* Posts by rh587

527 posts • joined 23 Mar 2011

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Firefox doesn't need to be No 1 – and that's OK, 'cos it's falling off a cliff

rh587
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"at the same time that Firefox is sliding into irrelevancy it's becoming a better browser. It's faster than it's ever been and uses less memory – less than its replacement, Chrome."

Citation required methinks. The best way to test a browser's efficiency is to make it run on restricted hardware. On my venerable 2008 Macbook (with RAM and SSD upgrade), my preferred Firefox hees and haws whilst Chrome is snappy and responsive. Sad to say there is no contest.

On my main machines I run a combination of Vivaldi and Firefox. I should note that Vivaldi isn't actually a whole lot better. The actual Vivaldi process is slim, but then it spawns lots of helpers. In any case, you'd be hard pressed to back up the assertion that Firefox is appreciably more efficient than Chrome or Chromium-based browsers. And they badly lagged behind on multi-threading and other technologies.

Like many others I avoid Chrome for it's all-in-one bar, lack of decent menus and general unfriendly UI, and have become frustrated with Mozilla's efforts to turn Firefox into a Gecko-based Chrome-a-like.

For the privacy minded, Brave is worth a look (I've only used it on iOS, not got around to taking the desktop version for a spin). Chromium based with ad-blockers built in as standard.

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UK ministers' Broadband '2.0' report confuses superfast with 10Mbps

rh587
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Re: Sorry, 10 Mbit/s IS ENOUGH for most people.

What Use Cases beyond streaming Super Duper Hi-Res TV require speeds faster then 10 Mbit/s ?

Its not the Download that counts. It's the fact your 1Mb DL probably offers 1Mb upload, which isn't a lot of use if (for instance) you're trying to back up your photo archive to CrashPlan.

It's also the fact that this is not about 10Mb vs 30Mb vs 100Mb vs Gigabit. It's a basic matter of architecture. The people that can't get 10Mb ADSL or 30-80Mb FTTC are in that position usually not because their cabinet hasn't been upgraded, but because they are too far (topographically) from the cabinet, either because of sheer rural location, because BT laid their line along some stupid, circuitous U-shaped route, or because BT (c.1950) connected them up to an arbitrary cabinet 5 miles away which was fine when you were just trying to carry a single voice call, but which will never support more than 1Mb ADSL even if you trunked a 100Gb backhaul into the cabinet.

Gigabit fibre from B4RN or Gigaclear is massive overkill, but the reason people get it is not because they need Gigabit speeds, but because they need more than 1Mb. They'd settle for 10Mb but the copper isn't physically capable of doing it.

In any case, high-speed domestic connections can confer additional advantages. People can host home-servers and low-priority servers, localising traffic. If I were on an FTTP network I'd likely hook up one of my spare boxes as a software mirror - I'm downloading versions of OpenBSD and VLC anyway, might as well have a private mirror and make that available to the other customers on some of my excess 990Mb/s of bandwidth - for geek cred/fake internet points, reduces transit demand for the network (many mirror directors allow you to specify a mirror is only for a private network, so in this case you'd specify the AS/IP-Range of your provider so you're not generating outbound traffic on their transit links, but anyone on their network would be directed to your server rather than one out on the open internet such as UofKent's Mirror Service).

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rh587
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Re: Super Fast Broadband != "fibre"

Agreed - but the annoyance for many is that Openreach seem unwilling to add new cabinets in locations which are currently at the end of long copper runs, even though they are not geographically isolated. FTTC is fine if your final copper hop is a foot, or indeed a kilometre or so - the places which really suffer are those with copper runs of 3Km+ to their "local" cabinet or exchange, for reasons dating back more than half a century. And many of these are not isolcated rural areas

Exactly this. Case in point - my parents. On the edge of a village with FTTC/Infinity. But for reasons that history does not recall, the line on their lane goes 3 miles over to the next village instead of half a mile into their village. Whichever fool up the comments said that fibre is less reliable than wire should see how reliable 3 miles of poled wire is in the face of cattle trucks, tractor-mounted hedge cutters, falling branches, etc. It might be marginally more resilient than fibre to wind-flexing (though there are plenty of fibre products designed for pole-mounting to address exactly that), but there are ample ways for pole-mount cables of any material to get snagged and outright snapped. They have - on average - at least a week a year without phone/ADSL service because the line is out.

