* Posts by Steve Knox

1827 posts • joined 16 Jul 2011

BOFH: Do I smell burning toes, I mean burning toast?

Steve Knox

Re: problem cats are the product of problem people.

You see when a mummy cat and a daddy cat are very much in love with each other...

Is that what started all that mess in Egypt way back when?

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Why are we disappointed with the best streaming media box on the market?

Steve Knox

Re: What does it do...

It's what it doesn't do that a PC does. No general-purpose programming, simpler device management, focused UI, etc. This allows it to be smaller, cheaper, and better targeted.

Yes, you CAN get a $100 PC to do what one of these boxes do, but you'll spend days to months stripping down the OS and customizing the UI to make it work, and even then it'll be slower and harder to use.

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Steve Knox

Re: I want one that works...

" I want H.265 support to watch my PC stored movies."

Plex works with Roku and most other boxen and you don't have to worry about codecs.

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Humble civil servant: Name public electric car chargers after me

Steve Knox

Re: So

Accompanied by a horrendous screeching sound?

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Knock, knock? Oh, no one there? No problem, Amazon will let itself in via your IoT smart lock

Steve Knox
Holmes

Foyer

Mudroom,

Porch,

Airlock.

Just a few names for similar concepts, where you have two doors between the outside world and your private areas. They don't need to have the same keys.

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Phone crypto shut FBI out of 7,000 devices, complains chief g-man

Steve Knox
Paris Hilton

Weak Logic

The problem does not arise in the UK, where it is a criminal offence to refuse to give your password to State investigators.

Oh?

Is the penalty for withholding one's password as severe as or worse than the penalty for the various crimes such evidence may be used for?

How does imprisoning or fining one suspect assist in tracking down others?

Or are you saying that suspects are so polite in the UK that, on hearing that it's (GASP) not proper for them to withhold their passwords, they all immediately surrender said passwords?

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Supreme Court to rule on whether US has right to data stored overseas

Steve Knox
Childcatcher

Re: Interesting tussle coming up ...

The US has a long (and proud?) tradition of extra-territoriality...

As opposed to the British, who have absolutely no history* of such behaviour.

* Because they opted to go the other route, viz. simply declaring any plot of earth which caught their fancy as part of their empire**.

** In spite of*** any objection from the poor people who happened to be living there.

***And often, to pour salt in the wound, ostensibly for the benefit**** of said people.

**** The benefit being, of course, to teach them Proper English Manners*****.

***** Up to, but not including, of course, the manners found in *.

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Western Dig's MAMR is so phat, it'll store 100TB on a hard drive by 2032

Steve Knox
Meh

Re: Why not SSD Drives?

LTO3 (400GB) , LTO4 (800GB) used tape drives...

1. When you've got 4TB of data, even an 800GB tape drive is not so useful.

2. I'd trust a used HDD before I trusted a used tape drive.

$50 to $100 for LTO3 and around $200-$250 for LTO4. With new unused tapes costing from $5 to $15 for both LTO3 and LTO4 (depending on sellers).

So that's (benefit of the doubt to you) $50 for the LTO3 drive and $50 for the ten tapes it'd take to store 4TB = $100 for LTO3, or $200 for the LTO4 Drive and $25 for the five tapes = $225 for LTO4.

Or you could just get a 4TB USB3 backup drive for $100 and enjoy faster and more selective backup/restore and not have to swap fscking tapes all the time.

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Is that a bulge in your pocket or... do you have an iPhone 8+? Apple's batteries look swell

Steve Knox
Facepalm

Re: Obligatory

"This is my personal commitment to El Reg, every time one of their authors uses it I’ll ask them nicely in the comments to grow the fuck up."

Because! That's! Worked! So! Well! With! Their! Other! Memes!

Seriously, man, this is a site of trolls. The writers, the readers, the commenters, the editors -- all trolls. "Biting the hand that feeds IT" -- get it? How could you not have gotten it in over EIGHT YEARS of visiting this site?

