* Posts by Boothy

732 posts • joined 17 Jun 2011

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Shatner's solar-powered Bitcoin gambit wouldn't power a deflector shield

Boothy

Re: Percentage?

Hellisheiði Power Station produces 303MW on it's own (the biggest geothermal station in the world).

Another 5 plants produce 401.5MW, so 704.5MW in total for Iceland as far as I can see.

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Microsoft commits: We're buying GitHub for $7.5 beeeeeeellion

Boothy

Re: And another thing....

Sysinternals is a good set of tools, usually one of my first downloads for any new PC.

Interestingly, if you look at the updated Task Manager in Win 10, it now has quite a few of the features that Sysinternals Process Explorer has had for years.

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Did you test that? No, I thought you tested it. Now customers have it and it doesn't work

Boothy

IBM Software

I can remember many years ago getting a new version of one of the components in the IBM WebSphere Message Broker products range (this was about 10 years or so ago), this version was only going out to select 'partners', and one of our devs was asked to do some evaluation. i.e. See if any of the new features would be useful, worth the effort to update to, if there was migration issues, bugs etc.

Whilst evaluating one of the new features, he noticed it didn't work the way he was expecting, and on reading the new manual (big print out, not even a PDF available yet), he noticed the process in the docs didn't actually work, and to get the feature to work, he had to set various things in the UI in a bit of a workaround process.

This was reported back to IBM as part of our feedback process. With the expectation being we'd get a patch for the software to remove the need for the workaround.

About two weeks later some new manuals arrived from IBM, now containing updated instructions on how to use this feature. Which now contained the workaround instructions, basically word for word as provided by our dev! They'd obviously decided it was easier/cheaper to just update the manual, than fix the software!

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Half of all Windows 10 users thought: BSOD it, let's get the latest build

Boothy

Re: "reflects perhaps misplaced confidence"

I've had one 'remind me later', a couple of weeks back, which I selected, and so far no new reminders, and it doesn't appear to have gone into stealth install mode either? Bonus!

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'Autopilot' Tesla crashed into our parked patrol car, say SoCal cops

Boothy

Re: Hmm

Indeed, or even add geo-location, so it can only be activated on known 'good' locations.

"You're not on a highway, computer says no!"

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Beardy Branson: Wacky hyperloop tube maglev cheaper than railways

Boothy

Re: Technological objections

With the force of the inrushing air, just how fast will the train be travelling when it ploughs back into the station?

It wouldn't, the pods aren't airtight in the tube, so this isn't like firing an air rifle. The pods are designed to travel in air, just not as fast as when in a vacuum.

All that would happen is the train would slow down, have brakes applied, and stop. Might be a bit bumpy for a little while with the air rushing past, but basically the same as air turbulence on a plane.

They would also have airlock doors every mile or so, (for ease of maintenance, and emergencies etc).

So a break happens at 149 miles in, they stop the pods in transit, close the airlock doors either side of the break, to contain the air loss. Then any pods in the still vacuum parts of the pipes, before and after the airlocked section, are just sent on to, or back to. the next/previous station.

Only people with any real issue would be if they were in the bit where the break was, but that section would now be in atmosphere. Assuming the power was still active, just maglev them slowly to the airlock, where they'd be a maintenance hatch, and by that point emergency services to grab them. Worse case, no maglev power, just wait for rescue, they pop an emergency hatch, and you walk to the nearest hatch.

It's just engineering issues, so not something insurmountable.

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OnePlus 6: Perfect porridge? One has to make a smartphone that's juuuust right

Boothy

Re: Missing from review

Just to respond to Timmy B.

All my past Android devices, from a HTC Hero (my first Android device back in 2009), to a Desire S (2011), Samy S3, Nexus 5, Nexus 7 etc. Have all ended up with a custom OS at some point. (Cyanogenmod back then). Usually due to official updates stopping, or being very out of date, or too much bloat being pre-installed etc.

