* Posts by eldakka

903 posts • joined 23 Feb 2011

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In Windows 10 Update land, nobody can hear you scream

eldakka
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Re: Last time

@Doctor Syntax

"when did ANYONE last use a CDROM?"

A few weeks ago. Debian or Devuan CD-ROM, boot up minimal installation disk, do a network install.

I do believe OP meant, but didn't explicitly say (perhaps being lazy), CDROM drive, as opposed to a CD R/W drive. And when's the last time anyone used a CD-only drive as opposed to a DVD-R/W drive or even, these days, a BluRay R/W drive?

Tho admittedly, at home, I have't had a working CD/DVD/BluRay drive for a decade.

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With sorry Soyuz stuffed, who's going to run NASA's space station taxi service now?

eldakka
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@Iain Thomson wrote:

SpaceX, Boeing running behind schedule, and don't get me started on SLS.

So, what's going on with the SLS?

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WebSphere and loathing in New York: IBM yanks buggy application server security fix from admins

eldakka
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Patched server, or working server. Pick one...

Well a non-working server is a secure server at least.

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Astroboffins discover when white and brown dwarfs mix, the results are rather explosive

eldakka
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Re: Cygnus, which is shaped like a swan

This is why we don't have time machines. Otherwise, we'd have people from the future coming back in time to give us an ear-bashing all day, every day.

I don't know, I think that'd be fun as long as I was the one doing the time-travel ear-bashing. I'd be like Bowerick Wowbagger the Infinitely Prolonged.

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UK.gov withdraws life support from flagship digital identity system

eldakka
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WTF?

"The days of creating different user names and passwords for every new website are numbered, thank goodness," promised GDS Maximum Leader Mike Bracken* in November 2011.

What's the difference between using a single username/password on a gateway/portal that fronts a dozen different services, vs creating accounts on each of those same dozen services but using the same username/password for each of those dozen accounts? Surely you get the same user experience (only having to remember one set of username/passwords) and same security( one username/password pair for access to a dozen services)? I'd suggest you'd have a superior user experience not using a portal, because in the single-portal version if you accidentally lock your account you've locked yourself out of a dozen services, whereas with the independent (but same credentials) version you'll still be able to use the other 11 services that you haven't locked.

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eldakka
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Re: It sucked lemons!

When you move home they can redirect your mail automatically to your new address at fairly low cost so I know it won't be a manual system. Anyhow, the scanner systems could record details of everything sent to every address and so a quick query of the database would reveal when your name started appearing on letters for your current home.

I frequently have mail addressed to me at locations not my current home. For example, when I moved out of my parents home, I didn't go around changing all my postal addresses with all the various companies, as I would have dinner at my parents at least once every month (if not weekly) for years after I moved out, so I could just pick up any mail then from entities who I hadn't bothered to update.

At one point when I was moving frequently (living in group houses etc.), I got a post office box and started using that for all my mail. Therefore for about a decade, through about 15 house moves, I had the same postal address, the PO Box.

Therefore any such automated system as you propose would not have any idea of when I moved house, only when I changed address, which could be years after I'd moved house.

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Don't make us pay compensation for employee data breach, Morrisons begs UK court

eldakka
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Re: I don't have any sympathy for Morrisons

Having being ordered by a court to pay, they should then have arranged a suitable non-disclosure settlement to keep it from bobbing up in the press.

Once you have been ordered by the court to pay, you no longer have the option of setting your own conditions (i.e. requiring a NDA). You can only do that before a court judgement is made and then having the case dismissed (or never lodging it in the first place) before said judgement is reached.

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Chinese Super Micro 'spy chip' story gets even more strange as everyone doubles down

eldakka
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China yes. What other country has the design and fabrication capability and the largest external spying organisation in the world, and I don't mean Russia?

The Federated States of Micronesia? You gotta watch those Micronesians!