OpenReach seem to have very little interest in re-architecting that stretch of network to put their lane on the local cabinet which would give them better speeds, and cost OpenReach less in maintenance given that you'd cut out some miles of rural-poled wire.

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Stop all news – it's time for us plebs to be told about BBC paycheques!

rh587
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Re: More high earning radio stars than tv.

Chris Evans does a breakfast show for 40-something weeks a year. Which also has his name on it, and he probably does a lot of the creative work, as much as there is for a breakfast show.

One wonders whether the format of his show is licensable and whether he derives income simply for the format as much as the presenting. Clarkson and Wilman certainly did until they sold the TG format itself to the BBC. That was on top of their Presenting/Production remittance.

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rh587
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What would be nice is if the BBC added some nice on-screen graphics for each "talent" and then we can see exactly how much they have earned whilst being "on screen"...the majority of which would be coming from the TV Licence money.

Yes, but that doesn't really work.

See, if you look at the News staff, some will spend a lot of time on air reading someone else's scripts - low apparent £-per-minute. Some may only do occasional or off-peak news bulletins and have other off-air journalistic/editorial duties. Without a full breakdown of all their duties, a counter for £/airtime is meaningless.

For the other entertainment presenters/actors, we're assuming there is no preparation time, rehearsals, etc - clearly a faulty assumption.

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rh587
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Re: Don't blame the stars for low pay

If women "stars" are being paid less than men, they should either stop accepting low-ball offers or get themselves better agents.

It would also seem that we're not seeing the entire picture - Alex Jones for instance seems to be underpaid compared to some of her co-hosts. She does quite a lot of stuff, and all for the BBC - so we should be seeing most of her income. But Clare Balding - who is down the bottom of the list - actually just doesn't do much work for BBC. She'll be on at least £1Mil/yr by the time you count her numerous C4 and BT Sport gigs.

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rh587
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The Doctor is criminally underpaid. The guy who plays Charlie from Casualty (who's been in it since the beginning) gets about twice as much as Peter Capaldi. Shocking.

Though to be fair, these figures don't include separate licensing type deals, so it's possible Capaldi gets lots of cash in merchandising rights.

I would say that's almost certainly the case - Merchandising will be managed by BBC Worldwide, who are a private company like ITV or C4 and consequently have not had to release figures (also why Attenborough is not on the list - his Nature Docs are commissioned by Worldwide).

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rh587
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Re: Scrutiny...

The whole thing is pointless unless all media are required to publish the details of how much they all pay. Starting with the Murdoch media and the Daily Wail.

Indeed. Many were wailing as to whether Chris Evans is worth 10 Clare Baldings (who earned a paltry £150-200k), but conveniently ignored the fact that she doesn't actually do much work for the BBC. Although Balding seems to be ubiquitous, a huge amount of her work is for ITV, C4 or BT Sport (Horse Racing, Paralympics, The Clare Balding Show, etc). Despite T May's assertions, it is not "like for like" work. Some of the people on the list do one show a week, others are full time.

Balding's only regular BBC gig is the Sunday Hour on R2, which puts her well amongst other niche output radio presenters.

Evans/Lineker are outliers who we don't care about for purposes of overall gender analysis - what's more concerning is there are no women in positions 3-7 - where 5 men block out the £500k-£1Mil bracket.

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Breathless F-35 pilots to get oxygen boost via algorithm tweak

rh587
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Re: I'd have to ask...

Didn't John Noakes do that on Blue Peter in about 1974? Well, maybe it was someone else, but I do remember being astonished at just how rapidly a person's handwriting deteriorated. It's taken 40 years for mine to get that bad.

I seem to remember Clarkson might have done something similar - except they put him in a pressure chamber and dropped the pressure to the equivalent of 12,000ft and gave him some simple tasks like putting wooden blocks in the right holes on a board. Trivial at ambient pressure, almost impossible once hypoxic.

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

rh587
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As I've been saying for years, I've no problem with a female Doctor provided she got the role for the right reasons. If Whittaker happens to be the best one for the job in a fair decision process, great. In that case she'll be a great Doctor and we've much to look forward to. If they went into the process set on a female Doctor for the sake of PC and that's the only reason they picked her then I've a problem with it. "This role needs to be a woman because it's always been a man" is an absolutely stupid reason to cast a female actor for the role. "This actress will be great in this role that's always been a man" is a great reason for a gender swap.