The OnePlus 3 is the first phone that's survived so far (almost 2 years now), and I've left it as stock, as there is no bloat, it gets an update most months, and is by far the most stable phone I've ever had (no having to re-boot to clear some issue, like slow running apps, or clear the memory out etc.).

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Boothy

Re: Missing from review

The only preinstalled apps are things like their gallery app, a custom dialer/phone app, all fairly small, and are either quite good, or can be ignored. They don't put 3rd party apps like Facebook on there.

Don't think installing a custom OS onto a phone is really a valid item in a phone review, as a review is more than just the hardware, it's the software as well. No issue with it being covered in a separate article, but that's not really a 'review' thing.

That being said, OnePlus don't lock their devices down too hard. OEM unlocking of the bootloader is a menu option under Developer options (and Developer options are enabled by just multi tapping on the Build number in the About phone settings menu).

Their phones also support things like fastboot mode direct from key combos, and all the usual adb/fastboot commands from the Android SDK work fine over USB. You can unlock the device, and do things like install a custom recovery image (like TWRP) straight from command line. No having to push a custom bootloader before you can get a recovery on there. Once the recovery is on there, it's just an adb push of the new OS and then flash from recovery.

That being said, OnePlus 6 is new, so not sure how well it will be supported yet, it's not listed currently by LineageOS.

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Boothy

Still got a OnePlus 3 here (not the T), had it from new.

From an OS update point of view, much better than many other devices out there. It's currently on patch level 1 May 2018, so is current,

Still lasts 2-3 days on a single charge with light-ish use, (I don't play games on my phone, I use a tablet for that).

With their Oxygen OS, as mentioned in the article, they don't do gimmicks, it's very close to stock Android, with some extra customisations (like better control as to what shortcuts are in the pull down menu, as one example).

Overall very happy, and no plans to replace it.

My one criticism of OnePlus now, is the price of their new phones.

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Microsoft gives users options for Office data slurpage – Basic or Full

Boothy

Re: Firewalls?

They are likely using hostname/s.

If you know what those are for Office tracking, it can be added to the hosts file, assuming it doesn't stop other things from working of course.

This is a good spot to look at....

http://someonewhocares.org/hosts/

although I've no idea if this Office info is blocked currently, but it does include Windows 10 reporting domains.. So if Office is using the same domain names, they too would be blocked.

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Want to know what an organisation is really like? Visit the restroom

Boothy

Re: It's not a sink

I find the dinner / tea debate an oddity, and other peoples experiences may differ of course.

I've worked all around the UK, and I find it interesting that even in the North, when in the office, the meal in the middle of the day tends to get referred to as lunch. But start talking about meals outside of office hours, and it's back to dinner and tea, no such thing as lunch.

People seem to have office speak mode, and then their off-duty, back home, with friends mode.

Just an observation. (and for ref, I'm a born and bred notherner).

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Boothy

Re: It's not a sink

Oxford English Dictionary:

Sink, NOUN :

A fixed basin with a water supply and outflow pipe.

‘I stood at the kitchen sink’

as modifier ‘a sink unit with cupboard and drawers under’

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Intel’s first 10nm CPU is a twin-core i3 destined for a mid-range Lenovo

Boothy

Seems completely logical to me. They've been having lots of yield issues with 10nm.

Going with a low clock, low core chip seems the sensible idea, keeping the transistor count down gives you more chance of producing working silicon, and keeping the speeds down, means less likelihood of a failure.

Build these i3's in bulk gives Intel a chance to tweak the 10nm process, whilst actually managing to sell some of the silicon. Over time they should then get the process improved, get yields up, and then start producing better i3's, then onto i5's and so on.

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And THIS is how you do it, Apple: Huawei shames Cupertino with under-glass sensor

Boothy

Most devices I've seen using fingerprint readers, ask you to set a pin or password first, and will periodically ask for the pin/password anyway to unlock. They also won't let you disable/change the security settings without the pin/password.

