* Posts by eldakka

824 posts • joined 23 Feb 2011

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Mozilla-endorsed security plug-in accused of tracking users

eldakka
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Disabling or removing the applet is proper, removing the post is not.

It is entirely proper.

A company has submitted a plugin to the Firefox plugin 'store'.

It has been accepted.

After that, Firefox wrote a post 'spruiking' this plugin, recommending it.

Some users raised concerns over the plugin. So Firefox has stopped recommending it until it's sorted out. Therefore they have removed the post that was recommending it. It has not been proven yet to be malicious, therefore it is still available, but Firefox are no longer recommending it.

The only thing wrong with the chain of events I see is the initial recommendation by Firefox. They should have thoroughly vetted the plugin before actually recommending it.

The rest after that I see nothing wrong with that chain of events.

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Bitcoin backer sues AT&T for $240m over stolen cryptocurrency

eldakka
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Re: So much for the "what you have" 2nd factor...

Turns out it's effectively virtual.

It's not effectively virtual, it is virtual.

The problem is, people think that in this sort of 2FA that the "what you have" is a phone. It's not. It's the phone number. And since phone numbers aren't a physical thing, and has been amply demonstrated can be transferred to someone else electronically, the antithesis of physical, then there is no "what you have" element in this type of 2FA.

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Reel talk: You know what's safely offline? Tape. Data protection outfit Veeam inks deal with Quantum

eldakka
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Re: Safe until ...

C:The old tapes in your cupboard are there for compliance reasons, not for for restores. And if they are so old that you can't use them in your new tape library then they should have been thrown out years ago anyway. Remember that tape drives are always backwardly compatible with the last few versions of the media.

The backwards compatibility usually only helps you if you keep the same technology. If you've moved from DAT to LTO for example, the LTO drives can't read any of the DAT tapes.

However, as part of the decommissioning process of the last of the old DDS-4 20GB DAT drives one used in the early 2000's, would be to transfer the data from the 1000 DAT tapes for archival storage onto 7 LTO-7 tapes, or 16 slightly older (from 2013) LTO-6 tapes. Then dispose of the 1000 DAT tapes and drive.

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Apple pulls iOS 12 beta 7 after less than 24 hrs

eldakka
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Re: Usual BS

"something Google has opted to copy."

Given that Google had been offering public Android betas since 2014 (android L), it's apple copying as per usual.

After perusing some of the stories linked by others in these comments, especially the Apple apologises sort of, I suspect that may be tongue in cheek.

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Medical device vuln allows hackers to falsify patients' vitals

eldakka
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Re: Manufacturer's T's&C's...

Just need to point out that their kit is for private LAN use only. The equipment is not to be used on LAN's connected to a WAN.

I was thinking this, so this isn't IoT kit, as the I stands for Internet.

I would expect that the manufacturers expect these devices to be placed on secure, segmented, access controlled (i.e. no open RJ45 ports for anyone walking past to just hook something into) networks.

But even saying that, in this day and age implementing reasonable security precautions should be a no-brainer automatic development process. Basic security is available from standard libraries, it's not like they'd have to roll their own, they'd just have to use whats already out there.

Even tho these are 14 year-old devices, I bet they were at the time (and probably still are) quite expensive as all medical equipment seems to be, therefore it would be standard practice that such devices are used for at least a decade, probably two to three decades in smaller regional hospitals or hand-me-downs to poorer regions of the world. Therefore manufacturers should still be supporting them with the occasional firmware updates (even if just every 3-4 years) to implement newer security practices in them.

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IPv6: It's only NAT-ural that network nerds are dragging their feet...

eldakka
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Why would any outside entity need to know the IP of an internal machine that doesn't already have access to the internal DNS server?

Why would any internal entity need to know the IP of anything internal, they just query DNS.

Right, so to make IPv6 useable I must also:

1) buy my own domain (or subdomain);

2) set up and maintain my own DNS server;

3) make it externally accessable?

I thought IPv6 proponents say that IPv6 is easier than IPv4?

