* Posts by GrumpyOldBloke

368 posts • joined 5 Mar 2011

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IT at sea makes data too easy to see: Ships are basically big floating security nightmares

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Die Hard: Offshore

Perhaps with an evil strategy to drive the container vessels into US war ships - though that might be a bit unbelievable even for Hollywood.

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How bad can the new spying legislation be? Exhibit 1: it's called the USA Liberty Act

GrumpyOldBloke

USA Liberty Act

The USA is at Liberty to Act - seems clear.

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Nadella says senior management pay now linked to improving gender diversity

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Quality over quantity...

The old hospital surgery straw man, well not for much longer. You can lie there happy knowing that diversity makes us stronger. Though some security was missed in the hospital electronics, a performance bias was included that considers your relative worth on the rainbow scale and your privilege level. While you might die, a cross dressing Latino man may live. See how warm and fuzzy that makes you feel. Similarly the AI in your self driving car will be capable of split second value judgments as to who should live and who should die in a collision, even if a circuitous route is needed to reach that outcome. Diversity is not just about gender, sexual orientation and colour but about value and intent.

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F-35 firmware patches to be rolled out 'like iPhone updates'

GrumpyOldBloke

Yeah but the graphics are better.

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Australia reviews defence export controls, perhaps easing cryptography research

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Is this an outbreak of common sense?

No, the DTCA covers more than just cryptography. It covers a wide range of research and activities in manufacturing, medicine, telecommunications, and a bunch of others even if there is no relation to the military. There is no exception for fundamental research. This is typical head up rear end Canberra with no thought for the unintended consequences, for the R&D driven entirely offshore or for the closing down of future skills pipelines. Just when you call peak stupid in Australia the country surpasses itself. That the serfs should feel happy about crawling to some lick spittle public servant for a licence to do R&D under the pretence of keeping us safe while our own governments supports the US in its terrorist activities around the world is laughable.

Fortunately as we have learned, Australian law trumps the law of mathematics. Our worthless policy makers and their sycophants can simply legislate supremacy in this area. ROT-13 is secure by government fiat and that is all we need.

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NSA ramps up PR campaign to keep its mass spying powers

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: It will be interesting this time around

The rest of the world has pretty much given up any hope for Trump. His presidency has been an exercise in bicycling backwards thus far. He does not have enough political capital to take on the TLA's, he couldn't even get his party to agree on what to do about Obamacare. Best to just wait until the US sanctions itself into irrelevancy.

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'Real' people want govts to spy on them, argues UK Home Secretary

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: well played poms

Don't underestimate the stupidity available down under. I have no doubt that we will easily counter Rudd's innings and go on to at least draw the match.

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Ohm-em-gee: US nuke plant project goes dark after money meltdown

GrumpyOldBloke

Or the North Korean's.

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nbn™ blames cheap-ass telcos for grumpy users, absolves CVC pricing

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: There is no N in NBN

>ACCC Chair Rod Sims in which he said Australia can probably sustain five major broadband providers

The ACCC has a lot to answer for.

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Retailers would love an NBN backhaul tariff restructure

GrumpyOldBloke

"restructured price book is therefore welcome to everyone in the industry – but it comes at great political risk to the government"

Doing nothing also comes at great political risk to the government. Council of Small Business Australia CEO, Peter Strong says "slow NBN speeds is as big an issue as energy".

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Unlimited quota plans are the issue

> people who are placing the most load on the network to pay

Once they have beggared their neighbour.

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China crams spyware on phones in Muslim-majority province

GrumpyOldBloke

In other news

Cockney Rhyming Slang instructors soon to be in big demand in the middle Kingdom.

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China censors drop the soap operas, sitcoms

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Japanese animation - not surprising

The titles you have listed are amongst the best examples of Japanese anime and would probably be compatible with Chinese party values. Fighting fascism is not a problem, every second Chinese period drama seems to be about fighting fascism as depicted by various Japanese invasions. Modern Japanese anime that are little more than incest and pedophile training videos might be more in the line of what China is trying to ban. Many of the titles would likely not pass Western censors either. China has started its own animation industry and the bans may also represent trade protections.