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Wanted that Windows 10 update but have an Intel SSD? Computer says no

Boothy

@AC ...XP era programs that demanded to be ran Admin .

One of the issues with a lot of XP era programs was that they were not following MS guidelines for NT platforms. Often being apps, or games, from Win 9* that had been ported across/tweaked to run in XP (or newer), or simply written by people who hadn't taken into account the differences between the old 9* platform, and NT OSs like XP.

A common issue I've seen with a *lot* of older (or just badly written) programs (utils and legacy games), is when the program has config data (often in .ini files), and they put these in the programs installation dir, rather than where they should be, i.e. under user space (e.g. in AppData, or even Docs).

The programs usually want to open these with write access, but as they are under the protected Program Files area, they need admin rights to do this under XP/Win7 etc..

A simple work around is to install these programs to somewhere that isn't protected, like D:\Apps or D:\Games instead.

Doesn't work with everything, but I've found quite a few old apps or games will stop asking for admin rights after doing this.

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UK.gov expects auto auto software updates won't involve users

Boothy

Re: you mean just like windows 10

@Dave15

For large Win 10 updates, you typically need a lot of free space on the boot drive (10GiB+), as it's basically doing a fresh install of Windows with the larger updates, and it keeps a copy of your old Windows dir (now called 'Windows.old' ) on your boot drive afterwards. This old Windows dir is quite often 10GiB+ in size.

This was to get round the old issue of the Windows dir just getting bigger and bigger over time, full of old cruft you no longer needed. This 'should' also get rid of the old need to reinstall Windows every couple of years or so (in theory anyway!). Still doesn't stop places like AppData getting bigger and bigger though!

Unfortunately this basically means your boot disk needs to have at least enough space for two full copies of Win 10, your old and new version, as it retains the old version for 10 days so that it can roll back if needed (it should be deleted automatically after the 10 days is up).

In my experience so far, you basically seem to need around 15GiB free on the Windows boot disk, otherwise the larger yearly updates are likely to fail. But the size is very dependant on your current Windows dir size.

(Would have been nicer if MS gave the option to use a separate drive for the Windows.old backup).

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Drone 'swarm' buzzed off FBI surveillance bods, says tech bloke

Boothy

Re: "direct surveillance of potential targets of interest"

Not all drones are battery powered, gas/petrol versions are around and they can fly and hour+ without issue.

Also who's to say even if they were the battery powered versions, that they didn't have multiple drones to hand, replacing an almost flat one, with a fully changed one.

Or could use spare battery packs, land, swap for a fresh pack, takeoff. With say 3 or 4 battery packs on rotation per drone, all on charge when not in use, you could keep a drone up in the air almost continuously.

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High-Optane thrills for 3D XPoint wanna-haves: Intel fattens gaming SSDs

Boothy

It has also slapped twin blue LED edging lights on the AIC card – weird considering it's installed inside a case.

Why? If this is aimed at gamers, which is what you seem to indicate, gaming cases all have viewing windows these days, with everything glowing inside. High end Memory modules, Motherboards, fans, the cases themselves etc. have all had lights on them for years now. Most of the new kit is all full RGB as well, not a single static colour, with lighting controllers to coordinate all the device lights together.

Note: My PC case does not have a side window, is tucked in the corner out of sight, and nothing glows other than a few status LEDs on the MB.

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Europe fires back at ICANN's delusional plan to overhaul Whois for GDPR by next, er, year

Boothy

Re: Interesting wording

You seemed to have missed this bit:

Quote: "Data protection authorities may, however, take into consideration the measures which have already been taken or which are underway when determining the appropriate regulatory response upon receiving such complaints."

Which seems to imply that if ICANN can demonstrate they are actively working on compliance, even if not compliant yet, that would, or could, be taken into account.

It also seems to indicate that they'd only start looking into this, after receiving actual complaints against ICANN. i.e If no one complains, then they won't do anything against ICANN.

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'Alexa, listen in on my every word and send it all to a shady developer'

Boothy

Re: Skills ?