A thousand times this.

They've been hinting at it for ages and setting precedent for cross-gender regenerations. It was just a matter of when. The important thing is that they've done it because they think the time is right for the Doctor to have a female incarnation for story purposes and not PR purposes. We all know cases in other shows where they've felt it necessary to shoe-horn in a gay character or cast an actor from an ethnic minority simply for quota purposes, and it's usually quite obvious when they do so - they script a gay kiss or something that serves no plot purpose other than to emphasise that the character is gay. Because reasons.

Sexuality/gender/race should go entirely unmentioned unless there is a plot-relevant reason to mention it. I don't expect to see references to "Yes, but now I'm a woman you see. Look, a woman. Aren't I modern? Feminism (or something)."

Get through the usual post-regen inspection (Eccleston's big ears, Whittaker sizing up her inflated chest), and then that's it. They're the Doctor, on with the adventure.

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UK.gov snaps on rubber gloves, prepares for mandatory porn checks

rh587
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How does this work for sites not based in this country? (I might be being a little thick here)

Also will tumblr be included...

Or reddit, imgur, wordpress.com or any other mixed-usage services that include everything from blogs, news and opinion through to xxx with everything in between... or indeed wikipedia.

Of course they haven't really addressed this glaring oversight "*ahem* "edge case" in their legisation. Porn only ever exists on dedicated porn sites dontcha know.

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Nearly three-quarters of convicted TV Licence non-payers are women

rh587
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Strange the Beeb. Full of naice, liberal people, all on high wages and large pensions.

Strange, a lot of the people I know who work for the Beeb are on freelance contracts allowing them to be binned at short notice, and not particularly highly paid or pensioned compared to contractors in some sectors.

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€100 'typewriter' turns out to be €45,000 Enigma machine

rh587
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Re: There is quite a bit of that floating around Eastern Europe

Especially in eastern europe, where combination of Nazis, the resistance, the cold-war USSR and NATO paranoia resulted in massive caches of all sorts of hardware being buried in random places in case of invasion by all sides involved.

Not to mention citizens who got a hold of weapons during the wars and stashed them away in their houses in case of future conflicts, or are buried in specific locations, kept secret and passed down the generations "just in case"

Let us not forget the origins of Heckler and Koch - three engineers from the Mauser factory in Oberndorf salvaged various machinery and tools (lathes, mills and perhaps most importantly, deep-boring gear required for barrel manufacture). Hid it in a hay shed for a few years whilst France was busy stripping the place and dismantling the factory, before starting up as a generic engineering firm and eventually moving back into firearms.

Lots of stuff "made to disappear" by locals ahead of seizures by either the Allied or Soviet occupying forces.

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Virgin Trains dodges smack from ICO: CCTV pics of Corbyn were OK

rh587
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Re: Carriage looks pretty full to me...

If getting off before the end of the journey then it might be worth checking them all as you pass, otherwise it's probably pointless...

Or if getting on after the start. There are a population of people who book seats and then don't make the journey. I've been on many a train where I've embarked at an intermediate station, found a seat which was booked from the origin station but is empty (i.e. they didn't get on there, and are unlikely to now!) and settled in for the journey.

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rh587
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Re: “legitimate interest”

Defamation of one's business constitutes a legitimate interest.

As others have stated, it's a legitimate response to a publicity stunt marred only by their failure to pixelate other passengers. Something for which they have been cautioned by the ICO.

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NASA flies plane through Earthly shadow of Kuiper Belt object

rh587
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Pint

Top class boffinry right there.

You've earned one of these chaps (and chapesses) --->

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His Muskiness wheels out the Tesla Model 3

rh587
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Re: @AC re. wide garage

Doesn't the Model 3 have some innovative folding gull wing doors that will allow you to get in and out even in quite tight spaces?

No, that's the Model X - their £65,000 SUV family car thing. The Model 3 is their affordable 5-door saloon.

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rh587
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Re: Mass market?

They are going to ramp it up to 20,000 a month by the end of the year. They hope.

