* Posts by User McUser

583 posts • joined 6 May 2011

Page:

World+dog ignores Rubin's Wonderdroid

User McUser
Coat

"PH-1"

phone's model number ("PH-1")

Personally, I'd prefer something a little more basic.

5
0

Disengage, disengage! Cali DMV reports show how often human drivers override robot cars

User McUser
Joke

The "Kitty Hawk" moment

If we define "self-driving" cars the way we defined "powered flight" after Kitty Hawk, then we're well past that point and have moved on to this: https://youtu.be/Sp7MHZY2ADI

3
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As Facebook pushes yet more fake articles, one news editor tells Mark to get a grip – or Zuck off

User McUser
Megaphone

Oh FFS - fixing this is EASY

Step 1 - Setup a news white-list. If you aren't on the list then your "news" won't be allowed.

Step 2 - Create a process whereby *any* news site can apply to be added to the white-list. This would be human reviewed by qualified people and the sites would be required to meet very basic journalism standards such as only publishing actual, factual news and having a clear demarcation between what's news and what's commentary or editorial content. (This is neither difficult nor burdensome.)

Step 3 - Review these sites on a regular basis to make sure that they are still in compliance.

DONE

1
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Leaky credit report biz face massive fines if US senators get their way

User McUser
Holmes

Re: No chance

The biggest problem with the bill is size of the potential fines. They are big enough to bankrupt a company in short order (50% of annual revenues). In many cases that would be as bad as the security breach as the company sinks taking other innocent businesses with it.

Well then they had better be pretty fucking careful with our data in order to keep that from happening.

26
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Game of Thrones author's space horror Nightflyers hitting telly

User McUser

Re: Meh

Well, there's this bunch of people going here, talking there, and occasionally seeing/doing something exciting. I suppose if you've followed the story lines you actually care what's going on, although the need to see the minutiae of riding north escapes me.

I'm sorry but that's just silly - you can't start reading a book at the 6th chapter and then stop at the 7th chapter and then not like the book because you didn't know who any of the characters were and didn't understand what they were talking about. The same goes for a TV serial drama.

You can say it's boring or not a genre you typically like or that the characters are uninspired or you can just not like it for non-specific reasons but this "without context" critique is just the weirdest thing I've ever heard.

16
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User McUser
WTF?

Re: Meh

Looked at without context, episodes (like the books themselves) are major snoozes.

It's OK if you don't like the books and/or the TV show; not everyone has to like everything.

But "Looked at without context" - what does that even mean?

16
1

Ubuntu 17.10 pulled: Linux OS knackers laptop BIOSes, Intel kernel driver fingered

User McUser

> Why is this [a kernel driver for the SPI flash] even a thing?

Actually, I meant "why is SPI flash a thing."

At a minimum, SPI should be an option that is disabled by default. But preferably (IMHO) it shouldn't even exist. The BIOS' flash storage should be read-only outside of the BIOS' own configuration screens.

Otherwise some random software cock-up could brick your shiny new laptop (Q.E.D.)

11
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User McUser
Facepalm

Intel's SPI driver is kernel-level software that allows the operating system to access the firmware's flash storage on the motherboard via a serial communication interface.

Why is this even a thing?

53
3

IT giant CSC screwed its 1,000 sysadmins out of their overtime – jury

User McUser

Re: Overtime?

Wossat, then?

http://dilbert.com/strip/1995-12-03

17
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Boffins show off speedy quantum CNOT gate - in silicon

User McUser
Thumb Up

The Future is Now

“We use the CNOT gate to generate a Bell state with 75 per cent fidelity, limited by quantum state readout”

It's official - real life science now sounds like SciFi technobabble.

8
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Forget Bruce Willis, Earth's atmosphere is our best defense against meteorites

User McUser
Mushroom

Re: So what happened to the 12,000 ton Chelyabinsk meteorite?

If they only recovered 5 tons of it, where did the other 11,995 tons go? Certainly it did not convert to energy (Siberia would be leveled otherwise)

I am not a physicist but I believe 11,995 tons converted into energy would not just destroy Siberia. Pretty sure it would destroy the entire planet several times over.

A one megaton explosion equates to about 46.5g of material being converted into energy. So 11,995 tons works out to be roughly 234,014,644.222 Megatons.

