* Posts by rh587

557 posts • joined 23 Mar 2011

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Beardy Branson chucks cash at His Muskiness' Hyperloop idea

rh587
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The idea is that magnetic levitation suspends the carriages above the tracks

No it isn't. The idea is that it rides on air bearings - making use of the fact that it's very hard to maintain a total vacuum in a tube and using the small quantity of air to ride on.

Linear induction is used for propulsion out of the stations (after which it coasts through the near-vacuum), but that does not constitute mag-lev.

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Crappy upload speeds a thing of the past in fresh broadband 'net spec

rh587
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Re: Great

I just wish I was still in a VM area and not stuck with fucking shite ADSL :-(

It wouldn't do you any good.

We tried to get VM for an office move. Contacted them 8 weeks in advance of the move, knew there was cable into the unit.

Then nothing. Chased every couple of days, apparently one department always waiting on another.

We opened a VDSL order, suspecting that VM were not going to deliver. The day after we moved we got a call asking us to confirm whether we would like to place the order for VM. We confirmed that 6 weeks ago and you sat on your hands. They even sent us the same order confirmation they'd sent us 6 weeks previous.

Incompetent wastes of oxygen.

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Twitter: Why we silenced Rose McGowan after she slammed alleged sex pest Harvey Weinstein

rh587
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Re: Sense of proportion

You are indeed correct however the message (as per the link in the article) doesn't tell her which tweet she needs to delete or why and it happens immediately after she slags off Weinstein.

It doesn't take a genius to work this one out.

It happens after she posts a number of very shouty tweets variously telling people to f-off, apparently one containing a private phone number, and yes, righteous abuse directed at Weinstein.

Trying to claim the block was due to one specific tweet when she had posted a large number of tweets in a short space of time is - frankly - political point scoring unless you happen to work for Twitter and have access to the relevant logs (and I'm taking a wild guess that you don't).

None of us have the relevant information to know for sure one way or another. Anyone claiming absolutes is a liar, fraud, or a Twitter employee in disguise.

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Dear America, best not share that password with your pals. Lots of love, the US Supremes

rh587
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Re: Sadly, a decision which needs more clarity

In common with many of the dear readers of this website I have worked at many a company where senior managers and the like have given their logins and passwords to their PA to enable them to handle all the stuff which is encrypted to save them the effort. Since each of those companies very clearly stated that such activity was forbidden and a disciplinary offence, I presume those managers/Execs in the US offices will now go to jail?

No, because the PA is authorised. That's literally their job.

Moreover, if that is the case then it's on IT to fix it.

If a Director has to hand over their credentials for the PA to access necessary data, then the PA does not have appropriate rights on their account, which is a failing of the IT systems. If the PA is expected - as part of their normal, authorised duties - to manage correspondence, keep the diary/appointments book, etc, then this needs to extend into the digital realm as well as the dead-tree documents.

Proper logging and telemetry then allows to you audit changes and messages sent by the Director, or the PA on the Director's behalf - something which is obviously impossible if they're sharing a single account.

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rh587
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Re: Why the upset?

You are not a party to the Netflix T/C so you're not liable for any breaches in contract/civil law (that's your wife's problem), but you probably are guilty of crime.

In the UK, you wouldn't even need computer misuse/"hacking" laws.

Fraud Act, Section 2 will do - Fraud by False Representation.

You have obtained a service by masquerading as a customer using their credentials. You are not a customer, you have not paid for a service, you are not entitled to use that service. QED.

I don't know about Netflix, but for Amazon there is Family Sharing, which allows you to share services such as Prime Video across a limited number of named users. There should be no need to ever share passwords. If Netflix has a similar system, then sharing passwords would indeed seem to be operating outside the system they have provided for family sharing, and would represent evidence of malfeasance (an intent to defraud) in and of itself.

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rh587
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Re: What happens if...

If you borrow a tablet from me and watch Netflix what then? You did not need to login to Netflix. Legal or illegal? Fine for an hour? Fine for a year? Still fine when you give me money for rent of the tablet?

I would suggest that is akin to borrowing a DVD - I can't use the tablet whilst you've borrowed it.

That's very different to plugging my Netflix creds into your tablet or indeed your smart TV so that we can both use the account in the comfort of our separate homes.

It's not a perfect analogy since I could be using my TV whilst you use my tablet, but the idea of sharing devices differs slightly in that it applies to a (presumably) finite number of devices, whereas raw credentials could (in principle) be used on an infinite number of devices (until Netflix blocks the account).