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eldakka
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Re: Privacy implications

Since MACs don't make it through routers,

Apart from those implementations that by default use the MAC address for the IPv6 suffix you mean.

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eldakka
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sites that use you IP address to identify uses and for Geo-location,

Well those are 2 problems right there.

IP addresses are neither identifiers or location beacons. And they never should be.

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eldakka
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Re: "the world is clinging stubbornly to IPv4"

Any ISP who has IPv4 only Routers has not upgraded their hardware since before 2012 ...

Many ISPs use 'own branded' routers, like many large telco's use 'own branded' mobile phones. They are big enough to have the actual hardware manufacturer remove their branding from the device, both hardware and firmware, rebadge it with the ISPs branding, and provide custom built firmware to the ISPs specifications.

I recently got an 'own branded' router/modem from my ISP, and there is no firmware available for it from any other source than my ISP. Even tho I do know the manufacturer of the device, they only build devices for 3rd parties. So I can't download a generic firmware from the manufacturer directly, as they provide custom builds to the ISPs that only enable the specific features that the ISPs want in the devices. The device is branded with all the ISPs brands, the firmware is all ISP-branded with no references anywhere on the device or in the firmware as to who the actual manufacturer is.

This is pretty typical for the cheapest (i.e. most popular) devices available from an ISP. Therefore there is much new hardware out there that only provides very limited functionality, because the ISP doesn't want the end-users to have the ability to make any of their own choices in the configuration.

Luckily the router does have a bridge mode option, so I can use it just as a modem and use a real router behind it. However, most home users won't want to spend the money, let alone have the knowledge to, configure a separate routing device from the modem.

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Bank on it: It's either legal to port-scan someone without consent or it's not, fumes researcher

eldakka
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Re: Heard that one before

The fact of the matter is that Halifax isn't technically scanning you.

Halifax is providing you with a piece of Javascript code and having you scan yourself. This is indicated by all of the '127.0.0.1' addresses in Moore's screenshots.

Can I claim that defense in court if I grab somebodies arm and smack them in their face with their own fist while saying "Stop punching yourself in the face"?

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The age of hard drives is over as Samsung cranks out consumer QLC SSDs

eldakka
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Fat lot of good when your laptop ONLY takes SATA (M2 pretty much has to be built into laptops). And desktops will have a hard time using an add on when the only slot that can carry it runs the GPU.

Then you aren't buying the right laptops or desktops.

While that's the case now, I would expect things to change in the future as trends change, as always happens.

One of the motherboards for the new Threadripper CPU (admittedly not exactly in the standard consumer class) comes with 6 M.2 x4 connectors, 2 onboard and the other 4 from an included PCIe add-in card.

Expect this sort of thing to creep down into the consumer space over the next few years. Some consumer motherboards right now have 2 M.2 slots onboard. If M.2 becomes the consumer standard such that it displaces 2.5"/3.5" form factors, then expect motherboards to ship with more.

Yes, if you want 4 M.2 right now on a consumer mITX board that only has one long PCIe slot for a GPU you are SoL. But if you want that many M.2, then you need to purchase a motherboard that can support that many, just like if you want 10 SATA drives you need to purchase a motherboard that can support 10 SATA or has additional PCIe expansion slots to add more SATA ports from add-in cards (or purchase one that supports SATA expanders, which is pretty rare in the consumer space).

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eldakka
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If your motherboard can't directly take M2 devices, there's a legion of addin cards. I've seen up to 4 mSATAs supported on one card and StarTech sell a neat wee pcie card that takes a NVMe drive on one side, with 2 msata carriers on the other that plug back to the motherboard ports.

The new MSI X399 Creation motherboard as reported on Anandtech comes with a PCIe x16 card that has 4 (!) M.2 x4 connectors.

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eldakka
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Re: What will be the data retention lifetime?

I do wonder how adding more and more layers to a single cell affects it's lifespan though.

Hugely.