11
1

"pre" tag not working as expected

User McUser

"pre" tag not working as expected

Should not the "pre" tag preserve the spacing and carriage returns of the text inside it as-entered? As implemented right now it seems it only changes the font face to a monospaced one.

Here's a test:

Line one.

Line two.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

The first two lines should be single spaced with one blank line between "Line two." and the first line of numerals.

The first line of numerals has a single space character between each one and the second has two space characters between each one.

EDIT: I see that when I edit my post after submitting it that the extra "linefeeds" are included in the comment editing box and the extra space characters have been discarded. So the issue would seem to be due to the parsing of the posts by the system when it no doubt sanitizes them against Johnny Droptable style chicanery.

0
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FCC backtracks on helping with neutrality fraud investigation

User McUser
Boffin

Easy Fix - Hash Them

[FCC general counsel Thomas Johnson] suggested revealing the IP addresses of commenters raised privacy concerns and posed a security risk to the FCC's comment system.

Then apply a hash+salt to the IP addresses before handing the data over. You can then compare the hashed values to see if a significant number of comments came from the same IP address without being able to know which IP address it is.

It's almost like they're just making up stupid and transparently simple excuses to not provide the information for political reasons!

4
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Facebook Messenger ... for who now? Zuck points his digital crack at ever younger kids

User McUser

If you do not use the class's WhatsApp group, you're ostracised.

I'd just like to point out that this is not anything new - the ostracizing part that is. In my day wearing the wrong kind of shoes was the uncool thing that got you shunned. So if it isn't an app it'll be something else that your children's peer group will use to divide themselves into groups.

14
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Badass alert: 1 in 5 Brits don't give a damn about webpage crypto-miners

User McUser
Alert

Ads -vs- Cryptomining

Cryptomining just might save us all from the horrifying ad-supported future ahead of us. (Sorry if that link is geofenced.)

In the current phase of the Internet, advertising rules the Web for sure. Entire systems have been established to coerce and fool people into clicking on links to generate ad impressions (or whatever the term is these days.) Because the advertising model rewards you for getting a lot of people to go to your site, you don't need any real content. It provides an incentive for websites to have small pages with a lot of ads surrounding said "content" and to stretch and split longer sections into multiple smaller pieces. (That way you have to click on the next page to get the next segment of content which results in loading more advertisements; rinse and repeat.)

Thus the rise of the "listicle" and the explosion of "fake news" websites. It's the web equivalent of SPAM; you only get a fraction of a $CURRENCY_UNIT for each person who loads the page so you need to get many thousands (or millions) of people to load a given webpage in order to make any money. Thus small pages with click-bait headlines and little to no actual content. Fake News leverages outrage and the hyper-partisanship of our day to drive users to their site and thus bump their impression rate.

But the important thing to remember is that they don’t need you to *stay* at the site. They don’t need you to become a regular visitor and they don’t need to have truthful or entertaining content. They don’t need anything other than gibberish, ads surrounding the gibberish, and then something to trick you into loading the gibberish. They have “Red Flag” headlines designed to get people emotionally invested in clicking but it doesn’t really matter what the headline is or what the actual content is once you click the link; they just need your eyeballs on the page long enough to register the view. In fact the less time you spend there the better – it lets you go back to Facebook or wherever you were when you saw the link in order to present you with a new link to click on in order to generate more ad views (rinse and repeat.)

Cryptomining in the browser requires the exact opposite approach. If someone clicks a link and finds nothing of interest to keep them reading, then the cryptomining website owner makes nothing. But if they can convince you to *stay* at that site by, say, providing actual content that is interesting and informative, then they will make money from the coins being mined while you are there. Thus it will be in the site’s best interest to attract more users and to keep them there longer. The more people with the page open and running the mining code and the longer people stay at a given site the more money generated for the site.

It’s not a panacea or course and there will be people who will abuse cryptomining systems as sure as people figured out how to abuse advertising systems. But browsers could provide a management method to control cryptomining much more efficiently than they can block ads; it could be as simple as a whitelist/blacklist of sites or cryptocurrencies or more complicated like some way to tell if you are actively reading a site's content or if there is merely a hidden window somewhere running code.

TL;DR – Ad revenue encourages a minimal amount of low quality content on websites designed to get you in and out quickly and repeatedly. Cryptomining revenue encourages high quality and engaging content that gets you to stay at that site longer.