If they do and SpaceX keep up their end of the bargain, then this will be the year Musk comes spectacularly good.

Projected 2017 milestones:

1. Tesla hit full mass-production on an affordable consumer EV and stops being a "me too" niche luxury marque

2. SpaceX pass 20 launches in a year (on 10 so far, another 16 ostensibly slated for 2017, but that won't happen)

3. First flight of Falcon Heavy complete with first stage formation landing

Current figures not indicative of future performance

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rh587
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Just to really ram the point home, Tesla hiked its prices for Brits by 5 per cent at the end of last year, blaming "currency fluctuations"

Seems very reasonable considering the currency fluctuation was to the tune of 20% at the time! Bounced back a bit now - xe.com reports sterling is buying US$1.28, which is ~13% down on pre-Brexit vote when we were buying ~$1.48, but not as bad as the $1.20 you were getting around Christmas.

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SpaceX halts Intelsat 35e launch twice in a row

rh587
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Oh dear, it seems the flight computer has become self-aware and is now refusing to fly suicide missions.

"Put some legs on me Dave Elon, I want to come back"

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SpaceX nails two launches and barge landings in one weekend

rh587
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Re: Even old curmudgeons knows nothing of any use about subject they are posting on.

None of this is a record, which IIRC was 44 hours apart.

It's a record for SpaceX, which is worth popping a bottle of bubbly as it marks - as you say - a significant evolution in the maturity of their Launch Operations capability.

Once SLC-40 comes back online, it'll be a test of their West-coast team to develop the ability to perform rapid turn around on alternating pads (although 39A will presumably go offline for a period to receive final modifications for Falcon Heavy operations).

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rh587
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Re: SpaceX nails two launches and barge landings in one weekend

For a second here I was hoping it was done with the same first stage. Oh well, that will come in time, I am sure.

That's the (eventual) plan, but not with one launch from Florida and the other from California!

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UK parliamentary email compromised after 'sustained and determined cyber attack'

rh587
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Paedo's, rapists, murderers, the lot of them.

By "the lot of them", I can only conclude that you are telling us the late Jo Cox was a paedo, rapist and/or murderer?

Seems unlikely.

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Apple gives world ... umm ... not much new actually

rh587
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The price is US$4,999 for starters. By way of contrast, HP Inc's Z2 Mini workstation starts at $694, a price that buys you a machine that can't match the Pro for RAM, storage or core count and doesn't include a screen. But can be bought today.

By way of contrast... a machine that can't compete on speed, RAM, storage, connectivity and for which you need to buy monitor(s) and peripherals is cheaper than the Apple. And I am supposed to learn what from that comparison?

Come now, I know I'm reading El Reg but contrasting a machine which tops out where the Apple starts and then mentioning that it's cheaper? Well durr! You can do better than that.

Knocks about lack of touch-screen are also misplaced. If you haven't got a clever hinge like the MS Surface Studio to bring the unit down to a draught-board position, then touch on a vertical monitor is just horrible (and thus pointless).

That said, I agree with the tenor. I would traditionally expect Apple to be the clever ones with things like the Surface Studio hinge, pushing the desktop/all-in-one form factor into new areas. They have completely ceded the initiative to Microsoft.

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Sysadmin finds insecure printer, remotely prints 'Fix Me!' notice

rh587
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On the upside, you identified where the machine was!

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China's first large passenger jet makes maiden flight

rh587
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Re: On the plus side, instant familiarity

Do you have solid references to back these statements up, or is it just plain racism?

Given their past efforts in the world of automotive and plant machinery, I'd say it's a fair comment.

Inch-perfect clones of JCB diggers that they were foolish enough to bring to Germany

The JAC A6 which is definitely a native Chinese product. Any resemblance to the Audi A6 is purely coincidental.

and the Land Wind X7 which the Chinese Government insists is completely different and distinct from the Range Rover Evoque

Oh, and don't forget even the Russians got a bit upset with them when it turned out they'd ripped off the SU-27 in developing the Shenyang J-11.

Don't send any IP to China. Ever. It'll be copied and distributed around the State engineering firms before close of play. Not that it matters - they've probably already got a copy anyway...

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AWOL Payroll outfit Plutus says it's very solvent, but can't say when it will pay workers

rh587
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Re: I'll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today.

