* Posts by eldakka

460 posts • joined 23 Feb 2011

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Yes, British F-35 engines must be sent to Turkey for overhaul

eldakka
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Re: 'Use-Case'?

The F-35's mission facing an air defence system worthy of the name is to get well forward into the AD radar envelope without being detected (that stealth thing), detect threats (the massive sensor and comms suite it's fitted with) and provide information to guide missiles such as Brimstone fired from fifty km behind it by ammo mules like F/A-18s and Typhoons into their assorted targets (to begin with the air defence systems and launchers that are stopping the mules from getting forward without getting blown out of the sky). It's a sniper weapon so it's not fitted with a bayonet mount unlike the Warthog's stupid BFG.
Errrm, no.

The F-35 is meant to replace F/A-18s, Warthogs, F-16s, Harriers, and all the assorted similar aircraft. It is meant to do the ground strikes, close-air-support and so on of all those other aircraft.

It is stealthy from the forward aspect only. It is the bombtruck. That is the only case where frontal-only aspect stealth makes any sense. It approaches enemy forces head-on, the only place its stealth works, and unloads its weapon loads into enemy positions/oncoming aircraft before they can detect and launch their own missiles/other defenses at it. And it better hope it eliminates all, or enough, of the opposing forces air defence sites or enemy aircraft, because once the F-35 turns away - or passes beyond those points thus exposing its non-stealth aspects to the remaining defences, then those remaining enemy aircraft who carry 6-12 AA missiles (as opposed to the maximum 4 of the F-35 if it wants to maintain stealth) will be able to unload their far-superior loadout capability at the un-stealthy aspects of the F-35.

The F-22 is the F-15, Typhoon equivalent/replacement. The air-superiority fighter, the all-aspect stealth aircraft. The one intended to go toe-to-toe with the latest generation of enemy air superiority fighters. The one meant to penetrate the enemy air defences to go after targets inside the AD zone.

The F-35 is meant to nibble away at the fringes, take out outer shell AD, then once that is eliminated, go after the next inner shell, and so-on.

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eldakka
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Re: Well that's just great.

The US?

No, they are being bought from that country that is halfway toward becoming yet another third-world theocratic shithole. The maintenance is being outsourced to a different country that is halfway toward becoming yet another third-world theocratic shithole.

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eldakka
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Re: Making life easier - for an adversary

Well no, if you're willing to write off the £6bn already committed on the carriers.

I would like to introduce you to the sunk cost fallacy.

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eldakka
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Re: Starting to make sense now

Instead we'll get renamed Puerto Britainia.
That's what I was thinking, an unincorporated territory rather than a state.

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eldakka
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Re: Turkey is a NATO country.

I don't think there's anything to stop the UK doing all its overhaul work itself, except for the substantial investment involved.

...or that it might be a breech of the terms of the purchase contract.

Sure, the UK might have the technical ability to perform overhauls, but they might be missing the legal - contractual, patent licensing and copyright licenses - to do so. Not to mention possible software keys to also do so. For example, replacing a component on the engine might be detected by the engine firmware or aircraft flight/control systems, and might refuse to function until the appropriate license key is entered to show that it is an approved repair - a key only supplied to approved repairers like the Turkish.

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Stealth web crypto-cash miner Coin Hive back to the drawing board as blockers move in

eldakka
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Re: this freely available tool has been abused

A large dildo could be used as a billy club.

So yes, the tool, a dildo, can be abused to do something not intended (well, unless it was bought in the S&M aisle, in which case that could be exactly what it's meant for...)

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Windows Fall Creators Update is here: What do you want first – bad news or good news?

eldakka
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> But which Linux?

In most cases, it doesn't really matter.

For most of the desktop-oriented distros, the only difference is the out-of-box experience.

You get a distro that comes with KDE desktop and don't like it? You can download MATE or gnome or whatever to it and run it instead.

A desktop distro is, basically, that organisations "my favourite packages/applications". They all have a linux kernel, they all have a GUI of some sort, they all come with a pre-canned set of apps. Therefore the only real way to decide which one is better is to try it - many come with live CD/thumb-drive versions that you can just boot straight off the media and have a poke about and see if you like it.

