* Posts by Steve Knox

1920 posts • joined 16 Jul 2011

Trump pulls trigger in US-China tit-for-tat tariff tiff: 10% slapped on $200bn of imported kit

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Why the icon?

Referring to the current POTUS?

Your statement is more truth than joke.

20
1

Microsoft pulls plug on IPv6-only Wi-Fi network over borked VPN fears

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: Why do we need IPv6

Seriously. Why more than one public IP per household, and maybe a dozen or so on average per organization?

Because most people have more than one device, and most organizations have more than a dozen or so devices.

No.

Most people do not have eve ONE device which needs to be publicly accessible. That's why most ISPs only provide one IP address per consumer connection; you have to use a NATing router (some ISPs even NAT you again internally). Have you got a consumer-grade WiFi router at home? Then you're almost certainly using NAT and getting private IP addresses for devices on your home network -- probably 192.168.x.x but possibly 10.x.x.x.

I don't know of any organization which does not use NAT to hide all non-public machines. Yes, you'll need an IP address for your webserver (but not a dedicated one if you use shared hosting), e-mail server (ditto on the shared hosting) and any edge routers you have (except those for private WAN routing) but for most companies that comes to well below a dozen IPs. Those few who need more are likely using the internet to allow tunneling VPN access to or between physical locations. This should average out to, as I said, fewer than a dozen per organization.

2
0
Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: Why do we need IPv6

Why do you believe it's reasonable for hundreds of devices per person to have public IP addresses?

Seriously. Why more than one public IP per household, and maybe a dozen or so on average per organization?

11
4

Berkeley bio-boffins' butt-blasting belly-bothering batt-teria generates electricity

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Terminator

Great.

Soon when our batteries fail, they won't just be munitions; they'll be biological weapons...

5
0

Trend Micro tools tossed from Apple's Mac App Store after spewing fans' browser histories

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: VW-ing (cheating) the App-Store screening?

Could Trend Micro have coded the apps to detect when they are being tested by Apple and not do the data slurp?

More likely Apple does the test on a clean VM, so no data to slurp.

2
0

Facebook flogs dead horse. By flog, we mean sues. And by horse, we mean BlackBerry

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Holmes

Tell me again...

...where these lawsuits were filed?

3
0

Ever wanted to strangle Microsoft? Now Outlook, Skype 'throttle' users amid storm cloud drama

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: we are the Cloud, you will adapt to service us. RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Yep, whats worse tho, an outage that microsoft spends it's time fixing or one you do?

One Microsoft spends its time fixing. Because they "fix" it by deploying an untested update which prolongs the pain. Did you even read the article?

Power goes out, how long does your UPS last, bro?

Til my generator kicks in. Which works until the issue is over or until the secondary site is brought up. That's what happens when you properly plan business continuity solutions, instead of chasing buzzwords.

Enjoy being bad at computers tho.

Right back at you, bro.

42
1

‘Very fine people’ rename New York as ‘Jewtropolis’ on Snapchat, Zillow

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Re: Trump bashing inaccurate here

Ever notice how righties always have to go back 30+ years to find an example of a leftie being racist, just so they don't feel so bad about their current hero being racist?

7
8

Quit that job and earn $185k... cleaning up San Francisco's notoriously crappy sidewalks

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: Scope creep

"phase two when you'll have to start disposing of the bodies..."

Or phase 3:

"I'm not dead yet!"

....

"Who's that?"

"Dunno. Must be a software developer."

"Why?"

"He hasn't got shit all over himself."

12
0

It's a net neutrality whodunnit: Boffins devise way to detect who's throttling transit

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: adamsmith.com

I miss amanfrommars

6
3

It may be poor man's Photoshop, but GIMP casts a Long Shadow with latest update

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: Forget the geeky stuff, sort out the user experience.

1. What's hard to understand about GNU Image Manipulation Program? It's a Program to Manipulate Images, brought to you by GNU. Makes sense to me.

2. Neither Adobe PhotoShop nor JASC PaintShop Pro allow you to sell or buy photos or paints. How is that easier to understand? I think it's more that you're familiar with them so you assume novices will be as well. At best you may argue that PhotoShop has become a colloquial term, but that's simply brand penetration, not clear naming to begin with.

3. Even if you only know it by GIMP, since it is not pre-installed on any systems that I know of, how would it even end up on a novice user's machine without them downloading it, at which point one would assume they've been to a website which describes to some degree what the software does.

5
7

Fire chief says Verizon throttled department's data in the middle of massive Cali wildfires

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: Unlimited; that word does not mean what you think it means

Verizon was true to its word: unlimited data, nothing was said about unlimited speed.

Are you a troll or an idiot? The latter is a derivative of the former over time. You cannot limit one without limiting the other.