But no, you've just done the one thing you don't do to a troll: you've exposed your weakness. Look forward to the phrase "Cupertino idiot-tax operation" showing up in every article even remotely related to Apple, and in every single comments section you ever participate in from here on out.

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Yahoo! search! results!, recommendations!, ad! flinging! code! is! now! open! source!

Steve Knox
Meh

"Vespa is the single greatest piece of software Yahoo ever built,"

High praise indeed.

This post was brought to you by the Sarcasm Standards Institute. If your sarcasm detector registered a 7.3, it is properly calibrated. Have a nice day.

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Microsoft: We've made a coding language for a quantum computer that may or may not exist

Steve Knox
Thumb Up

Microsoft's Quantum OS

Both vulnerable to malware and in the middle of restarting to install updates at the same time!

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Pirate Bay digs itself a new hole: Mining alt-coin in slurper browsers

Steve Knox
Paris Hilton

Re: ...support the website without seeing porno I am in...

This would only hurt his bottom line...

The pirating or the porno?

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Microsoft teases web-based Windows Server management console

Steve Knox
Trollface

Management Console looks good...

but what's that flat, boring skin they're using for Chrome there?

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Senators call for '9/11-style' commission on computer voting security

Steve Knox

Re: Not The Real. Problem

What we actually saw was 1,101,178 voters voting and 1,115,664 votes cast - both those numbers are from the Chicago election board.

Both of those numbers are from this story: http://chicagocitywire.com/stories/511195461-election-board-lists-more-general-election-votes-than-voters-in-chicago

That story also includes this explanation from the Chicago Board of Election Commissioners:

Jim Allen, a board spokesman, said that the list [of 1,101,178 voters] turned over to the Chicago Republicans was incomplete and handed over prematurely.

“Not all voters were entered electronically into the system at first,” he said. “They have since been added.”

End of story.

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Steve Knox
FAIL

Re: Not The Real. Problem

You're absolutely correct.

What you've described is not the real problem.

In fact, it's not a REAL problem at all:

Registered Voters, Chicago Illinois, 2016 general election: 1,570,529

Votes Cast, Chicago Illinois, 2016 general election: 1,115,664

(https://chicagoelections.com/)

This is a 71% turnout, which is consistent with the region historically.

The real problem is morons who still believe Fox News and ultra-conservative blogs after they've repeatedly proven that they believe lying is a valid tactic for pushing their political agendas.

There is no credible source which supports the story you're repeating.

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Terry Pratchett's unfinished works flattened by steamroller

Steve Knox

Re: I'm touched by the weirdness of this request...

Is there a suggested reading order?

Yes. Don't skip over the footnotes.

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Daily Stormer booted off internet again, this time by Namecheap

Steve Knox

Guidance and Indemnity

Was Namecheap registrar, hosting provider, or both to Daily Stormer?

The role of a registrar is to map text strings to numerical addresses. They are, and should be, solely a technical resource, like a phone book. They should also be treated legally, and by society, as such, and not held responsible for the content made available at those addresses.

Hosting providers, on the other hand, have to actually store and serve up the content. They bear greater risk of being associated with the content as well as infrastructure risk of excessive requests due to either spiking interest or DDOS attacks. Hence they should be allowed some leeway in what content they are willing to host.

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What's your point, caller? Oracle fiddles with major database release cycle numbers

Steve Knox
Trollface

Be More Concise!

How are we supposed to know if it's a x.1.x.x release and hence only for Americans as [N]o sane person would install a x.1.x.x Oracle DB? Last time I made that mistake was 10.1.0.4 oh disk corruption in asm when you add a new volume how I don't miss you.

There you go!

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BOFH: Oh go on. Strap me to your Hell Desk, PFY

Steve Knox

Re: True to tradition

I don't think he could have given the BOFH a big enough cut. 3 digits doesn't seem like much, unless you're talking percentages or fingers.

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Amazing new algorithm makes fusion power slightly less incredibly inefficient

Steve Knox
Terminator

Re: Optometrist Algorithm

Nah, this is computerized. So it's more like:

Which is better?