However, amortised across an entire 4TB SSD, lower write endurance should be acceptable for anything outside very high write I/O loads. e.g. database logs, caches in front of large arrays, etc, which is what SLC or Optane or other future technologies like MRAM are for.

Depending on source, typical max program-erase cycles are:

SLC 50k-100k > eMLC 20k-30k > MLC 5k-10k > 3DTLC 1k-10k > pTLC 1-5k > QLC 0.1k-0.5k (aka hundreds, not thousands).

SLC: Single-level cell, 1b/cell

eMLC: enterprise-class Multi-level cell, 2b/cell

MLC: Multi-level cell (consumer-class), 2b/cell

3DTLC: 3-d (stacked) Three-level cell, 3b/cell

pTLC: planar (2D, non-stacked) Three-level cell, 3b/cell

QLC: Quad-level cell, 4b/cell

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Internet overseer ICANN loses a THIRD time in Whois GDPR legal war

eldakka
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Re: Not legally binding...

> pull in scripts from 15 domains

Plus the rest, I've got some sites I visit that pull in over 45 domains, thank god for ad/script blockers.

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eldakka
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Re: Costs?

ICANN doesn't have any money of it's own.

2016 - .web $135m

2016 - .shop $41.5m

2014 - .app $25m

That's $200 million right there in three sales alone in ICANNs coffers.

They have plenty of money - minus whatever they've embezzled.

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eldakka
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Re: "no one is holding out much hope"

it's imperfections have created many of the freedoms that have allowed the Internet to grow and provide information to so many.

Organisations don't do this, the people in organisations do this.

Are the same people currently responsible for the current clusterfuck that is ICANN the same people who did many of these other useful things, or is this a newer generation in charge that have had nothing to do with the previous 'good things" that have come out of ICANN?

ICANN didn't exist prior to its incorporation on September 30, 1998. Most of the "good stuff" that I believe you must be referring to pre-date the founding of ICANN. Since then ICANN has been mostly in either maintenance mode of those benefits put in place prior to it - standing on the shoulders of, and taking credit for, those that came before it - or in clusterfuck mode, breaking those same benefits or trying to maintain itself with no regard for its "citizens", that is the civilian population who use the Internet, with the only regard for its own enrichment and power - "Respect my authorita!"

edit: typos

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Hmm, there's something fishy about this graph charting AMD's push into Intel's server turf

eldakka
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Re: (misleading stats)

No, but there are other chips that aren't AMD64 compatible that could be used in some cases. The Itanic is I believe still shipping, and probably someone is using it. ARM is another option

Also Power and SPARC (tho the latter is in a serious state of decline).

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Click this link and you can get The Register banned in China

eldakka
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when the US blew their own buildings

I know people say Americans have big mouths, but come on, they aren't that big.

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eldakka
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Re: Not the entirity of China...

Which means that if China should decide to impose its system on Hong Kong at some time in the future, Britain is not allowed by the terms of the relevant treaty to treat this as causus belli and take Hong Kong right back.

Is this why the Brits have built themselves a couple super(ish) carriers?

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Oz government offers privacy concessions on MyHealth Record

eldakka
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Re: It looks like we're doing something. Doesn't it?

Sorry, Canberra, ...

Canberra is a city of approximately 400k people, of which only 226 are federal politicians, and of those only 4 are residents of Canberra (the other 222 or so being residents of their respective electorates).

Stop blaming the 400k residents of the city of Canberra for the decisions made by those 222 non-residents.

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India mulls ban on probes into anonymized data use – with GDPR-style privacy laws

eldakka
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WTF?

re-identifying anonymized data

If it can be re-identified, then it hasn't been properly anonymized in the first place.

The fine should be on the organisation that claims to have anonymized the data for failing to do so, not on the person who did the de-anonymization.

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Shock Land Rover Discovery: Sellers could meddle with connected cars if not unbound

eldakka
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Re: New owner must be able to disconnect seller immediately from the vehicle

> Enabling the current person in the car to disable this kind of defeats the purpose.