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Chinese tech titans' share prices slump after THAT Super Micro story

eldakka
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Re: Yet another example of the need for security

Fabbing is not particular dirty,

While it doesn't produce much airborne pollution that would require the more traditional heavy industry signatures of smoke-stacks, it is still very dirty. It uses truckloads (literally) of highly toxic solvents and acids. Heavy metals. All which, if not handled and disposed of properly, can severely contaminate the factory and its surroundings.

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Decoding the Chinese Super Micro super spy-chip super-scandal: What do we know – and who is telling the truth?

eldakka
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Re: It is a matter of choice

Your choices are to be spied on in similar ways by the Americans, the Chinese, or by one of the other big players.

I'd rather be spied on by the foreigners. They are less likely to just wander into my home and arrest me and throw me into jail on trumped up charges.

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eldakka
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Re: Let's not go overboard with this.

As its been in the boards for a decade or so

Sure, if 3 years (2018-2015) fits into the "or so" part of "a decade".

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Day two – and Windows 10 October 2018 Update trips over Intel audio

eldakka
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Facepalm

Re: Cancel? Yeah, sure thing, buddy.

s/Cancel/F*** YOU/ <-- what MS needs to do for their 'cancel' button
that might not work too well.

Probably want 's/Cancel/F\*\*\* YOU/', or perhaps even better, 's/Cancel/FUCK YOU/' so you don't have to bother escaping the '*'.

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Windows 10 1809: Now arriving on a desktop near you (if you want it)

eldakka
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Re: "there isn’t a lot in it"

In any case, I'm no longer on the sidelines because my wife now has a work laptop with Windows 1 0 that I am desperately trying to find the way to properly lock down.

Is your wife self-employed, a contractor or similar? Otherwise, why is it your problem?

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Holy smokes! US watchdog sues Elon Musk after he makes hash of $420 Tesla tweet

eldakka
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Happy

Re: 5 minute recharge time

All electric cars have GPS and are connected to the internet,

*snip*

not all.

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Sync your teeth into power browser Vivaldi's largest update so far

eldakka
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FAIL

Re: Sync

@Red Eyes

Try https://start.me/

That is not a "local server" as far as I can tell. It is 3rd party service that hosts the bookmarks and other data online on their servers.

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'Men only' job ad posts land Facebook in boiling hot water with ACLU

eldakka
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Re: Companies probably aren't doing this to discriminate

If that is the case then why hasn't the ACLU gone after insurance companies for offering cheaper car insurance to women than men, or younger drivers than older ones? Just because they charge you based on your level of risk doesn't mean it isn't discrimination.....

Well, you see, there is this thing called the law.

Various laws are passed for various things. Some laws are passed that apply to specific industries, events, things, and so on. Sometimes there are laws that make it illegal for one person to do something - speed - but other people in other circumstances are allowed to do that - emergency services.

There are laws specific to the insurance industry that allow them to do that. The laws explicitly allow them to do that,

If the ACLU tried to sue insurance companies based on that, they'd be laughed out of court, since the law specifically allows them to do that.

However, there are laws specific to employment that prevent that same sort of discrimination. And it is this that the ACLU are bringing to court - employment discrimination.

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eldakka
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Re: Targeting peopel who are already truck drivers

@Doug

an owner on a tight budget probably considers it a waste of money to advertise both positions to both sexes.

The law in this matter doesn't care whether the owner thinks it is (or it in fact is) a waste of money of not.

It's a waste of money to properly dispose of the rubbish generated, therefore it's ok to just toss all the rubbish onto the street?

Is it so terrible to discriminate (without any intention to restrict the positions by sex) in ONE avenue of advertising, when others are equal?

There is an intention to discriminate by sex, it's right there in the options that the advertiser explicitly chose to select in the advert. Or are you saying the advertiser didn't explicitly select the option to target a specific sex? That Facebook did it automatically for them?

