* Posts by dajames

888 posts • joined 20 Mar 2011

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Huawei Honor 8 Pro: Makes iPhone 7 Plus look a bit crap

dajames
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Incorrect spelling of honour, so they've lost a pedantic customer.

Oh, I thought it was named in honour of Honor Blackman!

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What is dead may never die: a new version of OS/2 just arrived

dajames
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Re: Clunky?

Xerox designed the first GUI in their PARC, but they fumbled it. History would've been totally different had they patented it, yes?

Yes, if they'd patented it methinks it would have sunk without trace never to be seen again.

Now, if they'd Open Sourced it ...

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dajames
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Re: Retro?

... a stack of old system docs only available in WordPerfect ...

My old WordPerfect 4 and 5 documents open very nicely in LibreOffice ... probably no need to emulate DOS on a Pi for that.

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IoT needs security, says Microsoft without even a small trace of irony

dajames
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IoT needs security, says Microsoft ...

Seems they've learned to talk the talk, but can they learn to walk the walk?

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Robot lands a 737 by hand, on a dare from DARPA

dajames
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Re: Huh?

Well it can't be that hard, meatsacks have been flying different types of aircraft for years.

I have it on good authority that if you can fly a Sopwith Camel you can fly anything!

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While Microsoft griped about NSA exploit stockpiles, it stockpiled patches: Friday's WinXP fix was built in February

dajames
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Re: Eh?

So why have they released it publicly now?

Methinks it may be a public relations exercise to limit the damage done to their reputation.

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HTC's 2017 flagship U11 woos audiophiles and bundles Alexa

dajames
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Re: "Bundled" software

If I want Alexa, Facebook, Twitter or whatever else then I can simply install it myself. HTC should not be baking this performance / space / privacy sapping crap into the firmware.

I imagine that in the case of the Alexa functionality HTC are receiving some sort of backhander from Amazon for including it. If that's the case then I doubt that it can easily be removed.

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Microsoft to spooks: WannaCrypt was inevitable, quit hoarding

dajames
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Re: MS Marketing is brilliant

MS fixed this in March for supported OSes. Asking for a patch for XP is like asking for patch for Ubun^H^H^H^H Debian 3

If you are paying for extended support to XP (as the NHS was until HMG decided that that cost too much) then, for you, XP is a supported OS. Microsoft would have sent you the patch in March.

So, yes, I suppose it is like asking for a patch for Debian 3 -- if you're paying someone to support Debian 3 for you. The difference is that anyone can support Debian 3, if they have a reason/desire to do so, but only Microsoft can support XP.

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Fortran greybeards: Get your walking frames and shuffle over to NASA

dajames
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Re: @Ian Bush

IIRC variables named i, j, k were automatically of integer type.

All variables were implicitly declared. Any name starting with I, J, K, L, M, or N was integer, anything else was float, unless declared otherwise.

It was common practice, on compilers that supported it, to declare everything to be some unlikely datatype (such as 64-bit boolean) so that mistyped variable names would be picked up by the compiler.

IMPLICIT LOGICAL*64 (A-Z)

(please imagine that line indented by 6 spaces, " " doesn't seem to work here)

Of course ... that's going back a way. Modern Fortran, which isn't quite the oxymoron you might think, doesn't need such tricks.

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Linux homes for Ubuntu Unity orphans: Minty Cinnamon, GNOME or Ubuntu, mate?

dajames
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Why?

Why suggest one desktop with one distro and a different desktop with a different distro. This is Linux, and there is choice.

If Xfce is your choice for Debian there's no reason not to use in on (say) Mint or SuSe as well, if you like Cinnamon in Mint you can use that in (say) Debian or Arch ...

Pick a distro because it supports the packages you want to use and the hardware you have. Pick a desktop because you like it. Run the two together -- it'll generally just work. You may find that non-Ubuntu distros don't have Unity in their repos, though.

