* Posts by Boothy

653 posts • joined 17 Jun 2011

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OnePlus accused of installing cheat codes for benchmarks with new handset

Boothy

Oneplus 3 here (original version, not the updated one), and I get OTA updates every few weeks.

Current Android version is at 7.1.1, at a security patch level May 2017. It's rarely more than a month behind Google themselves.

Any other manufactures better than that? I'm genuinely interested to know?

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Microsoft admits to disabling third-party antivirus code if Win 10 doesn't like it

Boothy

It doesn't help that the popup is over keen as well, turning up a few seconds after boot up, warning that the AV client is out of date, this before the AV client has even managed to check online for updates (which it completed a few seconds later)!

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Currys PC World given a spanking for misleading laptop savings ads

Boothy

Re: PC World still exists?

@Aladdin.

Thanks for the link, it's worth a read of the page if only for a laugh!

Some highlights: (bear in mind this is an RJ45 Ethernet cable!)

Quote:

* Solid 100% Silver Conductors : Perfect-Surface Technology applied to extreme-purity silver provides unprecedented clarity and dynamic contrast.

* Directionality - All audio cables are directional. The correct direction is determined by listening to every batch of metal conductors used in every AudioQuest audio cable. Arrows are clearly marked on the connectors to ensure superior sound quality. For best results have the arrow pointing in the direction of the flow of music. For example, NAS to Router, Router to Network Player.

* Dielectric-Bias System - All insulation slows down the signal on the conductor inside. When insulation is unbiased, it slows down parts of the signal differently, a big problem for very time-sensitive multi-octave audio. AudioQuest’s DBS creates a strong, stable electrostatic field which saturates and polarizes (organizes) the molecules of the insulation. This minimizes both energy storage in the insulation and the multiple nonlinear time-delays that occur. Sound appears from a surprisingly black background with unexpected detail and dynamic contrast.

What do these people smoke!?

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Boothy
Paris Hilton

Re: PC World still exists?

Don't forget it needs to be gold plated as well, you can really tell the difference when they are, honest!

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Virtual reality headsets even less popular than wearable devices

Boothy

Part of the content issue is time.

It takes 3+ years to produce a AAA title, plus a lot of the big risk averse studios, want a bigger market before diving in, so you end up in a catch 22 situation of people don't buy VR, as there is nothing of interest, and studios not producing, as there isn't enough user base.

Things should start to change over the next 6 months or so, as some of the larger games start to come out (i.e. more than the 4 hours long, and are not just basically the $5 tech demos you have now (other than ED)).

Fallout 4 VR should be an interesting test of the waters, a full AAA tittle in VR.

I would also suspect moving forwards, that a new non VR 3D game will be easier to convert to VR, as long as it has been designed appropriately from the beginning (i.e not used 2D overlays for weather effects, or weapon selection menus etc, which are common issues with porting many existing games).

If it's all already fully rendered in 3D, with a bit of forethought, then less effort (and so less cost) to make it VR friendly.

There's no real reason why the next CoD/Battlefield type game couldn't be VR ready with only minimal effort, if planned in from the begging. (All mainstream game engines, as used by almost all AAA titles, have VR built in now, and have done for some time).

Doesn't fix the other issues though, although as someone else already mentioned elsewhere in the comments, about 25% of existing Steam users already own a VR capable machine, and about 25% more only need a better GFX card, and for entry level VR, that's about $200. Meaning about 50% or so off the current PC gaming userbase, is either already VR ready, or not too far off.

We just need to content!

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Boothy

Why would you say it's a non starter because you wear glasses?

I you're shortsighted, you can usually just use VR without your glasses (at least my friends who are shortsighted do that, and without issue).

I also wear glasses, but I'm longsighted, so don't have the option to be without, and I have no issues in VR (I have a Vive) with my glasses on, and can happily be in VR for several hours without discomfort or eye strain.

Granted you can't have the VR lenses adjusted quite as close to your face as you can without glasses, but the only impact that has is your field-of-view is slightly reduced (I also have contacts, so have tried with both contacts and glasses as a comparison, there was minimal difference).