Any avenue of advertising that allows you to explicitly, with specificity target - for or against - a protected class is discriminatory. Sure, you could put ads up only in YMCA notice boards, which implicitly targets young men. But there is a difference between explicit and implicit. Explicit is definitely illegal, implicit you might be able to get away with.

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eldakka
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Re: Is it discrimination

@Bernard M. Orwell

I'm not quite sure what your point is. You say:

..Perhaps then you can explain these businesses and their hiring policy?..

...or, how about all these jobs that are advertised as female only? ..

Asking for an explanation why, but then you make your own sound conclusion:

And yes, these companies are breaking the law.

Yes, they are breaking the law. What's that got to do with this topic? The ACLU are suing Facebook for, potentially, breaking the law. They aren't suing those businesses you've listed.

What's the relevance that others are also breaking the law? How does that impact the ACLU's case against Facebook?

"Other people do it too" is not a defense in a court of law. "Other people do it too" doesn't make it right.

If you have problems with those companies practices, then you do something about it, you begin a lawsuit against them for discrimination.

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eldakka
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Thumb Up

Re: The language is wrong

@Jonathan Richards 1

A targeted indication of a job vacancy is not an advertisement. It's an invitation sent to a defined group. The degree of definition is the very essence of what makes FB et al. multi-billion dollar businesses.

That is a very interesting, and nuanced, take on the matter. Advertisement vs invitation.

I like it.

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eldakka
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@jmch

*or indoctrinated

By definition if you have been indoctrinated - as many religions do from an early age - then it is not a choice or a formed/informed opinion.

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eldakka
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Re: I think some people might have missed something...

I definitely see the tricky bit since in the same token I can see how targeting ads would equally qualify. It's entirely possible that I see more ads for a pickup truck and my wife sees more ads for an SUV but does it fall under equal opportunity?

It may be the same, but in that case if it was the same it doesn't mean what they are doing with the job ads is OK (because everyone else does it with other types of ads), it means that those other types of ads may also be in breach of the law.

However, I will note that I know that there are many laws explicitly around the labour market - hiring, discrimination, and so on - which may not exist around, say, retail product (or vehicle retail) sales.

Just because one could be legal doesn't mean the other is. it could also be perfectly plausible that one type of targeted advertising - for cars - could be perfectly legal while the same type of targeting advertising around specific categories, such as employment or housing, could be illegal.

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eldakka
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Re: Companies probably aren't doing this to discriminate

They are doing it to maximize their advertising dollar.

Whether that is the motivation or not behind it doesn't matter. You can't choose to disobey a law because following it would cost you more money. (Well, OK, you could, but you'll have to face the consequences of doing so if caught).

They need to find a way within the law that is the most cost-effective.

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eldakka
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Re: I think some people might have missed something...

@ratfox

That doesn't mean that when putting an ad for a job in the local newspaper, you need to also place an ad in every local newspaper in the country

Further to @Wellyboot's reply, I'll add:

But anyone can buy that local newspaper and see those ads. But in this case, people are buying the local paper, i.e. having a Facebook account, and are still being denied the ads.

So this is the same as on buying the local paper, the seller cutting out the ads based on the individual who is buying that copy of the paper.

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eldakka
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Re: The ACLU is only interested because it is Fac$book...

@forcing_you_to_think, no it's not about the size of the payout. It's about the scale of the problem.

One employer setting that policy for one job is an individual job/business problem. ACLU has limited resources.

However, this Facebook issue is a systemic issue that affects thousands of businesses, hundreds of thousands of jobs, and millions of people. At the low end! Quite likely an order of magnitude or even 2 worse. And it indicates a societal issue. It is more likely to set a viable, wide-ranging legal precedent than dealing with a single job.

You think that really compares to a single job affecting a few dozen people?

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eldakka
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Re: In the current environment, women are too much of a business risk..

@AC there is much in there that seems to be generalisations based on a specific personal experience that you had. While that may be true of your sister, generalising that out to all women is not only unfair but unsupported.