Personally I use Mate on both Ubuntu and Debian systems, as well as Unity on some Ubuntu boxes where the desktop experience isn't important (because they spend most of their time in a single application). Mate is a fork of Gnome 2, and has the earlier Gnome's clean UI and small footprint -- I wouldn't call it Windows-like (it's certainly not like post-Metro Windows at all), there are other desktops that deliberately mimic Windows, for those who want that sort of thing.

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systemd-free Devuan Linux hits RC2

dajames
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Systemd is a solution to a messy and fragmented process that was well overdue an overhaul, modern software requires modern solutions which is something rabid luddites don't seem to understand.

Rabid luddites aside ... the problem with systemd is that it isn't a good solution to the perceived problems that it was intended to solve. The old sysvinit system may be messy and fragmented, but it works and is well understood.

Systemd is less messy, in many ways, but it doesn't (yet) work as well. If that were the only problem we could put it down to teething troubles and hope that future versions would be better, but systemd also brings problems that sysvinit doesn't have.

Systemd is a single, monolithic, system rather than a set of interoperating modules, so it goes against the Unix/Linux philosophy of making each job the responsibility of one tool that does that job well. Systemd does some jobs fairly well and others fairly badly, but doesn't allow any possibility of using its good parts and replacing its bad ones.

Systemd also has its dirty fingers into other parts of the system. As a replacement for sysvinit is is supposed to be an init system, but because its scope goes far beyond the initialization phase (and it doesn't let you take the good without the bad) it has become a dependency for many userspace programs that should never have any reason to interact with the init system at all, making it harder to use those programs on a non-systemd system.

Systemd is an insidious piece of malware, and the community needs to recognize this and expunge it, before it is too late.

Yes, the sysvinit system is getting old and creaky, and needs an overhaul or possibly a replacement ... but systemd is not an improvement.

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Windows 10 S: Good, bad, and how this could get ugly for PC makers

dajames
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Discounts ...

From the article:

The base spec model is $999 (£780) and prices only go up from there. Which kind of makes you wonder why the Surface team was here, at this education-friendly event, in the first place.

I'd say Microsoft were there to get a toe in the door. They want to get the next generation used to using Microsoft products and Microsoft software, so they have to be ready to produce "educational" products.

They can't give these products low up-front prices, because if they do the educational products will be seen as a cheap way to get a home/business machine, and the (profits on the) rest of the Surface range will suffer ... but they can certainly offer massive educational discounts to bona fide educational establishments who want to buy in bulk.

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Post Unity 8 Ubuntu shock? Relax, Linux has been here before

dajames
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I suggest a real rationalisation would be for Canonical to effectively end game it's 'proprietary' desktop, maintain the relevant repositories and to back one of the variants as the preferred mainstream business/enterprise desktop.

That's sort-of what's happened. Canonical have discontinued development on Unity 8 and will be using Gnome as the default desktop on Ubuntu in future. The Unity 8 sources are all being made available on github so development can be carried forward by the community if there is demand.

... an obvious candidate would be the Mint distribution with the Cinnamon desktop.

I wouldn't call that obvious. Gnome (whatever you or I may think of it) is much more mainstream than Cinnamon ... and why would Canonical use a Mint release rather than one of their own?

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What is this bullsh*t, Google? Nexus phones starved of security fixes after just three years

dajames
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Re: Could it be that security fix requires hardware that is younger than three years old

A security fix almost certainly doesn't make the OS require any better hardware than it did before the fix was applied.

If the OS vendor chooses to issue fixes by rolling them into updates that increase functionality, and so may require a different standard of hardware support that would be a different matter ...

... and we would be entitled to shout DON'T DO THAT! (... not that the vendor would take any notice.)

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dajames
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Re: How about this for a simple solution

You should petition them to conform to EU law and the Sale Of Goods Act, we might even hear the laughter emanating from Shenzhen over here.

Wileyfox are a British firm (the phones are made in China, but not designed or specified there).