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Thomas the Tank Engine lobotomised by fat (remote) controller

rh587
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I'm sure they've done the math, but that seems like it would be a hell expensive project to save on a small number of staff.

Eh, this mining is an expensive lark - I had a school friend who went out and did a few years as a Mining Engineer. The town his son was born in doesn't exist anymore - mine arrives, they build out, dig for 10 years and abandon it.

Every meat sack needs somewhere to sleep, eat and do their business. You have to ship food out to the arse end of nowhere and deal with waste. You have to air-condition the buildings, etc, etc.

The fewer people the better - these places are so remote that the best analogy is to an aircraft carrier/naval vessel.

Each job you can automate eliminates a bunk, a seat in the mess, reduces the requirements for waste-disposal systems, reduces the size of the food stores, eliminates a life-raft seat. Fewer crew reduces the number of galley cooks needed, which in itself churns back into reduced bunks/heads/food rations.

The savings form a positive-feedback loop that scales quite rapidly past the actual salary and training costs for the crew.

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Home Sec Amber Rudd: Yeah, I don't understand encryption. So what?

rh587
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Re: Techies will continue to sneer.

Sneerers gonna sneer.

Schneier's gonna Schneier?

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US yanks staff from Cuban embassy over sonic death ray fears

rh587
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I second the 'bullshit' call. CIA have huge technical capability. For example overhear conversations by bouncing a laser off a window and measuring the interference caused by sound waves vibrating on the window.

Yeah, this.

They may be shouting that it's the Cuban's responsibility to ensure the protection of visiting Diplomatic staff, but US Counter-Intelligence groups can and do sweep embassies and diplomatic premises for bugs and it seems highly improbable that they would allow their staff to be "attacked" for a period of months without taking some sort of diagnostic action - the Cubans/Russians/SPECTRE could have been listening in. They're also quite familiar with acoustic espionage tools and weapons, having developed a few themselves over the years!

I find it inconceivable that after the first few reports they didn't install additional counter-espionage and monitoring tools, step up their sweeps, etc.

Seems far more likely it's something bad in the aircon, CO fumes from a bad boiler, sick building syndrome or the like.

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The UK isn't ditching Boeing defence kit any time soon

rh587
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Re: Cseries not really competing with 737

As far as I know the Bombardier CSeries is not really competing with the 737 as the smallest 737 is much bigger than the biggest CSeries. If anything the CSeries is competing for the slot that is currently taken by older AVRO and Fokker aircraft and by contemporary Embraer models.

Some and some. The CS300 is rated for 130-160pax depending on configuration (1 or 2 classes). This compares very evenly with the 737 MAX-7 (130-172pax) or the older 737-700/800. 6000km range is -ishly comparable also.

The CS100 overlaps with the Embraer E-2s, but most Embraers are smaller (<100pax) and not really comparable.

As you say, Bombardier are a small player but unlike Embraer (who have been content to mostly play with smaller regional/domestic-service models), Bombardier have come straight in with a larger product which is no doubt why Boeing are taking more of an interest of whether they're going to get ideas of developing stretched variants or larger models running up to 230pax which would tread significantly on their toes.

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'Alternative network provider' CityFibre boosts sales 36%

rh587
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Does that mean each customer is paying an average of £15,000 per (something), or is there some other meaning?

That's the meaning, but consider that they're not hooking up people's houses (they have residential FTTH on their website but I don't think it's a focus area).

If you think of "customer premises" in terms of "University Halls of Residence" or "Office Block with 35 tenants", the figure looks more sensible (I don't know if they specifically do halls of residence or sub-contracting for the likes of JANET, but it's that sort of scale of business/customer - not running fibre up to people's front doors).

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Power meltdown 'fries' SourceForge, knocks site's servers titsup

rh587
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Re: Same everywhere

[1] "Scheduling" tests never works because Operations will subvert you by shifting the workload elsewhere. That causes the servers, fans and CRAC units to idle which means the power load you're switching won't be representative of a real failure condition.

Very true, though scheduled tests can be useful for doing things like running the fuel store down on a regular basis so that when you pull the breakers on an unscheduled test (or an actual failure) your tanks aren't just full of sludge where the diesel used to be.

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Why Uber isn't the poster child for capitalism you wanted

rh587
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I've never understood the hype over Uber.

They're a minicab/private hire company with a good app.