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Silicon Valley IT biz boss cops to lying about Cisco H-1B jobs

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: You ain't seen nothing yet.

Good suggestion but then you get cash-back (worker pays part of salary back to employer), service charge, foreign debt or company store type scams.

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Quantum crypto upstart QuintessenceLabs hopes to cut the cord

GrumpyOldBloke

Go Eve!

So Eve's presence effectively knocks out communications?

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nbn™ hits the half-way mark – but has more than half of the job left

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: How many have disconnected?

Internode over nbn HFC is just resold lowest common denominator TPG without all the Internode goodies - like static IP. When they take my ADSL modem from my cold wrinkly hands its sadly good bye to Internode.

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GrumpyOldBloke

The 12/1 and 25/5 are line termination speeds which sadly have nothing to do with throughput given nbn's cvc based contention problems. Low uptake doesn't only impact the nbn's finances but also the ability of the RSP's to economically aggregate enough cvc capacity per POI to give a half decent internet experience during the evening peak.

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Minister says Oz Medicare breach was crims, not hackers

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Keep calm and have a beer

This is minor, just a dry run for the metadata leaks we all know are coming.

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'Bio-hacker' embeds public transport ticket under his skin

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: wasted opportunity

That is because the transport offices are for the most part a perversion of the law. Rather than targeting the guilty their job is to force the commuter to continually prove their innocence. Law the Australian way. Travel to Japan and see how a mature nation handles this problem.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Hacking is an emotive term. He has made no attempt to operate the card outside of his own individual account or in ways that are foreign to the card readers nor is he attempting to evade the fare. He has merely changed the container of the active part of the card. There may be a lot of value in the market for this operation or others that shift the active part of the opal card into more convenient, containers like phones, key rings, watches and bracelets - but we don't do that here. Agile and innovative is lost behind authoritarian and inflexible. Yes, he is outside the terms of the user agreement but how many of us had a say in the drafting of that agreement or are we simply forced to acknowledge it as part of using a public utility that we all own and paid for. It took Uber to force the governments hand on taxi regulation. This will be similarly painful until it becomes such a political embarrassment that the ministers will look away from their donors long enough to meet their obligations to the general public and then we will move forward another inch.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Australia, the authoritarian dystopia where agile and innovative is the slogan of the day but everything is illegal.

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Huge ransomware outbreak spreads in Ukraine and beyond

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Place your bets

From the Australian ABC ransomware-virus-hits-computer-servers-across-the-globe...

The Federal Minister responsible for cyber security, Dan Tehan, said the Government was doing all it could to prevent further outbreaks.

"We have been in contact with our Five Eyes partners and the national cyber security centres in those countries to get a good sense as to what is occurring," he told the ABC.

"We are monitoring the situation, we are in touch with other countries to see what impact is happening there.

"That is the best we can do at this stage."

... That is it, the best we can do at this stage. The emperor has no clothes. I guess we wait for another programmer sitting in his bedroom to work this one out.

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Intel's Skylake and Kaby Lake CPUs have nasty hyper-threading bug

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Disable hyperthreading? Ouch.

Ryzen is not without its issues - random freezes.

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Facebook gives itself mission to 'bring the world closer' by getting people off Facebook

GrumpyOldBloke
Joke

Re: Was on Facebook...

FB Profile: Evasive, a loner, no stable relationships, no friends, subscribes to violent political discourse. Shouldn't be a problem.

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US Air Force resumes F-35A flights despite not knowing why pilot oxygen systems failed

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Simple Fix?

Under Citizen the menu reads: Guns, Missiles

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Debian devs dedicate new version 9 to the late Ian Murdock

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Sysvinit and Devuan

Looking forward to Devuan Stretch.