Agree.

skill

n. Proficiency, facility, or dexterity that is acquired or developed through training or experience. See Synonyms at ability.

n. An art, trade, or technique, particularly one requiring use of the hands or body.

n. A developed talent or ability: writing skills.

None of these definitions seem to fit the usage here. These are programs, or 'apps', nothing at all to do with skills!

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Time to ditch the front door key? Nest's new wireless smart lock is surprisingly convenient

Boothy

Re: What is this "7v battery" you speak of?

@ab-gam

Nope, not a Brit/UK thing, plus this lock seems to be designed for the US market, and from a US company, so I don't think there is much UK/Euro influence in there.

A very odd voltage indeed. I could understand a 9v PP3 type battery, common everywhere as far as I know, small and convenient. So would have thought a PP3 would be a much better option.

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Nominet drains mug of tea, leans back, calmly explains how to make Whois GDPR-compliant

Boothy

Have you understood what is happening?

Whois is not going away, registrars will still be asking for, and storing the same data they currently do, so no change there for the domain name registration business. It's only the visibility and access of the data that is changing.

If anything, it's making things slightly more complex, and removing a stream of revenue (making current registrations private), and therefore if anything, this will reduce income and push costs up by a small amount.

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Supreme Court punts on Microsoft email seizure decision after Cloud Act passes US Congress

Boothy

I guess that depends on how many local (to other countries i.e. not USA based corps), have cloud hosting services in the USA.

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'I crashed AOL for 19 hours and messed up global email for a week'

Boothy

Re: AOL memories

My first modem was also 2400 bps, it was a 'loan' modem from where I worked as they'd just bought a 28.8kbs one.

I just used it for BBSs etc at the time. I remember one local computer shop (PCs, Amigas, Atari STs etc) had things like stock-lists on a dial-up BBS system. You could even pre-order items via the BBS, and then go pick them up. (No payment system etc back then). They even gave you a free Compuserve email address (wow! ;-) ).

Once I got proper Internet access (Demon), I went and bought a USRobotics external 56k modem. Was in an aluminium case, almost exactly the same size as an external 3.5" floppy drive. This was all on an Amiga, didn't get round to switching to PC till the late 90s!

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Torvalds schedules Linux kernel 5.0, then maybe delays 'meaningless' release

Boothy

Re: As with the browsers

Browser version numbers are just bonkers. Unless it's a major functional change, it should not mean a major version increase, a point update, yes fine. Chrome and Firefox et al should be on something like v10, not in the 60s +

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Whois is dead as Europe hands DNS overlord ICANN its arse

Boothy

All domains need contact information. Otherwise it becomes impossible to perpetuate the healthy operation of the domain pool. Domains which do not have valid contact information are subject to be released back into the pool.

I don't care if you're being spammed. If you refuse or are not able to provide a valid means of contact you don't deserve to participate in the domain registration system.

As said several times already, NO ONE is saying that contact details cannot be asked for and stored, IF that is needed to provide the service. This is about who has access to that information. i.e. ICANN having access to your email/phone number in order to let you know your domain is about to expire is a valid business requirement, so is allowed, but some random person on the internet being able to grab your personal contact details in order to spam you is not!

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What most people think it looks like when you change router's admin password, apparently

Boothy

Re: In parts of Latam, ISP gives Zero / NO access to Router!

Can't comment on this. I always toss the ISP-supplied router and replace with something I've bought myself and which is better than the sort of junk that ISPs pass off as being fit for purpose

Unfortunately here (UK), some major ISPs, such as Sky, bake the account details for the *DSL side into the router itself, with no direct access to it, and won't provide the user/pass to the user on request (against their Ts&Cs. So using 3rd party routers can be difficult.

(There are ways to get the user/pass, but it can be convoluted depending on the router model you have).

