* Posts by Boothy

665 posts • joined 17 Jun 2011

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UK's lords want more details on adult website check plans

Boothy

What is this fixing?

Ignoring the fact (initially) that this is something that we all know won't actually stop anyone that really wants to watch 'stuff'.

All this time an effort to (try and) implement age verification for porn sites in some way yet to be defined.

So what current problem is this actually fixing? i.e. why is this even being discussed?

Is this just another generic "Think of the children!" bandwagon that a few politicians have jumped on?

Business case: If effort out-ways benefits, then don't do it. Especially when the 'benefits' seem to be perceived, rather than actual benefits!

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Devs reverse-engineer 16,000 Android apps, find secrets and keys to AWS accounts

Boothy

Quote: "You're then meant to create an "application specific" api key, which will only ever have permissions to do what is needed for that application. It is this api key that should be hardcoded in to the application, not the master key."

Yup this.

But one of the issues tends to be that some API services are very complex, and when generating a new application key, there can be a lot of boxes to tick/untick, and often the provided documentation isn't clear as to what is needed for specific functions/services to work.

I've gone through similar things myself (just for testing, not live applications), where an application key, ticked with all the permissions you think are needed after reading the documentation, doesn't work! Yet using a key with everything ticked, works fine, and it can be a sizeable tasks trying to whittle down the key permissions, to the minimum needed for the application still to work.

Not helped by the fact that often once a key is generated, you can't change permissions after the fact, and have to delete the old key, and generate a new key, for each new set of options to test, meaning you have to update your application each time before testing again.

My guess here is that some developers likely couldn't get a minimal key to work (or just didn't bother creating one!), and just ticked lots of options till it did, and unfortunately left in permissions that an application really shouldn't have!

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Microsoft Germany says Windows 7 already unfit for business users

Boothy

Re: Anyone Else Here Still On XP?

Don't have any machines running XP native anymore, but I do have it in a VM for the rare occasion when needed (usually some ancient legacy game that is so it it won't run in 7).

It's like visiting an old friend, doesn't mater how longs it's been since you last saw each other, you know exactly what's what and it feels like home again!

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Boothy

Indeed.

People (marketeers) still seem to try to compare the current PC market, to the one 15+ years ago.

Back then a 2 or 3 year old PC could be replaced by a similarly priced new one, that would likely be twice as fast as the one it replaced, and with software getting more bloated advance, the performance jump was usually quite noticeable, and generally financially justifiable.

These days a typical mid-range PC (i.e. typical business use laptop), won't be much faster than one from 4 (or more) years ago. The main changes in recent years being focused on power savings, rather than increasing actual computational power.

A quick look at my now venerable business only use laptop, a T420 from mid 2011, sporting an i5 @ 2.5GHz, with 8GB of RAM. Compare that to a new shiny T560, and it too has an i5, which runs at 2.8GHz (but only comes with 4GB RAM! But does have a slightly faster HDD (SSD only in the top end i7 model)).

Granted it's a newer gen i5, but a quick look at some CPU benchmarks and there is perhaps a 10-15% increase in performance, this after ~6 years of CPU development!

Almost all changes in the last 10 years (other than SSDs) have been minor incremental improvements.

I was told years ago that unless the 'new' device was at least 50% faster than the current device, a typical end user wouldn't actually notice the difference.

Cost (including the effort to reinstall everything), to move to a new PC/laptop, just isn't justifiable with current devices (power users being the likely only exception).

At this rate, people are likely to keep their current PCs/laptops for at least 5 years min, perhaps over 10 years, or until they physically break. Which also means most users will still with the OS that came on the device.

The World has changed Mr Marketeer, get used to it!

17
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BT installs phone 'spam filter', says it'll strain out mass cold-callers

Boothy

Re: Interesting development

Reminds me of the time I moved into a rented house about 12 years ago (no longer there), and I needed a phone line (on call, needed dial-up from home and this was before the company had VPN over broadband available).

The house had an existing line installed, with a master socket (an old one, no removable faceplate, but still a BT431A socket).

The line was dead, and the landlord wasn't interested in getting it hooked up for me, but said that I could do what I wanted with it myself.

So I called BT on my mobile, to get the line reconnected, to be told the house doesn't have an existing line! (The house also wasn't a new build, about 100 years old).