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Give 'bots a chance: Driverless cars to be trialled between London and Oxford

dajames
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Headmaster

Re: There's a great deal

Gas is a fossil fuel, as (technically), is Uranium.

Yes, the word "fossil" literally means "something dug up", and isn't limited to decayed animals and plants entrapped in rock ... but calling Uranium a fossil fuel seems to be taking "technically" a step too far!

... and surely you drill for oil and gas, rather than dig, so "technically" perhaps they're not fossil fuels?

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Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

dajames
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Re: How times change..

And now we go back to Gnome

As Winston Churchill said: I'd rather be right than consistent.

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dajames
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I wonder how many people will return from Mint, after Unity pushed them away.

I would hope that anyone who was put off Ubuntu by Unity -- and by Unity alone -- would simply have run Ubuntu with a different desktop. No need to run to a different distro altogether (but a lot of people seem not to have understood that).

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Hard-pressed Juicero boss defends $400 IoT juicer after squeezing $120m from investors

dajames
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Re: All the cost of a juicer at considerably more of the price (HP printer business model)

In the HP model the juicer itself would be sold well below cost and the profits all made on the pre-packaged fruit.

In this model the juicer is eye-wateringly expensive, and I'm sure the fruit packs aren't cheap either.

But ... and this is the real problem with the device ... you are restricted to using the manufacturer's own prepackaged mixtures of fruits and vegetables. You can't make up a mixture to suit your own taste, and you can't use fruit that's actually -- you know -- fresh!

It combines the inconvenience of having to squeeze your own juice with the restrictions of pre-packaged ingredients ... then it adds IoT foolishness just in case you still thought there might be something there to like.

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Toshiba spins out new NAS disk drive with its fastest transfer rate yet

dajames
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Re: A million hours MTBF?

It's no different to Miele claiming they've tested their washing machines for the equivalent of 20 years use and using that to justify adding £200+ to the price compared to the nearest equivalent (e.g a Bosch) but only offering a 2 year warranty (5 years if you're lucky).

Yes, it is different.

It's different because a hard drive isn't like a washing machine. When your washing machine stops working you need to repair or replace your washing machine, and maybe one load of washing (and, if you're really unlucky, mop up a lot of water). When your hard drive dies you need to replace (repair is unlikely to be possible) the drive and ALL the data you've ever stored on it, not just the data you're reading or writing at the time.

That makes a difference because while it is clearly acceptable (in the sense that lots of people do it, and people still buy their products) to deliberately make a less-than-perfect washing machine, it is definitely not acceptable to deliberately make a less-than-pefect hard drive. I say deliberately because we all know that even hard drives do fail, and sooner or later that will happen to all of us, so we keep backups (don't we?) ... the point is that no hard drive maker would ever stay in business by making a hard drive that was deliberately shoddy and liable to fail sooner rather than later, while washing machine manufacturers do it all the time.

[Incidentally, my Miele washing machine HAS been running without fault, averaging about a wash per day, for 20 years, and I rather doubt that I'd be able to make a similar claim of any other brand. It was a bit more than £200 more expensive than the alternatives, though (I think we paid £900 at a time that the Deutschmark was at an all-time high against the pound, and we could have had a cheap brand for about £250 or a Bosch for about £600). My Miele fridge and dishwasher have been going for 27 years.]

I suggested that if they were claiming they have been tested for that much use they should offer at least a 10 year warranty because if their machines were as reliable as their marketing material claimed the longer warranty cost to them would be negligible. I was told they couldn't possibly afford to offer a 10 year warranty which tells you all you need to know about their claimed reliability.

I think it tells you all you need to know about the way people treat equipment when they think that someone else will carry the can when it fails. People would try it on.

The thing is MTBF is lies damned lies a statistical measure based on intensive use over a short space of time with the actual failures extrapolated into an indicative MTBF value when used at a normal level. It doesn't really take into account real usage patterns over many years with the associated degredation of the materials over time.