0?

<flip>

or 1?

<flip>

0?

<flip>

or 1?

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US Homeland Sec boss has snazzy new laptop bomb scanning tech – but admits he doesn't know what it's called

Steve Knox
Mushroom

...terrorists had developed a method of packing explosives into notebooks...

On a completely unrelated note, whatever happened to all the batteries from those Note 7s, anyway?

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Bloke takes over every .io domain by snapping up crucial name servers

Steve Knox
Pirate

Double-edge

Also, it's doubly worth pointing out that DNS lookups are often cached, so the chances that a lookup will go all the way to the authoritative servers, and hit one of the hijacked ones, is low.

On the other hand, for exactly the same reason, any lookup which did hit a hijacked server might remain cached by non-authoritative name servers and be served up to all of their clients until either the operator of the caching servers finds out and clears the suspicious records or the TTL (which a malicious actor might set quite high*) expires...

* The TTL field in the DNS specification was originally a 32-bit signed integer, allowing values over 2 billion seconds (~68 years). Later clarification required that negative values be treated as 0, but still permits a 68-year positive TTL.

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Web inventor Sir Tim sizes up handcuffs for his creation – and world has 2 weeks to appeal

Steve Knox

Re: I don't see a problem.

You can't have an open source implementation of a DRM'ed browser without it leaking the content.

Actually it is possible, just very difficult.

Which is why the standard is recommending putting the DRM piece in the CDM, not the browser.

The CDM is the Flash-equivalent binary, except way simpler. The idea is to reduce the scope of the proprietary bits to the minimum needed to support DRM. It's a compromise that is actually very open source friendly.

And whether W3C approves it or not, it's already been here for years. Have you watched HTML5 video from Amazon, Netflix, Hulu, PornHub, et al. In any browser? Then you've been using a CDM.

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FREE wildcard HTTPS certs from Let's Encrypt for every Reg reader*

Steve Knox

Re: An admirable effort.

I believe this is what you meant to say:

This is true: "HTTPS = safer than HTTP"

This is NOT true: "HTTPS = safe"

Adding encryption is just one piece of a complex security framework.

PS. Damn you, El Reg! Complaining that you hadn't adopted HTTPS on every article in which you tell people to adopt HTTPS was one of the few pleasures I had left in this world!

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New work: Algorithms to give self-driving cars 'impulsive' human 'ethics'

Steve Knox

Re: Save the women and children first!

Firstly, having a choice does not equate to being in a position to make a choice, especially when that choice has to be made immediately and without time for analysis.

The parameters of the problem state that you are in a position to act, and most forms state that you do have time to make a choice, but not to analyze that choice. It's a snap decision, yes, but it is a decision.

Secondly, you seem to assume that everyone can make decisions easily and instantly when in reality many people find it difficult to make any decisions, let alone stressful ones; you can't simply claim that an inability to decide is a decision in itself.

This is the entire point of the Trolley Problem. It's an edge case exemplifying the line between thinking things through and snap decision making.

Perhaps you personally find it easy to make decisions - that's fair enough for you, but if you start projecting your decisiveness, or indeed any of your personal qualities, upon everyone else you're going to end up criticising everyone else for not being you.

I believe you misunderstand my point. My point is that if you are in the situation described by the Trolley Problem, then, whether you throw the switch or not, you are the only one with the capability to do so. Hence you have a burden of responsibility to do one or the other, and will personally have to live with the consequences of whatever you do.

I am not ascribing judgement on either choice, nor am I suggesting legal culpability would be a good thing in this case (as others have mentioned, the Good Samaritan laws exist specifically to prevent heaping legal trouble on top of the moral conundrum this type of problem poses.)

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Steve Knox

Re: Save the women and children first!

"if you do nothing then you can't be held responsible for the deaths of the several people because their fate would be the same as if you were not present and unable to influence the outcome."