The Vives headset also doesn't impact on the frames themselves, i.e. it's not pushing the frames into the bridge of your nose. (At least not in my case).

The only time I could see it being an issue for people with glasses, is if you've gone and bought some of those 70s/80s style large and/or thick frames ones, or if you only have bi or vary-focal lenses (as the bottom part of the screen is blurred), I know this personally, as I have vary-focals these days, so I just wear an older fixed lens pair of glasses I have as a backup.

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Blighty bloke: PC World lost my Mac Mini – and trolled my blog!

Boothy
Pint

Re: I'm barred from all PCW's....

She's right, it's not a sport.

For something to be a sport, it needs to be a challenge, so I don't think baiting PC World staff would qualify in that regards!

Pint, because, well why not.

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Boothy

Last time I went in to a PC World, dressed as a geek (my normal look), one of them started asking me about Chromebooks, and if they could use it for college work!

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Having a monopoly on x86 chips and charging eyewatering prices really does pay off – Intel CEO

Boothy

Why would ARM be a direct threat to Intel?

ARM don't produce chips themselves, and Intel are licensed to manufacture ARM based chips already.

Even if ARM do take off in the server and/or desktop space, it could well still have an Intel badge on it, and you can bet the budget holders when given the choice of purchasing and 'Intel ARM' chip, or some other brand, would likely stick with Intel simply as they already have an existing relationship with them for their existing x86 estate.

The one thing it could bring is some better competition, but even then, Intel probably have the most advance FABs around. So could likely produce some decent chips, if they put the same effort into ARM as they do currently with x86.

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Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

Boothy

Re: How do you abort the update?

@Steve

The last personal Laptop I bought was a Acer, back when Win 7 was still newly out. (So 2009, maybe early 2010).

Acer released a grand total of one, yes just one update for it, over the next 5 years. This despite the hardware providers (chipsset, sound, GFX etc) releasing many updates for the underlying hardware, some of which fixed real issues, or improved performance etc.

Seems Acer just couldn't be bothered to do the work needed to add these patches to their update service :-/

I eventually (a couple of years back) did a clean install, from my own media, and just let Windows install what it wanted. Result, a much cleaner, more stable, and fractionally faster system.

Don't think I'll be bothering with Acer again.

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Online ad scam launders legions of pirates and pervs into 'legit' surfing

Boothy

Why is pop under even possible?

Can't thins 'feature' simply be removed from browsers?

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Uber wasn't to blame for robo-ride crash – or was it? Witness said car tried to 'beat the lights'

Boothy

Re: Uber driving definitely contributed

Dangerous driving and speeding are not the same thing (one could contribute to the other of course).

I'd be curious on the legality side in the US around dangerous driving in this case, if this happened in the UK, and speed was considered a factor in causing the accident, even if the driver was still within the posted speed limit, the driver could still be prosecuted for dangerous driving.

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UK.gov confirms it won't be buying V-22 Ospreys for new aircraft carriers

Boothy

Re: ->The V22 has a less than stellar safety record, bring back the Fairey Rotodyne

Quote: "Why is it that modern aircraft, designed and built entirely with modern CAD/CAM techniques and the latest materials, are a lot less reliable than the old designs drawn by hand and made by the lads in the shed out the back before they tootled off to the pub for lunch?"

It's called over engineering.

Designers of old (my Dad was one), had to work things out by hand, (my dad always used a slide-rule, and a handful of reference books). Materials science wasn't as well known/accurate then, so you'd add a bit more here and there, 'just-in-case'. A lot of this would have been gut-feeling, based on experience. My Dad designed gear-boxes and turbines for large vehicles (think quarry trucks. shipping container vessels, hi-speed trains etc.).

Theses days it's all done in the software, to the exact amount they think is needed, with little room for tolerance other than what has been asked for in the specification. I would suspect if they were to add 5% for strength/resilience, 'just-in-case' on top, the weight etc. would all go up too much, and the design would no longer meet it's targets of speed, range or whatever was needed, and of course, the cost would go up!