Me "But it does, I can see it!", BT: "nope, doesn't have one now, and its never had one in the past.", Me: "But I can see the socket". BT "Nope".

So I gave in and went through the process of getting a new line.

Turned out, they had a special offer on at the time, which meant no installation cost for new installations. A re-connection at the time was normally something like half the price of a new install.

The BT engineer turned up, started putting in a newline from the cabinet end, before coming to the house, only turned up once the new line was outside the house. At which point he noticed the old line going through the wall by the front door, and once let in the house, could see the existing master socket on the other side of the hole (no cabling inside the house)!

"Hmm, that's odd, oh well", and duly ripped out the old copper wire and socket, few in the new wire through the pre-existing hole, and fitted a new master socket.

So their poor records basically saved me some money, cost them some, and got me a nice shinny new line and socket!

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Boothy

Re: "huge computing power"

Quote: "...so it's not exactly hard to filter out all their calls and send the lot to a voicemail."

And presumably if it's redirecting to voicemail, BT are still getting their coin for connecting the call through, so they still get some revenue anyway.

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Windows 10 Anniversary Update crushed exploits without need of patches

Boothy

Re: 'Own AV' vs. The Rest

Personally, I'd move on from Defender on the first boot of any new install.

Also bear in mind, these OS changes enhance the security of Windows, irrespective of the AV in use, so still better to use something more capable than Defender anyway.

I think even MS stated Defender was basically intended as a bare bones minimum, for those who simply haven't bothered to install a 3rd party option, or don't understand that AV is needed, and to provide minimal protection when first going on-line etc. (i.e. before a user has downloaded and installed a 3rd party AV).

If you look on av-test.org (at their home AV listings) Defender currently comes joint bottom for Protection (along with Comodo), and the same can be seen on other sites.

Even if you don't want to spend money, the free versions of Avast and Bitdefender give the highest (along with other products) protection ratings, much better than Defender. (AVG doesn't score as high, but is another popular free AV).

I switched from Avast to Bitdefender a while back, as Avast was getting more and more annoying with various pop up notifications that were not important, and couldn't be removed, whereas Bitdefender is focused on minimal intervention (ideal for none techie friends and family).

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Boothy

Re: Windows is the lowest form of Desktop Experience available

Hmm, I call bull

Open new tab to bing.com

Enter mozilla and hit return..

First result, taking up most of the page is 'Mozilla - Official site', https://www.mozilla.org

At least it was for me. (But I also have uBlock Origin installed, which is one of the first things I add to any new Windows install, so your search results may differ!)

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Flight 666 lands safely in HEL on Friday the 13th

Boothy

Re: Well, it didn't crash...

I was going to say the same thing, but for 666, regularly shows up when something it going well

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Customer: BT admitted it had 'mis-sold' me fibre broadband

Boothy

Re: Pull out...

Also replacing the old NTE5 Master socket with a vDSL Openreach one can help as well.

My ex girfield was a long way from the exchange (miles), and not yet FTTC enabled (old cabinet) and managed about 4Mbps at best, and was flaky.

I replaced the standard face plate (NTE5), with a Mk3 vDLS one, and it went up to 6Mbps, and was a lot more stable.

She later switched to FTTC once her cabinet was updated, and gets ~20Mbps through the same socket now (20 is what she paid for).

Just search for 'BT Openreach MK3' on Amazon/ebay etc.

Also if you don't use them, disconnect any extensions coming out of the master socket. My old house had two extensions, and as I used a wireless phone plugged directly into the master socket, they weren't needed, so I just pulled the wires out from the back of the little removable plate. I went from ~16Mpbs to 18Mpbs at the time.

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Boothy

Re: Self check

Quote: "It may have been installed by Openreach, but if it's a LLU line (e.g. SKY, TT), BT will have no idea what telephone number they have allocated, so the number checker will fail and the address should be used instead."

Yup, it was Sky.

I was moving to a new build, with no phone line yet (copper in, but not connected) and BT wanted something like £70 to connect it up.

Whereas Sky would do it for free, and install a new Satellite dish, as long as I signed up for another 12 months of TV and landline rental with them (TV I was going to do anyway, and at the time Sky line rental was cheaper).