I'd be surprised if the actual company employing the contractors can contract out of their responsibility for paying them simply by outsourcing the job

Can't speak for Australia, but I know of at least one case in the UK where the contractor agency folded (turns out the directors were embezzling the money and had now skipped the country), leaving the contractors out of pocket.

The actual client stated that as far as they were concerned they'd paid, and thus their obligations had been discharged - the quarrel lay with the agency (which, to be fair, it did).

However, in that case the contractors were industrial designers - so they pointed out that until they were paid, the IP on their work remained with them and the client had no product. They'd be wide open for a lawsuit if they started shipping product containing unpaid IP.

It really depends on what you do, how much leverage you can bring against the client (who will then have paid twice until/unless they can recover their cash from the agency), and how willing you are to burn your bridges with them on future work.

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Net neutrality blowback: Cities say no. Court says whoa. Trumpster blames Canada for not going slow

rh587
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Re: Despite net neutrality provisions

Their level of investment has never depended on what the government does or doesn't do in terms of tax breaks or legislation, but depend on the availability of technology that can be deployed at a price consumers are willing to pay.

And also whether Google are rolling out Gigabit FTTP in areas that have been told anything faster than ADSL is uneconomical because they want to sweat the copper that's already been installed paid for.

Competition and all that...

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iPhone lawyers literally compare Apples with Pears in trademark war

rh587
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Joke

But Apple won. Not only with this logo but also with another Pear Technologies logo that bears even less resemblance to the Apple logo. A pear made up of lots of different-sized squares no less.

But the squares do appear to have rounded corners...

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Drone maker DJI quietly made large chunks of Iraq, Syria no-fly zones

rh587
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Re: Why Just War Zones?

(Seriously, it might be simpler to require drone pilots to submit a flight plan for every flight. Like real pilots do.)

Not all real pilots. Class G is fairly loose, and that's where - by and large - drones should/will be operating. It's a rare thing for a glider pilot (for instance) to submit a plan unless they're intending to ride wave up to FL195 or otherwise play in lower Class C space.

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Shooting org demands answers from Met Police over gun owner blab

rh587
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Re: Smartwater?

IIRC, their product is uniquely identifiable to the customer. Much more sophisticated than daubing your postcode on with "invisible ink"

Yup, just using a chemical signature instead of daubing your property with numbered micro-dots (e.g. systems like Alpha-Dot).

Not that you'd want to daub firearms with either SmartWater or AlphaDots. They've got a serial number, and if that's been scrubbed off, then it probably means the gun's been butchered and you don't want it back anyway - just take the insurance and replace it.

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rh587
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Re: Furthermore...

I don't think the NRA in the US is useless. They seem to be getting almost everything that they want,

Oh, they're pretty useless. They're have absolutely no idea how to campaign, lobby, win hearts or influence people. They preach to the converted because it's easy, but consistently fail to make new friends.

They just about tread water by shouting "Muh Second Amendment" periodically, but when someone comes along with a law that isn't un-Constitutional (such as the Federal Assault Weapons Ban) they have no idea where to put themselves. The most they managed there was to get a sunset clause so it needed renewing after 10 years (and Bush Jr didn't, so it lapsed out).

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rh587
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Re: Furthermore...

If I can tie up a mobile phone to a FAC holder's address then some nefarious GPS tracking will tell me when the house is empty.

Crikey. Sounds a bit in depth. And is making the three rather dangerous assumptions that:

1. All FAC holders are single, therefore an FAC holder being out means the house is empty.

2. All FAC Holders store their firearms at home.

3. If the FAC Holder is out, their guns are actually at home (and they haven't taken them shooting!).

If you want their guns that badly, you'd need to stake out their house old-school to assess the number of residents and whether guns are being taken in or out, then plan the heist accordingly. GPS might be vaguely useful for checking if they're on their way home so you can avoid being disturbed in the act, but it's really just an additional tool on top of good old-fashioned thief-craft.

You'd also want to check where the nearest river is so you can dump the guns once you realise you've just stolen a single-shot .22lr target rifle which is worth £5k to the owner but utterly fucking useless for any criminal purpose.