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PCs were more and less expensive in Q1 as shipments stalled

Boothy

Re: My 2009 desktop still works fine

I have a home built i7-3770k (built in 2013). Stock speed is 3.5GHz, but runs quite happily at 4.25GHz with a good cooler (sealed liquid).

As an example, this can run Far Cry 5 (using their built in benchmark tool) at 58fps in 3440 x 1440 on High, drops to 53fps on Ultra (this with a now also old'ish 980Ti (AMP EXTREME factory overclocked version)).

As I'm not a framerate whore, I really don't see any point in upgrading my rig any time soon.

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2018's Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon laptop is a lovely lappie

Boothy
Facepalm

3 hours on a change = 3 hours on a charge. Obviously! (missed the edit window).

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Boothy

That is not a laptop! You are comparing completely different types of devices.

The X1s are around 1.2kg, and are designed to be lugged around all day long, and to run comfortably, on your lap (for short periods anyway), on a aircraft, on the train, in a client meeting etc. and to last for the entire day without the need for a power socket.

The MSI device you linked to is 4.1kg, so too heavy, lasts 3 hours on a change, so less than half of what's needed, and is fitted with irrelevant things like a decent GFX and sound card, which are a waste of time on a device that will be using tools like Office and Skype etc.

Come back when you can find the same spec as the MSI, that weighs under 2kg, and lasts at least 6 hours on a charge, under load.

PS: I do think the X1 is way overpriced for the spec though.

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Guns, audio and eye-tracking: VR nearly ready for prime time

Boothy

a) Nope, not anything good anyway, and probably not for a long time. You're talking about hardware more advanced/complex than a modern high end mobile phone, so we'll get *good* & *cheap* VR, when you can buy the equivalent of a current iPhone for less than $200 (by which times the hardware will be even more advanced of course!).

b) Vive works fine off-line, as long as what you are running works off-line as well of course.

Vive games/apps also don't need to be in Steam to use the Vive, the drivers and Steam VR software is managed via Steam, but once running, any app/game that supports OpenVR can use the headset.

c) Not sure what you are asking here.

d) I wear glasses, had a Rift DK2, and have a Vive, no issues wearing glasses with either (Vive especially). But obviously that's going to depend on things like size of your frames. Regular sized frames, or smaller, shouldn't have any issue, but oversized frames might have problems. Also bifocals and varifocals are not too good with VR, as the bottom part of the screen gets blurry.

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Boothy

Re: Simplicity is Key

I've had an Oculus DK2, and a Vive, these both connect via HDMI and USB, so not much that can go too wrong hardware wise, other than the hardware not being up to it (which admittedly does mean having a fairly good system ( i5 + GTX 1070 or better (or equivalent)).

The only issue I had hardware wise was when initially setting up the Vive. It needs a USB3 for the break out box (the bit connecting to the headset), and it didn't like the port I'd plugged it into on the motherboards backplate. Plugging it into a different USB 3 port and it worked fine. Turned out the initial port was provided by a 3rd party chipset connected to PCIe, whereas the working port, was provided directly by the MB chipset itself (I found out later the same 3rd party chipset also had issues with some other USB3 devices, like HDs).

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Boothy

Re: Eye tracking

Thanks for the heads up, I too have an ultra-wide monitor, plus two side monitors (basically my hand-me-downs), and regularly lose track of where the pointer is at times.

So i may well have a look at this myself (plus I'm a gamer, so bonus!).

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Europe plans special tax for Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon

Boothy

Re: Who pays the tax?

You seem to be the one missing the point.

The main issue here is Amazon etc, due to their current legal, but unethical tax payments, can undercut their competitors, basically trying to become a monopoly by forcing competition out, by unfair means.

Adding this tax, is about trying to level the playing field again. So yes, prices could well go up a little for the consumer, but that's only because consumers have been underpaying till now.

Companies like Amazon have effectively been using what should have been paid as tax, as a subsidy to keep prices artificially low.

Plus the companies impacted, could chose to absorb the tax themselves, and not pass it on the the consumers, time will tell.