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Boothy

Re: Self check

Tried that site before, they don't seem to have full records, which is odd for a BT wholesale site!

If I put my land-line number in I get this:

"There is no data available for this number. This could be either because it is not a BT line or it is a new BT number that has just been provided. Most new numbers will appear on the checker 24 hours after BT has installed the line."

It was BT wholesale/openreach who put the line in. I know this, as I was there and spoke to the guy who did the work, he was in a BT Openreach van. (This was about 4 years ago, a new build, so well beyond the 24 hours!).

The alternate address checker states the data is 'indicative', and not specific to your line. (Although it does now seem to have more data than it used to a couple of years back).

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Boothy

Re: Cable?

Quote: "...when on the day of activation there isn't capacity on the cabinet/exchange"

Why would they not know this in advance?

Isn't this what records are for?

Shouldn't BT know exactly what the max capacity is at every cabinet, know exactly how many much has been provisioned so far, and exactly how many are in the queue to be activated, and therefore know what capacity is available?

Keeping records goes back to imprints in clay, and knots in strings, so surely this ins't outside of the reach of BT (and BT wholesale) to manage?

If they don't have this information available, then to me that means BT are incompetent, and shouldn't be allowed to be in business anymore!

18
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Reg straps on goggles from upstart that wants to 'democratize' VR

Boothy

Re: Back to front

Quote: "You could improve VR/ER by tracking eyeballs and only 3d rendering an apparent circle of focus 4 feet deep whilst rendering the rest in 2d."

Basically already on it's way.

What you're describing is close to what is known as foveated VR rendering (by nVidia), although it still renders the whole scene in 3D, the peripheries are not done in any detail (blurs out to the periphery).

Companies like Qualcomm are also working on foveated rendering for mobile devices.

This apparently reduces the required GPU load considerable, as the processor only needs to concentrate on a central cone of view. This means a large overall reduction in the GPU overhead for current VR.

This should help lower the entry level needed for current VR, and also allow more detail going forwards with existing top end cards, and pave the way for things like 4k per eye displays at 90+ Hz.

At the moment the tech from nVidia doesn't do eye tracking, but other people are also working on that as well, and there is no reason they couldn't be tied together.

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Oh Britain. Worried your routers will be hacked, but won't touch the admin settings

Boothy

Re: Default passwords etc

Quote: "So that next door's teenager can set it up for you without your knowledge, I assume."

How are next doors teenager going to get in without knowing the initial SSID and password?

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Boothy

Default passwords etc

Personally I think 'default' passwords, admin and WiFi (and SSIDs) shouldn't even exist.

Part of the initial set up should be to force the user to log into the router/modem and put these details in themselves, with minimum standards on the complexity etc.

Even with an issue these days being that not everyone has an Ethernet enabled device, that could still be handled.

A possible option could be to have an initial, default but restricted Wifi SSID and password (and possibly a restricted Ethernet), restricted to a DMZ that only allows access to the routers admin page, and not the Internet itself.

So the user connect to new shiny router, with <any device with WiFi/Ethernet and a web browser>. And if via WiFi, uses the initial 'temp' SSID and password.

User is presented with a simple configuration web page (irrespective of what URL they typed in), that forces the user to set up a new admin password for the router, and then a new WiFi SSID and password (or to disable the WiFi if they don't want to use it).

The router doesn't enable Internet access until these steps have been completed.

If you only put in the new admin password, and don't change the WiFi SSID and password, then only Ethernet get Internet access, with any WiFi connections still being DMZ restricted to the router admin page.

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New Windows 10 privacy controls: Just a little snooping – or the max

Boothy

Reminds me of settings for 'Flash', which were actually managed on a web page, rather than in a local control panel or application!

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Boothy

Re: What about automatic updates, automatic drivers updates ?

Quote: "In future they'll go GSOD. Green is good. Or did I mishear?"

That's only if using the pre-released development version, the 'live' releases are still the good old BSOD.

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Boothy

Some options that have been turned off, seem to turn themselves back on again at a later date without any notification!

I now run the O&O Shutup 10 tool every week or two, just in case!

0
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Boothy

Re: bah

It's an unfortunate situation for PC gamers I think.