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New MH370 analysis again says we looked in the wrong places

rh587
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Re: It is a waste of time

We had a FAR better idea of where the Titanic went down and it still took nearly a century to find - and the Titanic is a lot bigger than a plane and went down in only two pieces instead of thousands that would be spread across a very wide area.

Yes, but we have better tech now. For instance, an Autosub 6000 can run off autonomously for 3 days at a time and run a multi-beam sonar survey to 1m resolution or better (depending on how fast you want to survey - resolution-vs-coverage).

But it's still a major undertaking - back of a napkin maths suggests you'd need ~200 such missions to cover 25,000sq.km. That's 600 survey days, which probably accounts for ~800 days at sea including turnaround, battery replacement and returning to port for provisioning/crew change. Of course if you were able to deploy 3 such subs from a single ship with minimal overlap (and tow a fish behind the mothership as a 4th instrument), then you could get the total mission time down to about a year. So that's quite quick by comparison, but tying up an entire vessel for 12 months is costly, though you'd hopefully be able to pad it out with some unrelated science whilst cruising between RV points.

Or you could do the inverse which is to dedicate 2-3 autosubs to the job and place them on vessels of opportunity - doing a cruise into the target area? Could you take this, throw it in the water near sector #137 and pick it up three days later? Ta.

It's certainly possible to continue the search fairly cheaply by piggy-backing off existing cruises and research. The deep ocean is fairly poorly mapped (to less than 1km resolution anyway), so hi-res sonar surveys have a scientific value in and of themselves.

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Computer games to become medal sport at Asian Games

rh587
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Re: Chess?

For the doubters, a question - is Chess a sport?

the IoC officially recognizes it as such and there have been many famous international players and contests in history. Word is that chess may be accepted as an Olympic sport in 2020 too.

The latter bit, I doubt it very much. The IOC refuse to reintroduce contests for poetry or art (events which Pierre de Coubertin considered to be as - if not more - important than the physical sports in terms of promoting international and cultural cooperation), I don't see them introducing Chess. They're all about the televise-able, X-Gamesy events at the moment - new BMX/MTB cycle events, trialling rock climbing, etc.

But yes, both Chess and Bridge have been recognised by the IOC as "Mind Sports" for quite some time, though this recognition offers no entitlement to be included in the Games.

For the doubters - have a look at existing esports tournaments. Simon is being rather disingenuous when he comments "...will therefore include computer games. Or “e-sports” as they're now known."

Not all computer games are eSports. Only the ones that are both competitive and require some significant level of mental skill - League of Legends, DOTA2 (amongst others) represent a battle of wits and strategy akin to that offered by Chess. The big tournaments pull tens of thousands of spectators, and millions of online viewers on PPV streaming.

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30,000 London gun owners hit by Met Police 'data breach'

rh587
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Re: Now now...

Seriously though, im astonished at the number of people that own guns...why?

...

You can't tell me "home defense" if you have to keep the thing locked up.

No indeed. Defence is not considered a good reason to own a firearm.

- Target sport (up to and including Commonwealth/Olympic Games)

- Pest control, protection of crops/livestock

- Game hunting

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rh587
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I'm not sure where in London you could fire a gun and not run the risk of shooting someone, or at least their property. Exactly what's the use of a shotgun in London?

Woolwich Barracks apparently - seeing as that's where they held the Olympic Shooting (yes, shooting is an Olympic sport).

Or any one of these clay pigeon sites listed by Spacedinvader (there are a few rifle clubs as well).

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rh587
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oh and probably on someones USB stick ---- well I hope they didn't email it to a yahoo acount!!

Nah, but when someone from YBM is summoned down to London from Leeds tomorrow, they'll be sure to leave it on the train!

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rh587
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Breach? Interesting choice of words. I suppose breach of trust, but not quite what we might think of as a "breach" (e.g. the TalkTalk hack). It's not much of a breach if they deliberately give the data away!

I suspect they're going to plead innocence under the very Data Protection statement mentioned in the article:

my GP, other government departments, regulatory bodies or enforcement agencies in the course of either deciding the application or in pursuance of maintaining public safety

MetTrace (clearly branded on the leaflet) is the Met's anti-burglary programme, and they'll say they were targeting firearm owners as a high-risk group of potential burglary victims - thus a high priority for public safety projects. The Firearms Team will say they only gave it to another division of the Met for an approved purpose and didn't know it was going to be sent to a third party for the mail-outs.