Except they pretend they're not a minicab firm so they can avoid the bother of getting themselves licensed, insured, or checking the qualification/insurance of their drivers.

I'm no fan of vested interests holding back innovation, but Uber isn't special - they're just the most tech-savvy of private-hire firms, and the various licensing regimes/authorities are catching up with that and holding them to account for their practices and the proper regulation of their drivers.

The greatest value Uber has had is in nudging the incumbents to embrace tech, forcing competitors to using Lyft or Hailo/myTaxi. This is good, but does not excuse their other shenanigans.

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NBD: Adobe just dumped its private PGP key on the internet

rh587
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Re: Also all,previous data

Maybe I am mistaken; I thought the related public key would do the decryption.

No, public keys encrypt, private keys decrypt (and sign - for verification of sender id).

Although Adobe will have issued a new key pair, anyone with an archive of mass-trawled email traffic (cough NSA cough) could now decrypt any archive messages, or spoof messages from Adobe to anyone who has not spotted the change in key pair.

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DRM now a formal Web recommendation after protest vote fails

rh587
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Re: Can it be turned off?

"When browsers implement this "feature" can it be disabled in the browsers? Forcing the video/media with it to not play at all?"

Well that'll be up to Google/Mozilla/Opera/Apple.

I should say yes in most cases, just as they give you options regarding treatment of cookies, etc today.

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Brit ministers jet off on a trade mission to tout our digital exports...

rh587
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Re: Brexit

No, not at all suitable. Spits are single-seater (except for trainers) so you'd have to open the canopy at high speed, while piloting, to lob the consignment out.

Some spits were fitted with rails. The MkXVI could carry 1000lbs of bomb (1x500lb, 2x250lb - in real units, 1000lb being equivalent to 108Jubs or 52.14 Adult Badgers).

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Auto-makers told their autopilots need better safeguards

rh587
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"And therein lies the problem, individuals no longer expect to have to take responsibility for their own safety, instead they expect that they will somehow be physically prevented from attempting something dumb.

A prime example is railway crossings in the UK: despite barriers, warning lights, and all the other safety equipment, people still attempt to cross in front of a train, and the railway is somehow blamed if they are killed or injured."

A very fair point.

I recall a documentary on the railways and in one segment they were in the cab with a featured driver. He'd been forced to reduce speed so that his stopping distance was within Visual Range because there were reports of people fooling around on the line.

He bemoaned the fact that this caused service delays. In the US, if you play on the railway and get hit by a train then the Police might - at most - collect your scattered body parts for your family to bury, taking the pragmatic view that you shouldn't have been there in the first place.

UK? Train stops, Police examine the scene, passengers are parked for hours, following services are delayed.

And the irony - in the UK we go to enormous lengths to keep people off the railways - fences, cameras, signage. Anyone on the railway is deliberately trespassing. There is no middle ground. In the US, they just run through towns and it's actually possible to wander onto a railway almost accidentally.

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Massive iPhone X leak trashes Apple's 10th anniversary circus

rh587
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"Apple's wireless charging is tipped to be incompatible"

Does that mean it uses a system that works? One which isn't horribly inefficient and incredibly pedantic about whether you've placed it on the mat just so?

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UK.gov unveils six areas to pilot full-fat fibre, and London ain't on the list

rh587
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And will any company other than BT (well, OpenReach I suppose) be able to negotiate the paperwork and strict criteria that will be imposed on any provider wishing to offer service under this new scheme?

Because we all know how many providers have qualified for BDUK funds.

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Tesla hit with official complaint over factory conditions

rh587
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Re: A bent Union Boss.

Indeed, we've seen union boss corruption from the earliest days of unions here in the States.

It's not just the US either.

e.g. Arthur Scargill - who started with a large union and a small house, and managed to finish with a small union and a large house.

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US Navy suffers third ship collision this year

rh587
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Re: What do they all do?

In a time of war ... sure, this makes sense. In peacetime?

In fairness, there are good reasons to disable in peacetime (such as in-transit to a zone of operations) if you don't want the locals to know exactly when, where or from which direction you will be arriving in theatre. Likewise if you don't want to make it too easy for Russian/Chinese subs to tail you for <reasons>.

But when you're playing in major shipping lanes (as per the McCain)? Probably best to turn it on or accept that as the ghost in the night, you're bearing additional responsibility for avoiding collisions because you probably have better instruments than anyone else, will be more manoeuvrable (x000s of tonnes, not x00,000s) and are deliberately deactivating collision-avoidance hardware.