It's like buying a new car, you have to take it for a test drive before you buy it - maybe the indicator stalk is on the wrong side of the steering wheel, or you prefer a between the front seats 'lever' handbrake to pull-out under-dash one, or you want the radio to have actual nobs for volume, or having the speedo in the middle of the dash (e.g. a mini) versus directly behind the wheel will drive you crazy, or you want one with stability control, or it must have a limited-slip diff - or a full-on diff locker for a 4x4 - only you can know those things, therefore you have to sit in it and have a look first.

And like ANYTHING, if you are not an enthusiast or professional in that area - or just a know-it-all (how many typical car buyers know or care about diffs and limited-slip/locking?) - you just get a common/mainstream one (e.g. toyota corolla) - mint, ubuntu, whatever - and use it.

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uBlock Origin ad-blocker knocked for blocking hack attack squawking

eldakka
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Re: disagree with Scott and Troy

If the site has an XSS vulnerability then the report would inform the site owner who could take action to fix the underlying cause.

I would expect a website owner to test their own site for XSS exploits before opening it to the public. Not to use their users as guinea-pigs - actually, canaries would be a better description.

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Xperia XZ1: Sony spies with its MotionEye something beginning...

eldakka
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Re: Great review...

With a few exceptions, all modern phones meet minimum standards for usage as a phone - reception, phone app, address book, mic and speaker. There is not a lot of improvement to be made in those areas generally speaking.

Therefore, unless the phone features are either truly remarkable, or noticeably sub-standard, there isn't really much to say - it worked.

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Super Cali goes ballistic, small-cell law is bogus. School IT outsourcing is also... quite atrocious

eldakka
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The Land of the Free has some of the most complex, inane and bureaucratic sets of rules on the planet, with overlapping sets of government full of jobsworths who make Vogons seem pleasant to work with.

It's not just the US, most "democracies" build up similar, tho perhaps not quite to the extent of the US, rules.

Most of these rules are to ensure that it remains free. There are rules put into place to make accounting for every cent spent possible to verify that there is no (ha!) corruption. Rules to prove that you've engaged in a fair tender process. That you haven't given kickbacks or bribes. That the $300million allocated for X has been spent on X and not redirected somewhere else, and so on.

The cost of preventing bribery, ensuring the money is spent were it's supposed to be, that it can be reported back to the parliament/public, is greater than the cost of said bribery.

It gets to the point where 2/3rds of the money allocated to a department/project is spent in making sure it's all above-board, accounted for, fair, and so on, whereas if they let money disappear (not accounted for properly), some bribery and so on, you'd probably lose 1/3rd of that money - and have 2/3rds accomplish its actual goals, rather than only 1/3rd of that as currently.

It's like saying we have to make the roads 100% safe, there can be no fatalities, so let's implement all these restrictions - no vehicle can travel faster than 20mph, EVER, everyone has to do advanced driver training and be tested every-year, jail-time for breaking any road rules, if someone LOOKS tired - jailtime, and so on and so forth. Imagine the nightmare that would imposed on actually getting transport done. Well, you don't have to imagine it. just look to the rules, regulations, bureauacry that is meant to accomplish that with respect to government spending.

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Neutron stars shower gold on universe in big bang, felt on Earth as 100-second grav wave

eldakka
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Re: Neutrons → Protons

[The first person to say "there is no such thing as centrifugal force" has to name the direction of the force that a test tube exerts on a centrifuge].

I started reading up on this on wikipedia, and I sort of felt I was grasping something, until the equations started, then my eye rolled into the back of my head and I said "Centrifugal force, yeah, that's what it is"

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Twitter: Why we silenced Rose McGowan after she slammed alleged sex pest Harvey Weinstein

eldakka
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Re: How widespread?

As I understand it, they weren't A-listers at the time of the abuse. It was while they were still young, up and coming actresses.

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eldakka
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Re: Re Notas Badoff: Sense of proportion

Easy - they could have deleted the tweet that violated their TOS. But then they'd be responsible for the diarrhea in their toilet content of their site.

As has been demonstrated many times in court, policing content does not make the site responsible for the content they let through.