But I will respond specifically to these related points below:

...

* Are the overwhelming majority of sexual harassment complainants

* In manual labour jobs, get injured more seriously, more often

* Are the majority of OHS complainants

...

The ugly truth is that if you are running a small / medium business, even hiring one woman can completely sink your business, as they lodge any sort of sexual harassment claim, even if it's proven to be 100% false and malicious can set your business back anywhere from $50-$150K, just to resolve it.

Historically men have been conditioned to "suck it up", "don't cry", "put up with it", "be a man and stop complaining", "it's but a mere flesh wound", "It's only a scratch, keep working", "bottle up your emotions", "that's just the way it's done", and so on.

Women, again historically, were taught to be more open with their emotions, to be "delicate little wallflowers", and so on.

Therefore the mismatch in actual reporting of issues, injuries (OHS), harassment, and so on, is more aligned with that mindset where the men just don't complain, be tough and soldier on, but the women say - rightly IMO - "that's not right, it is an issue and I'm reporting it".

To me, the women are leading here, men should be reporting when they are the targets of sexual harassment, or injuries at work, or unsafe conditions.

So I think the dichotomy here is not that these things happen less to men, it is that the men are less willing to admit it, to talk about it, to report it, to see it as a problem and not just acceptable work culture, than the women are. And this is wrong, the men should be just as willing to report these issues as the women rather than just sucking it up and "being a man". In my mind, you are a better man, being "a man" by having the guts to report issues rather than allowing them to be swept under the carpet, rather than accepting that that is the work culture.

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eldakka
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Re: In the current environment, women are too much of a business risk..

Yeah, how dare women complain more than men about sexual harassment.

I also noticed, it's always the Jews who complain about antisemitism.

I'm not sure what you are trying to say here, because I'm hoping you aren't meaning how I am reading it.

Since Jews are the only ones who can experience antisemitism, be the target of it, as that's what it means, being anti-Jewish, then comparing that to your leading sentence implies to me that you are saying only women can experience sexual harassment. Which I wholeheartedly disagree with. Men can be, and are, a target of sexual harassment also.

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eldakka
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Unhappy

Re: Equality in advertising

The equivalent would be that during the ad break in Scrapheap Challenge her TV detected the fact she is of the vagina'd half of the population and replaced the Navy ad with one for makeup or shoes or something vagina-bearers are supposed to be interested in.

With always-connected smart-TVs with embedded cameras, like for example where MS tried (and failed) to make an always-online kinect-enabled XBox One compulsory, I fear this is where we are headed.

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Garbage collection – in SPAAACE: Net snaffles junk in first step to clean up Earth's orbiting litter

eldakka
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Thumb Up

And we're on our way to the sanitation ships of the United Galaxy Sanitation NGO.

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First Boeing 777 (aged 24) makes its last flight – to a museum

eldakka
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Re: Fatal hull loss is more accurate

I believe, and I've used it as an example in Human Factors training a few times, one stewardess was killed when her seat departed the aircraft. Two passengers departed the aircraft because they weren't strapped in*, one of whom only actually died after a fire truck drove over her. The second time.

Wow, that sounds more like a skit from a satire like Airplane!

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Euro bureaucrats tie up .eu in red tape to stop Brexit Brits snatching back their web domains

eldakka
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Not sure why your brought up the .us rules since they are much more liberal then the .eu rules and show how silly the .eu rules are.

Because it shows that the principle of having citizenship/location/relevance requirements is not unique to just the new .eu domain rules.

It is a difference of degree, not kind. Whereas the article and many comments are implying if not outright saying that having any restrictions around location, citizenship etc. is malicious and aimed to 'punish' the UK.

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eldakka
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That would be because .com is international. Americans have access to .us domains though, here's the 123-reg FAQ on who can register .us domains. Note how you must be a citizen of the US or have a business presence in the US.