Old engineers built things to work, to last, and hopefully built something they (and their team) could be proud off.

Modern engineering, like so many other industries, is all about cost, period.

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NASA finds India's missing lunar orbiter with Earth-bound radar

Boothy

Re: Puzzled

@AC

And what relevance does any of what you said, have to the (quite sensible imho) question asked?

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Two million recordings of families imperiled by cloud-connected toys' crappy MongoDB

Boothy

Quote: People learn far more from their mistakes than successes. Sure fire the IT dept, but can bet your boots those guys/girls won't make the same mistake twice.

Except in this case, they obviously have, not once, but multiple times. Their databases have been deleted on several occasions, and replaced with warning messages, and they have had to restore the databases each time, and yet apparently, at no stage did they wonder why this was happening, or investigate ways to stop it.

They are most likely different people/teams. The devs were probably hired to build the system, and have likely long since gone. Being replaced by a likely cheaper support team (or person), who probably doesn't know much about MongoDB itself.

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Boothy

Re: Incompetence

There was no mention of paying the ransom, so I'm guessing they just restored from a backup each time (as mentioned in the joke above).

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EU privacy gurus peer at Windows 10, still don't like what they see

Boothy

Re: You probably can't turn EVERYTHING off but

Quote: "By default the power-off button in Windows 8.x and 10 puts the computer into a suspend state. It's not actually off."

Don't know about 8, as never had a copy other than a very early pre-release to have a look at (shudder).

In Win 10 doing a shut-down does power off the device, it's not a suspend (does by default for all the Win 10 Home machines I've set up so far anyway).

But, and here is the catch, Windows 10 uses a hybrid hibernation when you select shutdown, rather than being a 'proper' shutdown.

Basically it closes all the the running Apps and logs you out, just like a traditional shutdown would, but then hibernates the PC. The idea being that you've basically hibernated a running OS, that's already completed its initialisation processes, and so booting back up should be faster.

Within Windows 10, it's know as 'fast startup', which you can disable in settings. Disable this, and shutdown becomes a normal shutdown, and boot up, becomes a cold boot each time, rather then the restore from hibernation that it is by default.

I decided to disable fast startup (and hibernate) on my main PC at home, it's running on SSDs, the boot up time did increase, but only by a second or two.

I suspect, unless you're running on a slow HDD, the 'fast startup' option just isn't really needed.

Plus disabling fast startup reduces writes to the SSD, (as you are basically hibernating every time you switch off), so seemed like a good idea to turn off anyway from an SSD life point of view.

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Boothy

Re: What information does Win 10 slurp?

One little tip for the Win 10 Microsoft Account issue, is don't connect the device to the Internet until after you've finished the install/initial set-up. i.e. Don't plug in the Ethernet, or select a Wi-Fi network.

Without Internet, Windows 10 bypasses all the Microsoft Account stuff, and only asks you to provide a local username and password.

Obviously once set-up is complete, you can connect and do what you want afterwards.

One additional warning for anyone using a local account in Win 10 (as I do), if you do use MS services (like XBox/hotmail/O365 etc), and you decide you want to access those services when logged in to Win 10 with the local account, be careful, as some services when adding an MS account, will ask if you want to move/convert your local account to the MS one. Don't do it, just don't!

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Boothy

Re: What information does Win 10 slurp?

Try https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10

That disables Cortana for me, and lots of the other 'extras' you get in Win 10.

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'At least I can walk away with my dignity' – Streetmap founder after Google lawsuit loss

Boothy

Re: Streetmap App

Never really liked Uber as an entity, but at least they seemed to have shaken up the Taxi market somewhat.

In the past 20 years and until very recently, the only real customer facing technology changes most taxi firms seems to have adopted, were SMS notifications that your car is nearly there, and phone number recognition when ordering, i.e. "Press 1 to be picked up from <blah blah>, otherwise Press 2 to talk to an operator".