There have been many lawsuits filed against platforms that use logic along the lines of "you moderate content, therefore you are responsible for that content" that has been routinely rejected by the courts.

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Rejecting Sonos' private data slurp basically bricks bloke's boombox

eldakka
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Re: Crap like this...

When I was a kid in the 70's, my fathers receiver had A/B, and it was 15 years old then...

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New coding language Fetlang's syntax designed to read like 'poorly written erotica'

eldakka
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Re: Idiots in the IT field.. too many in the last few years...

@Jason Bloomberg

If I come across a stack of compiler discs tucked under a bush in the local park I might give it a whirl. It will make a change from doing the usual 'tied to the desk' stuff I have to do.

Looks like you are trying to write Fetlang code...

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Six weeks later, drone biz DJI deploys control app 'flight mode'

eldakka
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Since Local Data Mode blocks all internet data, the DJI Pilot app will not be able to detect the location of the user, show the map and geofencing information such as No Fly Zones and temporary flight restrictions.

Surely the global, or at least continent-based (like with SatNavs), data can be downloaded and stored locally for this information? Why do you need to have internet data enabled to determine location, isn't that what GPS is for?

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Australia commits to establish space agency with no budget, plan, name, deadline …

eldakka
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Re: Shirley

At least there aren't any Spiders on Mars

If Australia starts a launch industry, then that won't be true for long.

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eldakka
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Re: Space port (Woomera)

Britain being the only nation to launch a satellite, and then give it up.

Add Australia to that list.

In November 1967 Australia launched WRESAT, designed and built in 11 months, from Woomera aboard a left-over American Redstone booster (10 were provided for warhead re-entry tests, but only 9 were used for that program).

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Did the Earth move for you, too? Grav waves sensed from black holes' bang 1.8bn LYs away

eldakka
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and the Virgo detector near Pisa, Italy.

Are we sure it wasn't caused by the collision of 2 pizza dough's being spun and colliding?

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Helium's for balloons and squeaky voices, not this 10TB Toshiba beast

eldakka
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Re: Save the Helium, ban balloons

US 2014 usage of helium (from wikipedia):

Estimated 2014 U.S. fractional helium use by category. Total use is 34 million cubic meters.[122]

Cryogenics (32%)

Pressurizing and purging (18%)

Welding (13%)

Controlled atmospheres (18%)

Leak detection (4%)

Breathing mixtures (2%)

Other (13%)

So, balloons make up a part of that 13% other. Which means a small percentage of helium is used in balloons.

I'll keep using helium balloons to make people, especially kids, happy, thank you.

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CBS's Showtime caught mining crypto-coins in viewers' web browsers

eldakka
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"And I would have gotten away with it too.. if if wasn't for you meddling kidsscript-kiddies!"

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Equifax fooled again! Blundering credit biz directs hack attack victims to parody site

eldakka
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Re: Why a new domain name?

fail.equifax.com

insecurity.equifax.com

allyourbasesarebelongtous.equifax.com

would have been better names

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Boffins discover tightest black hole binary system – and it's supermassive

eldakka
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Surely:

as it provides more evidence that supermassive black holes collide in galaxies, and are the a source of gravitational waves.

?

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Stack Overflow + Salary Calculator = your worth

eldakka
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Silge said the Salary Calculator covers five different countries – Canada, France, Germany, the UK, and the US

Would have been nice to know that before providing the link.

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Missed patch caused Equifax data breach

eldakka
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Re: The CIO did know to sell shares, but didn't know to patch

The CIO will be fine.

Few million golden parachute and a cushy number someone else.

Feel sorry for the poor buggers at the bottom.

Maybe, maybe not.

The way I read @Tree's comment was as referring not to the financial return the CIO made, but to the criminal act that that entails.

If the CIO knew about the breach, then sold the shares before announcing it publicly, that is criminal insider trading. And while rich business people get away with a lot, insider trading is something the SEC tends to clamp down on because it affects other rich people as well. So the CIO (and the 2 other executives who sold shares) could be facing an SEC probe into insider trading which could lead to jail time - not for the lax security that allowed the breach, but for insider trading.