10
1

Big Cable's pillow talk with FCC to forbid US states from writing own net neutrality rules

User McUser
Devil

Dear Internet Service Subscriber;

Say, we all enjoy Netflix, right? And the Facebook? And Spotify sure is swell these days! Wow, those sure are popular sites... It would be a real shame if someone were to, say, slow down your access to those websites and services! Why someone in the right position could reduce bandwidth and/or latency to those sites and there would be nothing you could do about it!

Well, we here at Your Internet Service Provider are proud to announce our newest line of easily payable fees! For just $14.99 a month*, you can guarantee that those "hypothetical" ne'er-do-wells won't reduce your bandwidth and/or latency when you try to access these extremely popular websites and services! Yes, you'll enjoy the exact same performance you're already getting with the added benefit of knowing that you're now paying extra money each month for it!

Of course you could decline our generous offer and take your chances, but we don't recommend it! Don't forget, only 6% of the country has access to more than two high-speed Internet Service Providers and only 46% have more than one, so good luck finding another ISP that isn't going to do the exact same thing.

--Your Internet Service Provider.

*For now, we'll see how high we can get that later. Additional website and service packages available soon!

7
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Snap: We've blown $3bn this year and Tencent wants to give us more

User McUser
FAIL

The company works just like their app...

For the calendar year, Snap told investors it has racked up a staggering $3.1bn in losses

So just like their app, the money comes in and vanishes sometime later with nothing to show for it in the end.

I'd also like to point out that four years ago, almost to the day, Snap turned down both a $3billion offer from Facebook and a $4billion offer from Tencent to buy them. (https://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/11/13/snapchat_laughs_off_facebook_buyout_offer/)

1
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AI bot rips off human eyes, easily cracks web CAPTCHA codes. Ouch

User McUser

Re: Oh no not again

Real humans don't need loads of examples. Three year old human vs computer "learning" what a hot dog is.

Yeah, they kinda do. Letters are especially hard compared to physical objects.

No matter how you orient a hotdog in space it's still a hotdog but letters are not like that.

Turn the letter "b" upside down and now it's a "p" - mirror it and it's a "d" or "q". It's part of why children learning to write will sometimes render letters backwards or in other strange ways.

20
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'Alexa, play Charlie Bit My Finger.' I can't do that, Dave. No, really

User McUser

Won't play YouTube?

Why are you telling me good news as though it were bad?

7
1

Google's pay-to-play 'remedy' is warming Eurocrats' hearts

User McUser
Unhappy

Re: How about..

FoundEm & all the other price comparison sites develop their own search engine and make it better than Google

Because the normals do not use the Web in that way. They don't go to an appropriate site or vendor and then search for what they want. They just Google that shit and click on the first thing in the list.

I know people that Google the literal string "youtube.com" instead of typing that into their browser's URL bar. For the majority of users, Google *is* the Internet; they know of no other context in which the Web can exist except as search results.

5
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Mozilla whips out Rusty new Firefox Quantum (and that's a good thing)

User McUser
Flame

It's so fast I don't even care

IDK about anyone else, but the actual rendering of the webpage I'm viewing isn't the slow part - that takes like 2 seconds and not being a gnat my attention span is sufficient for that delay. No, the problem I have is the thirteen billion external JS files that every page needs to fetch from ten billion other servers that are too busy to respond in a timely manner. "Waiting for analytics.somefuckingadnetwork.com..." is what holds up my browsing experience, not the 30 extra milliseconds layout rendering takes to sort out the CSS or whatever.

8
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US government sued by 11 pissed-off travellers over computer searches

User McUser
Big Brother

Re: Searches, Searches...

When you cross a frontier, EVERYTHING is subject to search for contraband.

OK, fine search my bags for illegal fruit and/or drugs; but I ask you this - what could *possibly* be stored on a phone that a customs agent needs to see?

0
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Boffins prove oil and water CAN mix – if you do it in a gas giant

User McUser
Coat

Re: Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds

Just wanted to add that when it comes to chemistry, you're either part of solution or you're part of the precipitate.

30
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PC sales to fall and fall and fall and fall and fall for the next five years

User McUser

Re: Virtual Reality

As for "showstopped bugs being worked out", do you mean the sync issues with direction getting out of sync with reality, the issues in manipulating 3D space or the objects in it (moving around or interacting with objects) or the issues of interacting in an unconstrained way with the environment (leaning or otherwise moving through a solid surface).