But now, even my local Taxi firm has a mobile App (I'm guessing some branded app that multiple taxi firms use), that includes favourite locations, geolocation pickups (i.e. "I have no idea where I am, just come pick me up"), shows where your taxi is on a map in real time, with a real time ETA, a call-your-driver button, payment processing if you want/need it, so no need for cash or messing about with cards in the car, automatic notification when you car is a minute away, so you can make your way outside to meet it etc etc.

I'm fairly sure, if Uber didn't exist, then little would have changed in the last 2 or 3 years.

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Nokia's 3310 revival – what's NEXT? Vote now

Boothy

Re: 3310?

We had the 6310 as company phones back in the day. We only needed to charge them about once a month!

I think I was still using my 7110 at the time as a personal device, although by then (2001/2002?) you had to manually slide down the bottom plate, as using the spring-loaded release would propel the plate, which held the mic, at great speed onto the floor.

This then mean having someone on the line (as it answered the phone at the same time), going "Hello? Are you there?", whilst you tried to refit the front plate, (with the mic in it), before the person hung up!

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Boothy

First HDD I ever bought for personal use was an 80MB 2.5" drive to fit in an Amiga (an A500 with an adaptor).

I even partitioned it for specific functions, full Workbench on one, trimmed down version for gaming, another command line only boot etc.

Happy days!

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Global IPv4 address drought: Seriously, we're done now. We're done

Boothy

Re: So, how do I go about implementing it?

If you're on Sky Broadband, IPv6 is enabled by default, (once the local hardware is updated to support it of course).

I've got a ~3 year old Sky Hub, and noticed about a year ago, while I was looking into network configurations for a VM, that my desktop now had a v6 address assigned, as well as a v4. A quick look at the router config, and sure enough I now had a v4 and v6 Internet address, and v6 was routing to the local LAN.

As an example, the above mentioned test site (http://test-ipv6.com/) gives me a 10 out of 10 score on my Desktop PC.

Just as a warning, not all devices at home will support v6 yet, although I was surprised at how many did support it in my house once I checked them out!

As an example, my Sky Box (standard HD box from about 4 years ago, not the newer Q version), only picks up IPv4, and my NAS server is also only IPv4, although the later is simply me not getting round to doing anything about it yet (It's a Linux OS, and had v6 disabled by default).

But all other devices I have, do seem to support IPv6. So that's an XBox One S, two Android phones (OS 6 and 7), my TV (an LG smart from a couple of years back, although is usually disconnected from the network), an old Android LG Tablet that was never supported past 4.4.2, and also my first gen Nexus 7 (2012), all support IPv6!

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Samsung's Chromebook Pro: Overpriced vanilla PC with a stylus. 'Wow'

Boothy

Re: On the subject of the hardware specs.

Quote: "My only complaint is that they took away the bloody delete key..."

Just in case you're not aware, Alt+Backspace should be Delete (doesn't get the button back, but better than nothing!).

For anyone that doesn't know, there are tons of keyboard shortcuts in ChromeOS. To view them on the Chromebook, just hit Ctrl+Alt+? and an interactive overlay should popup, just press the Ctrl, Shift, Alt buttons to see what each modifier key does.

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Boothy

Oldish Lenovo N20P here, and that also has cursor keys.

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SQL Server on Linux? HELL YES! Linux on Windows 10? Meh

Boothy

Re: Windows ME was worse

I found that some of the 'Admin' rights issues could be fixed worked around by installing apps to a non standard folder, like C:/Apps rather than to 'Program Files' (which of course is a special location for Windows).

Still works now for some legacy XP era apps running on newer Windows.

Didn't work for everything of course though.

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Google's Chrome is about to get rather in-your-face about HTTPS

Boothy

Re: Browser Facism gone mad

Personally, I think disabling things like obsolete security options by default in a mainstream browser like Chrome is a good idea, at least for the vast majority of users.

Although I know what it's like trying to do development work with Chrome on older environments, as I've had issues myself with access etc.

It would be nice if Chrome had a Developer/Super User type mode, where you could then re-enable things, perhaps on a case-by-case basis on a chrome://somename page.