And similar for .au domains:

https://www.domainregistration.com.au/infocentre/info-center-qd3.php

This decision over .eu doesn't seem to be particularly unique.

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eldakka
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Re: Couldn't have said it better myself

Its full of job justifiers, desparate to appear like they are doing something. Building little enclaves and empires, expanding remits, etc. It's like a large conglomerate or multinational, only 100x worse.

Plus all the paid lobbyists giving away free meals (star of restaurant and meal time defining how important you are), peddling influence in a huge circle jerk.

How is the different to any other human endeavour that involves more than one person?

Self-serving, empire-building bureaucracies exist at all levels, national, state/provincial/county, city, district, town, school, social clubs, political parties, marriages, sports clubs, friend circles, business circles, companies, small-businesses, non-profits, NGOs, religious organisations. Everything.

It only ever seems bad when it's not your empire, not your group, that is in control.

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US govt confirms FCC's broadband speeds and feeds stats are garbage

eldakka
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"Overstatements of access limit FCC’s and tribal stakeholders’ abilities to target broadband funding to such areas. For example, some tribal officials stated that inaccurate data have affected their ability to plan their own broadband networks and obtain funding to address broadband gaps on their lands."

So, working as intended then?

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Nope, the NSA isn't sitting in front of a supercomputer hooked up to a terrorist’s hard drive

eldakka
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Re: Clipper ? - Intel ME

The question is, why did they start putting it in all their consumer kit as well?

One word (well, technically, acronymn not word): DRM.

The UHD Bluray standard (including UHD i.e. 4k stuff streamed in browsers or apps, e.g. Netflix) mandates a secure encryption path through the system. A path a user (i.e. owner of the computer) cannot access, so that they can't bypass HDCP 2.x encryption on video. This is implemented via Intel's IME or AMD's PSP.

Without such secure (supposedly), controlling enclaves to prevent the computer's actual owner from accessing the content, then the computer can't access (or be the streaming conduit for) commercial UHD content.

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Make BGP great again, er, no, for the first time: NIST backs internet route security brainwave

eldakka
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Coat

Cisco, Juniper Networks, Palo Alto Networks, AT&T, CenturyLink, Comcast, and the George Washington University in the US helped NIST prepare the paperwork.

You left out: NSA.

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Benchmark smartphone drama: We wouldn't call it cheating, says Huawei, but look, everyone's at it

eldakka
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Re: VW

I’m all in favour of a doped up sports league.

Let's expand on this a bit further.

In addition to general sports-enhancing drugs (steroids etc.), let's also allow categories for recreational drugs.

Let's see the 100m sprint with those high on weed, vs those on cocaine, vs meth, vs LSD, etc.

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Google skewered in ad sting after Oracle-backed bods turn troll

eldakka
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Re: Meanwhile Google/Alphabet top executives refused to appear in front of Congress....

.... evidently they now believe they are a sovereign state, making their own rules.

In a free(*) country, the legislature and government cannot just order people around generally, and people are not required to follow said orders unless those orders have a legal basis behind them. There is no rule that says if congress 'orders' an appearance, you are required to attend, unless it is accompanied by a subpoena/warrant.

Congress can issue such a subpoena, but unless they do so there is no rule that says you must attend. And so far such a subpoena has not been issued compelling attendance. So far congress has only made non-binding, non-compelling, non-legally enforceable requests for an appearance. Therefore Google/Alphabet hasn't broken any rules or made up any of their own with respect to this particular circumstance.

I mean, it is impolite, and bad form to not attend. And could lead to legislative consequences down the road such as the snubbed/offended congresscritters giving bad publicity or influencing their votes on legislation impacting those no-shows.

(*) assuming said country is indeed a free country.

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eldakka
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Joke

Re: Conflicted

Google vs Oracle - I am conflicted - a plague on both their houses!