I'm a keen PC gamer, (strategy games, and FPS games using Keyboard and mouse mostly) and likely 95%+ of the games released are Windows only. Often new games won't play under Wine or a VM (at least not in a playable state).

Quite a few indie titles tend to be cross-platform these days, often supporting Linux natively (and more rarely Mac OSX), and I thank the Devs for this.

But for the A+ titles from larger studios and publishers, it's still very very rare to have any none Windows version (other than consoles). Which is a real shame. :-/

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Boothy

Re: Fix it

After every main update to Win 10, I go grab the latest version from O&O and run it again, just in case!

I have noticed items that were previously disabled, have occasionally switched themselves back on after a patch!

Plus O&O do update the app, in sync with the Windows changes, so something turned off (or on) previously, they might now have changed their recommendation.

I also like that the O&O method, gets rid of Cortana, and Internet searches from the task bar, but still leaves you with a standard functional search box (for local apps/documents etc. Some other tools I've used, just got rid of the search bar completely, which i didn't want.

(It's very rare I ever launch the Start menu in Win 10, most everything I need is either Right click on Start, on my desktop, or a few characters typed into the search bar).

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PlayStation 4 probs: Gamers struggle with PSVR headset blackouts

Boothy

reddit usually is, at least in my experience.

If people start being uncivil, they get down-voted, and so their posts tend to vanish from site.

Perhaps I frequent nicer channels? (Usually tech, gaming or development related).

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CES 2017 roundup: The good, the bad, and the frankly bonkers

Boothy

Re: Nothing from Intel on this list?

When I first saw the 'Compute Card', the first thing that popped into my mind was how is this any different than basically a top end smart phone without a touch screen?

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Programmer finds way to liberate ransomware'd Google Smart TVs

Boothy

Re: Get off my lawn!

Quote: "So go to 'Choose what the power button does', then 'Change settings that are currently unavailable' and turn OFF 'Fast start-up'. Then it doesn't part-hibernate, and takes only a few seconds longer to boot. Power pack still lights the motherboard, though."

Yup, what Steve said.

Also not recommended to use Fast start-up on an SSD, as it increases the writes to the drive quite a bit, (dumping GBs of memory to the SSD on every shutdown) and it's not really needed on an SSD anyway (you might shave a couple of seconds on boot).

And unless you want to use hibernate, doing a 'powercfg /h off' from the CMD, gets rid of the old hibernate file, so saves a bit of space too. (Turning fast startup off, and even turning off hibernate in Windows settings, doesn't seems to actually switch it off fully and leaves the hiberfil.sys file behind, which can be several GB in size!).

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Boothy

Re: Get off my lawn!

Quote: "My windows 10 work pc has an item on the srat menu called power \ shut down , and when i click it the pc appears to switch off .

I'm not sure though i think its just pretending , in order to show off how quick it can "boot" up.

pstools say its been awake for weeks!"

Win 10 shut down is some form of hybrid hibernate. It shuts down apps, but as far as I know the OS itself is basically hibernated. It only gets a real full shutdown, when re-booting after updates etc.

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Lenovo shows off 'Microsoft-friendly' VR cosplay at CES

Boothy

Re: Major Problem

There are some gloves that have actuators on the back. As you grasp objects in the VR world, the gloves provide variable feedback, per finger, so you actually get tactile feedback to each finger individually, as if really holding something.

Apparently it good enough for people to be able to recognise different objects due to their 'feel'. i.e. recognise if something is hard or soft, what it's shape is etc.

Early days yet though.

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Facebook has stopped SHA-ring, a year later than it promised

Boothy

I'm curious as to who these 'users' are.

Are these people that are still using IE6 on XP or something?

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Microsoft's Edge to flush Adobe Flash in Windows 10 Creator’s Update

Boothy

If your using Firefox, just go to about:config, then find media.autoplay.enabled, and double click to disable.

If your a Chrome user, try this extension: Disable HTML5 Autoplay

It's Open Source for those interested in the code on github.

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Boothy

Re: BBC take note

The BBCs HTML5 support is still in beta, so it's opt-in currently.

Although if you don't have Flash installed/enabled in your browser, it will automatically switch to HTML5 anyway, without the need to opt-in.

As above, just go here to opt-in : http://www.bbc.co.uk/html5

There are also lots of technical details and other info on that page.

