* Posts by GrumpyOldBloke

335 posts • joined 5 Mar 2011

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Chinese e-tailer beats Amazon to the skies with one-ton delivery drones

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: THUD

Should be OK so long as they are not delivering pianos or anvils.

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Australia considers joining laptops-on-planes ban

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: What they are really admitting is...

They are looking for drugs and cash - especially cash!

Just like the war on drugs, the war on terror is merely a plot device for the war for control of money.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Please no!

Turnbull will never be that person.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Have any of the idiots promoting this drivel spoken to the airlines

We had issues here in Oz when one of the senior ministers was selected to go through the full body scanners. Scanners that her and her party voted for with a law that offered no opt out clauses, no limits on future technology and no requirements that the machines be safe or effective. Oddly enough her party then joined the government at the time in a round of applause when the bill passed so something wasn't on the level. I agree with Jim, we should not only be imposing the same restrictions on politicians and senior public servants, they should be first in line every time to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of their actions.

Another interesting thing about the scanners is they are crewed by private contractors, not border farce (public servants). Government perhaps hedging their bets in case the scanners aren't as safe as the US vendor assured them.

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Ransomware scum have already unleashed kill-switch-free WannaCry‬pt‪ variant

GrumpyOldBloke
Trollface

Re: Oh what fun...

> someone in Nigeria has been hit

Yes, my uncle. A Nigerian Prince desperately trying to get his money out of the country. With his computer out he is now looking for an honest soul who can help him for a 10% cut of the funds. Due to the nature of his finances the money can only be moved to a credit card account. If someone would be so kind as to send him theirs...

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UK hospital meltdown after ransomware worm uses NSA vuln to raid IT

GrumpyOldBloke

But where is GCHQ? An attack on the realm and the spooks are nowhere to be seen. Where is the government rushing in with a key generation service? How bad does it have to get before this turkey sold as keeping us safe actually starts to fly.

It is easy to blame the Yanks but the glorious British empire is culpable as well. Now if only we had that magic encryption that is secure but with backdoors.

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Oz MP flies crypto-kite, wants backdoors without backdoors

GrumpyOldBloke

This is Australia, a yes answer would not matter.

National security is about building a counter insurgency capability against your own people while pretending it is a counter terrorism capability against foreigners. This is the same way it operates in most of the free West. Though the US will protect its own interests as will the UK to a lesser extent. Australia will carry on in the role of the the village idiot.

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: I remember the old joke...

> issue guns to every passenger

Finally a solution to the problem of the person in front of your reclining their seat.

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Microsoft's new hardware: eight x86 cores, 40 GPU cores

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Project Scorpio?

Yeah, but where can you buy hammocks?

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Cambridge Analytica arrives in Australia to STEAL our democracy!

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Great Barrier Firewall

Block facebook! That leaves the oldies banging away on various flavours of solitaire - and they vote.

Brexit and Trump were about trying a different path, an easy sell. In Oz the task for the ALPLNP is to try and get the 25% or so of very unhappy voters plus the swingers to accept the status quo. A much harder sell.

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Good Guy Comcast: We're not going to sell your data, trust us

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: I'm pretty sure they were behind the bill in the first place

Trump is in a new show now. The President. Catch it on Fox.

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First the Rise of the Machines, now this: UK military's Exercise Information Warrior

GrumpyOldBloke

Sounds like they need a MOD App store. I suggest Worms for battlefield management, Lemmings for colour revolutions and Snakes for spook work. On the larger platforms with reliable power perhaps an original DOOM clone to coordinate mobile artillery.

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Australia bins safe harbour, presses ahead with Minister-as-NetAdmin plan

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Rubber stamp

> ASIO will just be a rubberstamp to anything the attorney-general wants.

You might have cause and effect around the wrong way. 5 eyes and the ever increasing pay to play is the threat. Like him or loathe him, the battles that Trump is having to fight against his own security services should be ringing alarm bells throughout Western democracies. Unless of course democracy was only ever a sham.

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Germany to roll out €100bn gigabit internet network

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Surely not?

>What needs that sort of bandwidth in residential settings?!

Real time mass surveillance.

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Samsung phones, Apple's iPhones are 'overpriced', says top Huawei exec

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: It sounds like the old Windows cruft idea

Google doesn't seem to have the issue - 3 and a bit years on a Nexus 5 and no noticeable performance changes. Could be planned obsolescence, manufacturers cruft or cheap nvram. Might be better for Huawei to identify the actual problem rather than plastering over it with ML.