5
2
Steve Knox
Silver badge
FAIL

Even their "good" practice is bad.

"Regardless of the plan emergency responders choose, we have a practice to remove data speed restrictions when contacted in emergency situations."

Then why implement the data speed restrictions in the first place? Why make emergencies worse by putting up an entirely artificial barrier to efficient resolution?

42
0

'Oh sh..' – the moment an infosec bod realized he was tracking a cop car's movements by its leaky cellular gateway

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: Default passwords? In this day and age?

What!? They've hacked my luggage!?

64
1

Drama as boffins claim to reach the Holy Grail of superconductivity

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: As usual, incredible claims come from far away

Statistically, most of anything comes from far away...

Well, if you want to get technical, the vast majority of stuff is far away, but doesn't come here. It's moving away at an increasing rate.

All the stuff you mentioned is staggeringly close to hand in comparison.

2
0

Boffins build the smallest transistor, controlled by an atom

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Coat

"It has potential..."

Wouldn't that be a battery?

6
0

Click this link and you can get The Register banned in China

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Interesting cultural intersection.

Now can you do a piece on the Annoying Orange and see if Trump will ban you?

1
0

Make Facebook, Twitter, Google et al liable for daft garbage netizens post online – US Senator

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: I wonder...

Of course they should. And this bill will pass at about the same time as the bill holding them liable.

8
10

Windows Server 2019 tweaked to stop it getting clock-blocked

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: 1 second

Don't account for leap seconds and in a couple of years time you are 30+ seconds out which means that no TOTP system (like Google Authenticator, banking apps, etc.) will generate the right codes if they are using different clocks that do (e.g. in a smartphone).

No. FTA:

[Since 1972] To date, there have been 27 leap seconds added – when clocks show 23:59:60 rather than rolling over to 00:00:00 after 23:59:59. The other 10 seconds arrived as a bulk adjustment in 1972.

Even including the 10-second block in 1972, that's 37 seconds over 46 years, or 0.8 per year. Even if we round up to 1/year, it would take 30 years to be 30 seconds out. By then you're likely to have replaced any system you're using for OTP 3-6 times over.

0
0

One two three... Go: Long Pig Microsoft avoids cannibalising Surface

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: No

Didn't know it was a typo -- this was the first article I read on the device, and 800x1200, though in portrait mode, is a much more common resolution than 1800x1200.

However, my point still stands -- and is perhaps reinforced:

1. my 5-year old 8-inch tablet still has a higher resolution, and cost significantly less.

2. 1800x1200 is still not FHD, as a minimum horizontal resolution of 1920 is required for that.

This second point makes me think someone at Microsoft wanted to keep this product on-point and didn't want people looking to use it as a budget FHD media player, as it's suspiciously close to FHD.

4
3
Steve Knox
Silver badge
Stop

No

"The 10-inch 800 x 1200 (217 PPI) resolution is impressive."

No, it most definitely is not. I have a 5 year old tablet with 4x that resolution that cost under $200 back then. Anything under FHD is unacceptable on any device with a screen over 3" in size.

10
9

Thanks for the happy memories, Micron – now beat it, says China: Court bans chip sales

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: People’s Court

Actually, the apostrophe in "People's Court" is correct -- just as the full name of China is indeed the "People's Republic of China" -- "people" in this case is a singular noun referring to all of the individuals in China as a unit (similar to "group" or "team"), so it takes the singular possessive form.

"Peoples" is not possessive, and "Peoples' Court" necessarily means a court for multiple nationalities, tribes or other groups of people, because people as a plural of person never has a trailing s, so "peoples'" must be the possessive plural of "people".

See http://www.dictionary.com/browse/peoples -- especially the section on usage, which touches on the possessive.

3
0
Steve Knox
Silver badge

Yes, but Taiwan doesn't have a big orange potato talking smack about Chinese steel and doing everything in its power to start a global trade war.

31
1

Microsoft has another crack at fixing Chrome problems in Windows 10

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Best fix for Chrome...

install Firefox.

Yeah. Because the pesky part of "performance problems" is the "performance" part..

1
4

Unbreakable smart lock devastated to discover screwdrivers exist

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Facepalm

3. We are giving replacements to anyone who is able to open the back-cover without damaging the locks.

Because criminals are going to try to not damage the locks? If the back cover can be removed, damage or no, then the lock is not fit for purpose.

22
0

Computer Misuse Act charge against British judge thrown out

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: Thrown out? Or she should be jailed?

Ummm ...., you seem to have lost sight of the fact that if you are not found guilty you haven't broken the law.

That is entirely incorrect. Whether or not someone broke the law is dependent solely and entirely upon the intersection between their acts and activities proscribed by statutes.