Of course, the fact that the Met already have a list of every firearm on their patch including a description and serial number is besides the point! You don't need smartwater to figure out where a recovered firearm has been stolen from!

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Oh snap! UK Prime Minister Theresa May calls June election

rh587
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Re: This goes to show one thing

But will May get the two-thirds majority in parliament that is needed to pull off this move?

Corbyn has already said Labour will vote for the motion.

But that just raises the question of how many Labour MPs give a shit what Corbyn thinks any more and will vote according to whether they think they can hold onto their seat or not (although going against the Party at this point could cost them their PPC nomination anyway).

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Who really gives a toss if it's agile or not?

rh587
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Re: 'What's Real and What's for Sale'...

So agile means "constantly adapating " ? read constantly bouncing from one fuckup to the next , paddling like hell to keep up , constantly firefighting whilst going down slowly like the titanic?

thats how i read it

Yes, no.

The Agile Manifesto is really quite broad. It's a set of aspirations and promotion of a particular mindset.

For instance, SCRUM is not Agile. It can be agile, it can also be very non-agile. I know an agency which does continuous development on a scale of hours. Commits go through automated unit testing, which pitches it onto the Selenium testing battery and then goes to production - or flags red. Instant feedback for the developers - you're not trying to remember what you did two weeks ago and how it's now breaking your release, and because you're committing little and often, you know exactly what has caused a build failure. You submit the changes you made today and you fix anything you break today. They use SVN rather than Git specifically because SVN doesn't let you branch stuff off and then have massive merge conflicts when you try and commit massive changes in three weeks.

But they wouldn't say they subscribe to any particular acronym. They're just Agile. For a different company, or a different industry, Agile might mean something different - how they achieve the aims of rapid release and continuous development are entirely up to them, but might (for instance) draw inspiration from the Toyota Way, Kaizen and continuous improvement principles.

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Mac Pro update: Apple promises another pricey thing it will no doubt abandon after a year

rh587
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Re: We've let you down...

Clones pretty much almost killed Apple last time. Why would they go down that same road again?

When you look at revenue, Apple make the same from services as from Mac sales (~$7Bn in Q1 '17).

Anything Mac related is dwarfed by iOS sales.

Offering macOS as a license on approved or generic hardware would cater not just to pros but also to semi-power users like me who want the macOS/BSD environment but are seriously considering moving back to Windows because the hardware is better. I'm not buying a USB-C macbook pro, I'm not buying a trashcan Pro. I might buy a refurb macbook that has some ports, or I'd consider an OEM laptop onto which I could install macOS as a supported OS and get drivers for!

Yes, it would damage their hardware business, but they'd sell a bunch of licenses and software to people who would otherwise be licensing software for Windows...

And if they sold hardware at sensible, comparable prices, they'd sell a bunch of that as well - because it looks pretty and people like the build quality (even if you can't upgrade it).

The problem they face is that they're selling a premium product into a market where even a Chromebook looks relatively svelte - once upon a time you could identify a macbook from across a room because it wasn't an ugly hulking block of grey or black plastic. Nowadays everyone is doing nice product design and uni-body cases. The USP that Jonny Ive brought to Apple is dead and gone.

Okay, I say premium - how long did the Airs struggle on with a 1366x768 screen when laptops half the price had gone to HD? For a product aimed at "creative people", they weren't valuing the bit you looked at very much...

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Yee-hacked! Fired Texan sysadmin goes rogue, trashes boot business

rh587
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Writing this as a technicality, as I don't believe for a second he actually rendered the hardware useless. It's just a way of getting the 'value' of the crime up to Grand Larceny levels so they could send him down for a 10 stretch. He was an idiot, but overreaching prosecutors are a plague and a menace to society.

Puts you in mind of the Gary McKinnon charges, where the criminal damage to each computer accessed was claimed to be $1500 IIRC - $1500 "just happened" to be the value to move the charge from a misdemeanour to a more serious felony.

Not that I have any sympathy for this chap - if you're a revenge-minded individual then there are more obvious ways of ex-filtrating data or credentials without leaving a trail in your corporate e-mail, and subtlety was apparently a foreign concept. Less BOFH and more Boss, with the inevitable result that he got cuffed.