For security, you could even have it based on zones, i.e. specific addresses listed in zone 'XYZ' can use RC4 with TLS (or whatever is needed), anything not listed in zone 'XYZ' (or some other explicit zone) is automatically in the default zone, which still uses the default security, so leaves your Internet and other sites still locked down.

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Boothy

Re: Security and obscurity

Judging by this chromium bug discussion.

It seems the previous 'Details' button, which took you directly to the Security tab in the Dev tools window, was always just a temporary thing to bring attention to where the security info is located (i.e. inside the Dev tools).

Looks like the plan was always to remove it after a while, as they seem to think regular uses don't need to view the certificates. (Not sure I agree with this myself!)

The new 'Learn more' button is for regular users, rather than developers, so just takes you to the generic web page documenting what the various icons mean etc.

Seems the chromium devs didn't like the idea of regular users landing in the dev tools: Quote '...so that regular users who are newly clicking on the lock icon (due to icon/verbose UI changes) don't click on it and end up somewhere unexpected.'

Like I said, not sure I agree with this approach, and a few people on the chromium forum even suggest having a new link/button to take you directly to the certificate details.

But for now, seems we are stuck with Ctrl+Shift+I, or the More Tools -> Developer tools menu, then click the Security tab :-/

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Google hardwires its Android app store into new Chromebooks

Boothy

The article seem to indicate that manufactures of Chromebooks would be annoyed....

Quote: "...it is almost certain that antitrust authorities will see it differently: as Google again using its position to force manufacturers to include specific Google software on their systems."

But this doesn't seem to cover the fact that there are no custom apps on Chromebooks! Everything on a Chromebook is already controlled by Google as they all get the same identical OS *.

Manufacturers have to differentiate themselves with the hardware, so the keyboard, screen, battery life etc.

I would suspect that Manufacturers will actually be very happy at this announcement, as it means Chromebooks, which are a tiny, although still growing market, are now more capable devices, without the manufacturers really having to do anything (perhaps some testing, but the devices are the same), and they can now be treated as large Android devices for marketing purposes.

* The one caveat being that eventually devices are dropped from support of the latest builds. Although from what I've seen, this seems to be typically be a much longer time period that a typical phone (4+ years), and support seems to mainly be around hardware capability, rather than New shinny, so old shinny has been dropped tm.

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Boothy

Re: Don't hold your breath

What promise?

I'm not aware of Google ever stating that the beta would be rolled out to any other devices other than the small handful they've been using to date.

The supported device list (linked in the article), that's been available for quite some time now (well over a year), isn't a roll out list, it's a list of devices that can support the new Android capabilities, and so they plan to support those once the final version is out.

My guess is the devices they chose to support in beta, cover a wide enough cross section of underlying hardware, to cover most (or all) of the other devices.

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Boothy

Re: Apple app store

Quote: "No - the difference is MS never locked out all competing software like Apple and Google do."

Neither do Google.

Apple I can understand, but for Google, you're free to install 3rd party app stores on Android, for example you can download and install the Amazon app store direct from the Amazon web site.

Plus of course a lot of Android devices are the Amazon Fire Tablets, as they are cheap, and readily available (in stock in local supermarkets etc), and those don't come with Googles app such as their Play store.

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Annoyingly precocious teen who ruined Trek is now an asteroid

Boothy

You sure you've got your dates right?

Stewart was born July 1940 (76 years old).

NG aired in September 1987, so Stewart would have been 47 (on air date, perhaps 46 during filming).

Wheaton was born October 1972, so is currently 44 years old.

So still 2-3 years to go.

Still makes me feel old though :-/

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Unbreakable Locky ransomware is on the march again

Boothy

Re: viduses

Basic computer usage, such Internet safety (both malware and pervs etc), as well as why backups are important etc, aught to be a mandatory part of school IT lessons.

At least then the kids could pass that on to their parents back home as well.