No, because doing nothing when you have the capability to do something is a choice in and of itself. Hypothesizing about being removed from the situation is simply wishful thinking in an attempt to abdicate responsibility, not a valid logical argument.

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Steve Knox
Joke

Re: Save the women and children first!

The assumption is that this is a good thing but now you may be deliberately mowing down A to preserve B which will be making lawyers salivate.

Or run, depending on where they are with respect to the road...

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Search results suddenly missing from Google? Well, BLAME CANADA!

Steve Knox
Holmes

Re: JohnnyS777

Oh yeah, and if you don't want to be associated with animal care products, especially by a site known to take tech companies less than seriously, you may want to rethink your company's name -- it's amazing how many people know just enough Latin...

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Steve Knox
Happy

Re: JohnnyS777

Looks like somebody joined just to plug their company's point of view! Welcome, JohnnyS777!

That Title box above the comment area is for putting a relevant title to your post, not for repeating your handle.

Your arguments about Boeing and Jaguar are speculative and without merit, but to answer them anyway, I'd expect Boeing or Jaguar to pursue the case in all relevant jurisdictions, not to presume a single nation can dictate global activity with impunity.

The question at hand is whether a local judge has jurisdiction beyond their nation's sovereign borders. Do you believe that to be the case?

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Not Apr 1: Google stops scanning your Gmail to sling targeted ads at you

Steve Knox

Re: Cost

Scanning for spam detection and scanning for personal info for targeted ads are two different things.

Not as different as you apparently think. They're both essentially contextual key phrase scans. To be effective, they both require the same type of processing, and if you're doing one, the incremental cost of doing the other is very close to zero.

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Steve Knox
Facepalm

Re: Cost

Wait until the AI algorithms can filter out the spam...?

Without scanning it?

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Intel to Qualcomm and Microsoft: Nice x86 emulation you've got there, shame if it got sued into oblivion

Steve Knox

Re: Tough Times at Santa Clara

Your linked article is not evidence. It's hypothesis.

Specifically, it's a calculation based on published ratings and some tests (not linked or adequately documented) which is assumed to give a good estimate of performance per watt: "We are not pretending that our calculations are 100% accurate, but they should be close enough."

There are also a lot of "probably"s and "assume"s elsewhere in that article.

Evidence would be actually running specific loads on specific systems and comparing those results.

The whole idea of "x is more efficient then y" is incomplete, lacking the vital qualifier "at z."

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Steve Knox
Happy

Of course they welcome lawful competition

They've spent billions of dollars over the years writing those laws, they'd love it if their competitors followed them...

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We're not saying we're living in a simulation but someone's simulated the universe in a computer

Steve Knox
Alien

Re: Are we a simulation?

No. That's preposterous. Of course you're we're not in a simulation. Now just go back to your day, subject 3E1AC75B34FF21 yank_lurker...

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Steve Knox
Trollface

Re: That is not science..just a waste of time and resources!

Safe commenting tip: Don't forget the appropriate icon:

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The Big Blue Chopper video that IBM might want to keep quiet

Steve Knox
Facepalm

Re: I don't understand the outrage...

Do people REALLY think that CEOs, C-level people and Board Members travel economy/coach?

No. That's not the point.

At the top there are a LOT of jealously-guarded perks, and the use of chauffeur-driven cars, helicopters and corporate jets are amongst these perks. Different industry but remember the near-bankrupt US auto makers in 2010 heading to Washington to ask for Government money - they went by corporate jet.

Thanks for stating the blatantly obvious.

Is it right? No, it isn't, but it is a rare CEO or Board Member who will share the pain in fiscally-pressured times. Perhaps they should, but it is unlikely to ever happen.

If you can say that it is unlikely for a human being to do what should be done, and not understand why that fact should cause outrage, you are beyond numb.

7
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Gay Dutch vultures become dads

Steve Knox

"Gay Teutonic Vultures"

aaand someone's got a new band name...

8
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Microsoft Master File Table bug exploited to BSOD Windows 7, 8.1

Steve Knox

Re: "by Dave Cutler, who Microsoft hired as the NT team leader."