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Elon Musk reveals Mars colony rocket capable of bringing pizza joints to the red planet

GrumpyOldBloke

From a pollution point of view his idea needs more work. Perhaps an environmentally friendly way of getting into orbit might be his first task if he plans on moving a million people.

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Disney mulls Mickey Mouse magic material to thwart pirates' 3D scans

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Hmmm

Yup, music and video all over again. Remove the artificial scarcity and see what people think it's really worth. If the brand name is not enough, maybe Disney will have to find a way of adding real value to a 1c piece of plastic. Put a bar code on her butt and enable the princess to access licensed content that is kid safe and not as creepy as some of the internet enabled spy toys we have seen so far. The plastic should be merely the gateway not the final product.

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Five Eyes nations stare menacingly at tech biz and its encryption

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Does Not Make Sense

It makes sense, you just have to look at it the right way. A rational point of view is that mass surveillance is a sickness, a disease that will kill the 5-eyes hosts. Attempting to control encryption is just one more pox on us all. However, from a mass surveillance point of view encryption gets in the way of big data and that is a problem. For data mining and mass surveillance it increases the cost of what is already a worthless endeavour. If mass surveillance is ever to be proved useful we must all stand naked before it just like the scanners at the airports.

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Australian oppn. leader wants to do something about Bitcoin, because terrorism and crypto

GrumpyOldBloke

There are two things we simply do not know enough about to deal with properly

Thanks god for that. The things that they do know about and have tried to deal with properly have been an utter fsck up.

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Oz government says UK's backdoor will be its not-a-backdoor model

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Stop the trade in idiots

Ours appear to be a special breed. While the British gene is strong there is a local mutation that puts ours in a class of their own.

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Lockheed, USAF hold breath as F-35 pilots report hypoxia

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Is this part of...

Without the meatbags, an empty ejection seat popping out the top of the plane when it got into trouble would just look silly.

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Australia to float 'not backdoors' that behave just like backdoors to Five-Eyes meeting

GrumpyOldBloke

5 Eyes is our Greatest Threat

The means has become the ends. Principles of trust and privacy must be discarded to feed the monster which is 5 eyes (or 14 eyes as another thread suggested it has become). Not because it has any value but because it now has a life of its own and we must be part of this US led school for bastardy. Lord knows we have the morals for it. Malcolm in a muddle has bipartisan support from the rubber chicken leading the opposition - no surprise there. Convenient that all this wailing and gnashing of teeth has drowned out the allegations of corruption levelled against our two major parties over Chinese donations.

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Chinese e-tailer beats Amazon to the skies with one-ton delivery drones

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: THUD

Should be OK so long as they are not delivering pianos or anvils.

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Australia considers joining laptops-on-planes ban

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: What they are really admitting is...

They are looking for drugs and cash - especially cash!

Just like the war on drugs, the war on terror is merely a plot device for the war for control of money.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Please no!

Turnbull will never be that person.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Have any of the idiots promoting this drivel spoken to the airlines

We had issues here in Oz when one of the senior ministers was selected to go through the full body scanners. Scanners that her and her party voted for with a law that offered no opt out clauses, no limits on future technology and no requirements that the machines be safe or effective. Oddly enough her party then joined the government at the time in a round of applause when the bill passed so something wasn't on the level. I agree with Jim, we should not only be imposing the same restrictions on politicians and senior public servants, they should be first in line every time to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of their actions.

Another interesting thing about the scanners is they are crewed by private contractors, not border farce (public servants). Government perhaps hedging their bets in case the scanners aren't as safe as the US vendor assured them.

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Ransomware scum have already unleashed kill-switch-free WannaCry‬pt‪ variant

GrumpyOldBloke
Trollface

Re: Oh what fun...

> someone in Nigeria has been hit

Yes, my uncle. A Nigerian Prince desperately trying to get his money out of the country. With his computer out he is now looking for an honest soul who can help him for a 10% cut of the funds. Due to the nature of his finances the money can only be moved to a credit card account. If someone would be so kind as to send him theirs...