I would rather argue that MTBF doesn't mean what you apparently want it to mean. It's a measure of the likely number of failures occurring in a large sample of items over a period of time. It doesn't tell you anything useful about the likelihood of any particular item failing in that time, or of the likely time before a particular item fails.

You're right though, that MTBF is often misunderstood, and is often used misleadingly.

You could argue MTBF is useful in comparing reliability between different mechanisms as a drive with MTBF=200k hours implies it's 2x reliable than a drive with MTBF=100k hours but that assumes the testing methodology hasn't been massaged to inflate the figures is directly comparable.

I find one has to make assumptions of that kind when assessing the content of any sales-oriented "literature".

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Why Firefox? Because not everybody is a web designer, silly

dajames
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If you're a web developer looking at that chart what you see is, "Man, wouldn't it be nice if Chrome would just finally finish off the others to become the one true browser."

I'm not a web developer, but what I see there is "Man, wouldn't it be nice if all the browser writers just embraced the (open) standards that define the web and wrote their products to display all correctly-written web pages quickly, efficiently, and correctly!"

Of course, it would also be nice if all web designers wrote their pages correctly to display in a standard way in a standards-compliant browser.

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Hasta la Windows Vista, baby! It's now officially dead – good riddance

dajames
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Headmaster

Re: Embiggen

WTF....

That's just Reg-speak for "embigrify".

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dajames
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Re: User Account Control..

A necessary evil? Maybe. A royal pain the the ass. Assuredly.

Microsoft dug themselves a great big stinking hole when, in XP, they made every new user account an Administrator account by default. Those with a clue changed that (and had to use "Run as", or an explicit Administrator login, to install and configure stuff).

In Vista they did The Right Thing ™ and made new user accounts non-Administrator by default. Had that been all that they did it really would have been a PITA as about 104% * of all home users -- not knowing about Administrator accounts -- would have been unable to install or configure their own PCs.

UAC was the answer to that. It did a couple of things that increased security (like blocking apps from hooking the keyboard, to prevent keyloggers (and some keyboard macro utilities) from working) but mostly it reduced security in a supposedly-controlled way to help users work more-or-less as before with non-Administrator accounts. You should not have seen a pop-up unless UAC was asking whether you wanted a process to be allowed to elevate its privileges -- and that's something that a user really ought to want to know about. Anyone who doesn't care deserves to get pwned.

The big problem with UAC is that the version in Vista, at launch, was buggy and occasionally asked for elevated privileges when it didn't need them (and didn't ask for them when it did), and occasionally effected the elevation without asking ("Citation Needed", but I've been told that was the case). The Windows 7 version of UAC is much more robust and hardly any trouble at all.

So: Necessary: Arguably, yes. Evil: Not so much. Pain in the bum? More a minor annoyance of the sort that one should be grateful for.

[* To a first approximation.]

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Finally a reason not to bother with IPv6: Uh, security concerns...?

dajames
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Re: I think bollocks...

So what exactly is stopping this detection system from unpacking the traffic and checking the real contents ...

I haven't read the paper, but judging by what it says in the article the point seems not to be that detections systems can't unpack the tunnelled traffic and check it, but that most currently available tunnelling systems don't do so.

In other words: it's a failure of existing tunnelling software, not of the tunnelling mechanism, per se, and certainly not if IPv6 itself.

As you suggest, if the traffic in the tunnel is encrypted it can't be checked in transit, only at the endpoint ... so it's at the endpoint of the tunnel that the checking must take place. This is where the current tools are inadequate.

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Customer satisfaction is our highest priority… OK, maybe second-highest… or third...

dajames
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Me? Work for Microsoft? Sir! I am offended.

You jest, but I seem to have spent a large part of my life working for Microsoft ... not officially, mind you -- they've never paid me, or anything ... just cleaning up after them and trying to make stuff work on their cranky and underdocumented OSes.

Never again!

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dajames
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Re: "coffee please"

"I'll have a tea."

It'll probably be served tasting faintly of coffee.

I didn't know Starbucks were masters of irony ... their coffee tastes nothing like coffee, so why would their tea?

