* Posts by Tomato42

699 posts • joined 31 May 2011

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EU plans for domestic exascale supercomputer chips: A RISC-y business

Tomato42
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Re: We can watch if from the UK

yes, Europeans are really bad at at big scientific projects, they never deliver, just look at Large Hadron Collider, I think you can read about it on their fledgling technology called "The Web" (talk about ridiculous naming) that came from the same institution /s

> 15+ years alter, assuming anything is created, itll be something like a 2Ghz 6502.

nobody is saying they have to start from scratch

> If the EU want the hardware then they just need to pay the Taiwanese fabs to create it.

oh, so the foundries in Dresden closed recently? when was that?

> They are pissing money because they dont knwo that value add is the software.

WTF you talk about? all of HPC runs Linux. Just because you don't hear about Google's and GitHub's from EU, doesn't mean EU does not make a lot of software. There's a difference between technology aimed at consumers and technology aimed at corporations.

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GitHub to Pythonistas: Let us save you from vulnerable code

Tomato42
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Re: What?

I'm quite sure they started working on it well before acquisition

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Google Chrome update to label HTTP-only sites insecure within WEEKS

Tomato42
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Re: http download: 90 seconds, https download >= 45 min

https://istlsfastyet.com/

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Tomato42
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the whole point of marking http as insecure is to drop the, as you rightly point out, "secure" identifier on https sites

so that we end with just websites, no "not secure", no "secure", just websites

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Tomato42
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well, if you like ISPs injecting ads into your otherwise ad-free websites (https://www.infoworld.com/article/2925839/net-neutrality/code-injection-new-low-isps.html) then, sure, go and continue using http only

I prefer to read what the author intended to be on the website, and http doesn't ensure that.

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Europe's scheme to build exascale capability on homegrown hardware is ludicrous fantasy

Tomato42
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Re: What about the software?

Linux is already ported to all the architectures discussed here, and x86 HPC also runs Linux, so that's hardly a problem

the issue is with applications, hand coded assembly in numerical libraries, not with stuff below that

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Tomato42
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> I assume it's the French who want to drive this forward using EU money.

I'm quite sure that they (in pure monetary terms) contribute more to the EU budget than they get out, so it's more like "using their money with the help of other countries" than the parasitic-sounding "using EU money"...

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Tomato42
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Re: I beg to differ

well, ARM is European, though likely soon not EU, so it's not like we would be starting from zero

and while the foundries in Dresden are of GlobalFoundries, so US coroporation, it does show that they can be competitive

so definitely not an insane idea

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Astronaut took camera on spacewalk, but forgot SD memory card

Tomato42
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Re: The man is 53, for god's sake!

> I very much doubt the astronauts have a supply of SD cards for putting in various things.

Actually, they have quite a few DSLRs on ISS that they can freely use to take pictures in their spare time, so, yes, they do have a supply of SD cards

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Tomato42
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> 3. The camera recorded everything, but there were things present that NASA don't want us to know about...

no, there was just static, 18 hours of it

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Tomato42
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Re: The man is 53, for god's sake!

@CrazyOldCatMan I'm sorry officer, it's really inexcusable. Where should I send my space geek card and Kerbal Space Program CD-Key? (would also send Orbiter CD-Key, but it's free, so...)

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Tomato42
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Re: The man is 53, for god's sake!

I'm quite sure he's more than able to handle a stupid go-pro.

Every professional photographer had at one point forgot about an extra SD card (and haven't cleared current one), or forgot a spare battery, left it in the charger...

For him to find himself outside IIS without an SD card is a fuckup on at least half a dozen different levels, so maybe stop with the ageism?

also: goPros are more that able to handle harshness of space, they wouldn't be allowed to go outside with them if that wasn't the case; see also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8HRP-iqHRE

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Creep travels half the world to harass online teen gamer… and gets shot by her mom – cops

Tomato42
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Re: @Tomato ...@AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

@ Ian Michael Gumby

> First, legally, he couldn't get a gun.

really? in country with such lax laws that they are essentially non-existent (ekhm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_show_loophole ekhm)

also, what happened to the "if making owning guns illegal, only criminals would have them", he isn't exactly an upstanding member of society, now is he?