You've clearly only used mobile VR - the ones that use your phone. Proper desktop VR has robust tracking and positioning and the controls are mapped 1:1 within the space around you. You can pick up virtual objects with ease - it's all very intuitive and natural feeling. Don't get me wrong, there are still a LOT of issues to work out, but it is merely a matter of time before they figure them out.

Is VR "the future" of all computing? I have no idea, but I think that the technology is here to stay, even if it's just for video games and entertainment.

1
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US trade watchdog puts down the phone to Qualcomm, reaches for probe, sticks it in Apple

User McUser
WTF?

I Clearly Do Not Understand Patent Law

[Qualcomm] wants an import ban placed on iPhones and iPads that use Intel-made wireless broadband modems, the operation of which allegedly infringes six patents held by Qualcomm.

Surely Qualcomm should be suing INTEL then? Apple is merely buying Intel's chips so not sure how that would infringe any patents...

Apple usually uses Qualcomm modem chips in its handhelds, but has started using Intel components in some of its latest products. Qualcomm reckons Apple's use of Intel's technology tramples on its patents, hence the import ban request.

I know lawyers like money but how is this even a lawsuit? Does Qualcomm have a patent on device manufacturers buying chips from their competitors?

0
0

Creepy tech tycoons Zuck and Musk clash over AI doomsday

User McUser

Re: Slavery

What if we programmed them to *want* to perform mundane tasks?

Would that still be slavery?

0
0

I've got a verbal govt contract for Hyperloop, claims His Muskiness

User McUser
Alert

Re: Please complete this sentence Elon:

But Main Street's still all cracked and broken!

Seriously though - America has a large infrastructure problem that will eventually doom us if we don't start doing something about it soon. We need to fix the existing roads, bridges, tunnels, airports, and train tracks before we invest in what's basically an oversized pneumatic tube system for people. (Which is more of a Futurama thing anyways.)

11
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DARPA cracks wallet to open heads: Brain interface projects get Uncle Sam's backing

User McUser
Boffin

Re: Clearly needs machine learning

The 1 million neuron number is the sort of level you'd need to drive the optic nerve, once you'd figured out how to convert the image from a conventional sensor into one the brain can process.

Back in 1999 they figured out how to decode the visual info, at least in cats: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/471786.stm Encoding would seem to be a matter of reversing the process.

0
0

Trump's CNN tantrum could delay $85bn AT&T-Time Warner merger

User McUser
Megaphone

Re: Temper temper!

It is true that almost half of USAins don't like Donald, but the other slightly larger half like him just fine

So, are you calling Trump supporters fat or are you just bad at math?

Popular Vote Tallies:

Trump: 62,979,879

Clinton: 65,844,954 (2,865,075 more)

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/21/politics/donald-trump-hillary-clinton-popular-vote-final-count/index.html (Oops, CNN again...)

8
3

FREE wildcard HTTPS certs from Let's Encrypt for every Reg reader*

User McUser
IT Angle

I disagree

"Before Let's Encrypt, HTTPS was difficult and cost money," [Josh Aas] said.

Getting and installing an SSL certificate wasn't ever difficult - it was actually quite straight-froward and easy if you just RTFM and followed the instructions. And it only cost money if you wanted a certificate that was signed by someone other than yourself.

3
0

It's the iPhone's 10th b'day or, as El Reg calls it, 'BILL RAY DAY'

User McUser

As Mr. Ray himself wrote about his iPhone prediction: "I'd hate to be remembered for that one article when I've made so many bigger mistakes than that."

15
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Murderous Uber driver 'attacked passenger and the app biz did nothing. Then he raped me'

User McUser

And would be on the wrong end of an industrial tribunal if it took action against an employee on that basis without at least supporting evidence from the powers of law enforcement.

Except that this is in America where you can basically be fired for any/no reason. And furthermore, given that its drivers are all supposedly "independent contractors", Uber doesn't even have to tell them they're "fired" - they can just shutdown their login and that's that.

4
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Google plans to scrub 'inflammatory' and terror vids from youTube

User McUser

Re: Nice idea but...

A good example of that would be the masked doctor video where the BBC [changed] her words to say "Chemical Attack".