[Last time I found myself unavoidably breakfasting in a Starbucks I did indeed opt for tea, and got handed a rather hipsterish upmarket nylon teabag stuffed with large tea leaves, and a cup of almost hot enough water. A surprisingly successful outcome, considering.]

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Ex-IBMer sues Google for $10bn – after his web ad for 'divine honey cancer cure' was pulled

dajames
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Re: They walk amongst us

As a, internationally famous statistician remarked to me once, the worst thing you can do for your health is follow a doctor's advice.

That's just the sort of conclusion one might expect from a statistician.

What's the adage? Lies, damned lies, and statistics!

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Lenovo's 2017 X1 Carbon is a mixed bag

dajames
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Re: Dosh?

MicroSD

MicroSD?

That's a bit odd ... the only thing I ever use the SD card slot in a laptop for is to read the (full-sized) SD card from my camera. If I wanted to read microSD cards I could use an adaptor ... but there is no adaptor to fit a full-sized SD card into a microSD slot.

Lenovo seem to have failed to understand why an SD card slot can be useful in a laptop. It's not to add storage, like it is in a phone.

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Ubuntu UNITY is GNOME-MORE: 'One Linux' dream of phone, slab, desktop UI axed

dajames
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Re: Horses and stable doors

I was an Ubuntu user from v. 10.04 until Unity became mandatory (14.04 ? or something like that).

Unity has never been mandatory ... Ubuntu Maté is working fine on my laptop.

Ubuntu abandoning Unity and going back to Gnome will probably mean Gnome 3 which again is not a classic desktop design and therefore no better than Unity.

I actually like Gnome 3 rather less than even Unity. It's not the job of a desktop environment to be seen, it's the job of a desktop environment to launch applications and get out of the way -- something that the Gnome developers seem to have lost sight of.

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dajames
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The original version of Unity was for netbooks. However, the current version is definitely not, even though they re-used the name.

That "original version" for netbooks actually had a different name: Ubuntu Netbook Remix.

It only came to be called "Unity" when it spread onto other platforms than netbooks.

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Startup remotely 'bricks' grumpy bloke's IoT car garage door – then hits reverse gear

dajames
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Re: Remote Garage Door opener

As well as 6 points on your licence in the UK unless you stop the car and turn off the engine before operating the phone.

Surely this only needs to be a tap on an icon, so it could be done hands-free if the phone is in a cradle ... or even by voice command?

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Y'know CSS was to kill off HTML table layout? Well, second time's a charm: Meet CSS Grid

dajames
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Re: Formatted email messages

In my corporation, it would be a company policy to ONLY sent plain text, ...

I bet you just love those emails that are sent in multipart/alternative with the message only in the HTML part, and a text/plain part that just says "Click here to view this email in your browser" ... but, of course, clicking has no effect because it's plain text and your mail client isn't 'clever' enough to recognize the URL as a URL and make it a clickable link.

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dajames
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Re: Finally!

For a start, its SHARP - as in the musical notation - but you knew that already.

No it isn't -- it's C#. That '#' character is Unicode "U+0023 NUMBER SIGN", which the gnome character map program notes is also called "pound sign", "hash", "crosshatch" or "octothorpe".

That's how Microsoft spell it, on here the MSDN website, for example. So, despite what Microsoft may claim, the language is "C Hash" (or "C Pound" if you prefer, but on this side of the pond we reserve the name "pound" for "U+00A3 POUND SIGN").

That's quite different from "C♯" ... that '♯' character is "U+266F MUSIC SHARP SIGN".

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Samsung Galaxy S8: Slimmer bezels, a desktop mode – and yet another me-too AI pal

dajames
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Re: Hmmmm

I have a Nexus 5X with the fingerprint scanner on the back. When you use it becomes apparent that it is the obviouc place to have it.

Doesn't the case get in the way ... I mean, you do keep your phone in a case, don't you?

Pick the phone up and unlock it in one motion.