However aren't most of the desktop Windows from a later, not NT code base?

No. Windows 1.x, 2.x, 3.x, 95, 98, and ME are the non-NT desktop Windows versions.

Windows NT 3.x, 4.x, 2000, XP, Vista, 7, 8 and 10 are all based on the NT kernel (with various pieces added/removed/rewritten over time.) 2000 was the last NT version which used the same name/number for server and desktop versions, but Server 2003 is based on the same major kernel as XP, 2008 is based on the Vista kernel, 2008R2 on 7, 2012 on 8, and 2016 is based on the 10 kernel.

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Steve Knox

Re: More like from the 1970s

The fundamental problem here is that a container for internal state for NTFS appears as a file in the file name space.

No, the problem is not exposing internals as files (that's a convenience found in many systems [/dev , /proc anyone?]), but in not properly securing said internals.

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Vegemite tries to hijack Qantas name-our-planes competition

Steve Knox

Honor Australia's Greatest Hero.

Name one of them "A Knife" and the other seven "Not A Knife"

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Don't gripe if you hand your PC to Geek Squad and they rat you out to the Feds – judge

Steve Knox

Re: I can understand offering bounties...

Which is why the FBI didn't use the image to charge the "good" doctor, but instead used it to obtain a search warrant. Evidence requirements for obtaining a search warrant are lighter than for prosecutions -- otherwise you'd have to prove a crime was committed before you could search for evidence of crime.

Bit of a cart, horse problem there.

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2

Sophos waters down 'NHS is totally protected' by us boast

Steve Knox
Joke

Homeopathy for Computers

Here. -> 1010 <- Install these bits on your computer. They're a memory dump from an infected PC distilled to 5C, so they should provide adequate immunity.

1
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Warm, wet, mysterious... sound familiar? Ah, yes, you've heard of this second Neptune, too

Steve Knox

Re: " it may be telling us that there’s more to planet formation than we expect."

Based on what I understand of current theory (and I understand that I do not understand enough),

I believe it says "we don't know what parameters could produce a planet like this."

So not so much that it's wrong but that it's incomplete. Not surprising since until recently our sample size for planetary observations was less than 10 entities in a single environment.

This finding exemplifies why I fully support searching for and investigating exoplanets. I bear no illusions that we will visit any of these planets in the foreseeable future, but understanding the possibilities and how they come to be helps understand both the overall physics of the universe and the specific physics of our locality.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 ARM-twist comes closer with first demonstration

Steve Knox
Holmes

Never looked into what the acronym WINE means, huh?

I won't spoil it for you. Suffice to say that what WINE is is much tougher to get right than a simple CPU emulator.

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1

Go, GoDaddy! Domain-slinger decapitates email patent troll in court

Steve Knox

Seriously!?

"GoDaddy's attorney and legal fees in the case, around $14,000."

So did they just use an unpaid intern, or did it take just about 10 billable hours for their attorney to prove how useless those patents were?

17
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How to remote hijack computers using Intel's insecure chips: Just use an empty login string

Steve Knox
Holmes

Re: AMD

When it comes to bugs, I'll take probably over definitely any day.

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Steve Knox
Facepalm

Sad...

...when the better function to use is also easier to use, and in fact on the same man page.

7
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Gamers red hot with fury over Intel Core i7-7700 temperature spikes

Steve Knox
Trollface

By Design

"For the i7-7700K, momentary temperature changes from the idle temperature are normal while completing certain tasks like opening a browser or an application," a spokesperson said.

"It's normal for the temperature to rise while the CPU is logging the task completion for later transmission to the proper authorities."

1
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Big mistake by Big Blue: Storwize initialisation USBs had malware

Steve Knox
Trollface

Re: Malicious malware copies itself to /tmp/initTool

How do you get trojan.win32.reconyc to load and execute from the /tmp directory on Linux or Mac systems?

Well, first you need to install and configure Wine...

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