This is the first I've heard of this - any links you care to share?

4
0

Disney mulls Mickey Mouse magic material to thwart pirates' 3D scans

User McUser

Re: Disney complaining about others ripping them off?

Surely you just spray the item to be scanned with [matte] black paint or something first?

Or just take molds of them and cast your own copies to scan.

14
0

Fear the dentist? Strap on some nerd goggles

User McUser
Coat

Re: More detail required?

It's a very broad topic, quite long in the tooth!

Why even with years of study one could hardly put a dentin it.

0
0

French firm notches up 50km unmanned drone inspection flight

User McUser
Headmaster

BVLOS?

Surely "visual line of sight" is redundant, yes?

4
0

Please do not scare the pigeons – they'll crash the network

User McUser
IT Angle

evaporation being Ethan's best guess about the cause of problems in situations when users would not admit to having touched a thing.

Reminds me of an old (possibly part of a joke) technical support form from the mid-90s which read in part:

"Please note what you were doing at the time the error occurred. (If 'Nothing' please explain why you were wasting our computing resources.)"

8
0

July web protest plan: What do we want? Net neutrality! Um, that's as far as we've got for now

User McUser
Megaphone

Just Call Them

Seriously, no need to get cute or clever - just call your actual[1] members of Congress and tell the intern who answers the phone that you support net-neutrality and give them your name, address, and phone number so they know you are actually in their district. Be polite and brief. Do not call anyone outside your district or State, only your actual representatives (and make sure you are registered to vote in their district!)

If just 500,000 people across the nation all did this on the same day, it would be far more effective than whatever online nonsense is decided upon. If you can't or won't call, send a snail-mail letter.

Remember, your members of Congress are almost certainly OLD - email is generally meaningless to them (doubly-so for form-letter email) so only phone calls and snail-mail will matter to them.

[1]Find your Representative here -> http://ziplook.house.gov/htbin/findrep

Find your Senator here -> https://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

6
0

'My PC needs to lose weight' says user with FAT filesystem

User McUser
Unhappy

I remember the time when I was 10 years old and I discovered compression on Windows 98

Thanks for making me feel old!

When *I* was 10, I was crushed to discover that the BASIC program I had written at home on our brand new Commodore 64 and saved to a 5.25" floppy was not readable on the school Computer Club's Apple IIe.

7
0

Virtual reality headsets even less popular than wearable devices

User McUser

Still in the early days.

The problem here is people's unrealistic expectations about what VR is and should be versus where we actually are right now. People want a Holodeck on their face and we are not at that point yet. People want AAA top-tier games and services but the installed user-base just isn't there yet.

Developers and designers are still working out how to present virtual worlds in a believable way; they're still developing the tools, techniques, and "language" that they need to offer better and more natural interaction with the virtual space. Motion sickness is still an issue with a lot of people; hell I generally have an iron stomach and on occasion I have felt a little nauseous playing some faster paced games. We still need to figure out what new tropes will apply to virtual environments[1].

It helps to think of early cinema - back at the turn of the last century, many movies were essentially YouTube clips ("Man Washes Horse" was a real nail-biter I'm sure.) But eventually the industry figured out all of the tools, techniques, and "language" that make movies into films. Framing rules, establishing shots, the 180° rule, split edits, traveling mattes, optical compositing, and so forth. You don't go from "Train Arriving at the Station" to "Star Wars" overnight. VR is just starting on that journey.

To put it another way, we're still at the Atari 2600 stage of the VR market; the tech is new and exciting and in your home for the first time and there are a lot of competing devices that provide varying levels of fidelity. The games are more simple and a large segment of the available software relies heavily on multiplayer being the driving force (no need to program an AI if you just make player two be another human) or is just sandbox style "play." Eventually we'll get to the NES/Famicom stage of the VR industry - I would guess that we'll hit this point in about 3-4 years - and that is when it is going to take off.

[1] - For me, the most compelling VR experience I have engaged in is a silly little "game" called "Room 202" in which you are being interrogated by two police officers and can only respond with a nod or shake for yes or no. There is a moment in the game where one of the cops tosses a photograph onto the table in front of you and asks you to look at it. When you lean over to get a good look, the game uses your change of focus to switch you into a flash-back moment at another location. It's an amazing trick - you're concentrating on the picture and when you look up again you're in an entirely different location. It feels extremely natural but at the same time delightfully surprising; a sort of "distracted transition." It's these sorts of techniques that need to be developed and refined before VR becomes what people want it to be.