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rh587
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Re: Worth a read

Is that not covered by the most important navigational rule of all for yachts:

"Plastic (or wood) gives way to steel"...?

Something along those lines.

Or in other words "Leisure gives way to Business".

The old "power gives way to sail" in Southampton Water will simply land you in hot water when you get back to land (assuming you haven't been run over in the cold water). Interfere in commercial port operations at your peril.

I've likewise been on the back of a Research Boat - we were on station near shore, instruments in the water, displaying the correct flags when a regatta came ploughing around us. A couple of the dinghies apparently did not see us, or assumed that the powered vessel would move for them, not understanding that a working vessel on station with £120k worth of instrumentation hanging off the back does not care about such things. There were some angry shouts when they bumped into us, but the skipper's tannoy was louder as he delivered a lecture on flag signals.

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Tomorrow, DreamHost will square up to US DoJ to avoid handing over 1.3m IP addresses of anti-Trump site visitors

rh587
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Re: Trump brings out the best in people

The Dems have done everything to harm Trump.

Trump has done everything to harm Trump.

I don't even need to touch on his politics.

1. Trump fired the Director of the FBI via CNN. Didn't have the grace or courtest to phone him and tell him personally (which seems odd considering how much he enjoyed saying "You're Fired" on TV).

2. Trump turned a Boy Scout Jamboree into a Political Rally

3. Can you spell Nepotism?

4. @realDonaldTrump. Nuff said.

5. He can't bring himself to say that neo-nazism or white supremacy is bad.

1. and 2. indicate what we already knew - he isn't a pleasant human being. Whether or not you agree with his politics, he's just a nasty person. He doesn't value people - even his supporters. He has managed to piss off the Republican Party so badly that he couldn't repeal Obamacare - something the Reps have been campaigning for since it was passed. How badly do you have to alienate your own (majority, House-controlling) party to not be capable of passing a bill which they've been clamouring for!?!

Trump has no sense of propriety or general courtesy - much less Diplomacy or Political nous. He's got where he has by throwing Fred's money at problems and buying his way in. That doesn't work on the global political stage, as he's rapidly finding out.

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Judge yanks plug out of AT&T's latest attack on Google Fiber

rh587
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Re: Is that fear I smell?

As in Google's guys break my Service and I have to explain to customers that its not our fault?

Cuts the other way - AT&T linesmen can handle Google's fiber when doing pole work.

I wonder how reliable Google's Louisville service will turn out to be, or they're going to find their fibre has a lot of "defects", like getting inexplicably crimped.

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Lenovo thought PC salesfolk could sell servers and was wrong by about $500m

rh587
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Re: IBM

Who said IBM was foolish for selling their PC and Server business to Lenovo?

What do IBM actually do these days? Based on their inexplicable to-consumer TV advertising, something to do with "business" in white rooms full of racks of boxen (which they don't sell any more... Lenovo), and something to do with Wimbledon.

El Reg - an article for you - explain what Big Blue actually sell!

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She's arrived! HMS Queen Lizzie enters Portsmouth Naval Base

rh587
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Re: Worth it?

You mean apart from carrying twice as much, twice as far, almost twice as fast, as the Harrier. With a RADAR and an integrated target designation system. That sort of less capable in every respect?

But nonetheless with a combat radius and useful payload significantly smaller than the Carrier variant.

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rh587
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Re: One ship, not two

No, you've bought one operational ship for the price of two.

The Royal Navy already know they will only get 50% uptime from their new toy; and that's before it's encountered the real world..

Which is rather good value if they can make it work considering they normally come in threes. One in deep maintenance, one on stand-by, one at-sea/deployed.

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rh587
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Re: Genuine question

Although there's a valid argument to be made for having better enabling aircraft, e.g. tankers, AEW, etc. realistically the MoD can't afford to add more aircraft types to its inventory anyway.

This was a key argument, and does somewhat hamper possible operations.

The other thing though is to consider joint ops and end-of-life.

1. Big Lizzie is conventionally powered, not nuclear. In the past we have sold vessels at EOL to other nations (including carriers). Not being nuclear (which eliminates any proliferation issues), that possibility existed with the Elizabeth Class vessels except that without cats and traps, the only possible buyers would be people both allowed to purchase and inclined to operate F35B. No chance (for instance) of flogging it to India who might operate MiG-29Ks off her. Same happened with the Invincible carriers - no use to anyone who didn't want to fly Harriers off them (or have a glorified helicopter carrier).