As per the OP you are replying to (emphasis mine):

If there is a concern about theft then the back end for the function can be made more complex: still collect the data but prevent the previous owner from accessing the data or controlling anything. The police can still have access to the data (for example with a warrant) but the previous owner does not unless they go through a process to reclaim the car (disputing that ownership has been transferred).

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All that dust on Mars is coming from one weird giant alien structure

eldakka
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Pirate

Have you ever wondered where Mars got all that striking iron-rich rust-colored dust from?

With questions like:

  • where'd the Martians go?
  • where's all the water?
  • what happened to the canals?
  • is there sub-surface liquid water?
  • is there any life on mars at all?
  • how can we colonise it?
  • when will man first step foot on mars (if it hasn't already, queue conspiracy theories)?

I can honestly say that no, I've never wondered where all the dust came from.

(Icon because I hope we 'board' mars soon).

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If you're serious about securing IoT gadgets, may as well start here

eldakka
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Re: why indeed

> I have just 6 Internet Things: a router, 2 phones and 3 laptops.

Do we have a formal definition of IoT?

I ask because I would not consider a laptop, a general purpose computer, as an 'IoT' device.

I always view an IoT device as (usually) an appliance, a limited function device that needs internet connectivity back to specific vendor/product back-ends, to work.

General Purpose devices that can work without a constant, or near constant, connection to the internet, that don't have a specific manufacturer/vendor frequent/constant required connection to, I personally wouldn't regard as an IoT device.

But that's just me, and I know I'm weird.

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eldakka
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Re: Why?

> Second, the idea that all this stuff can provide a real, automated household is an interesting and compelling dream.

I have no problem with this dream.

What I have a problem with is the way it is trying to be implemented. That is, introducing 'the cloud' into it all.

There is no need for the cloud for home automation tasks. All that's needed is to use the internet for a communications medium between your in-home server that is managing everything, and whatever communications device you need to use to manage it or receive updates on.

I do not want any management, automation, access, monitoring, security run in the cloud.

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eldakka
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> We techies often forget that Joe User hasn't a clue or the interest in learning this stuff.

The problem becomes when the only mechanism put in place caters for the lowest common denominator and us techies get stuck having to do it that way too.

I mean, they say "at time of purchase you give to the manufacturer a passcode". Who does that? How is it done? I bet you $100 bucks that it'll be an interface on the checkout's screen, so the BestBuy or other minimum wage person ask you for the code then inputs it on your behalf. And since that's the only way the device will work, you have no option other than announcing to the other people in earshot what the code is, and having the checkout person enter it, possibly being saved in the store's system before going to the manufacturer, if you want to buy the device.

As long as such a system were optional, I'd have less issues with it. But it won't be.

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eldakka
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> my synology replacement costs about £50 based

I went the opposite way as I'm replacing my old NAS. I built it myself, but I went silly with the components to future-proof and due to scope creep (maybe I can run some VMs on it for the additional services I usually run on my NAS, so yeah I'll put in 32GB ECC RAM...) and it's cost a heap - probably more than buying an off the shelf 8 or 10-bay NAS - but been interesting to do.

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UK spies broke law for 15 years, but what can you do? shrugs judge

eldakka
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Re: So that's the big deal

> well, I'd be MORE concerned if the slurped info lead to convictions later on.

And what are you basing this on?

How do you know that there have been no convictions based on this snooping? Or that it hasn't led to "extraordinary renditions"? Because the government has said so? That same government who are on record as lying to a court?

The agencies also had to amend their witness statements several times after it became obvious that their original contents, claiming they and the Foreign Secretary obeyed the law in full, were simply not true;

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Microsoft: The Kremlin's hackers are already sniffing, probing around America's 2018 elections

eldakka
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Re: "seized in as little as 24 to 48 hours"

> No you cannot. The server is outside our jurisdiction. So the only way to "see" is to arrest the domain and point it to server(s) you control.

Rubbish, the entire world is subject to American Law and jurisdiction!