> However in the UK... you have really weird gun laws.

there is a world outside anglophone countries, you know...

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Tomato42
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Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

> While many in the Western world can't own firearms... law abiding citizens in the US can and many do.

just because you have to have a permit to have a gun in civilised countries doesn't make them illegal

also, this guy was "stupid" for not getting a gun himself, not like anything would prevent such an unhinged individual from getting one in the US

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Registry to ban Cyrillic .eu addresses even if you've paid for them

Tomato42
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I'd say you should have a mirror running on "traditional", Latin-only, name anyway, if only to allow people from outside your little country to actually be able to visit (including expats that don't have access to PC with the correct input method installed)

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Tomato42
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Re: Here's a thought...

> a url with two different scripts

that doesn't work, аррӏе.com is fully in Cyrillic, apple.com is in Latin script

the whole idea with IDNs is back-asswards, everybody needs to learn Latin script anyway, for languages that use diacritics, loosing them is not a huge problem (and I speak two of them)

for countries that don't use it, it's still actually used in them (like on road signs) because it is so popular and universal

not to mention languages like Chinese dialects, Japanese and Korean, where you write in Latin script that is then transformed to traditional characters

it's a cash grab by registrars, plain and simple

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German researchers defeat printers' doc-tracking dots

Tomato42
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Re: Did it really sink Reality Winner?

The dots in question are yellow, just use b&w printer, go to some public xerox place to then duplicate them again on a b&w machine, if you are really paranoid.

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At last! Apple admits its MacBook Pro butterfly keyboards utterly suck, offers free replacements

Tomato42
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Re: Er, this Doesn't Really Fix the Problem...

@Dan 55 let's just say, I have a very small violin, you could maybe even call it "world's tiniest"...

seriously though, hubris getting punished only causes me schadenfreude, and apple has plenty of hubris

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It's time for TLS 1.0 and 1.1 to die (die, die)

Tomato42
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SHA-1

Primary reason to abandon TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1 is SHA-1: both signatures made by server and the handshake transcript integrity depends on SHA-1.

The SHA-1 HMAC in the TLS 1.0 era ciphers is still secure so they can be used with TLS 1.2, where they'll use SHA-256 for handshake transcript integrity (and a negotiated hash for server signatures).

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Intel chip flaw: Math unit may spill crypto secrets from apps to malware

Tomato42
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Re: Homomorphic encryption only option

homomorphic encryption still needs to be implemented in a way that hides the information about the secret addition to the already encrypted data – that's a place for bugs.

it's not a panacea

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First A380 flown in anger to be broken up for parts

Tomato42
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second hand parts are problematic if their provenance and usage amount is unknown; no such thing in aviation

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NASA makes the James Webb Telescope a looker with a heart of gold

Tomato42
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> It's also a reminder of the project's cost, estimated to be about $8.8 billion by the US Government Accountability Office

I'm quite sure the amount of gold on it is so small that any astronomer that will be able to use it would pocket the cost of it himself or herself if it guaranteed 10% of time on the Webb.

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Is Microsoft about to git-merge with GitHub? Rumors suggest: Yes

Tomato42
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Re: And Google is just as bad

exactly, when I read the comments I have flashbacks to early 2000's

Microsoft is now much more pro-OSS than Google is – Microsoft is open sourcing stuff while Google is close-sourcing stuff that was OSS (like parts of Android)

and while IBM likely wouldn't screw users up, they are not a user-centric services company, so GitHub wouldn't really fit with them...

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Tomato42
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Re: Watch "Antitrust" (2001) hollywood movie, they predicted it 17 years ago

if only there was something to prevent them from doing that, I don't know, like a law for copying stuff, we could call it "copyright"

also, facepalm on even suggesting that GitHub has control over any of the code they host, with git of all things

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Internet engineers tear into United Nations' plan to move us all to IPv6

Tomato42
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> A country that can singlehandedly start AND END World War III deserves attention whether you like it or not.

I somehow can't see a situation in which just few ICBMs are in the air that doesn't end in an all-out WW III. So either everybody that has nukes gets the veto, or the people that don't use veto exclusively to stop investigations into their own war crimes get the veto.