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Google loses Android friends with Pixel exclusivity

Boothy

Re: OTA OS version updates

Unfortunately 2 years seems to be about the sweet spot. Past that and you 'might' get security patches for another 12 months, but most likely nothing after 3 years.

The Nexus devices can last a bit longer, with support usually only being dropped once the hardware can't keep up, but unfortunately that range is no more (the Nexus devices still for sale are basically what's left of the stock).

To me the Pixels are too expensive for what you get, and I'm happy with my OnePlus3 anyway.

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Boothy

OTA OS version updates

Quote: "New platform features arrive via new phones - hardly anyone upgrades Android from one major version to the next using OTA updates."

Isn't the issue here the lack of the OTA updates themselves, rather than the users not doing the updates? Which is what the sentence above seems to imply to me.

Most OTA updates are done automatically, click Yes to a prompt, and you've got an updated phone. Most current Android phones these days get an OTA update every month or two, (although normally just security patches), and most Android phones (at least in my experience) will usually get at least one major OS update in their lifetime (although rarely more the one).

One issue tends to be that manufactures time their new phone releases with new OS versions, and once the new phone is out, they typically drop support of older models in the same range. Perhaps still supporting one previous model, from the year before, but dropping support for models from 2+ years back (maybe just security patches, but no more OS version releases), even through the devices themselves could likely run the OS perfectly fine!

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Deadly Tesla smash probe: No recall needed, says Uncle Sam

Boothy

Quote: "Whilst the manuals state that, what did the salesman state?"

That's one of the things the judgement kicked up, basically stating Tesla needed to do more to make it clear in-car that this isn't a fully automated self driving car (at least not yet), and this needed to assume the drivers have not read the manual or other documents etc. i.e. like they've just jumped into a new car and set off, and then hit the autodrive button.

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College fires IT admin, loses access to Google email, successfully sues IT admin for $250,000

Boothy

Re: Lax Procedures

Not just unlawful access.

If something went wrong on the system, even if completely unrelated to your brother, and the investigation then showed unauthorised access around the same time, they could well assume he was involved and call the authorities.

Even if not guilty, just having the police requesting you come in to help with their enquiries doesn't look good to other people.

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Did Oculus swipe blueprints from rival? Zuck takes the stand

Boothy

Quite: "Imagine if Facebook were to collapse overnight, and the servers were turned off. I don't think it would be much of an exaggeration to state that the Western World would fall to pieces.".

I think that's very much an exaggeration!

Facebook may be financially sizeable, but that's almost all (if not all of it) advertising revenue, due to the number of users of the service.

If FB where to suddenly vanish, all that would happen is that people would go elsewhere for their social 'fix', and the advertising revenue would simply go with them.

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UK's lords want more details on adult website check plans

Boothy

What is this fixing?

Ignoring the fact (initially) that this is something that we all know won't actually stop anyone that really wants to watch 'stuff'.

All this time an effort to (try and) implement age verification for porn sites in some way yet to be defined.

So what current problem is this actually fixing? i.e. why is this even being discussed?

Is this just another generic "Think of the children!" bandwagon that a few politicians have jumped on?

Business case: If effort out-ways benefits, then don't do it. Especially when the 'benefits' seem to be perceived, rather than actual benefits!

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Devs reverse-engineer 16,000 Android apps, find secrets and keys to AWS accounts

Boothy

Quote: "You're then meant to create an "application specific" api key, which will only ever have permissions to do what is needed for that application. It is this api key that should be hardcoded in to the application, not the master key."

Yup this.

But one of the issues tends to be that some API services are very complex, and when generating a new application key, there can be a lot of boxes to tick/untick, and often the provided documentation isn't clear as to what is needed for specific functions/services to work.

I've gone through similar things myself (just for testing, not live applications), where an application key, ticked with all the permissions you think are needed after reading the documentation, doesn't work! Yet using a key with everything ticked, works fine, and it can be a sizeable tasks trying to whittle down the key permissions, to the minimum needed for the application still to work.

Not helped by the fact that often once a key is generated, you can't change permissions after the fact, and have to delete the old key, and generate a new key, for each new set of options to test, meaning you have to update your application each time before testing again.