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Sysadmin left finger on power button for an hour to avert SAP outage

Boothy

Re: Typed 'Reboot' where ... ?

I used to use PuTTY a lot on Windows, into *NIX boxes, back then we had direct access to boxes. So we just set up each environment with it's own custom colour and Widows title settings. Green, you're on a Dev box, Red - prod, etc. Nice and easy.

These days we have to go via jump boxes, and are usually on Linux laptops. So it's all basically one shell, same colour for text etc. But someone did tweak all the Red Hat boxes, so if in a live environment, the user and server name all have a red background colour at the prompt. (The name@server: bit).

Still doesn't help if you're on the wrong prod box, but at least you are less likely to run something not prod friendly.

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Boothy

Re: New PC case.

I like my current Antec Tower case (had it years now, triggers broom ya knows).

It has a full height door on the front, hiding things like 5.25 and 3.5 bays (all unused these days), but it also hides the Power and Reset buttons.

I don't know if by design, or accident, but the edge of the door also has large (finger sized) air vent holes from top to halfway down, the bottom one of which lines up quite nicely with the buttons.

So no way to hit them by accident, but you can still use them without having to open the door.

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Java EE renamed 'Jakarta EE' after Big Red brand spat

Boothy

Re: Unsurprising outcome

I saw Enterprise Profile and immediately thought, how is anyone going to do keyword searches with that? Or fit that easily into package names etc?

If you're creating a new brand name, at least try to make it standout, Enterprise Profile doesn't! How did it even get shortlisted?

5
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Nokia tribute band HMD revives another hit

Boothy

Re: I still have a 7110...

Also a 7110 owner, it was my first personal mobile (had a few work ones before this).

I can remember having to clean the contacts now and again, otherwise the mic stopped working.

Also the stops for the slide wore out eventually, so you couldn't pop it open via the button, as it just shot off the end. Of course this also automatically answered any incoming calls, which you couldn't then talk to until you managed to get the base re-attached! Happy days.

And WAP! Almost forgot about the wonders of Internet access back in those days :-)

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IBM Java CTO: Devs shouldn't have to learn Docker, K8s, 30 other things to deploy an app

Boothy

Re: Hear fucking hear!

But isn't that poorly configured dev environments?

One of our clients insists all all developers use Ubuntu laptops, and these are locked down.

Developed apps (Java) cannot have libs put directly into them, all build and dependencies are managed by Maven.

App builds (other than local IDE) and deployments are all run on remote Jenkins environments, that have no Internet access for dependencies, so all Maven dependencies can only be downloaded from a local curated repository.

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Boothy

Re: Hear fucking hear!

If your doing it right, the 'package managers' (Maven etc) won't have any external access, everything they 'download and install' is from an internal repository, such as Artifactory, where the contents have (hopefully) been checked and validated before being added.

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This job Win-blows! Microsoft made me pull '75-hour weeks' in a shopping mall kiosk

Boothy

Re: It could be worse

quote: "Was not allowed to take any holiday for first 12 months".

Was that in the UK? As we have statutory leave entitlement in the UK, 28 days for someone in full time employment, less if part time or Irregular hours, but you still get some.

A company might (probably would) expect you to work for a period before taking your first leave, say a month or two, but they still have to give you your full legal entitlement before the 12 months is up. If not, off to court with them.

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Teensy plastic shields are the big new thing in 2018's laptop crop

Boothy

Re: But there is still little use for laptops.

For me:

Tablet : Checking, but not replying to email. Reading, some web browsing, small amount of mobile gaming, checking news and weather, doing searches on the Sky box (rather then using the remote).

As soon as I need to type more than a word or two (i.e. anything beyond simple searches etc) I open the Chromebook.

If I need the Internet for more than an hour, or want to do anything productive, so App development, gaming, finances, images, video etc. I switch to Desktop, in a proper chair, at a desk, with a proper keyboard and mouse.

At work, I use laptops (multiple due to client requirements, mix of Windows and Linux).