Also, while the Oligarchs exploit Russians, they do it to fund their extravagant lifestyles in the West, not in Russia. Doing that in a nuclear wasteland is rather hard.

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Tomato42
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thing is, Russia having veto power is a relic of the past. Having GDP far smaller than Italy, let alone other EU economies.

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New Windows Servers are like buses: None for ages, then two at once!

Tomato42
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Re: In-place upgrade?

> where everything is virtualised and "replacing" is fairly low cost.

inter-version compatibility would still be a problem then

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Russia to Apple: Kill Telegram crypto-chat – or the App Store gets it

Tomato42
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Re: They could take down Telegram...

but before that new app is vetted, and news about it spread, in the in-between confusion they will be able to find the "terrorists"...

...just after they have committed a suicide by 4 shots to the head, or by eating half a basket of poisonous mushrooms

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Tomato42
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no, it's the terrorist group that shot down the MH17 flight

oh, wait, it's the same group

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US-China trade war is back on: White House repeats threat to tax Middle Kingdom imports

Tomato42
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Unhappy

Mexicans have a word for this behaviour...

they described it as "loco"

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GDPRmageddon: They think it's all over! Protip, it has only just begun

Tomato42
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Re: Yahoo! Did! it! All! Wrong!

not to mention using 3rd party mailers to send all those queries

no effing wonder ICO website is down; of the 20 emails I received in just last two days begging me to agree to receive "offers from our partners", probably 3 or 4 were actually what I'd call GDPR compliant

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You know that silly fear about Alexa recording everything and leaking it online? It just happened

Tomato42
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"extremely rare occurrence"

yes, I'm sure that it happens only once every 1 million transactions or so, which makes it a "rare occurrence"

if they really were worried about privacy it would be technically impossible for this thing to happen

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GDPR for everyone, cries Microsoft: We'll extend Europe's privacy rights worldwide

Tomato42
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Re: Cynical, me?

> A US citizen flies to France for a meeting, but his phone/laptop/whatever is set up in default full-snoop mode... Is he now subject to GDPR? Is his whole company?

GDPR applies to companies, not people; if he or she is a private citizen, then no they are not subject to GDPR

second, if they do business in EU or offer services to EU citizens, they are under the GDPR well before the cavity search by TSA of that US citizen

> Seems just easier to extend it to everyone until a court warrant says otherwise - at which point you at least have right intent on your side if nothing else.

that was the point of GDPR, so if US company shares data only because of a legal warrant, then that sharing is legal, even under GDPR; that being said, just keeping data obtained without consent and with no business relationship will incur fines under GDPR

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Tomato42
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Re: Msft Employee Perspective

> Couple that with the fact that the law in the US might be quite different to the law in Europe about what's legally required

first, contrary to public opinion, courts are sensible, so if it really is required, and is not a far departure of items listed in GDPR, it likely will be let slide through; though I am quite curious of examples of PII data like this

second, there's a difference in having the data and sharing it willy-nilly: if they are required by US law to collect some data, they can, but that doesn't mean that the access to it has to be easy, that it can't be pseudoanonymised in storage, etc. "being required legally to collect data" is a "reasonable business need" in GDPR, but that means that this data can be used only for that specific law-complying purpose

and I fail to see how that's not an improvement

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Senator Kennedy: Why I cast my Senate-busting vote for net neutrality

Tomato42
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Senator's opinions...

"Cable companies that provide internet access contend that in a free market, so long as they disclose it, they should have the right to control their product, (...) including which websites download quickly, which websites download slowly and which don't download at all."

"Internet is a necessity: it's like water, it's like electricity it's like a telephone,"

doublethink is a helluva drug

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US Congress mulls expanding copyright yet again – to 144 years

Tomato42
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Re: 100 Years Of Hell

yes, yes, yes, both parties are responsible for copyright extensions

thing is: a). now it's the GOP that's in power, and b). it's the party that has critters that are impervious to facts, logic and totally unashamed (if not proud) of it

with Democratic congress we would have at least a chance of showing them empirical data that shows that their solution is wrong and have a discussion about it; with GOP it will be ignored as paid-for scientists of "Big Public Domain", enemies of "Economy" and ignored completely

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Tomato42
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Re: 100 Years Of Hell

as soon as the supporters of the Grab Our Pussies (and other conservatives) party notice that it's not the liberals that are the enemies but their "own" elected politicians

i.e. never

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Tomato42
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Re: Next act will be titled: "To infinity - and beyond!"