2. Much talk was made when they were being laid down of doing joint-ops with France and working with allied forces. Without cats and traps we can engage in joint ops with precisely one ally - the USMC (and possibly Italy if they go ahead with their order).

Would joint-ops have happened? Maybe, possibly not - probably just politicians doing their thing. But it does hamper the flexibility, and even if we were not operating fixed wing Tankers/Cargo/AWACs ourselves, it would permit say, transfers between US and British vessels via Greyhound or sharing resources as part of a joint taskforce.

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UK industry mouthpiece wants 'near-universal' broadband speeds of 30Mbps by 2020

rh587
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Re: Use cases please?

Copper is incapable of providing more than 1-3Mbps over medium distance runs. There are a significant number of people who either live remotely, or who live on the end of unfathomably long copper runs because of bizarre network layout (e.g. my parents, whose phone line comes from the next village 3 miles over, not their nearest village half a mile away which is Infinity-enabled).

This is not a rural issue though - lots of people even inside the M25 have EO lines or some weird legacy layout that means their connection is not much good for anything other than e-mail and voice calls.

For those who are more than 1 mile or so from their cabinet it's fibre or nothing. They don't need more than 10Mbps, but copper won't give them that - in order to reach anything better than 1-3Mbps over those distances you need fibre.

It's why B4RN exists - they don't need gigabit, but they need more than 1-3Mbps, which BT were either technically incapable of providing, or unwilling (on cost grounds) to lay. It's not about gigabit, it's about not-complete-shite.

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Your top five dreadful people the Google manifesto has pulled out of the woodwork

rh587
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It's okay, there's a bright future for Damore as Leader of the Commons.

Jk. Anyway, I lost interest in this article after Kieren said:

The document is an embarrassment. It views everything and everyone in black-and-white terms: you are a man or a woman; you are white, or you are not; you are right-wing or you are left-wing.

Unlike this article (which treats the "manifesto" in absolute black and white terms), the document does no such thing. It goes to lengths - literally on page one - to state that the generalisations do not apply to all women or all men, but are just that - demographic generalisations which can be used as a basis for discussion at an industry scale. They are not a discussion on individual hiring decisions.

There is a great deal to dislike or disagree with in the manifesto, and much of it just plain wrong, but most commentators have also ignored his slew of grievances with such Google practices as reviewing team make-up if they do not hit certain diversity quotas. Assuming you have selected by Merit in the first place, such a review means - by definition - that you are bringing in a "second choice" in order to hit your diversity quota. By arbitrarily writing off the entire thing, you prevent dialogue or discussion.

I was pleased to see that Google's own CEO show a much more mature response than Google's Diversity Officer or indeed Kieren.

First, let me say that we strongly support the right of Googlers to express themselves, and much of what was in that memo is fair to debate, regardless of whether a vast majority of Googlers disagree with it. However, portions of the memo violate our Code of Conduct and cross the line by advancing harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace.

He acknowledges that Damore crossed a line, whilst also admitting that there are elements worthy of debate. That's a well considered response. Short article from Inc about why it's a great response.

This article pretty much falls directly into the issue the "manifesto" was attempting to address:

Google’s left bias has created a politically correct monoculture that maintains its hold by shaming dissenters into silence.

Diversity does become a distraction sometimes when people try and force it. I was involved in an application a few years back to a grants body to develop facilities at a local sports club. They gave us a very hard time about how we were not sufficiently ethnically diverse. We had enough women but all 90 of our members were "White British". They only backed off after we sought the 2011 Census data and showed that the area was 99.2% White British. Minorities would have been more than welcome, but none had come knocking on the door. Just one member from a minority would have made us more statistically diverse than the actual local area! All things must be considered in proportion.

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Firefox doesn't need to be No 1 – and that's OK, 'cos it's falling off a cliff

rh587
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"at the same time that Firefox is sliding into irrelevancy it's becoming a better browser. It's faster than it's ever been and uses less memory – less than its replacement, Chrome."

Citation required methinks. The best way to test a browser's efficiency is to make it run on restricted hardware. On my venerable 2008 Macbook (with RAM and SSD upgrade), my preferred Firefox hees and haws whilst Chrome is snappy and responsive. Sad to say there is no contest.

