren developed the iconic F1 road car, it was the creation of designer Gordon Murray. His business, Gordon Murray Design has developed new techniques for building cars in the Twenty First Century, perhaps presciently called - iStream® - http://www.gordonmurraydesign.com/en/istream.html a move here would make a lot of sense, we know Apple likes British designers.

So perhaps the financial press has been barking up the wrong tree?

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Encryption backdoors? It's an ongoing dialogue, say anti-terror bods

Uberseehandel

From time to time I have had to work with what US embassies euphemistically call "Legal Attachés", or the oddball occupants of corner offices in large international consulting practices. Without exception, none of these people struck me as intelligent, interesting, sophisticated, stylish or educated. It never occurred to me to socialise with any of them. Yet these are the selfsame people who are demanding back doors in encryption tools. . . . go figure oops, they don't do "math".

Absolute planks.

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Just not cricket: Microsoft's big data Googly called No Ball

Uberseehandel

Who really benefits from this research?

Is it possible that the Big Data project in India has nothing to do with the D/L/S method but is, in fact, a useful tool for the nation's bookmakers and punters?

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UK will be 'cut off' from 'full intelligence picture' after Brexit – Europol strategy man

Uberseehandel

Re: Yet more Brexit nonsense

The problem with Ireland as a post-Brexit alternative to the UK is that there is a shortage of infrastructure and services and the indigenous workforce does not always have the training required to fulfil roles that an organisation might expect to fill using local staff.

Most large organisations know this already. For a corporation it is more convenient to be located in central Europe than on the (Celtic) fringe, closer to customers, closer to suppliers.

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John Ellenby, British inventor of the first laptop, powers off

Uberseehandel

Ultimate Cool & Very Effective

Quite fortuitously I was at Comdex when the Grids were released.

I was looking for portable PCs for all the staff of the professional practice I was a member of, and sadly realised that these wonders were too expensive if I were buying over a 100 of them, but that they were perfect for putting on board the most competitive ocean racing boats.

Previously, we were using PDP11s on race boats, which were not ideal in a very difficult environment. The self contained Grids had a magnesium case, which struck a chord with the tech savvy yacht designers and crews, and fortuitously the best race instrument maker at that time had written software for use by the US's 12 Metre America's Cup racers, which, thanks to a bit editor from Norton, I was able to run on the MS-DOS Grids, which was a first.

The following year the first event in the World Chamionship was the Kenwood Cup in Hawaii, which was windy, hot and humid with big seas running, and inside a yacht hull built out of composites, the temperatures soared and the salt laden air was so corrosive, I had to strip down the computers and clean them as the salt was showing signs of eating into the boards.

The Grids were great, we won the regatta and the world championship later in the (2 year) series. from this time onwards computers became an integral part of racing offshore. I never knew that John Ellenby was British but we did know that some of his computers were used by the CIA.

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Quake-hit Italy: Open up Wi-Fi

Uberseehandel

All they have to do is ask the MNOs. German/Swiss Red Cross have the portable quick set up tech as well.

In reality they probably have a greater need for portable espresso machines. Then they can think straight about the other stuff (not being rude, the espresso machine is a vital technology component, honest).

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French, German ministers demand new encryption backdoor law

Uberseehandel

Dream On

Bernard Cazeneuve is from a smart family. Presumably, as the thicko of his generation, he was shuffled off into politics.

Back doors are so easily overcome it is pathetic to try and evolve a situation where they are universal. There are Open Source tools out there that cannot be legislated out of existence.

I'd love to have a contract providing bath soap to politicians.

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Tesla touts battery that turns a Model S into 'third fastest ever' car

Uberseehandel

I guess Tesla knows its market - fast in a straight line, sh1t round corners

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Das ist empörend: Microsoft slams umlaut for email depth charge

Uberseehandel

Re: English is wonderful

I think NT was supposed to be Unicode compliant and then there was some strange OS/2 smoke and mirrors....and.....and.......

At this point I switched to Unix servers, which were great.

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Business users force Microsoft to back off Windows 10 PC kill plan

Uberseehandel

Windows Beta

Whilst I generally like Win 10, I am very uncomfortable with its perpetual beta-feel. Together with Office-365 and Azure (Cloud), there is an ongoing sense of flakiness that is extremely unsettling. I'm glad I'm not trying to administer this frickarse[sp].

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Microsoft adds new 'Enterprise Products' section to privacy policy

Uberseehandel

Nobody at MS has an overview of the big picture right now

Presently I have Office 365 Business Premium, which gives me most of the Office applications (not Access) on up to 5 devices plus 1TB of sync-able Cloud storage and, usefully, a managed Exchange server, for GBP 78 a year. Which is a really good deal. By dint of stuffing around I manage to turn off most of the Win 10 Pro and other MS nastiness, and remind myself that my data is stored in the USA, but that need not be an issue, with careful planning.

I soon discovered that using Office 365 gives me an Azure AD account, gratis. And then discovered Azure Information Protection (in Prview). At this point I decided I better understand a bit more about Azure. Which seems more useful that I anticipated, which was encouraging.

But what is truly overwhelming is the rate at which new and updated services are being released, the uncoordinated prerequisites for similar services and the understandable inability of authors and online trainers to keep abreast of what is being released.

MS has tools that allow what feels like zillions of their people to cooperate on everything, but nothing to make sure that somebody has a clear overview of what is being pushed out the door as policy.

I have found 3 different sets of prerequisites for the new Azure Information Protection service. When I ask the team developing the software what the situation is, silence. Because nobody sees the big picture.

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