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Privacy watchdog to probe Oz gov's right to release personal info 'to correct the record'

GrumpyOldBloke

> all those other projects rely on public, trust and public acceptance of promises the government makes about protecting client confidentiality

No they don't. It is pretty much impossible to exist in the free West without interacting with government or its agents. Such interactions are either mandatory, backed by penalties or require you to accept onerous terms and conditions - including the right to share information. It's the demographics - we have another 20 or 30 years of this crap.

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NSA snoops told: Get your checkbooks and pens ready for a cyber-weapon shopping spree

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Well It'd be wise for the well tanned man...

Dealing with Israel or not is not a simple question of pro or anti Semitism. Unlike other mindless vassal states, like Australia, Israel has its own ideas about what it wants to be when its grows up. Sometimes it is a strategic ally of the US, sometimes a strategic competitor. Not to recognise this, especially in an area of warfare where the barriers to entry are low, would be very foolish.

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'Leaky' LG returns to sanity for 2017 flagship

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: LG?

LG's boot-loop technology does help with privacy though it only appears in some phones.

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Smash up your kid's Bluetooth-connected Cayla 'surveillance' doll, Germany urges parents

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: @ Dwarf

Who would give their kid a Theresa May doll. You just know that is not going to end well.

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Turnbull transforms tech right off his agenda

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: He screwed NBN and now it's renewables.

Yep, can't wait for my sooner, cheaper, faster electricity.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Non-synchronous generation

Going forward we may need a different clock distribution model. The traditional solution of heavy inertia laden systems to time the rest of the network doesn't work too well as we move to many GW's of small scale or low inertia distributors who can change their frequency and phase on a dime. It is getting close to time when the big coal and nuke plants will have to change the way they generate and consume clocking rather than persisting with the current system where a big failure knocks out all the little guys as well.

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Trump signs 'no privacy for non-Americans' order – what does that mean for rest of us?

GrumpyOldBloke

Do we have any constitutional lawyers in our midst. I would think that if we are to be subject to US law, even as foreign citizens, then that law derives its legality from the constitution with all the restrictions and protections that this implies including unreasonable search and seizure or privacy protections. Does the constitution allow two legal systems. One for US citizens with restrictions on government mendacity and one for the rest of the world that simply says 'go crazy'?

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Oz government on its Centrelink debacle: 'This is fine'

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: How long before scammers get wise on this??

Those notices would be identified as fake straight away. The Australian government would never settle for half when it has its boot on your neck. The notices would be better written demanding full payment and promising additional ruinous penalties if proof is not offered as to innocence in some impossibly short time frame. That is the way Australian governments work. The daily tele reported this morning that there is now a whole new faux security apparatus to pay for modelled on the highly successful US DHS. Bring on the debt collectors!

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Oz regulator trims broadband prices

GrumpyOldBloke

I still have problems reading "superfast broadband access service" and "25Mbps" in the same sentence. I fear that this is destined to become one of those Australian cultural jokes like jobs and growth, agile and innovative or what an exciting time to be an Australian.

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NSW government drops a Catch: Bus Wi-Fi is a privacy nightmare

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Free country?

Don't worry. I am sure the NSW police will have warrantless access to this data - the old essential for fighting crime excuse like opal. So the police will be well placed to stop any bad guys, or at least to identify the victims. Per your Moscow story - recent trip to NZ was an eye opener as well. Walk into a shop with a bag and not be treated like a criminal. Buy a local sim without 100 points of Id. Go to the library and logon to the WiFi, no id or email addresses required. Though they still have mandatory plastic hat laws for cyclists :-(. Looking at the people at SYD airport happily skipping through the worthless but mandatory full body scanners I do not think many Australians' understand how incompetently the country is run. I think they rather enjoy all the demands for compliance. Like a good crossword puzzle, I can do it I must be smart.

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Australia's future technology headlines … for 2018!

GrumpyOldBloke

Australia sniffs around the UK's Snooper's Charter

Further faux security will be waved through by a useless government and a spineless opposition bipartisan on National Security. What will be interesting is One Nation, the emerging third force. We have seen Pauline in parliament helping to justify the ridiculous new national security fence - which should be called the don't abseil into the forecourt and embarrass the big talking government and its muppets in shiny uniforms memorial fence. Pauline also speaks positively on a national ID card. I think that she will be someone that the LNP can work with to further the national security narrative. Tony Abbot in a skirt.