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♫ The Core i9 clock cycles go up. Who cares where they come down?

eldakka
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This macbook is clearly designed to be used inside a bath of liquid nitrogen.

Come on, don't exaggerate like that.

They work perfectly fine in a cold-room (as in sub-zero commercial walk-in refrigerated storage rooms like restaurants have).

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eldakka
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These need a disclaimer that sustained maximum performance is not possible. The idea is sound that the processor can smash through a web page render or other short workload and then throttle back. BUT it's just not suitable for multi-hour rendering or gaming sessions.

That is the theory behind Intel's ultra-low processors like the m5-6Y57. It's a "finish the job as fast as possible and then go back to sleep" paradigm.

Which is fine for general purpose consumer laptops that follow that sort of workload - maximum speed while launching a program, or rendering a webpage, then go back to sleep.

However, these are 'pro' laptops, targeted at professionals doing video editing, rendering, other professional type workloads.

At the very least they should be able to sustain base clocks. But these laptops cannot even do that, they aren't just throttling turboboost, they are throttling their base clock speeds down.

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Mmm, yes. 11-nines data durability? Mmmm, that sounds good. Except it's virtually meaningless

eldakka
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Re: "acts of God"

Being pedantic here, but please don't use "acts of God".

Gives undue succour to people who believe in nonsense. Natural Disasters, or a similar synonym is perfectly good.

"acts of God" in this context is actually a legal term, not a religious one, that used to, if not still currently does, appear in contracts, especially things like insurance contracts.

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Declassified files reveal how pre-WW2 Brits smashed Russian crypto

eldakka
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> Wouldn't that only happen if people knew? I mean, print a run for the government, print some duplicates for you...

I can see the print shop operators now:

"one for you, one for me, one for you, one for me"

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Fork it! Google fined €4.34bn over Android, has 90 days to behave

eldakka
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Re: > "And Google technology is far more pervasive than Microsoft's ever was."

> 99% of white colour workers are

OK, is this a racist rant, or did you mean white collar workers?

I can't tell from the rest of your uninformed article as it works either way...

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eldakka
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Re: First time someone gets fined for giving something for free

> First time someone gets fined for giving something for free

1) it's not free;

2) it comes with a long complex license with many strings attached.

So nothing is 'given', and nothing is 'free' about Android for handset makers.

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eldakka
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Re: Meh ...

Google argument here will be simply that the commission didn't look at the whole market and actively ignore iOS and Apple, I suspect they have a very good case of getting this overturn.

No they don't.

iOS is an exclusive operating system to Apple, it is not available for licensing to 3rd parties. So for other companies, the only realistic option is Android. So for the non-Apple handset makers, Android is the monopoly operating system.

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eldakka
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"payments to phone makers to make Google Search the default"

- Not sure how this hurts, as such, as surely other people could pay those makers to be the default? So long as it's changeable? Is this any different to Apple being paid to direct people to Google? That could hurt if that went to court based on this case.

Corporation undertakes behaviour A, perfectly legal.

Corporation becomes a monopoly, same behaviour A is now no longer legal.

When you become a monopoly, many behaviours that you may have engaged in previously, or that other corporations currently engage in, become illegal for you to engage in now, but those other non-monopolies can continue to engage in those behaviours now forbidden to you.

So as a monopoly provider of phone operating systems, it is illegal for Google to pay handset makers to make Google search their default search. However, since say Microsoft, Yahoo and DuckDuckGo are not monopoly phone operating system providers, and also are not monopoly search providers, it would be perfectly legal for them to pay handset providers to set their search engines as default.

I'm not sure why people seem to have difficulty with this concept as it's brought up frequently whenever a company gets fined for anti-trust for doing what seems reasonable or that other companies are doing. It's perfectly straightforward: Once you become a monopoly the rules change, your behaviours become more constrained than when you aren't a monopoly.

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Google to build private trans-Atlantic cable from US to France

eldakka
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Re: Google braced for giant Android fine from EU

> so bypassing the UK was just a routing decision.

The Internet will route around damage...