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Meet Hyper.is – the terminal written in HTML, JS and CSS

Boothy

I had a quick look

Think I'll stick with PuTTY thanks.

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Hardware Labs sees off Nvidia trademark sueball-smasher in court

Boothy

Why are Hardware Labs even doing this?

First, as people have mentioned, names like GTS, GTX etc are quite generic amongst performance devices.

nVidia also seem to have Prior art, as they've been using GTS since the 'GeForce2 GTS' in 2000, and GTX since at least 2005.

Hardware Labs, as far as I can tell from some searching (please correct me if anyone knows different), were founded in 2005, and made car parts back then!

At some point since then (and presumably after nVidia had been using the GTS and GTX names), they switched from producing car parts, to PC cooling radiators, and it's these radiators that have the GTS/GTX name.

So the only commonality, other than the name, is they are both for use in a PC, but otherwise are completely different product categories.

How exactly is anyone going to confuse a liquid cooling radiator, with a GFX Card?

Especially as these will be PC enthusiast components, i.e. people who build their own systems, and so can easily figure out what's what!

I can't see how Hardware Labs has a leg to stand on here, and I'd think this could even damage their own market, as any nVidia fanboy out there (and there are lots), on hearing about this, are likely to add Hardware Labs to their black-list, and go get their cooling solution from someone else!

0
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Fitbit picks up Pebble, throws Pebble as far as it can into the sea

Boothy

Re: weaselling

Wouldn't a better analogy be more like a fire sale?

From other comments, it seems Pebble were circling the drain already, with layoffs earlier in the year, and basically surviving on investor money (i.e. not actually making enough income to cover costs).

All they've done is sell off what bits they could (i.e. some/all of the IP), and try to protect a few jobs, before closing the doors on the business for good.

1
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Veeam kicks Symantec's ass over unpatentable patents

Boothy

Re: Patentable?

Court confirms patents "were not patentable"

Step 1. Patents are resided.

Step 2. Any existing court cases referencing the same patents are amended to remove those claims (if other patents are still in dispute), or court case is dismissed fully if only resided patents were involved, with any costs automatically going against the organisation that raised the case.

Step 3. Any members of staff at the Patent Office who were involved in approving the patents, are re-trained, disciplined and/or sacked, as appropriate.

Step 4. All existing, and any new Patent requests from the same organisation (or any related to them) to have additional scrutiny applied, for a period of time determined by how serious the issue was (e.g. for the next 5 years, and assuming no further stupid requests are made (i.e. if a stupid request is made, the 5 years starts again)).

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Portable drive, 5TB capacity. Hmm, there's something fishy here

Boothy

You'd have thought they could have thrown a few benchmarks in there to make it at least look like they did something with the drive!

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Run a JSON file through multiple parsers and you'll get different results every time

Boothy

You seem to be stating that Jackson is failing simply because of the use of UTF-16, and stating use UTF-8 to 'fix' the issue!

Try reading the actual specs (or the referenced article).

Quote: "JSON text SHALL be encoded in UTF-8, UTF-16, or UTF-32. The default encoding is UTF-8".

If Jackson is failing due to the encoding alone, then the failure is with Jackson, not the encoding.

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Netflix reminds password re-users to run a reset

Boothy

Re: Passwords

I suspect this would have been a management decision, and the people in IT likely tried to tell them why it was a bad idea, and would simply have been ignored.

That's why in any decent company, you should have a dedicated, and suitably qualified security expert, that the management are not allowed to overrule.

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Boothy

Re: Amazon too

I like Amazons approach.

Not just an email warning like some sites (which no doubt many users would simply ignore), but a forced reset, therefore hopefully blocking anyone who's accessing your account unauthorised, forcing the user to actually do something to gain access to the services again.

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Y'know that ridiculously expensive Oculus Rift? Yeah, it just got worse

Boothy

Re: Still not sure..

HTC already updated the cables used for the Vive, from the rather heavy and stiff 3-cable ribbon they started with, to a lighter more flexible single cable (direct replacement part, just plugs in to existing headsets).

Plus they are working on wireless, but that automatically gives you bandwidth, latency, and of course power issues.

There are also back-pack PCs available now, that are basically a high end laptop, with extra large batteries and cooling vents. The Vive has an advantage there, as the tracking stations (the lighthouses), don't need to connect to the PC, leaving you completely un-tethered.