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Australian Internet policy remains years behind reality

GrumpyOldBloke

The LNP has been entirely coherent and consistent in its approach to the internet during its term in power. It is a thing that threatens the established gatekeepers and rent seekers that define the Australian economy. It is a thing people use to download pron. Further, looking at events as evidence of donor based policy and the business of politics we find an approach that is again entirely coherent and consistent. If the nations security services didn't wan't to protect Australia by destroying its democratic foundations through 5-eyes and mass surveillance it is unlikely the LNP would tolerate the Australian internet even in its current crippled form.

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Dear hackers, Ubuntu's app crash reporter will happily execute your evil code on a victim's box

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Apport

I normally disable it in /etc/default/apport but removing it sounds like a better idea.

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HBO slaps takedown demand on 13-year-old girl's painting because it used 'Winter is coming'

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: This website has ruined my life

Localisation failure, please check your browser settings.

The correct tag line for NZ should have been: Earthquakes are coming.

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The case for a police-civilian cyber super-agency in Australia

GrumpyOldBloke

> a civilian-led agency with police powers obtained by the secondment of police offices

Have you seen border farce and the embarrassment they have become at the airports. A tribute to low recruiting standards replacing previously friendly and efficient immigration and quarantine officers. Sorry but the nut jobs holding the reigns of power in Canberra haven't seen a uniform yet that they don't like the look of. We are treading the path of a totalitarian police state with the destruction of civil liberties and the inevitable destruction of the economy that follows. Civilian-led, not in Tony's life time.

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Trump's taxing problem: The end of 'affordable' iPhones

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: In Trump friendly Texas...

A century ago the European elites were drowning in debt maintaining their extravagances and their standing armies and needed to cull large swaths of the population or risk being swept aside as their economies crumbled. Completely different to now.

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Copyright crimefighters FACT change tack after Hollywood calls The Terminator

GrumpyOldBloke

> How Hollywood can police this more effectively from Brussels is a mystery.

No mystery. Hang around politicians and public servants, tell them tales of woe with $B's of economic hurt, rub hands in glee, get draconian laws passed, get tax payer funded law enforcement to do your work for you. Less cost and less risk of reputation damage than suing old ladies.

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Australia again ponders making attorney-general netadmin-in-chief

GrumpyOldBloke

The stupidity continues

Australia takes another 2 steps back and no steps forward. NZ had a problem with SDN because of stupidity such as this. I suppose it is difficult to conduct covert surveillance on your population on the pretence of fighting [insert scary thing here] if the network topology keeps changing. Veto over network gear is understandable since the muppets have created the mandatory data retention honeypot and have no doubt tightly coupled the government surveillance systems into it like rats to a corpse. Reading between the lines I guess this highlights the technical limitations of the spooks. Yeah sure they can crack encryption in a few seconds and can prosecute you if they can't but their big data systems are not good if things move around or route around them. Poor dears. Like the defence trade controls act, lets cripple the productive economy for the sake of the parasitic one.

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Uber's robo-truck makes first delivery of ... Budweiser in Colorado

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Robot delivered beer

Remote control the tricky bits out of a dark room somewhere until such time as the truck learns to do them itself. The more interesting part is getting the truck to consume bud as its human occupant would have lest some of the estimated $50M savings be flushed away as lost sales.

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Oz gummint's de-anonymisation crime is as mind-bendingly stupid as we feared

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Morons … ?

Definitely the electorate. The government is bright enough to give itself exemptions.

Recent ANU poll 2/3rds support mandatory data retention to combat night terrors. Pity the bill wasn't written that way but is rather an open slather by government thugs on what should be private data. It is very disingenuous of ANU to try and skew the public into the belief that the bill was to created to fight terrorism when a whole grab bag of agencies can access the data and more can be granted at the whim of the AG. But the electorate brought it. 2/3rds support.

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18 seconds that blacked out South Australia

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: RET plan

> Why is nuclear power not even considered in Oz

If Dick Smith is right and the federal government are lying to us (again) and the French nuclear subs that we will order off the plan with a small tweak to convert them to diesel electric propulsion are really going to be nuclear then this may open the way for further debates on nuclear power in Oz. Indonesia is also planning nukes which, once they are on our doorstep, could open debates here.

However, throwing away 90% of a rare and non-renewable energy source that then needs to be stored for 10's of thousands of years at great public expense seems like a crazy way to generate power. The building, decommissioning and nuclear fuel cycle is also very dirty and generates lots of greenhouse gasses to the point where you might as well burn coal or preferably gas. We need a better option that the current crop of civilian electricity generating reactors before we should count on public acceptance. We also need much greater trust in our business leaders and body politic before we should entertain nuclear reactors in our backyards (eg Lucas Heights gas leaks). Figuring out how to store energy from renewables might be a more productive use of our time.