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Cops' use of biometric images 'gone far beyond custody purposes'

eldakka
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Holmes

However, concerns have previously been raised that the automatic deletion of images of unconvicted individuals would be too costly, due to the complexity of police IT systems.

In which case all the databases should be deleted, and no new photos can be taken of anyone by the police, until new databases/processes are put into place that can automatically delete un-convicted individuals.

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Apple’s facial recognition: Well, it is more secure for the, er, sleeping user

eldakka
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f you used the digit it would actually just be pronounced "Windows Neun" by any German speaker.

Wouldn't it be "Fenster neun"?

It seems incongruous to translate one part but not the other.

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eldakka
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Understandable numbers to avoid in business that I can think of are: 69 and 666.

If someone has 69 up or downvotes on a comment, I never vote either way because I'm not going to be the one responsible for preventing anyone from having a 69.

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eldakka
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It seems the only people not vulnerable would be Muslim women, bikers, and teens wearing hoodies...

What about a hoodie-wearing teenage Muslim woman biker?

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eldakka
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Or just a reference to the awesome show "Better Off Ted".

Loved that show, I'm still perplexed to this day why it didn't have a longer run (but then, I feel that way about Firefly too).

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Astroboffins map 845 galaxies in glorious 3D, maybe dark matter too

eldakka
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Re: 97% of the Universe is composed of math particulates and hyperdense equations....

Odd that our current galactic model is geocentric, just like the flat Earth, celestial sphere models....

We can see 13 billion years in every direction.... Earth is the center of the Universe....

Umm, science does not believe the Earth is the center of the Universe.

We are in the Universe, and we can only see what we can see from accessible points of references. The only one which we currently have access to is the one from our current location, our own Solar System. Therefore any 'exploration', mapping, must take place from that location outward.

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Google to kill Symantec certs in Chrome 66, due in early 2018

eldakka
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not sure I like the power and muscle google is flexing here. I do not see how it is their job to stop a browser from working with certificates from a particular provider.

1) It is exactly their job to asses as to whether their software will trust a CA. This is how the certificate system works. It is a chain of trust. The software receiving the certificate has to somehow trust the cert (usually via a chain of trust to the signer). To 'trust' a CA, the software has to include (i.e. a pro-active step from the developer of the software) the trust chain in the software (or it can trust the operating systems truststore). Therefore a CA like Symantec, Digicert, etc. has to ask the developer (Firefox, Chrome, or the OS like windows which has an OS-wide truststore) to include them in that chain of trust, so they can put the cert in the software-supplied truststore (one of the things updates to browser/OS software does is add/remove certs from their truststores). If the developer of the software no longer trusts a CA, then they are perfectly within their rights - in fact this is how it is supposed to work - to have their software to stop accepting certs signed by that CA.

2) I'm not 100% sure on this, but you could probably manually trust the Symantec CA by installing the certs yourself in the appropriate truststore. Most of these systems have exceptions/documented/standard ways of enforcing a user-preference on the certs, manually updating the trust-stores and revocation lists. What we are talking here is the out-of-box, un-user-configured/personalized experience of Chrome.

3) Chrome is Google's browser, so they can do with it as they will. Chrome isn't by any means a monopoly. The browser market is a crowded place. This is not a situation where there aren't viable alternatives. Don't like it, there are PLENTY of other browsers out there, Firefox, IE, Edge, Safari, Vivaldi, and more. Many of those others are forks of the main browsers engines, but since they are forks they can decide whether or not to include certain features.

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Apple's adoption of Qi signals the end of the wireless charging wars

eldakka
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Cupertino committed to bringing out Qi-enabled phones and its own industry-standard wireless charging pad.

Oxymoron?

Apple has actually been using Qi for quite some time in the wireless charging pad for its Watch line. But it tweeked the standard so that only Apple hardware could use the charging station and also so that it could charge a lot for the hardware.

Ahh, that's more like it, the world makes sense again.

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Five ways Apple can fix the iPhone, but won't

eldakka
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Re: @Eddy Ito

@Eddy Ito

I suspect you might be one of those uncommonly sensible people who turn off battery sapping but limited use items on the phone and only have them on when needed?