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Boothy

Audio

Quote: "The fact that Oculus has gone to the trouble of creating a custom audio socket is just another sign of the organization's desire to create an entirely walled garden."

Compare that with the HTC Vive, that has both a standard 3.5mm headphone socket, plus an unused USB socket, both on the headset itself, leaving the user free to use just about and headset type they want!

28
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Google's home tat falls flat as a soufflé – but look out Android makers

Boothy
Coat

Re: Price and choice.

+ 1 for the OnePlus, wait.... I'll get my coat

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Google may just have silently snuffed the tablet computer

Boothy

I've had a few Nexus devices, last one being the Nexus 5 (original). They always seemed to be a reasonable spec, at a reasonable price, without being messed with by carriers and manufacturers.

But now, the last Nexus devices, and the new Pixels, just seem expensive to me!

So last July (when my Nexus 5 finally died on me) I decided to go somewhere else, and bought a OnePlus 3 instead for £328.99, and have been very happy with it.

The OnePlus 3 seems very comparable with the Pixel XL for screen size, CPU etc. With many things being better on the OnePlus.

The only real + for the Pixel, being that the OnePlus 3 is 'only' a 1080p screen, compared to the Pixel XL being a 1440p, but that to me is irrelevant, I've done direct comparisons with other 1440p screens, and personally, I really can't tell the difference on a screen this size! But then I don't have perfect (not even close) eyesight.

OnePlus also don't seem to mess with the OS much, a few tweaks, such as enabling customisation of the pull down area (data/wifi/NFC on/off etc.), controlling the LED colour (for notifications, battery state etc), and the few apps they pre-load, can be ignored, nothing is forced on you. It also gets the monthly security patches from Google.

Oh yes, is dual-sim as well, which is handy for some people.

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Boothy

Re: Not enough personally identifiable data on a tablet for Google

@ Mellipop

Quote: "You still need to log into a Google device; android tablet or chromebook..

Not true for Android devices, at least not most I've used.

I think Nexus devices do force you to log in with a Google account before you can use them, (and possibly some other manufacturers), but the non Nexus devices I've used (and Nexus devices where I've put stock Android on, or Cyanogenmod), let you skip that step during initial set-up, as it's not needed by Android itself, only by the Google services pre-installed on the device (Gmail, Play store etc.).

You of course still need a Google account to use play store, sync contacts with GMail etc. But it's not needed to access the device itself.

Different with Chromebooks of course, as that's intrinsically tied into the Google services (Drive, Docs etc.), and is basically a brick without an account (unless you replace the OS of course).

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Boothy

Unfortunately dave bates is correct, the gen 1 Nexus 7's slow down over time, no matter what you do.

I've wiped mine several times over the years, with fresh stock ROMs installed over USB rather than OTA, in order to really factory reset the device, but it was never the same after 5.0 was rolled out.

I replaced the stock OS with Cyanogenmod a few months back, which gave it a little bit of a speed boost compared to the stock OS, but it's still quite sluggish to use and isn't really a nice experience anymore.

I no longer use the Nexus 7 as an actual tablet (I have a newer device), so these days it just sits in a dock in the kitchen, with the audio output in the dock connected to a hi-fi system. So is basically just used as a music jukebox now.

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Hololens for biz shocker: Surprisingly, it doesn't totally suck

Boothy

Whist I agree with you on the business side, I think for gaming, VR rather than AR is going to dominate.

AR isn't immersive and that's by design, so for most games, VR will always trump AR (imho). In fact I suspect most genres of games wouldn't be playable in AR at all, or at least not very well.

I could see AR being good for table top type games, games with a 3rd person, top down type view, such as strategy games etc. But that''s a fairy small market. For anything first person, or role playing type game, which covers a huge chunk of the gaming market, I can't see how AR could be used effectively there, being able to see you're still in your living room, would just break any immersion.

But all this being said, VR (other than for cockpit type games), needs to be room-scale. Sitting in a seat with an XBox controller in hand, is doing VR a disservice currently, even potentially damaging a new market by imposing restrictions that shouldn't really be there.