My guess here is that some developers likely couldn't get a minimal key to work (or just didn't bother creating one!), and just ticked lots of options till it did, and unfortunately left in permissions that an application really shouldn't have!

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Microsoft Germany says Windows 7 already unfit for business users

Boothy

Re: Anyone Else Here Still On XP?

Don't have any machines running XP native anymore, but I do have it in a VM for the rare occasion when needed (usually some ancient legacy game that is so it it won't run in 7).

It's like visiting an old friend, doesn't mater how longs it's been since you last saw each other, you know exactly what's what and it feels like home again!

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Boothy

Indeed.

People (marketeers) still seem to try to compare the current PC market, to the one 15+ years ago.

Back then a 2 or 3 year old PC could be replaced by a similarly priced new one, that would likely be twice as fast as the one it replaced, and with software getting more bloated advance, the performance jump was usually quite noticeable, and generally financially justifiable.

These days a typical mid-range PC (i.e. typical business use laptop), won't be much faster than one from 4 (or more) years ago. The main changes in recent years being focused on power savings, rather than increasing actual computational power.

A quick look at my now venerable business only use laptop, a T420 from mid 2011, sporting an i5 @ 2.5GHz, with 8GB of RAM. Compare that to a new shiny T560, and it too has an i5, which runs at 2.8GHz (but only comes with 4GB RAM! But does have a slightly faster HDD (SSD only in the top end i7 model)).

Granted it's a newer gen i5, but a quick look at some CPU benchmarks and there is perhaps a 10-15% increase in performance, this after ~6 years of CPU development!

Almost all changes in the last 10 years (other than SSDs) have been minor incremental improvements.

I was told years ago that unless the 'new' device was at least 50% faster than the current device, a typical end user wouldn't actually notice the difference.

Cost (including the effort to reinstall everything), to move to a new PC/laptop, just isn't justifiable with current devices (power users being the likely only exception).

At this rate, people are likely to keep their current PCs/laptops for at least 5 years min, perhaps over 10 years, or until they physically break. Which also means most users will still with the OS that came on the device.

The World has changed Mr Marketeer, get used to it!

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BT installs phone 'spam filter', says it'll strain out mass cold-callers

Boothy

Re: Interesting development

Reminds me of the time I moved into a rented house about 12 years ago (no longer there), and I needed a phone line (on call, needed dial-up from home and this was before the company had VPN over broadband available).

The house had an existing line installed, with a master socket (an old one, no removable faceplate, but still a BT431A socket).

The line was dead, and the landlord wasn't interested in getting it hooked up for me, but said that I could do what I wanted with it myself.

So I called BT on my mobile, to get the line reconnected, to be told the house doesn't have an existing line! (The house also wasn't a new build, about 100 years old).

Me "But it does, I can see it!", BT: "nope, doesn't have one now, and its never had one in the past.", Me: "But I can see the socket". BT "Nope".

So I gave in and went through the process of getting a new line.

Turned out, they had a special offer on at the time, which meant no installation cost for new installations. A re-connection at the time was normally something like half the price of a new install.

The BT engineer turned up, started putting in a newline from the cabinet end, before coming to the house, only turned up once the new line was outside the house. At which point he noticed the old line going through the wall by the front door, and once let in the house, could see the existing master socket on the other side of the hole (no cabling inside the house)!

"Hmm, that's odd, oh well", and duly ripped out the old copper wire and socket, few in the new wire through the pre-existing hole, and fitted a new master socket.

So their poor records basically saved me some money, cost them some, and got me a nice shinny new line and socket!

6
0
Boothy

Re: "huge computing power"

Quote: "...so it's not exactly hard to filter out all their calls and send the lot to a voicemail."

And presumably if it's redirecting to voicemail, BT are still getting their coin for connecting the call through, so they still get some revenue anyway.

7
0

Windows 10 Anniversary Update crushed exploits without need of patches

Boothy

Re: 'Own AV' vs. The Rest

Personally, I'd move on from Defender on the first boot of any new install.