Whether not someone is found guilty is dependent on an entirely different set of factors, including but not limited to:

a. the amount of evidence against them,

b. the amount of evidence they are successful in having invalidated,

c. their ability to fund a legal defense,

d. their influence in judicial and political circles.

1
2

Have to use SMB 1.0? Windows 10 April 2018 Update says NO

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: So for a while now...

The BSOD has been available for Linux since 1998:

https://www.jwz.org/xscreensaver/screenshots/

1
0

Stern Vint Cerf blasts techies for lackluster worldwide IPv6 adoption

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Analogy Units

This is 2 million times (2^(53-32) = 2^21) more than IPv4; still a lot, but not mind-bogglingly vast.

2^53 is over 900 000 000 000 000. That's approximately 1.2 million addresses for every living person on the planet.

Except it isn't -- it's 1.2 million network addresses for every living person. Each network can contain about 2^64 = over 1 800 000 000 000 000 000 devices for over 2 200 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 devices for every living person.

But what about companies, you say? Well, there are about 115 million companies in the world. Let's make them need about 60 x more network addresses (on average) than individuals. Why 60? Because that makes their total effect roughly equal to the individual effect, and I'm lazy. So instead of 1 200 000 networks with up to 2 200 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 devices per entity, we're talking 600 000 networks with up to 1 100 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 devices. (That would actually be 600 000 networks per person, and 36 000 000 networks per company.)

This means that even if 99.9999999999999% of IPv6 address space gets wasted, it's still bigger than IPv4.

Put another way, even with the waste you mention, IPv4's address space is less than 0.0000000000001% of IPv6's.

1
1
Steve Knox
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: Belgium

HOW DARE YOU USE THAT WORD OUTSIDE OF A SERIOUS SCREENPLAY?

15
1
Steve Knox
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: New unit of measurement

You only need 16GB of storage to store all IPv4 addresses.

6
0

America's comms watchdog takes on the internet era's real criminals: Pirate pastors

Steve Knox
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Whooosh!

Also, seems to be trying to restore favour with (American-definition) liberals after destroying net neutrality.

Why would (American-definition) liberals care about some superstitious cult leaders abusing an obsolete broadcast technology that is wholly irrelevant to their streaming services? Or desire additional support for cable companies to bilk their customers?

If this guy's trying to appease US liberals, he's failing miserably.

6
12

You have GNU sense of humor! Glibc abortion 'joke' diff tiff leaves Richard Stallman miffed

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: Shouldn’t quality and professionalism be the issue?

Let’s also make clear that there are many of us who believe Stallman should simply be muted and censored as his behavior is generally reprehensible.

So you believe that censorship is acceptable behavior? I happen to think it can be, in one specific set of circumstances.

Censorship of others is at best morally questionable: even when their statements appear reprehensible to the rest of us, logically countering them is generally much more productive.

However, self-censorship is a very useful practice, as it can preserve one's reputation and prevent foot-in-mouth disease. Give it a try, won't you?

49
3

Microsoft's most popular SQL Server product of all time runs on Linux

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: laugh or cry

Microsoft know the vast majority of users will eventually want features like always on availability group clustering in production so they will eventually need SQL on Windows Server and then end up paying for the fully capable version.

1. You can do Always On Availability Groups on Linux.

2. If you're using it for production data, you still need to license SQL Server on Linux, same way, same price as SQL Server on Windows.

3. Microsoft has stated that their long-term goal is feature parity between SQL Server on Linux and SQL Server on Windows. Many of the features not supported on Linux are features that have been deprecated on the Windows version for some time, so I expect those features to fade away in Windows rather than be implemented on Linux.

1
0

Nvidia quickly kills its AMD-screwing GeForce 'partner program' amid monopoly probe threat

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Stop

Nope.

Nvidia's GeForce is one of few gaming super-brands so you could forgive the company for imagining it could use that market power to tie companies into its chips.

No, I can't. And you shouldn't. Antitrust law is clear on this type of thing, and only gross incompetence on a massive scale would prevent a corporation like Nvidia from knowing this.

56
1

FCC shifts its $8bn pot of gold, sparks fears of corporate money grab

This post has been deleted by a moderator

It's World (Terrible) Password (Advice) Day!

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Trollface

Sensible Rules

1. Require a fixed-length password, so that it can be stored and retrieved efficiently.

2. Require a specific pattern of {lower-case letter}{upper-case letter}{number}{special character}

3. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES ALLOW:

Spaces ( )

Quotes (')

Double-quotes (")

Ampersands (&)

Backslashes (\)

Forward Slashes (/)

ASCII control characters

Anything other than 7-bit ASCII printable characters (specifically ASA X3.4-1965, to maintain compatibility with IBM 2260s)

4. Determine the average amount of time to brute-force a password created using these rules, and require password changes at least twice as frequently*.