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UK hospital meltdown after ransomware worm uses NSA vuln to raid IT

GrumpyOldBloke

But where is GCHQ? An attack on the realm and the spooks are nowhere to be seen. Where is the government rushing in with a key generation service? How bad does it have to get before this turkey sold as keeping us safe actually starts to fly.

It is easy to blame the Yanks but the glorious British empire is culpable as well. Now if only we had that magic encryption that is secure but with backdoors.

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Oz MP flies crypto-kite, wants backdoors without backdoors

GrumpyOldBloke

This is Australia, a yes answer would not matter.

National security is about building a counter insurgency capability against your own people while pretending it is a counter terrorism capability against foreigners. This is the same way it operates in most of the free West. Though the US will protect its own interests as will the UK to a lesser extent. Australia will carry on in the role of the the village idiot.

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: I remember the old joke...

> issue guns to every passenger

Finally a solution to the problem of the person in front of your reclining their seat.

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Microsoft's new hardware: eight x86 cores, 40 GPU cores

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Project Scorpio?

Yeah, but where can you buy hammocks?

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Cambridge Analytica arrives in Australia to STEAL our democracy!

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Great Barrier Firewall

Block facebook! That leaves the oldies banging away on various flavours of solitaire - and they vote.

Brexit and Trump were about trying a different path, an easy sell. In Oz the task for the ALPLNP is to try and get the 25% or so of very unhappy voters plus the swingers to accept the status quo. A much harder sell.

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Good Guy Comcast: We're not going to sell your data, trust us

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: I'm pretty sure they were behind the bill in the first place

Trump is in a new show now. The President. Catch it on Fox.

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First the Rise of the Machines, now this: UK military's Exercise Information Warrior

GrumpyOldBloke

Sounds like they need a MOD App store. I suggest Worms for battlefield management, Lemmings for colour revolutions and Snakes for spook work. On the larger platforms with reliable power perhaps an original DOOM clone to coordinate mobile artillery.

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Australia bins safe harbour, presses ahead with Minister-as-NetAdmin plan

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Rubber stamp

> ASIO will just be a rubberstamp to anything the attorney-general wants.

You might have cause and effect around the wrong way. 5 eyes and the ever increasing pay to play is the threat. Like him or loathe him, the battles that Trump is having to fight against his own security services should be ringing alarm bells throughout Western democracies. Unless of course democracy was only ever a sham.

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Germany to roll out €100bn gigabit internet network

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Surely not?

>What needs that sort of bandwidth in residential settings?!

Real time mass surveillance.

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Samsung phones, Apple's iPhones are 'overpriced', says top Huawei exec

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: It sounds like the old Windows cruft idea

Google doesn't seem to have the issue - 3 and a bit years on a Nexus 5 and no noticeable performance changes. Could be planned obsolescence, manufacturers cruft or cheap nvram. Might be better for Huawei to identify the actual problem rather than plastering over it with ML.

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Privacy watchdog to probe Oz gov's right to release personal info 'to correct the record'

GrumpyOldBloke

> all those other projects rely on public, trust and public acceptance of promises the government makes about protecting client confidentiality

No they don't. It is pretty much impossible to exist in the free West without interacting with government or its agents. Such interactions are either mandatory, backed by penalties or require you to accept onerous terms and conditions - including the right to share information. It's the demographics - we have another 20 or 30 years of this crap.

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NSA snoops told: Get your checkbooks and pens ready for a cyber-weapon shopping spree

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Well It'd be wise for the well tanned man...

Dealing with Israel or not is not a simple question of pro or anti Semitism. Unlike other mindless vassal states, like Australia, Israel has its own ideas about what it wants to be when its grows up. Sometimes it is a strategic ally of the US, sometimes a strategic competitor. Not to recognise this, especially in an area of warfare where the barriers to entry are low, would be very foolish.

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