@JohnFen ok, then let's establish it to "10 years before the heath-death of the universe"!

but then I expect the Big Rodent lawyers say that it's still not enough to extract enough revenue

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Consent, datasets and avoiding a visit from the information commissioner

Tomato42
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Re: Glad to see the appropriate GDPR noises are being made

@Adam 52: not when it includes a 3rd party

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Tomato42
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Re: but you can't then presume to use it for mailshots trying to sell other stuff

@AC: having ability to de-anonymise the data means that it is not anonymised, so it still needs to remain protected

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Pointless US Congress net neutrality vote will take place tomorrow!

Tomato42
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Re: Obvious

Thank Scalia (R) for that

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Tomato42
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Re: What do you want them to do?

> Obama's great sin was to eschew congress

It was a Republican congress! They kept cutting their own noses to spite him! And it worked, because the US general public has a memory worse than a goldfish.

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Tomato42
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Re: Just Political Ad Fuel

@Big John

> Trump has no huge problem with women that I'm aware of

then get aware: https://www.wsj.com/articles/trump-discloses-reimbursement-to-michael-cohen-tied-to-stormy-daniels-payment-1526493667

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Tomato42
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Re: Just Political Ad Fuel

sorry, but any reason to get people, that don't believe in science and want to cook us all through global warming, from power is a good reason

if I agree with it, it only makes it better

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UK has rejected over 1,000 skilled IT bod visa applications this year

Tomato42
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Re: Visas and skills gaps

somehow I don't see the trained "locals" working for the same wage as the "imports"

because empire

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Tomato42
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Re: Hmm what could be the cause....

> My job went to India, it took 2 people to half fill my shoes,

and they did cost a tenth of your wage, that's a win! /s

(because fuck quality)

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You love Systemd – you just don't know it yet, wink Red Hat bods

Tomato42
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Linux

Re: Spherical wheel is superior.

I don't claim I know better, but I do know that I never saw a non-distribution provided init script that handled correctly the basic of corner cases – service already running, run file left-over but process dead, service restart – let alone the more obscure ones, like application double forking when it shouldn't (even when that was the failure mode of the application the script was provided with). So maybe, just maybe, you haven't experienced everything there is to experience, so your opinion is subjective?

Yes, the sides of the discussion should talk more, but this applies to both sides. "La, la, la, sysv is working fine on my machine, thankyouverymuch" is not what you can call "participating in discussion". So is quoting well known and long discussed (and disproven) points. (and then downvoting people into oblivion for daring to point this things out).

now in the real world, people that have to deal with init systems on daily basis, as distribution maintainers, by large, have chosen to switch their distributions to systemd, so the whole situation I can sum up one way:

"the dogs may bark, but the caravan moves on"

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Tomato42
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Re: fscking BINARY LOGS.

> I haven't had the displeasure much of dealing with the systemd binary logs yet myself.

"I have no clue what I'm talking about or what's a robust solution but dear god, that won't stop me!" – why is it that all the people complaining about journald sound like that?

systemd works just fine with regular syslog-ng, without journald (that's the thing that has binary logs) in sight

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Tomato42
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Re: However, I don't recall any major agreement that init needed fixing.

> Do they actually not agree with me? Or is it more that they are blindly following Redhat's lead, simply because it's easier to base their distro on somebody else's work than it is to rollout their own?

I'm not stupid, other people are stupid!

cool argument bro, very mature, bro /s

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Tomato42
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> Why would I feel the need to write a replacement for something which has been working for me without major problems for two decades?

funny you say that, because for other people old sysV init wasn't working and systemD is a welcome replacement as it does work, and does work exactly as advertised

yes, including starting services only after the network is available

(use "After=syslog.target network.target")

> there are already several working alternatives apart from systemd

and yet for some reason Debian, SLES, Fedora, Archlinux, CoreOS and Mageia use it by default, it's almost as if people that had to deal with SysV issues knew about those issues and wanted them gone

but conspiracy theories are much more exciting

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