5. Require all employees to share their current passwords with their manager in case of emergency.

Problem solved!

* In fact, just require a password change every time a user logs in. Make sure to automatically lock that workstation when idle for over 1 minute!

25
2

Apple somehow plucks iPad sales out from 13-quarter death spiral

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: iPad user here

iPads aren't proper computers

Really? Do tell us your definition of a "proper" computer.

While you're at it, perhaps you could explain the difference between a Scotsman and a True Scotsman...

9
0

LLVM contributor hits breakpoint, quits citing inclusivity intolerance

Steve Knox
Silver badge

You're not the only source of information in the universe.

A lot of people have asked how different classes of people are represented, and what they've found is that the systems that have evolved around various types of work have evolved to support individuals who closely conform to majority norms.

Of course you couldn't give a fuck. You're not affected (except in a positive way.)

15
29

Whoa, Gartner drops a truth bomb: Blockchain is overhyped and top IT bods don't want it

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: Make your mind up Gartner

There aren't enough skilled engineers to implement Blcokchains.

Case in point?

2
0

Texas residents start naming adopted drains

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: Scary...

"Some"? Based on the numbering scheme, at least 260! This company, whatever it is, seems to have a predilection for big, wet holes!

As for names, how about

"a hole in the road where the rain goes out"

or

"Spout! Spout! Let it all out!"

It remains to be seen how many of these adopters will actually do the work to merit the name. In other words I wonder -- still I wonder -- who'll swab their drains?

1
0

We just wanna torque: Spinning transfer boffins say torque memory near

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: Intriguing....

You'd still just reboot -- or you may be able to get away with restarting a given service or component (or you would if anyone really cared about writing a truly modular OS anymore.../rant>).

The key here is working memory -- That contains current state data, which the OS should reset to reasonable start-up values restart.

1
0

if dev == woman then dont_be(asshole): Stack Overflow tries again to be more friendly to non-male non-pasty coders

Steve Knox
Silver badge

I'm anonymous, am I a man or a woman?

I can say with a fair degree of certainty that you are.

26
0

Sprint, T-Mobile US sitting in a tree, M-E-R-G-I-N-G

Steve Knox
Silver badge

The deal almost certainly won't sail through, given the competitive implications that flow from reducing the number of major mobile carriers in America. So brace for regulatory rumblings a-plenty before the deal goes down.

Have you forgotten who's running the regulatory show on this side of the pond right now?

Given that, I'd say the odds of a serious regulatory block are significantly lower than you imply here -- unless Sinclair Broadcast Group feels threatened.

5
0
Steve Knox
Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: It's technically an acquisition, but the headline fit so perfectly we couldn't resist

Passable rhyme (the only one given the limited source pattern), unacceptable meter.

2/10

7
1

Oracle demands dev tear down iOS app that has 'JavaScript' in its name

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Which is Which?

...the standard on which JavaScript is based, the ECMAScript programming language.

Shouldn't that be "...ECMAScript, the standard which is based on the JavaScript programming language"?

JavaScript was created between May and December 1995. ECMAScript didn't show up until 1997, and it was based almost entirely on Netscape's submission of JavaScript.

Perhaps you could say that future versions of JavaScript were specifically aligned with ECMAScript from there on out, but JavaScript was the original.

9
0

Whois is dead as Europe hands DNS overlord ICANN its arse

Steve Knox
Silver badge

If that level of interest is repeated for other internet addresses under ICANN control, like .com, .org and .net, Neylon says it will be "perfectly manageable" from his business' perspective.

Which is unlikely.

Not only is .com itself 13x the size of .uk, but it still holds the sites of most interest to those who would query WHOIS. There's a reason .com accounts for almost half of all existing DNS names and almost 80% of new registrations.

3
0

'Well intentioned lawmakers could stifle IoT innovation', warns bug bounty pioneer

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Title should be

Well intentioned lawmakers should stifle IoT innovation

20
0

European Space Agency squirts a code update at Mars Express orbiter

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Joke

Side effects...?

"We were also helped by being able to take code flown on Rosetta and transplant it into the Mars Express guidance software."

Here's hoping there aren't any passing comets...

8
0

Wanna work for El Reg? Developers needed for headline-writing AI bots

Steve Knox
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Just as our cousins in the newspaper world had to ditch their unionized hot-metal printers as well as other follies such as accuracy and dignity...

So glad El Reg never had to sacrifice, those last two...

5
0

Any social media accounts to declare? US wants travelers to tell

Steve Knox
Silver badge

Re: What about the El Reg commentardiat?

I've always considered it more of an antisocial media account.

57
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018