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You wanna be an alpha... tester of The Register's redesign? Step this way

eldakka
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One of the issues with news websites is their seeming incapability to get away from old print-media paper styling.

For example, when you would walk into a newsagent, there'd be 10, 15, even 20 different newspapers lined up so that you could only see the top half, the above-the-fold part. You aren't allowed to touch them, to pick them up and read them, until you buy it. All laying there side by side so the customer can see at a glance all the competing newspapers with the story their publishers think is the most eye-catching.

It was even worse for magazines, there were literally hundreds of different magazines, all vying for optical space, eye-catching space so a customer would even be aware it existed, on the racks that they had to have splashy headlines, eye-catching images.

In that system, yes you needed an eye-catching above the fold headline and/or picture to in the first instance catch the eye, get enough of the customers attention that they'd even notice it existed, then to encourage someone to buy your paper over the other ones, take it home/work/park/cafe and then to read through the rest of it.

With websites, this is not the case. Sure, catchy headlines are still good, but you don't need to attract this initial "I see you" attention, because by going to the website you have already caught their attention before they've even seen your page layout or flashy images. You don't need to persuade someone to buy it over another site because by browsing to the site to see the front page the consumer has already, philosophically if not literally, "bought" your site and is reading it. They've already taken it home/work/park/cafe and are reading it.

Therefore the 'top stories', or visually eye-catching headlines, pictures, are just not necessary. I've already bought it, and already flipping through the pages (clicking links to stories), reading it.

As a consumer in this position, the only logical reason I can see for things like 'most read' stories, or 'top stories', is because there might be some specific reason you want those pages clicked over and above the customers interest in a story on a site they've already bought into. Is there extra advertising? Is it really an advertorial that the news site gets extra clickthroughs just from someone reading the story? What is the ulterior motive for flagging these stories when I can see all the stories, all the headlines, just by scrolling through and picking out the ones I want to read?

I am not saying this is why The Register does this, but since there is no need for it in todays online experience - it just doesn't work the same way as print media sitting in a newsagent sharing shelf space with everyone else - then suspicions are aroused as to why. Whether it's purely innocent ignorance: "this is how print media has always formatted their front pages, and we are just a digital version of them so we'll format using the same theories", or something more: "this is an advertorial that we make more mony from than other stories so let's try and get more clicks for it" it's still problematic styling.

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eldakka
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Re: Ok, maybe I understand now...

I agree with what you've said generally.

However, for recent 'older stories' - if that makes sense - try the /Week/ context, i.e.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/Week/

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eldakka
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Re: Small Steps

> If it filled my close-up 16:9 26" screen I would constantly be moving my head to cover the sides.

In which case you can reduce the size of your browser window to a width and height comfortable to you. You don't have to have the window full screen.

But, unfortunately, the reverse isn't true. There is a certain maximum size to the website, and if you do stretch your window beyond that size, it has no effect other than making empty whitespace around the page in the browser window.

All websites should expand - or shrink - to fit the width of the browser window. Whether it's 5-point font on a 100" wide window, or 20-point font on a 19" wide window, the website should fill from side-to side. It's why we have resizeable windows and use markup languages that reflow the text to the size of the current viewing area automatically as long as you don't explicitly limit it.

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eldakka
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Re: News Prioritization by Popularity not ideal.

The "most read" unit has a distinctive light grey background, in contrast with the white background used by the other stories, which at least right now are in chronological order.

This all points to the "most read" unit maybe needing a little further hint that it's really just those four stories... but IMVHO the background colour change should be enough.

Just my 2 cents on this section:

The grey background is very subtle, I didn't even notice that there was a grey background until this thread noted it (note that I think that that grey shade would actually be a better background for the entire site, not the bright white you currently use).

While the articles themselves might be 'in' the grey box, the headline "MOST READ" and the heavier grey horizontal next to it aren't in that grey box, they are on the main white background of the page. There is a roughly the same weight grey line at the bottom of the greyed background area that looks like it is part of the grey background zone, not a terminator to the "MOST READ" heading.