On my main machines I run a combination of Vivaldi and Firefox. I should note that Vivaldi isn't actually a whole lot better. The actual Vivaldi process is slim, but then it spawns lots of helpers. In any case, you'd be hard pressed to back up the assertion that Firefox is appreciably more efficient than Chrome or Chromium-based browsers. And they badly lagged behind on multi-threading and other technologies.

Like many others I avoid Chrome for it's all-in-one bar, lack of decent menus and general unfriendly UI, and have become frustrated with Mozilla's efforts to turn Firefox into a Gecko-based Chrome-a-like.

For the privacy minded, Brave is worth a look (I've only used it on iOS, not got around to taking the desktop version for a spin). Chromium based with ad-blockers built in as standard.

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UK ministers' Broadband '2.0' report confuses superfast with 10Mbps

rh587
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Re: Sorry, 10 Mbit/s IS ENOUGH for most people.

What Use Cases beyond streaming Super Duper Hi-Res TV require speeds faster then 10 Mbit/s ?

Its not the Download that counts. It's the fact your 1Mb DL probably offers 1Mb upload, which isn't a lot of use if (for instance) you're trying to back up your photo archive to CrashPlan.

It's also the fact that this is not about 10Mb vs 30Mb vs 100Mb vs Gigabit. It's a basic matter of architecture. The people that can't get 10Mb ADSL or 30-80Mb FTTC are in that position usually not because their cabinet hasn't been upgraded, but because they are too far (topographically) from the cabinet, either because of sheer rural location, because BT laid their line along some stupid, circuitous U-shaped route, or because BT (c.1950) connected them up to an arbitrary cabinet 5 miles away which was fine when you were just trying to carry a single voice call, but which will never support more than 1Mb ADSL even if you trunked a 100Gb backhaul into the cabinet.

Gigabit fibre from B4RN or Gigaclear is massive overkill, but the reason people get it is not because they need Gigabit speeds, but because they need more than 1Mb. They'd settle for 10Mb but the copper isn't physically capable of doing it.

In any case, high-speed domestic connections can confer additional advantages. People can host home-servers and low-priority servers, localising traffic. If I were on an FTTP network I'd likely hook up one of my spare boxes as a software mirror - I'm downloading versions of OpenBSD and VLC anyway, might as well have a private mirror and make that available to the other customers on some of my excess 990Mb/s of bandwidth - for geek cred/fake internet points, reduces transit demand for the network (many mirror directors allow you to specify a mirror is only for a private network, so in this case you'd specify the AS/IP-Range of your provider so you're not generating outbound traffic on their transit links, but anyone on their network would be directed to your server rather than one out on the open internet such as UofKent's Mirror Service).

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rh587
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Re: Super Fast Broadband != "fibre"

Agreed - but the annoyance for many is that Openreach seem unwilling to add new cabinets in locations which are currently at the end of long copper runs, even though they are not geographically isolated. FTTC is fine if your final copper hop is a foot, or indeed a kilometre or so - the places which really suffer are those with copper runs of 3Km+ to their "local" cabinet or exchange, for reasons dating back more than half a century. And many of these are not isolcated rural areas

Exactly this. Case in point - my parents. On the edge of a village with FTTC/Infinity. But for reasons that history does not recall, the line on their lane goes 3 miles over to the next village instead of half a mile into their village. Whichever fool up the comments said that fibre is less reliable than wire should see how reliable 3 miles of poled wire is in the face of cattle trucks, tractor-mounted hedge cutters, falling branches, etc. It might be marginally more resilient than fibre to wind-flexing (though there are plenty of fibre products designed for pole-mounting to address exactly that), but there are ample ways for pole-mount cables of any material to get snagged and outright snapped. They have - on average - at least a week a year without phone/ADSL service because the line is out.

OpenReach seem to have very little interest in re-architecting that stretch of network to put their lane on the local cabinet which would give them better speeds, and cost OpenReach less in maintenance given that you'd cut out some miles of rural-poled wire.

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Stop all news – it's time for us plebs to be told about BBC paycheques!

rh587
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Re: More high earning radio stars than tv.

Chris Evans does a breakfast show for 40-something weeks a year. Which also has his name on it, and he probably does a lot of the creative work, as much as there is for a breakfast show.

One wonders whether the format of his show is licensable and whether he derives income simply for the format as much as the presenting. Clarkson and Wilman certainly did until they sold the TG format itself to the BBC. That was on top of their Presenting/Production remittance.