Maybe we could persuade them to get married? And have a Red Wedding?

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Archive.org's Wayback Machine is legit legal evidence, US appeals court judges rule

eldakka
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I agree but at least with normal evidence there are at least some safe guards, what do you have with this? It's not like you can cross check against something else.

Well, first of all, if the defense are suspicious, they could subpoena the Way Back Machine for their logs regarding that particular archive website, e.g. file modification dates, backups, logins to the system, and so on to see if after the initial 'scrape' of the site was changed later in the saved version of the site they have.

The defense can also introduce their own rebuttal evidence, e.g. the accused still has their own copy of the site from the same time, and it is different from the Way Back Machines.

And like every other piece of evidence, there needs to be someone to 'vouch' for it. This can be in the form of eyewitnesses or expert witnesses.

e.g. CCTV footage of a crime can't be admitted unless the admitting party can prove its provenance, i.e. "My name is Joe Blogs, and this is the video tape I took from my shops security system minutes after the incident. The timestamps displayed are accurate, it is a security system with only one camera attached to it, and it was functioning normally at the time of the incident, and between removing it from the recording machine and handing it to the police, no-one else but me has touched it and it has not been tampered with."

Substitute the Way Back Machine for CCTV system, and Joe Blogs the shop owner with various system admins/management at the Way Back Machine.

That is how all evidence works. Someone presents evidence, attests to it, and then it is up to the other side - or the judge - to present reasons why it can't be accepted. That is the whole point of rebuttal testimony, cross-examination, character examinations and so on. When a defense attorney asks Joe Blogs from my example above seemingly irrelevant questions like whether he is having an affair, or is a closet homosexual, or has a police record, or about his taxes, he is trying to cast doubt in the minds of the judge and/or jury about how reliable this person is, and maybe you shouldn't believe anything he says about the submitted CCTV evidence because he is a known liar, etc.

Exactly the same process will apply to the Way Back Machine, the opposing counsel has the opportunity to examine the providence of the evidence, and can bring in their own expert witnesses to cast doubt on the evidence, to show, reasonably, that it could have been tampered with.

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eldakka
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Re: snapshot versus screenshot of snapshot

how do you establish that a screenshot of said archive is legit? Even if the site itself is legally sound, a screenshot seems highly dubious...

Because when evidence is presented, then it is usually taken at face value unless there is some reason to doubt it.

If the lawyer presenting the screenshot says: "I took this screenshot last week, and it shows..." then unless there is some articulable reason for not believing the lawyer, then it is taken to be the case.

That's how the whole chain of custody works. SOCO says "I found blood sample A at scene of crime, and sealed it into evidence bag 234a3dsa, and placed it into storage container 1234 that was sealed on completion of gathering evidence at the crime scene."

Then Constable Fred says "I unsealed storage container 1234, took sealed evidence bag 234a3dsa from it, and delivered it to Bob at the lab."

Bob then says "I received sealed evidence bag 234a3dsa from Constable Fred and gave it to lab technician Jones."

Lab technician Jones says "I received sealed evidence bag 234a3dsa from Bob, unsealed it, and performed DNA tests per standard procedure XYZ, and these are the results of that test".

Every step of that chain depends on believing the person who made those declarations. To cast doubt on that evidence, then it is up to the person trying to cast doubt on articulating that doubt and presenting evidence themselves to back up their claims.

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eldakka
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Anyone could go on internet archives website and either bribe or threaten someone to make changes.

And how is that different to any other form of evidence?

Eye witnesses can be tampered with.

Expert witnesses can be tampered with.

SOCO's can be interfered with to add/delete/substitute crime-scene evidence.

Evidence in storage can be tampered with.

Judges can be tampered with.

Jurors can be tampered with.

That's why, generally speaking, a suite of evidence is needed (although there might be a single piece that is more persuasive than any others) to convict someone.

This and that and that and that and that all point to me having eaten the cake.