From your comment, (cockpits and moving characters in-game when you are not moving), I'm guessing your experience is limited to the Rift, so seated or standing, using an XBox controller? If so I suggest you go out to a PC World or similar, where they have the HTC Vive on display and give room-scale with motion controllers a go. It changes VR completely, and makes the Rift look positively dated in comparison (although I will admit the Rifts headset does look better than the Vives!).

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HDMI hooks up with USB-C in cables that reverse, one way

Boothy

Re: Only vaguely USB-C related rant incoming...

I went through a very similar trek a few weeks back.

Had a bit of a move around at home, which meant having a larger desk space. I realised I could fit three monitors on the desk now (from two previously), and I had an old spare 1920x1200 one sat on a shelf doing nothing, so I figured why not!

I too ended up buying new cables on line, as no local shops (Maplins, .*PCWorld, large Tescos, Asda living etc) had anything of any use to me.

In fact I'd go so far as to state that most of these shops, were essentially only stocking what I'd class as 'legacy' cables, and not one of them was stocking anything that could be used to connect 'modern' devices to another 'modern' device.

Same was true for USB-C.

I get the feeling that whoever is in change of stocking things like cables in these shops, is working of a list that's about 5+ years out of date, and so they simply don't cover current 'standard' connectors, like DisplayPort etc.

1
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Latest Intel, AMD chips will only run Windows 10 ... and Linux, BSD, OS X

Boothy

Re: Another option (if you really want to stick with Windows)...

Would that still work?

Don't VMs access the CPU (essentially) directly anyway?

i.e. If your host is a 3rd gen i7, then your VM also see's a 3rd gen i7. All the 'user' can usually do is manage things like how many cores are available to the VM, not what type of CPU the VM gets to see.

Therefore wouldn't trying to run Win 7 in a VM, on a host that was running on a new CPU, still have the same compatibility issue?

Genuine question. As my experience with various VM environments (desktop, not server), don't allow you to change the 'type' of CPU available to the VM, they always see whatever the host has installed.

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The calm before the storm: AMD's Zen bears down on Intel CPUs

Boothy

Re: Go AMD !

Long time AMD CPU fan here, I've built a few AMD gaming rigs over the years (late 90s onward)..

But my current rig, built in 2012, is an i7 (3770k), as unfortunately for gaming, single core speed, not number of cores, rules, and AMD just were not there!

I really hope this 3GHz speed is just due to it being a test, and that this isn't indicative of the real world speeds we can expect from this new chip set in the final production version.

Hopefully if they can match proper desktop speeds, as in 4.5GHz (and upwards), then this could mean AMD become a contender against the top end i7 chips, and become a viable option in time for my next build.

3
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Windows 10 needs proper privacy portal, says EFF

Boothy

Lobby for new/updated privacy laws instead

Wouldn't the EFF be better lobbying for legal changes instead of targeting specific vendors? (Or do both?).

i.e. try to get the same things that the EFF are asking for here with Windows, but within a legally binding set of privacy laws, that cover all software, applications, devices etc.

That way all operating systems (desktop or mobile), applications (including phone apps etc), and anything else that can capture any metrics, has to abide by this legal framework.

For example, such as declaring what is captured and why, and clearly identifying what is necessary for the service to work (i.e. GPS data for a navigation system), and what is not. With mandatory means to manage this 'additional' data, or at least allowing for a more informed decision on if to use that OS/app if you can't turn it off.

Plus also making sure this snooping isn't just some obscure bit of text hidden inside the T&Cs/EULA but rather something that explicitly informs you during installation, before it actually starts capturing the data, with a mandatory means to not accept, or at least back-out.

7
1

Tesla's Model S autonomous mode may have saved a life

Boothy

Re: Manual override

I can just imagined, say 10 years from now when auto-braking and collision avoidance systems are likely to be common place, some miscreants deciding to have some fun kicking footballs across a busy motorway, or dropping cardboard boxes from a bridge, just to see what happens!

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1
Boothy

Quote: 'I didn't say it should do anything different, I just commented on the apparent lack of differentiation in the display.'

Surly in an emergency situation, a speedy response and warning is the critical path?

Spending CPU cycles on deciding if it's a car/lamppost/meat-bag before warning the driver is just going to be wasting time, literally.

Perhaps they should just change the warning to something more generic?

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