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Zuckerberg to spend $3bn+ to rid world of all disease by 2100 (Starting with Facebook, right?)

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Yet another rich asshole's vanity project

So all vaccines are good and beneficial and have no harmful side effects? No child has ever been harmed or killed by vaccines? No vaccine manufactures has ever been involved in corporate fraud?

Mass vaxxers is an appropriate label. They make profit by selling a product as widely as possible using fear as a marketing technique. It takes a great act of faith to believe that all the product they supply is benign or even necessary simply on the assumption that vaccines == good. You would not make that assumption for your food. Why would you make a blanket assumption for medical products.

From the FDA website drugs development and approval process

ADRs (adverse drug reactions) are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in health care. The Institute of Medicine reported in January of 2000 that from 44,000 to 98,000 deaths occur annually from medical errors. Of this total, an estimated 7,000 deaths occur due to ADRs. These statistics do not include the number of ADRs that occur in ambulatory settings. However, other studies conducted on hospitalized patient populations have placed much higher estimates on the overall incidence of serious ADRs. These studies estimate that 6.7% of hospitalized patients have a serious adverse drug reaction with a fatality rate of 0.32%. If these estimates are correct, then there are more than 2,216,000 serious ADRs in hospitalized patients, causing over 106,000 deaths annually. Also, it is estimated that over 350,000 ADRs occur in U.S. nursing homes each year. The exact number of ADRs is not certain and is limited by methodological considerations. However, whatever the true number is, ADRs represent a significant public health problem that is, for the most part, preventable.

But I am sure all vaccines are safe.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Zika isn't "don't spray"

The CDC website lists zika symptoms as being mild and many people do not even realise they have it. There are suggestions that the microcephaly was as a result of widespread spraying of pyroproxyfen in the affected towns rather than the zika virus. This of course is dismissed by anyone who might have legal liability for these actions. Zika seems to be a perfect example of a well hyped threat for which a bio-hub might influence governments to act based upon a potentially faulty or corrupt diagnosis.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Yet another rich asshole's vanity project

Looks to be a purely commercial play. $3B over the next 80 years won't go far. But if he has a team of scientists who can quickly analyse perceived threats and onsell that information to the mass vaxxers while opening the wallets of fearful governments then he could be onto a winner. After a couple of wins he might even be able to start harvesting national health data. However, like H1N1 before it, Zika as an example seems to be a way overhyped threat with the prize being billions of dollars in vaccination contracts rather than any public health issue that can't be explained as don't spray crap in poor people's drinking water. This also highlights the threat to the rest of us - do no harm will be discarded for some manipulated perception of the social good.

To see what's coming check out the past: Uncle Bills involvement in India's mass polio vaccinations and the massive costs and consequences that arose from a small (few million dollars) donation.

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NBN HFC scaled down to stave off financial disaster

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: In other words...

And that's the killer - the opex costs of running the sooner cheaper faster network mean that they will never have enough money to move forward. Power is just the start. There will be flooding and failures under summer heat and battery maintenance and disposal and problems with lightening when the eld's trip and the cost of additional or upgraded wan side cards in the node if we ever migrate off national 12/1 adoption. As the money runs out they will have to start squeezing the rsp's which will drive the low usage members of their customer base towards wireless which in turn will cause the rsp's to decrease cvc commitments frustrating the more profitable users who will signal to the marketplace that they are prepared to pay for alternatives. The sad end to yet another failure managed out of Canberra will be the disposal of the network (probably to Telstra unless there is a generous foreign donor who catches their eye) for cents in the dollar. On a positive note, as this will probably take a decade to play out the NBN will remain a millstone around the neck of the LNP for at least the next few elections.

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Will US border officials demand social network handles from visitors?

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: That's good to know.

Hmmm, some sort of vigilante are you.

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Conviction by computer: Ministry of Justice wants defendants to plead guilty online

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Report's opening paragraph

The paid for version of the justice app will have an undo button.

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Phones exploding in kids' hands, shares tanking – but it's not all good news at Samsung

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Hot

Down at this end of the world we had combusting Samsung washing machines. Would have been nice to get the dryer as well just to live on the edge. Murderous home appliances are about the only fun left in this police state.