That must be awfully inconvenient whenever you want to pick up your phone without unlocking it, which I have a feeling I do more often than I pick it up and want it instantly unlocked.

I suspect our mileages vary ...

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New plastic banknote plans now upsetting environmental campaigners

dajames
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Coat

Giraffe tallow ...

... other fats are just shortening in comparison.

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BMW chief: Big auto will stay in the driving seat with autonomous cars

dajames
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It's not about engineering ...

... it's about Intellectual Property.

The big motor companies own all the patents on the stuff that goes into cars. They will not license those technologies cheaply to competitors from the IT world. It'll be cheaper for tech companies to get into partnerships with motor companies than to license, or (literally) to reinvent the wheel.

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US ATM fraud surges despite EMV

dajames
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Re: slow?

EMV is not very difficult (for anyone) and stops a lot of crime - what is the problem over there?

The US has a huge network of ATMs, many of which are antiques that can't be upgraded. To replace the whole lot with something more modern and more secure would cost a very large amount of money, and the cost of fraud to the banks is going to have to get even higher before they consider it worth replacing the network.

I had an interesting discussion with a US banking security expert a few years ago, on the subject of PIN length. I was working with a British manufacturer of PoS terminals, and we wanted to be able to offer the banks the ability to let customers set longer PINs. He said that in the US ATM PINs would remain at 4 digits for the foreseeable future because that length was essentially hard-coded into more ATMs than it was feasible to replace ... and international travel means that if the US is limited to 4-digit PINs, everyone else has to be as well.

It's much the same with chipcard adoption. It won't happen until the level of fraud rises even more, or until the banks are forced to indemnify customers from any fraud on their accounts.

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Reg now behind invisible HTML5 Bitcoin paywall

dajames
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Pint

(yes I clicked the 'source code here' link)

I was rather expecting that link to lead to a lurid flashing banner saying "April Fool" ... that it was a rickroll was just icing on the cake.

Well done, El Reg! Have one of these --->

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I need an ISP that offers IPv6. Virgin Media: Whatevs, nerd

dajames
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Curious, if they adopt ipv6 will that be nat or would all the devices on my network get unique ipv6 addresses and bypass the firewall?

It's a good question, but it has been asked a lot of times before.

Normally, if you have only IPv4 equipment you won't get any IPv6 traffic, so there's no need to worry about firewalling.

If you are connecting to an IPv6-enabled ISP, you must have equipment that can 'speak' IPv6. Any half-decent IPv6 router (say) is going to contain an IPv6 firewall, and in its default state is going to refuse any external connection unless you configure the firewall to let it through.

So, no, nothing is going to "bypass" the firewall; IPv6 traffic should have its own firewall. IPv6 connections will not be seen by the IPv4 firewall -- and if you currently have a dedicated firewall that only speaks IPv4 you're going to have to upgrade it when you switch to IPv6.

If, however, you use a system that tunnels IPv6 traffic through an IPv4 network, then the IPv6 traffic will pass through the IPv4 firewall unchecked (so long as the firewall is configured to allow the tunnel). This should come as no surprise -- you need to add an IPv6 firewall to be safe.

This last point is one of the reasons that it is better to have native IPv6 support from the ISP rather than relying on some tunnelling scheme: You don't have to worry about firewalling the tunnel if there isn't one.

IoT devices with unique ipv6 addresses would be madness.

Making IoT devices visible on the internet-at-large is madness however you address them. IPv6 doesn't change that, it just means that the devices you do want to make publicly visible can have individual, unique, addresses, rather than having to be addressed through some complicated port-forwarding scheme.

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Samsung plans Galaxy Note 7 fire sale

dajames
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Not so daft ...

The battery and/or the battery compartment seem to be the problem -- those and the fact that nobody trusts the "Note 7" brand any more.

So, Make new cases with "Note 8" on them, having slightly larger and more rigid -- and user accessible -- battery compartments so the battery has room to expand with charging, and won't be damaged by bending of the case. If necessary throw out the old batteries and use new ones made to better tolerances.

