* Posts by DougS

10981 posts • joined 12 Feb 2011

Google keeps tracking you even when you specifically tell it not to: Maps, Search won't take no for an answer

DougS
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Re: Firefox and DuckDuckGo

Why should I be worried about Yahoo collecting data on me? Comparing that to Google collecting data on me is like the difference between putting your SSN and credit card number on a flyer on the windshield of every car at a football game attended by tens of thousands of people, and putting your SSN and credit card number on a single sheet of paper and posting it on the underside of a dumpster behind a McDonalds in Yakima, Washington.

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Where is this setting for "location history" they are talking about

Is this something you set when you login to Google? The only setting for the Google Search app regarding location on my iPhone is to allow it to access my location "always", "while using app", or "never" which is the one I've got set.

There's no setting for "location history", and if that's a setting on your Google account somewhere it makes sense that I'm not familiar with it - I pretty much never login to Google - if I have to I use a private window/tab. Same treatment I give Amazon!

Unless Google has found and is exploiting some sort of iOS bug, it doesn't matter what setting my Google account has, Google is not going to get my location info off my iPhone.

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Samsung Galaxy Note 9: A steep price to pay

DougS
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Re: Bezels

No bezels means it's even more glued up and therefore more difficult to fix.

Not true, at least not in the case of the iPhone X. iFixit gives it a repairability rating of 6, the same as the fully bezeled iPhone 8. The past five generations of iPhones all had a score of 7. The reason last year's models went from 7 to 6 was the glass back, which was included to support wireless charging. Apparently on either one replacing the back glass is a major endeavor. Replacing the front glass, or battery, on the iPhone X is no more difficult than on the previous half decade of iPhones, something most Reg readers could easily accomplish.

The Galaxy S9 and Note 8 have a score of 4, but they have a bezel on the top/bottom. Same as the S6, which has "traditional" top/side bezels with no wraparound screen or anything. I see no evidence that lacking a bezel makes a phone harder to repair. Shouldn't the Galaxy S6 score a lot higher if that were true? Shouldn't the iPhone X have a lower score than the iPhone 8 if that were true?

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DougS
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Re: Bezels

Because you get more screen.

What's your problem with phones without a bezel that "made you wish you had them"? I sure haven't wished for bezels on my iPhone X. There's just enough 'bezel' or inactive area or whatever you want to call it on the edges that you can hold it, and even if your fingers curl around the touch the screen you don't get false touches.

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Google Spectre whizz kicked out of Caesars, blocked from DEF CON over hack 'attack' tweet

DougS
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Re: Hum

And how is the hotel going to know your Twitter handle is Justicesays, since I'm assuming that's not your real name? It isn't like most people use their real name on Twitter, or if they do that the hotel would have any way to link their real name to one of the many accounts with the same real name.

Besides, if they searched on "break the bank" they'd probably have dozens of hits a day. Everyone always makes some smart ass comment like that when they post in social media about going to Vegas.

Sorry, there just isn't any way for them to link social media to real life, unless they decided to act like US Immigration and required people to turn over a list of their social media accounts (and passwords, in case their posts threatening to count cards weren't public)

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DougS
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Re: Hum

I doubt anyone at the hotel was monitoring all the guests Twitter accounts, but the FBI probably was. Though IMHO more likely in a conference this size there are a few people who don't like this guy for whatever reason, saw his tweet, and anonymously reported it to the hotel as a threat to cause trouble for him.

Could be anything, maybe he stole the girl someone was talking to in the bar the previous night, professional jealousy at his recent success, or maybe he's just an asshole in person and disliked by many for perfectly understandable reasons.