Things like GPS and wifi? Things you only need on when doing things that need GPS (maps) or wifi (extensive online use - streaming audio/video, etc.)

I've had people complain about battery life on their phone, lasting less than a full day of light use (not talking about someone using their phone to play a game on all day or watching moves) and have a squiz and see that their GPS is always on, no matter what they are doing on the phone. Same with wifi, if you aren't using the phone at all for anything internet/data-related, why is wifi on? Both of those services, while on, sap a lot of battery.

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Sci-Fi titan Jerry Pournelle passes,
aged 84

eldakka
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@Pompous Git

Are you always like this when someone dies? Rude, obnoxious and totally lacking in either knowledge or couth. Frankly I wouldn't piss on you if you were on fire.

1) Can't speak for the others you refer to, but how is replying to your post, which had nothing to do with a person dieing, it was a single sentence which was presenting a false equivalency (that because it had socialist in its name it was socialist), rude and obnoxious?

@Pompous Git:

I usually find that when people use words such as you do here, they are referring to themselves. I strongly disagreed with Jerry politically, but he was not Nazi (a socialist? FFS!), he was a paelo-libertarian.

2) Pot, kettle.

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eldakka
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Nazi = National Socialist Workers' Party
By that logic, the German Democratic Republic (aka communist East Germany) was a Democracy?

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F-35 firmware patches to be rolled out 'like iPhone updates'

eldakka
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Hope they don't

get into a boot-loop after an upgrade.

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eldakka
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The plane is technically still under development. The customers (US and UK now) are now flying early models around and reporting back problems to be fixed.

I've paid $30 or $40 for early access of a steam game, basically being an alpha or beta tester. Then I get the full game on release.

But paying billions (or tens of billions) of dollars for early access alpha testing? And having to pay for upgrades (in unavailable downtime if not extra money for specific upgrades) - fuck me.

Wonder what the kickbacks were for that particular agreement?

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Microsoft won't patch Edge browser content security bypass

eldakka
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Re: re: Microsoft products - exploitable by design.

@Steve Davies 3

Microsoft products - exploitable.

There fixed it for you.

No. As per the quote in the article:

“Microsoft stated that this is by design and has declined to patch this issue”.

It is not shabby coding, a bug, a mistake, carelessness, they designed it to behave in this exploitable fashion and are happy it is working as designed.

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eldakka
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Microsoft products - exploitable by design.

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Microsoft extends free Windows 10 S to Win 10 Pro upgrade offer

eldakka
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Re: Is there a TARDIS in the room?

That was the 90's, the browser didn't exist in the 80's ;)

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It's official: Users navigate flat UI designs 22 per cent slower

eldakka
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Re: Mr Nielsen

If you consider design to be "functional design", then in this case good aesthetics != good design.

Something my be aesthetically very pleasing, but functionally useless.

The ideal is to have something that is both aesthetically pleasing and functionally effective.

However, when it comes to something that is meant to deliver concrete information (to buy something click here, to get details on this legislation click here, to get the specs of the widget I am looking at incorporating into my industrial process, click here, to update my payment details click here, to fill in and submit my tax return click here, to fill and and submit my visa application click here) then aesthetics must give way to functionality. That doesn't mean it has to be ugly, un-artistic, but those are secondary to functionality.

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eldakka
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Re: Putting on my tinfoil hat ...

Actual eyeballs on adds probably don't matter, how long an add was being displayed on a page is probably more important from a sites ad revenue perspective.

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eldakka
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Re: Personally

Virgins have EPGs?

Will wonders never cease.