Reflash the innards to use the "Note 8" name (and run Nougat, if they didn't already).

Profit! (or at least amortize the loss).

It was, by all accounts a good phone (albeit at more than I'd choose to pay) and if it can be made safe it should be used.

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Manufacturers reject ‘no deal’ Brexit approach

dajames
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Re: It'll be fine

If in 24 months from invoking Article 50 we have no deal negotiated then we revert to WTO rules. No ifs, no buts, no extensions. The EU cannot extend negotiations without breaking their own rules.

Untrue.

According to this (PDF) section 3 of Article 50 says:

3. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend this period.

Their own rules (however flawed) do make explicit provision for this.

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DNA-bothering eggheads brew beer you were literally born to like

dajames
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Pint

... 12 hectolitres (about 2,100 Imperial pints or 2,500 US pints)...

2,100 Imperial pints is a bit more than 2,500 US pints ... it's about 2,625 ...

In fact 12 hectolitres is real 2,116.7 pints, or 2,640.8 short pints.

I'm not sure what that is in swimming pools ....

[Icon ... obviously ...]

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'Clearance sale' shows Apple's iPad is over. It's done

dajames
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With touchscreen a trackpad should be obsolescent.

Not at all. When using the device as a tablet the touch screen is essential, but when using it in "laptop mode" and typing on the keyboard it feels more natural to use the trackpad ... and avoids tilting the whole contraption over backwards.

Having both input mechanisms available means that each user can use the device in their own preferred way.

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dajames
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Re: I've said it before...

My laptop IS my workstation!

With a docking station...

When it's docked it's no longer a laptop for the purposes of determining what can usefully be done on a laptop.

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Why do GUIs jump around like a demented terrier while starting up? Am I on my own?

dajames
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I operate the mouse with my left hand, and it's in left hand mode. That way I have my right hand free to operate the numeric keyboard. As I often have to enter a lot of numbers this speeds up things quite a bit.

You shouldn't have to enter large volumes of numeric data by hand. If you have a need to process large amounts of numeric data and they're not already in electronic format you should get a manager to enter them for you. That's what the lower orders are for.

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dajames
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Re: You hit it Dabbsy

Forget damm stupid attempts at GUI innovation. Read what Xerox figured out in 1970s, which took till mid 1980s for Apple to get right and mid 1990s for Microsoft to get right. It's been downhill the last 20 years, especially the last 15.

Yes, this!

... and F1 means "Help". When you press F1 the application should invoke some system (possibly a browser, but the help information should be local and should not require an internet connection) and show you help that is directly relevant to the thing you are trying to do at the time.

The help should be useful and informative, and not simply "Fardle: Select the 'fardle' option to fardle the active selection".

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Microsoft loves Linux so much, its OneDrive web app runs like a dog on Windows OS rivals

dajames
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Re: Fixed now

PS: El'Reg, signatures please, pleaaaaaaaaaaaaaaase!

You already have a signature -- see the little silver vulture at the top left of your post? Just next to that it says "Hans 1" -- that's your signature.

That's all the signature you need, and all the signature I want to see here from anyone.

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Android O my god! It's finally here (for devs)

dajames
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Re: So what's the "O"?

Could go retro and call it Opal Fruits. Doubt those are well known outside the UK though.

Or, perhaps, "Starburst" for devices with pyrotechnic batteries?

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Why are creepy SS7 cellphone spying flaws still unfixed after years, ask Congresscritters

dajames
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Re: replacing dangerous things

This presupposes that there are more capable politicians...

There are ... it's what they're capable of that should concern us.

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Headphone batteries flame out mid-flight, ignite new Li-Ion fears

dajames
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Re: Water

Dropping a chunk of pure lithium is a different kettle of heavy metal.

ITYM "different kettle of light metal" -- Lithium is the least dense of all metallic elements -- but you are correct that lithium ion batteries aren't made out of actual metallic lithium.

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