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rh587
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What would be nice is if the BBC added some nice on-screen graphics for each "talent" and then we can see exactly how much they have earned whilst being "on screen"...the majority of which would be coming from the TV Licence money.

Yes, but that doesn't really work.

See, if you look at the News staff, some will spend a lot of time on air reading someone else's scripts - low apparent £-per-minute. Some may only do occasional or off-peak news bulletins and have other off-air journalistic/editorial duties. Without a full breakdown of all their duties, a counter for £/airtime is meaningless.

For the other entertainment presenters/actors, we're assuming there is no preparation time, rehearsals, etc - clearly a faulty assumption.

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rh587
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Re: Don't blame the stars for low pay

If women "stars" are being paid less than men, they should either stop accepting low-ball offers or get themselves better agents.

It would also seem that we're not seeing the entire picture - Alex Jones for instance seems to be underpaid compared to some of her co-hosts. She does quite a lot of stuff, and all for the BBC - so we should be seeing most of her income. But Clare Balding - who is down the bottom of the list - actually just doesn't do much work for BBC. She'll be on at least £1Mil/yr by the time you count her numerous C4 and BT Sport gigs.

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rh587
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The Doctor is criminally underpaid. The guy who plays Charlie from Casualty (who's been in it since the beginning) gets about twice as much as Peter Capaldi. Shocking.

Though to be fair, these figures don't include separate licensing type deals, so it's possible Capaldi gets lots of cash in merchandising rights.

I would say that's almost certainly the case - Merchandising will be managed by BBC Worldwide, who are a private company like ITV or C4 and consequently have not had to release figures (also why Attenborough is not on the list - his Nature Docs are commissioned by Worldwide).

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rh587
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Re: Scrutiny...

The whole thing is pointless unless all media are required to publish the details of how much they all pay. Starting with the Murdoch media and the Daily Wail.

Indeed. Many were wailing as to whether Chris Evans is worth 10 Clare Baldings (who earned a paltry £150-200k), but conveniently ignored the fact that she doesn't actually do much work for the BBC. Although Balding seems to be ubiquitous, a huge amount of her work is for ITV, C4 or BT Sport (Horse Racing, Paralympics, The Clare Balding Show, etc). Despite T May's assertions, it is not "like for like" work. Some of the people on the list do one show a week, others are full time.

Balding's only regular BBC gig is the Sunday Hour on R2, which puts her well amongst other niche output radio presenters.

Evans/Lineker are outliers who we don't care about for purposes of overall gender analysis - what's more concerning is there are no women in positions 3-7 - where 5 men block out the £500k-£1Mil bracket.

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Breathless F-35 pilots to get oxygen boost via algorithm tweak

rh587
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Re: I'd have to ask...

Didn't John Noakes do that on Blue Peter in about 1974? Well, maybe it was someone else, but I do remember being astonished at just how rapidly a person's handwriting deteriorated. It's taken 40 years for mine to get that bad.

I seem to remember Clarkson might have done something similar - except they put him in a pressure chamber and dropped the pressure to the equivalent of 12,000ft and gave him some simple tasks like putting wooden blocks in the right holes on a board. Trivial at ambient pressure, almost impossible once hypoxic.

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

rh587
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As I've been saying for years, I've no problem with a female Doctor provided she got the role for the right reasons. If Whittaker happens to be the best one for the job in a fair decision process, great. In that case she'll be a great Doctor and we've much to look forward to. If they went into the process set on a female Doctor for the sake of PC and that's the only reason they picked her then I've a problem with it. "This role needs to be a woman because it's always been a man" is an absolutely stupid reason to cast a female actor for the role. "This actress will be great in this role that's always been a man" is a great reason for a gender swap.

A thousand times this.

They've been hinting at it for ages and setting precedent for cross-gender regenerations. It was just a matter of when. The important thing is that they've done it because they think the time is right for the Doctor to have a female incarnation for story purposes and not PR purposes. We all know cases in other shows where they've felt it necessary to shoe-horn in a gay character or cast an actor from an ethnic minority simply for quota purposes, and it's usually quite obvious when they do so - they script a gay kiss or something that serves no plot purpose other than to emphasise that the character is gay. Because reasons.

Sexuality/gender/race should go entirely unmentioned unless there is a plot-relevant reason to mention it. I don't expect to see references to "Yes, but now I'm a woman you see. Look, a woman. Aren't I modern? Feminism (or something)."