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UK not as keen on mobile wallets as mainland Europe and US

eldakka
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Re: Define "regularly"

Personally it just means I only need to carry one thing, after all it's replaced the walkman
Yeah agree on it replacing the walkman - but then I only ever used a walkman-like device (e.g. ipods) on longer trips where I'd also be carrying at least a daypack-type bag anyway.

books
Not really. Sure, sometimes I read a book on a phone, usually when I'm wasting time waiting for something. But when I'm reading books I like, I use a tablet or on long trips an e-book reader (easier on the eyes). And again, if I'm on the length of a trip where I want to bring a book along, I'll be carrying a pack of some sort to store a tablet or ebook reader (or the pockets of some of my jackets with larger pockets) in anyway.
the camera
Again, not really. If I'm going somewhere where I plan to take pictures - holiday for example - I'll bring a discrete camera. Even my compact "happy snap" camera takes better photos than a phone, let alone my SLR. It gives me a camera to take on-the-spur/surprise photos in situations where I wouldn't be carrying a separate camera, but then, previously I just wouldn't have taken a photo. So it hasn't replaced the camera, just allows me to have an emergency camera to hand more often.
the calculator
Absolutely.
the diary
Sometimes, but generally not. I've never kept a personal diary, but do set an alarm reminder on the phone sometimes. For work, I still use a written diary for taking notes in meetings. And email for appointments and so on when I get back to my desk - my memory is good enough to remember to go to a meeting straight from lunch rather than going back to my desk.
the alarm clock
definitely;
the address book
again an address book is not something I've ever felt the need to carry on my person at all times. I don't need so many addresses that I need an address book on hand all the time. Like with the diary, the desktop/laptop computer has replaced the address book, not my phone.

I frequently leave my phone behind and just take a wallet - or when I go swimming I don't take a phone or wallet, just a credit/debit card I can swim with in the zipped-up pocket.

Having the option of using a phone for payment is nice. But definitely not a necessity or even particularly convenient unless I'm in a situation where I've forgotten the wallet - although, since by law you are required to have your drivers license on you when driving I'm more likely to go back and get it than I am if I forget my phone.

This just goes to show that everyone is different. I don't feel wedded to my phone, if I leave it at home when going to work or down to the shops, meh, so what. So being able to do things on my phone no easier than I do currently is neither here nor there.

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15 'could it be aliens?' fast radio bursts observed in one night

eldakka
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Alien

Re: I'm not saying it's aliens....

Ahh, but if you divide 15 by the mystical number 3, you get 5, which is a prime number!

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US cops can't keep license plate data scans secret without reason

eldakka
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Re: LAPD vs LASD

LAPD=Los Angeles Police Department.

LASD=Los Angeles Sheriff's Department.

As per wikipedia:

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department – provides law enforcement services for the unincorporated parts of Los Angeles County, as well as 42 cities.

Los Angeles County, officially the County of Los Angeles,[7] is the most populous county in the United States. Its population is larger than that of 42 individual U.S. states. It has 88 incorporated cities and many unincorporated areas and at 4,083 square miles (10,570 km2), it is larger than the combined areas of the U.S. states of Delaware and Rhode Island. The county is home to more than one-quarter of California residents and is one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the U.S.[8] Its county seat, the City of Los Angeles, is also its most populous city at about four million.

The city of Los Angeles is an incorporated city within the County of Los Angeles.

Therefore the LAPD is the local city of Los Angeles-only police department. The LASD is the Los Angeles County-wide police (Sheriff's Department) force, the provides policing for those parts of the County that do not have their own police force.

An incorporated city, like Los Angeles city, can either form its own police department, or contract the County Sheriff's department to provide policing.

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NYPD head of IT doubles down on Windows smartphone idiocy

eldakka
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Grow a backbone

"She's a terror if she doesn't get her way, so I usually let her get her way," Bratton said. "So she's certainly getting her way with this technology."

...and do your job.

If you are going to give in to some whiny underling, then you are not suitable for the job.

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Terry Pratchett's unfinished works flattened by steamroller

eldakka
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Re: I'm touched by the weirdness of this request...

And camels rock.

And spit, and do maths in their heads!

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Google has some sort of plan for not favouring its own shopping service

eldakka
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Re: I hope the EU is satisfied by the measures

It's not the price comparison engine.

It's the general search engine. The claim is, google elevates shopping results from its own stores above what the general search ranking algorithm should do. If a google store result was, for example, ranked 14, then showing it as 14 would be fine. However, google would ignore their own algorithm's "neutral" ranking (what they normally use to rank all the web pages out there) of 14, and instead elevate it to, say 1 or 2.

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