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Strewth! Aussie ISP gets eye-watering IPv4 bill, shifts to IPv6 addresses

eldakka
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Re: Finally?

as they are simply reselling TPG service there.

As Internode is a subsidary of TPG (TPG bought iinet in 2015 who had previously bought Internode in 2011), is that really surprising?

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Linux 4.19 lets you declare your trust in AMD, IBM and Intel

eldakka
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Re: People trust that?

"Because if you can't trust the CPU's RNG, you can't trust ANY RNG."

I don't follow that logic. Can you explain?

Because any other source of RNG would have to be accessed via a communications interface in the same computer that has a compromised CPU RNG. The PCIe, USB, thunderbolt, serial, parallel, PS/2, or any other communications interface is controlled by the same source as the CPU. Therefore if the manufacturer of the CPU is going to compromise the CPU's RNG, they are full capable of intercepting, and modifying, any other data traffic in in the computer.

That hardware RNG you plugged into the USB port? Pity the number being used in the encryption software running on the CPU isn't the one from that USB attached RNG, as the CPU substituted the RNG from the USB port with its own dodgy RNG.

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VMware 'pressured' hotel to shut down tech event close to VMworld, IGEL sues resort giant

eldakka
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Re: Not just IT

I thought the goal was to "serve and protect" the public, not serve as the hotel PR office's goons.

Not in the US, no.

The Police Have No Obligation To Protect You. Yes, Really.

Justices Rule Police Do Not Have a Constitutional Duty to Protect Someone

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HTC U12 Life: Notchless, reasonably priced and proper buttons? Oh joy

eldakka
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Re: Midrange? Where is the savings?

That's a HTC U12+ (plus) at $850.

Amazon.com doesn't yet list the U12 Life, which is what this hands on is about.

And just for comparison, it lists the U11 as 650 with the U11 Life at 380. So the Life branding is a lower end of the Uxx branding.

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No D'oh! DNS-over-HTTPS passes Mozilla performance test

eldakka
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Missed edit window after thinking about this a bit more...

If you are on satellite you probably don't want your own recursive resolver, as that means it'll do the heavy lifting of following the DNS tree until it gets the answer, which means rather than sending one request-response, it'll be sending multiple as it traverses the tree.

So you'd want a I guess a cacheing forwarder (?) for the network, so it receives all requests from anyone on your local network, forwards the request to one of the DoH DNS servers to let them 'walk the tree' and respond with the final resolution, so you do send a single request-response. However, your local forwarder caches the results of the DNS lookup, so next time any device on the local network needs that same address, it returns it from the local forwarder (if within the cache TTL) rather than going out to the external DNS server.

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eldakka
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Set up your own local recursive DNS resolver, point to it.

Have it use DoH in its recursive resolution. It can cache the results of DNS lookups. So if you've looked up a site you've looked up before within its cache timeout, it never leaves your network to do the resolution, instead pulling it out of its cache.

If you are on satellite, I'm surprised you aren't already doing this with standard DNS.

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Chinese hotel chain warns of massive customer data theft

eldakka
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You ever hear of this thing called 'a joke', the sort of thing implied by the hat-and-coat icon?

Many people imply, if not outright accuse, so many Chinese companies of being an extension of the Chinese government - Huawei, ZTE, etc. that I was tongue in cheek playing on that concept.

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eldakka
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Coat

I guess this means that a Chinese government system was hacked?

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Big Baboon ain't gibbon up: SAP, HP accused of aping software squirt's e-commerce patent

eldakka
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The plaintiff alleged that the version of R/3 that predated the '275 patent lacked the web functionality described in claim 15 – and that "at some point in 1997 or thereafter, the web-enabled R/3 system was made and sold by SAP which included web-enabled or disabled software modules".

So prior to the .com boom, companies software wasn't web-enabled. And during said .com boom it became web-enabled? *Gasp* Say it ain't so!

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