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You won't believe this but... everyone hates their cable company: Bombshell study lands

DougS
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Re: "Broadcast TV fee" has not existed for decades

There's help on the way for reception problems. At least in theory. ATSC 3.0 uses a different modulation which nearly eliminates multipath as an issue, so having multiple transmitters on the same frequency in different directions works just fine. Thus ATSC 3.0 supports the concept of "single frequency networks" or SFNs, which allow TV stations to add a bunch of smaller transmitters throughout their footprint to fill in areas where people have bad reception (like if they live in a canyon or the wrong side of a mountain)

They can be pretty small, so theoretically they could rent out some space on the tallest cell tower in a city and cover that whole city and surrounding area.

The question is whether stations will want to make the investment for this to happen. If this causes viewers who are currently paying for cable/satellite (and thus paying the station) to cut the cord and pick up the station for free with an antenna, it'll cost them money! So it isn't clear to me that we will actually see SFNs or not.

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DougS
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"Broadcast TV fee" has not existed for decades

Not sure where the author got that ridiculous claim from. It is a fairly recent phenomena, and until five years ago was less than a buck so it wasn't even worth itemizing. But local stations have been jacking up the price they ask cable/satellite companies to carry them by 200-300% every time they come up for renewal.

Not because they are greedy, but because the networks charge them more to carry their programming. A lot of that is because they pay a ton of money for the sports they carry, especially the NFL.

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Yay for me!

I have a bottom five ISP and a bottom five cable company - and they're two different companies! Though actually I don't have too much to complain about with my internet service from Centurylink. True, it isn't hundreds of megabits like cable service but I always get max speed and it almost never goes out, but for the price I pay I should get faster speeds.

The internet service from Mediacom may offer faster speeds, but it slows down a lot during the evenings and goes out for hours on a regular basis. Plus they don't offer static IPs, and Centurylink does. There's a fiber ISP expanding into my city, can't wait to have the chance to check that out!

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Clap, damn you, clap! Samsung's Bixby 2.0 AI reveal is met with apathy

DougS
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Re: Who's this "us" you're talking about?

Apple did the notch because it was necessary - they have a bunch of stuff that needs to be on the front face of the phone, so they can either have a big bezel on top with wasted space on either side, or they can put some screen so the space isn't wasted.

Other phone makers have similar issues, even if they don't have as much hardware up there as Apple does they still have some stuff that has to be on the front of the phone. People have been talking about "big ugly bezels" for years and lusting after concept designs that were all screen. Well too bad, all screen designs just aren't possible today, so the notch is as close as you can come. Maybe some of them were aping Apple, but some of them simply reached the same answer to the same problem that Apple did.

Some Android phones with a notch let you disable it, which gives you the big bezel you apparently would prefer to have instead of the notch. So I don't see why you would complain, when you can have what you want with a simple configuration change!

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DougS
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Re: Who's this "us" you're talking about?

Yes, it is clear. You don't think companies playing in billion dollar markets do market research? There are many Android OEMs, and they are all competing for the same customers. If there was a way for them to tap into a huge new market by offering a different product, they would!

It is the same way you know there is not a huge demand for pink cars, because very few carmakers offer any models in pink. If that became a thing, you'd see major brands begin offering cars in pink.

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Who the hell would want an easily accidentally activated external button to control the flashlight? If you need one so often you want a hardware button on the outside of the phone to turn it on, maybe you should carry an actual flashlight with you...

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Who's this "us" you're talking about?

Oh, you mean the 2% of people who are techies and read sites like the Register or Anandtech or whatever and are the only ones asking for those features. Sorry, but the average consumer does not care about "vanilla Android" or partitioning an SD card, or a replaceable battery. If they did, someone would be selling phones like that and cleaning up.

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Re: "Do not want" is not strong enough.

Huawei are snapping at their heels because the native brands are taking over China. Samsung used to have really good market share there, but they've been losing out to their Android rivals. Sure, sales of the S9 are down from previous Galaxy models, but it isn't like other Android OEMs have been selling more flagships to pick up the slack. There are just fewer higher priced Android phones getting sold because lower priced ones are a lot closer than they were a few years ago.