0
0

Defend yourself against ISP tracking in an Trump-era free-for-all

User McUser

Re: What is metadata, exactly?

With HTTPS, your ISP will know:

* A computer with the IP address they assigned to your endpoint did a DNS lookup for "en.wikipedia.org"

* That computer then connected to port 443 of the IP address returned from the DNS query.

* The amount of data that was exchanged between the two and the amount of time it took.

But that's pretty much all they get with HTTPS; the rest of the connection info, including the requested URI, is encrypted.

2
0

Sainsbury's IT glitch spoils bank holiday food orders

User McUser

Re: First world problems

I don't have two hours to drive to a "local" Sainsbury's

Why do you shop at a store that's two hours away? (Or is it an hour each way and you're giving the round-trip figure? Or perhaps you are just being hyperbolic?)

19
6

Uber New York class action alleges passengers overcharged $7.43m per month

User McUser

Re: Stealing one penny on every transaction

You mean the Superman III/Office Space scheme?

1
0

What's got a vast attack surface and runs on Linux? Windows Defender, of course

User McUser

Pardon my ignorance...

But how is this not just WINE?

0
0

Armstrong's moon-purse set for $4m bid-off

User McUser

the (by now empty) lunar sample bag

Oh, I bet there are a few specs of lunar regolith somewhere in there. Anyone who's ever taken a bag or backpack to the beach knows that you'll be cleaning the sand out of it forever.

4
0

Vegemite tries to hijack Qantas name-our-planes competition

User McUser
Coat

Re: Bruce

Rule One? - NO COPTERS!

8
0

WannaCrypt 'may be the work of North Korea' theory floated

User McUser

Re: Naive Question

Usually it's because some program requires IE 6 to operate correctly; Windows 7 shipped with IE 8 and (AFAIK) it can't be back-leveled/downgraded.

You could of course run those apps in XP Mode, but that merely contains the XP in a VM rather than eliminating it entirely.

0
0

So your client's under-spent on IT for decades and lives in fear of an audit

User McUser

Wait what?

Recently, a client of mine went through an ownership change. The new owners, appalled at how much was being spent on IT, decided that the best path forward was an external audit. The client in question, of course, is an SMB who had been massively under-spending on IT for 15 years, and there [was] no way they were ready for – or would pass – an audit.

So the new owners were appalled at how *much* was spent because the SMB had *underspent* on IT for 15 years? Surely that should be "appalled at how *little* was being spent on IT" because otherwise it sounds like a marketing drone overheard a conversation between two techs and made up a story to headline a not-quite-but-sort-of "news" article?

This article is sponsored by HPE.

Oh, I see. Never mind then.

20
0

It's been two and a half years of decline – tablets aren't coming back

User McUser

Buy another? Who needs one at all?

A while ago they gave us all iPads at work (because "iPads" I guess? TBH I'm not really sure why we got them.) I booted it up, signed into my Apple account, turned it off and put it on my desk where it has remained completely unused for over two years now.

I see no reason to bother with it - the company already provided me with an iPhone that runs exactly all of the same software as the iPad and does so in a form factor that fits in my pocket and works when I'm away from the WiFi. For any situation where I need to do real work (or just need more screen real estate) my dual monitor PC is vastly superior in every conceivable way.

Whatever niche it is that tablet devices fill is not one that I have ever encountered. At no time have I ever said "Gosh, if only I had a tablet device right now! This [smart-phone/laptop/desktop] just isn't cutting it."

6
2

Linux Mint-using terror nerd awaits sentence for training Islamic State

User McUser

Low tech

[The flash disks] contained military manuals for guided missiles, which Ullah was said to have been preparing to translate for the Islamic State terrorist organization

[...]

“This is just the sort of information that may have helped people involved in planning devastating, low technical level attacks on crowded places as we have seen in other cities across the world,” added [Metropolitan Police Counter Terrorism Commander Dean Haydon]. (Emphasis added.)

So guided missiles are low tech now?

And while we're on the subject, who needs help planning the "drive a large vehicle into a crowd" type of terrorist attack? Seems like everything you need to know is in the description.

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