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Telstra wins AU$39 million for data retention costs as grants revealed

GrumpyOldBloke

Unless telco mandatory data retention is just smoke and mirrors and the real action is happening with the hidden servers per the Confidential Commodities List (rept in el Reg) and the ASIO/DSD/AFP business collaboration centres being opened in our state capitals are really about receiving the live feeds. The AFP and the spooks are not bound by the 2 year retention limit. We then have a clear case of win-lose which is how our bought and paid for government works. Canberra can claim that they only approach the telco's a small number of times for the very worst drug dealing child pornographing terrorist cases and the spooks get to throw proportionality and targeting out the window with the rest of their 5-eyes (+1) rabble. I just can't see 1.4M covering the costs this legislation is imposing. The 600+M that Abbott gave to the security services during his rein of terror seems closer to the number required to sell out a nation of this size.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Properly protect? Not a chance. If DoD was successfully hacked what hope is there for the rest. This is another Canberra policy disaster Arrogance with ignorance - thanks Bill and Tony. TPG's grant is interesting (only 1.4M) despite being the countries 2nd largest ISP. While I understand the top 3 have a multi technology mix of networks and applications and these are more expensive to support (eh Malcolm) what is a small company like Exetel (1.8M) doing that TPG is not. 1.4M suggests that TPG is off shoring and or dumping to tape at major network aggregation points. If the former - give up on the idea of security. If the later then there is some hope as access beyond the tape online storage boundary will require a physical presence at wherever the tapes will be stored.

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Exploding Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phablets recalled immediately

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: This:

My sympathies are with Samsung on this one. it is possible that the supplier was screwed down to the last cent and took short cuts. It is more likely that the failures have highlighted a manufacturing process or quality control issue that once identified will be fixed.

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Uber lost $7m a DAY in the first half of this year

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Nuke all the things

Never is a long time, especially with governments being influenced to sign up to TPP and TTIP to protect the intellectual property and business practices of said yanks. The only problem at the moment is without profit there is no tax so the US government isn't getting a cut. Once that changes the lure of having a percentage of half the worlds point to point journeys will be too much for fhe US 'lawmakers' to ignore. One day we may find ourselves invading Italy for their WMD's and their ride sharing and taxi profits.

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UK's mass-surveillance draft law grants spies incredible powers for no real reason – review

GrumpyOldBloke

The trick is to understand that security does not mean the same thing to you and I as it does to the spooks. In spook talk security means nothing changes. They are the ultimate conservatives. Hence whenever a new political movement or agitation for social justice arises the police and the spooks are always the first to join / infiltrate / surveille to ensure that nothing can threaten the established order - ie security. When something bad happens these agencies are always the first with the cover ups to ensure nothing can threaten the established order - again security. If a foreign country becomes a strategic competitor rather than adjust and improve, undermine and destroy to protect the established order - security. The sad thing is that the sort of people who join these agencies probably believe that they are playing a vital role protecting the realm rather than realising that they are a wart on the nations butt stopping any and all sensible reform. Unfortunately there is no known cure for this sort of nonsense. Once infestation starts you are stuck with the consequences.

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Turnbull's Transformers intend to test single sign-on to Gov.au on the offshore, public cloud

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Since Malcolm is my local member

Been there, done that, it doesn't work. The inventor of the internet is way out of his depth trying to lead his party of rabid cats. I am convinced that they lock him in a small room where he dreams of innovation and agileness while remaining completely divorced from his responsibilities to represent the views of Australia's civilian population. Turnbull is probably not liked by the traditional LNP donors (or voters) and is not going to score a win in anything of consequence politically. Letting him play on github and public clouds is probably seen as a safe way of not offending the guy who stumped up $1M for the LNP's partial reelection campaign, just in case they need him to do it again. We are still a long way from being bound by law to actually put data into his creation. The conservative branch of the LNP is starting to make noises about privacy as if after the census they have just discovered it is a thing and possibly even a vote winner. Turnbull is a lame duckling so I would not be too worried yet.

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IBM makes meek apology for Oz #CensusFail, offers no fail detail

GrumpyOldBloke

Sorry Dan, I can't see your appeal to reason falling on anything but deaf ears. The Westminster system has completely failed in Canberra. With senior members of parliament like Dutton and Brandis being ex public servants and others having never known life outside the public sector we now have a system where the public sector is representing itself and no one is speaking for the civilian population. The public sector are making out like bandits with every power grab they can get their dirty mits on. Turnbull has compounded his failure as a politician by not recognising what the issue was with the census. No one cares about a site going down, this is Oz it could have been laughed off. But 'the most significant invasion of privacy ever perpetrated on Australians' flys right over his head. The LNP almost lost an election by pandering to their worst impulses and those of the Canberra elite and they still haven't figured it out.

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