If you buy Android today, you get very little extra paying $1000 versus paying $300-$400. At least with Apple, the difference between the SE and the X is pretty obvious so they don't have to worry about cannibalizing their own high end too much - but more importantly as far as Apple is concerned, if you want an iPhone/iOS you have only one source so they don't have to worry about competition nearly as much as Samsung does.

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Phased out: IT architect plugs hole in clean-freak admin's wiring design

DougS
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Re: Don't get me started on Architects who know best...

What would have stopped the other drainpipe from getting clogged up? No one noticed the first until water came inside the building, if it was draining down the other pipe they wouldn't know until it too became clogged.

It would probably be better as a backup to have an open pipe that drains off the roof directly over the front entrance. Then you'd be SURE to notice the first pipe had clogged up, and get it fixed right away!

Ought to be easy for an architect to hide a six inch section of open pipe sticking around with some trim detail, or the open mouth of a gargoyle if he wanted to go gothic.

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DougS
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Re: Is that legal now?

Yes, we have the exact same thing but they are called ground fault circuit interrupters here, or GFCIs for short. They are required by code anywhere water may be present, like kitchens, bathrooms, patios, etc.

There are also arc fault circuit interrupters or AFCIs which are a bit newer which detect arcs (but somehow distinguish between a non-problem arc like in the normal operation of a switch and one that could cause a fire) They are required by code in bedrooms.

To my knowledge there aren't any GFCIs or AFCIs for multi phase circuits (i.e. hot/hot/ground 208v or hot/hot/hot/ground three phase 208v)

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DougS
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Re: Is that legal now?

Ah, so it is a rule that predates grounded receptacles. That's presumably why server rooms are exempt, along with anywhere else that's up to modern code.

The business I own has three phase power, and the panels are wired in sequence on each side - i.e. from top to bottom breakers use phase 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, etc. (standard US 120v, along with a few things that use "two phase" 208v, and rooftop HVAC units that use three phase 208v) so I've got multiple phases in the same room all over. I have three meters for different sections of the building, and each meter is fed by a separate utility phase.

Since the main/middle section has almost outgrown the two panels that serve it, some later additions were wired from the single panels in adjacent sections. Once in a while the utility will have an outage that drops only one phase, so you get this seemingly random mismash of things that lose power and things that don't - i.e. one 'single panel' section will lose all power, plus a few things here and there in the main section, or most but not all of the main section will lose power. The first time it happened I had no clue what was going on, I thought the building was possessed! :)

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DougS
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Re: Is that legal now?

What would be the reason for wanting all the receptacles in a room on the same phase?? Electrical/fire code almost always has some basis in safety, even if a pretty theoretical concern...not sure what safety would be compromised by having outlets on two different phases.

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DougS
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Re: get out quick

I found out (by trying to cut a wire and getting a flash and loud bang for my trouble) that the overhead lights in my mom's kitchen are powered by TWO breakers. There is a switch in the kitchen, but a second switch in the dining room. Turning either one on will power the lights, and the breakers are wired to the switch not the fixture!

I'm not really sure if that's against the electric code, but IMHO it sure as hell ought to be! Of course I was using insulated snips to cut it, knowing it might be live since the breaker box was unmarked and "flipping breakers until everything in the kitchen was off, so I could probably assume the non-functional overhead lights were also off" was not a 100% safe strategy. I probably should have turned the main off, but then I wouldn't have discovered how stupidly wired her house was!

I wonder how common this sort of thing is? It was built in the late 70s, maybe that was considered OK then.

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Talk about left Field: Apple lures back Tesla engineering guru

DougS
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Re: Cue Elon Musk

Yeah from the looks of things, working for Musk combines the worst parts of working for Steve Jobs (screaming, abuse, impossible deadlines) and Donald Trump (bizarre public statements and tweets, persecution complex)

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DougS
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Re: Cue Elon Musk

Apple started work on the iPad in 2002, but knew it would be years before it could be manufactured at a reasonable price for the quality they wanted so they changed directions to do a phone first. It took five years from the start of that to the iPhone seeing the light of day, eight for the iPad.