Also bear in mind, these OS changes enhance the security of Windows, irrespective of the AV in use, so still better to use something more capable than Defender anyway.

I think even MS stated Defender was basically intended as a bare bones minimum, for those who simply haven't bothered to install a 3rd party option, or don't understand that AV is needed, and to provide minimal protection when first going on-line etc. (i.e. before a user has downloaded and installed a 3rd party AV).

If you look on av-test.org (at their home AV listings) Defender currently comes joint bottom for Protection (along with Comodo), and the same can be seen on other sites.

Even if you don't want to spend money, the free versions of Avast and Bitdefender give the highest (along with other products) protection ratings, much better than Defender. (AVG doesn't score as high, but is another popular free AV).

I switched from Avast to Bitdefender a while back, as Avast was getting more and more annoying with various pop up notifications that were not important, and couldn't be removed, whereas Bitdefender is focused on minimal intervention (ideal for none techie friends and family).

2
0
Boothy

Re: Windows is the lowest form of Desktop Experience available

Hmm, I call bull

Open new tab to bing.com

Enter mozilla and hit return..

First result, taking up most of the page is 'Mozilla - Official site', https://www.mozilla.org

At least it was for me. (But I also have uBlock Origin installed, which is one of the first things I add to any new Windows install, so your search results may differ!)

9
1

Flight 666 lands safely in HEL on Friday the 13th

Boothy

Re: Well, it didn't crash...

I was going to say the same thing, but for 666, regularly shows up when something it going well

1
0

Customer: BT admitted it had 'mis-sold' me fibre broadband

Boothy

Re: Pull out...

Also replacing the old NTE5 Master socket with a vDSL Openreach one can help as well.

My ex girfield was a long way from the exchange (miles), and not yet FTTC enabled (old cabinet) and managed about 4Mbps at best, and was flaky.

I replaced the standard face plate (NTE5), with a Mk3 vDLS one, and it went up to 6Mbps, and was a lot more stable.

She later switched to FTTC once her cabinet was updated, and gets ~20Mbps through the same socket now (20 is what she paid for).

Just search for 'BT Openreach MK3' on Amazon/ebay etc.

Also if you don't use them, disconnect any extensions coming out of the master socket. My old house had two extensions, and as I used a wireless phone plugged directly into the master socket, they weren't needed, so I just pulled the wires out from the back of the little removable plate. I went from ~16Mpbs to 18Mpbs at the time.

1
0
Boothy

Re: Self check

Quote: "It may have been installed by Openreach, but if it's a LLU line (e.g. SKY, TT), BT will have no idea what telephone number they have allocated, so the number checker will fail and the address should be used instead."

Yup, it was Sky.

I was moving to a new build, with no phone line yet (copper in, but not connected) and BT wanted something like £70 to connect it up.

Whereas Sky would do it for free, and install a new Satellite dish, as long as I signed up for another 12 months of TV and landline rental with them (TV I was going to do anyway, and at the time Sky line rental was cheaper).

0
0

Reg straps on goggles from upstart that wants to 'democratize' VR

Boothy

Re: Back to front

Quote: "You could improve VR/ER by tracking eyeballs and only 3d rendering an apparent circle of focus 4 feet deep whilst rendering the rest in 2d."

Basically already on it's way.

What you're describing is close to what is known as foveated VR rendering (by nVidia), although it still renders the whole scene in 3D, the peripheries are not done in any detail (blurs out to the periphery).

Companies like Qualcomm are also working on foveated rendering for mobile devices.

This apparently reduces the required GPU load considerable, as the processor only needs to concentrate on a central cone of view. This means a large overall reduction in the GPU overhead for current VR.

This should help lower the entry level needed for current VR, and also allow more detail going forwards with existing top end cards, and pave the way for things like 4k per eye displays at 90+ Hz.

At the moment the tech from nVidia doesn't do eye tracking, but other people are also working on that as well, and there is no reason they couldn't be tied together.

2
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