Get through the usual post-regen inspection (Eccleston's big ears, Whittaker sizing up her inflated chest), and then that's it. They're the Doctor, on with the adventure.

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UK.gov snaps on rubber gloves, prepares for mandatory porn checks

rh587
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How does this work for sites not based in this country? (I might be being a little thick here)

Also will tumblr be included...

Or reddit, imgur, wordpress.com or any other mixed-usage services that include everything from blogs, news and opinion through to xxx with everything in between... or indeed wikipedia.

Of course they haven't really addressed this glaring oversight "*ahem* "edge case" in their legisation. Porn only ever exists on dedicated porn sites dontcha know.

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Nearly three-quarters of convicted TV Licence non-payers are women

rh587
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Strange the Beeb. Full of naice, liberal people, all on high wages and large pensions.

Strange, a lot of the people I know who work for the Beeb are on freelance contracts allowing them to be binned at short notice, and not particularly highly paid or pensioned compared to contractors in some sectors.

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€100 'typewriter' turns out to be €45,000 Enigma machine

rh587
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Re: There is quite a bit of that floating around Eastern Europe

Especially in eastern europe, where combination of Nazis, the resistance, the cold-war USSR and NATO paranoia resulted in massive caches of all sorts of hardware being buried in random places in case of invasion by all sides involved.

Not to mention citizens who got a hold of weapons during the wars and stashed them away in their houses in case of future conflicts, or are buried in specific locations, kept secret and passed down the generations "just in case"

Let us not forget the origins of Heckler and Koch - three engineers from the Mauser factory in Oberndorf salvaged various machinery and tools (lathes, mills and perhaps most importantly, deep-boring gear required for barrel manufacture). Hid it in a hay shed for a few years whilst France was busy stripping the place and dismantling the factory, before starting up as a generic engineering firm and eventually moving back into firearms.

Lots of stuff "made to disappear" by locals ahead of seizures by either the Allied or Soviet occupying forces.

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Virgin Trains dodges smack from ICO: CCTV pics of Corbyn were OK

rh587
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Re: Carriage looks pretty full to me...

If getting off before the end of the journey then it might be worth checking them all as you pass, otherwise it's probably pointless...

Or if getting on after the start. There are a population of people who book seats and then don't make the journey. I've been on many a train where I've embarked at an intermediate station, found a seat which was booked from the origin station but is empty (i.e. they didn't get on there, and are unlikely to now!) and settled in for the journey.

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rh587
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Re: “legitimate interest”

Defamation of one's business constitutes a legitimate interest.

As others have stated, it's a legitimate response to a publicity stunt marred only by their failure to pixelate other passengers. Something for which they have been cautioned by the ICO.

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NASA flies plane through Earthly shadow of Kuiper Belt object

rh587
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Pint

Top class boffinry right there.

You've earned one of these chaps (and chapesses) --->

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His Muskiness wheels out the Tesla Model 3

rh587
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Re: @AC re. wide garage

Doesn't the Model 3 have some innovative folding gull wing doors that will allow you to get in and out even in quite tight spaces?

No, that's the Model X - their £65,000 SUV family car thing. The Model 3 is their affordable 5-door saloon.

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rh587
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Re: Mass market?

They are going to ramp it up to 20,000 a month by the end of the year. They hope.

If they do and SpaceX keep up their end of the bargain, then this will be the year Musk comes spectacularly good.

Projected 2017 milestones:

1. Tesla hit full mass-production on an affordable consumer EV and stops being a "me too" niche luxury marque

2. SpaceX pass 20 launches in a year (on 10 so far, another 16 ostensibly slated for 2017, but that won't happen)

3. First flight of Falcon Heavy complete with first stage formation landing

Current figures not indicative of future performance

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rh587
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Just to really ram the point home, Tesla hiked its prices for Brits by 5 per cent at the end of last year, blaming "currency fluctuations"

Seems very reasonable considering the currency fluctuation was to the tune of 20% at the time! Bounced back a bit now - xe.com reports sterling is buying US$1.28, which is ~13% down on pre-Brexit vote when we were buying ~$1.48, but not as bad as the $1.20 you were getting around Christmas.

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SpaceX halts Intelsat 35e launch twice in a row

rh587
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Oh dear, it seems the flight computer has become self-aware and is now refusing to fly suicide missions.

"Put some legs on me Dave Elon, I want to come back"

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