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Boothy

Re: But there is still little use for laptops.

Desktops are only usable if you have a fixed desk.

I use one at home (gamer, and WFH sometimes), but at work we don't have fixed desks, and many don't even have a fixed office location.

Work on project A, go sit with that team, work on project B, ok go sit over there now instead, and this isn't just in my company, most of our clients all work in the same way, all using hot desks and dynamic teams.

Currently, in my company, the only people who have desktops are 1st line support people, are those are basically glorified terminals, that get a hard reset on every boot up.

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Boothy
WTF?

Re: @Lee D

Quote: Did you know games are 64-bit only and demanding 16Gb+ RAM nowadays? That's not the top-end gamers only, but just to RUN the game on Steam.

Citation needed.

Not sure what relevance 64bit games has here, as most gamers would be using a 64bit OS anyway, and have been since at least Win 7 being released. So use of a 32bit vs 64bit exe is both irrelevant and transparent to most users, at least in the Windows world. The switch to 64bit has mostly been around using more than 4GB of memory in a single app, not trying to hit 16GB+.

And, as an avid PC gamer, I've yet to see a single game demanding over 16GB+ RAM. Some games can take advantage of more memory, by caching more data, so reducing things like load time between areas etc. But the core game itself still runs happily in under 8GB RAM.

Most modern gaming engines are cross platform, so need to work on PC and consoles, current consoles are limited to ~8GB, so no modern game using these engines (so that includes just about all AAA games) will demand more than 8GB, unless it's using a custom engine build for PC only. They might take advantage of over 8GB for caching textures etc, but they won't demand it.

Most PC gamers still have 8GB of RAM, with 16GB being in 2nd place. That's not likely to change any time soon with current RAM prices, so no game producer is going to target 16GB+ systems, as there is just no market there.

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Flight Simulator's DRM fighter nosedives into Chrome's cache

Boothy

Re: The first virus EVER was a DRM tool.

The first computer virus was around 1970, early DRM didn't turn up till the mid 80s.

5
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Microsoft's Windows 10 Workstation adds killer feature: No Candy Crush

Boothy

Re: Now get rid of Cortana

If you don't want to mess with regedit etc. Just grab Shutup10 from :

https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10

Just run it (no installation needed), select the recommended settings, apply, and restart (don't have ti restart, but some changes only kick in after a restart).

It disables Cortana, removed the Bing/Internet searches from the Start menu search box (so is back to just local searches), disables metrics etc. (It disables more than is done by following the privacy settings in Win 10 itself), and a bunch of other stuff.

You just need to remember to update it and run it again after any major Windows Updates, as those will sometimes re-enable things like metrics again.

0
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From tomorrow, Google Chrome will block crud ads. Here's how it'll work

Boothy

When using Chrome, I change the autoplay settings under chrome:/flags to disable HTML5 autoplay.

Does mean sites like YouTube etc need an extra click to start playing, but that's a minor issue that I'm happy to accept in order to avoid misbehaving sites.

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Boothy

Re: Well behaved ads on the Reg

I find using https://m.theregister.co.uk/ at work to be a better experience than the full site.

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Who wants dynamic dancing animations and code in their emails? Everyone! says Google

Boothy

I switched to duckduckgo for search and all the AMP stuff just vanished.

AMP was basically the last straw for me with Google search.

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PC not dead, Apple single-handedly propping up mobe market, says Gartner

Boothy

Re: Another reason private PC sales are flatlining

Even with multithreaded tasks, quite a few of Intel's CPUs now underclock with all cores in use, so you can't simply assume your going to get a full speed CPU at 100% with all cores running. Especially on the more budget Intel CPUs.

This guy on Youtube has a quite well done video on the topic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O98qP-FsIWo

He also covers quite a few related things, such as latest AMD vs Intel, price vs performance of GFX cards, the impact of crypto mining etc. He seems to spend a long time doing the work as well. Worth checking the channel out if you are into that sort of stuff.

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