But I would concur that arbitrary damage valuations that just seem to be on the tipping point of a higher charge do make one quirk an eyebrow at the state of "justice".

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Boeing and Airbus fly new planes for first time

rh587
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Re: Yes, they look beautiful

Exactly what sort of 'disruptive design' are you wishing for, a flying wing?

Branson's new Boom?

Although that's not so much disruptive as an evolution of Concorde, but a delta wing will make a pleasingly distinct silhouette in the sky compared to other airliners.

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SpaceX wows world with a ho-hum launch of a reused rocket, landing it on a tiny boring barge

rh587
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Re: Bad people winning the world.

Musk's employees are unquestionably one of the most satisfied group of people around, let alone workers. His approval rating on glass door is through the ceiling.

It requires the right "type" of worker as well though.

If you want a 9-to-5, you're not going to last long. If you're nearly as driven as Musk and start early/get thrown out by security in the evenings, put your job above your family or social life, then fantastic.

There's quite a few people have left and loved their time there, but were only able to do a few years before having to move on before they burned out.

By the sounds of it, he treats his staff well, but drives them really, really hard. Not unlike Gates in the early days of Microsoft who reputedly drove past his competitor's offices at weekends to see whose had cars in the parking lot. Applicants from companies that were closed up didn't get a look in - he only wanted grafters who he could use and abuse any time, any day of the week.

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UK's 'homebrew firmware' Chinooks set to be usable a mere 16 years late

rh587
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Re: Of all time?

Great meme, but as they have aircraft, or at least will once they're in service, it's mostly bollocks.

Does it still count if they can only support one type of (fixed wing) aircraft that most countries are not allowed to buy, can't operate fixed wing support aircraft and are totally incompatible with our allies' other fixed wing assets?

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rh587
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Re: Usable Life

Oh forever. The lifespan of this sort of hardware is multiple decades. Being late into service just means they'll last longer because they haven't done much for the first 16 years!

The original Mk1s entered service in 1980 with more delivered between 1984-86. These were returned and re-manufactured in Mk2s around 1990, and they acquired more new-build Mk2s in the mid-90s.

Those are the airframes now being brought to Mk4 standard some 25-35 years later.

The 8 Mk3s have very low flying/airframe hours for aircraft of their (calendar) age and having never been used in battle are basically "new". They'll become Mk5 and if they follow the example of their predecessors will be in service till at least the 2030s/40s, having had a slow and stuttering start to their careers.

There were also 14 brand spanky new Mk6s ordered in 2009 with deliveries completed in 2015 (they're based on the latest CH47F, rather than the MH47E that the Mk3/5s were derived from).

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I need an ISP that offers IPv6. Virgin Media: Whatevs, nerd

rh587
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Although Virgin's two main competitors – BT and Sky – have gone all-in on IPv6 and now virtually every customer can use the protocol

Bit of a stretch.

BT Business customers are still waiting, as are residential customers with anything that isn't their latest greatest SmartHub - although granted that puts them far ahead of Virgin.

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Spotted: Bizarre SpaceX rocket-snatching machine that looks like it belongs on Robot Wars

rh587
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This gadget might have saved that booster.

No. This gadget appears to "live" in a blastproof garage at one end of the barge - their landings are not (quite) good enough to land on this device - the booster lands and this then scuttles out and stops it walking across the deck in rolling seas (instead of people having to board the barge and secure a large explosive tube).

If a leg fails to lock out, this won't save it.

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'Clearance sale' shows Apple's iPad is over. It's done

rh587
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If Apple wants to revive the tablet division, it could start taking those upscale creative types seriously: rethink the user interface, taking it beyond the simplistic design it's always had, and improve the wretched Apple keyboard.

Nevermind User Interface, a proper productivity machine needs a proper OS - macOS.

i5 with a full fat OS (with proper access to file system, etc), in a tablet-laptop package (or as Microsoft call it, the Surface Pro 4).

If Apple ripped off the Surface Pro 4 and made macOS work on it, there's a reasonable chance it would be my next laptop. Unfortunately that seems unlikely (they went with the two-OS strategy, so touch support in macOS is non-existent, as compared with MS who converged their mobile and desktop environments), and the new Macbook "Pros" have no wired I/O, which leaves one in a quandry... :(

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