So what I see, how I comprehend it (prior to you explanation), is a new section headed "MOST READ", that includes within it (i.e. it is a component of "MOST READ", not the sole content of "MOST READ") a very subtly shaded grey area, and then continues on with more "MOST READ" content after it.

At the very least, the "MOST READ" heading and it's grey horizontal line need to be within the same 'box", with the same background grey, as those 4 articles.

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eldakka
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Re: Talk about make my laptop fan spin up !!

> My venerable Lenovo T420 normally is very silent, i used the Alpha site and after about 30 minutes, the fan was trying to make a cyclone. closed the tab and it went away... what sort of coding does this ?!?!?!?

Maybe they've got a crypto-miner running?

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eldakka
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Re: My Comments

Or what some sites have, a "top of page" link/floating(discrete!) button.

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Submarine cables at risk from sea water, boffins warn. Wait, what?

eldakka
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Re: Not really a big issue

They don't have to move it, just build retaining walls around the facility. There are only a limited number of relatively small facilities, it wouldn't cost much (in relative terms, especially compared to trying to move them entirely) to build up sea walls and, eventually, turn them into small islands.

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No, seriously, why are you holding your phone like that?

eldakka
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Re: Damn

> was testing the security of the meters to ensure only authorised users could access the specific data they are allowed, infact legislation was passed to define all this and protect consumers.

And that legislation is merely so much toilet paper to the security services and local councils trying to find out who it is not cleaning up their dogs poop when they take them for a walk. As they are all authorised users. Most 'authorised users' system authorise users, not uses of systems, therefore the cop who's authorised to use the system could look up info on their sisters best friends 3rd cousin's turd boyfriend to see what he's up to.

Oh, and when was the last time a hacker actually bothered to read the legislation, let alone get authorisation, first?

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Indictment bombshell: 'Kremlin intel agents' hacked, leaked Hillary's emails same day Trump asked Russia for help

eldakka
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Re: anonymous coward

> They really are not much of a threat. That's why the Germans are so unenthusiastic about spending money on defence. Against what?

Doesn't matter. It's still a case of the Germans wanting cake, just like many in the EU claim of the British with a soft brexit. NATO is a treaty, and part of that treaty says you will spend at least 2% on defence. End of story.

Germany are perfectly within their rights to say that they don't perceive any threat to them that justifies spending 2%, but not while staying in NATO as it exists today. Not spending 2% or more on defence is a case of wanting the mutual defence benefits of being in NATO, without paying your share.

They either need to meet their treaty obligations of 2%, or get the NATO treaty adjusted to a lower minimum spending, or leave NATO.

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FCC caught red-handed – again – over its $225 complaint billing plan

eldakka
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Re: America, oh, America

> America, oh, America

> Home of the vested* interest.

/em Looks at Inventor of the Marmite Laser, then looks at Boris Johnson, David Davis, looks back at Inventor of the Marmite Laser with a raised eyebrow.

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FBI for the Apple guy: Bloke accused of stealing robo-car tech

eldakka
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Wonder if there was some quid-pro-quo between Apple and the FBI for this investigation?

FBI: you know, we'd like to help you out, but with these un-crackable iPhones we don't have the resources to investigate this.

Apple: Well, you know if you plug a standard USB-2-lightning connector into the slot it'll bypass the lockout timer...

FBI: We're arresting Zhang for this industrial espionage...

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Brit privacy watchdog reports on political data harvests: We've read the lot so you don't have to

eldakka
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Re: Data sold to Experian, will it end up traded to Facebook?

Interesting stories from BBC about Emma's Diary and then the other stories linked to that on the whole data sharing situation, thanks for the link.

But one thing that piques my interest is I wonder if the selling of the data by the collectors like Emma's Diary is in breach of their own policies?

Experian is not a marketing company, it is a data broker, it does not use the data sold to them for marketing - it onsells it. So if the privacy policy says that they use the data for marketing, and fails to mention sales to data brokers, wouldn't that be a breach?

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