So forgive me if I cut them a little slack on seeing something come of this. Tesla is still years away from an autonomous car, as is everyone else, so it isn't like Apple is losing any ground in a market that doesn't exist. Unlike Tesla, they have no interest in selling an ordinary human driven electric car, so no one is going to see what they're doing until it is VERY close.

The rumors go back and forth about Apple, first they were doing a car, then they were doing a 'platform', now they are doing a car again. Apple is a company that sells hardware, they don't license their stuff to run on someone else's hardware, so personally I think they will do a car.

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DougS
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Cue Elon Musk

Claiming the guy was let go rather than quit. He's said that before when engineers leave Tesla for other companies with self-driving ambitions, like Apple, Google, Uber, etc.

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Australia on the cusp of showing the world how to break encryption

DougS
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On the contrary, they love progress

That's what has enabled them to conduct mass spying on millions of communications simultaneously for decades. They just don't like that progress has continued, and they are losing that ability they became used to - which had caused them to mostly forget older methods they used before they could listen in everything at once.

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What do a meth, coke, molly, heroin stash and Vegas allegedly have in common? Broadcom cofounder Henry Nicolas

DougS
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Re: Another affluenza victim, shirley.

The Trump connection is because a growing number of former campaign or administration staffers are being convicted of various crimes, as Mueller slowly works his way up to the top.

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Hackers can cook you alive using 'microwave oven' sat-comms – claim

DougS
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Re: Risk to people?

Which was several times the classified distance the associated missile could fly for some reason.

Makes perfect sense to me. That gives command time to be made aware of the fighter sized contact, determine its FoF status, and make the decision whether or not to fire upon it before it reaches missile range.

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DougS
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Re: RF OOps

Probably a bigger risk to point the antenna at electronics (assuming that's even possible) that operate the plane/ship/etc. rather than trying to kill someone with <scarequote>radiation</scarequote>, which is definitely impossible unless someone was somehow sitting outside the metal skin of the airplane. Then you kill everyone (airplane) or inconvenience everyone (cruise ship)

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DougS
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Re: Still smells of researcher hype

Yes, unless they have demonstrated a proof of concept attack that can take place in the real world, this is all just mental masturbation. Do we even know for sure these guys have ever worked with SATCOM hardware, or are they just reading manuals they downloaded off the web and thinking "wow, the default settings aren't safe, I'm going to assume everyone is vulnerable and any safety protections can be magically overridden".

Not saying they're wrong, just that they don't seem to provide any support for their claims.

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NVMe? Well, quite. Now Intel, too, is pumping out consumer QLC SSDs

DougS
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Re: My understand is there's not an "SLC write cache"

Well yes, where "cliff" = "still orders of magnitude faster than any hard drive, and competitive with SSDs from just a few years ago". How fast do you need your SSD to be? Most people could use one of those Intel 320 series SSDs from almost a decade ago - which I still do as boot & /home - and not notice if they got the 10x or more speedup possible from the latest and greatest.

If you regularly copy multi gigabyte files, or run an Oracle DB for fun, then yeah you probably want to make sure you don't run into the 88% slowdown.

As for "better off with a smaller or more expensive drive with a proper SLC write cache"...you already have that with this Intel one. You want one that's smaller, use only half its capacity (by leaving half unpartitioned) and you're fine, or you could buy one of Intel's that's twice the size for presumably twice the price, and again use half of it. The nice thing about using half of a drive is that you have some spare storage in case you ever need it in a pinch, something you don't have if you buy a smaller or more expensive one and use its full capacity.

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DougS
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My understand is there's not an "SLC write cache"

Instead it uses some of the QLC as SLC when there's free space, until it gets to something like 60% full. So if you choose to use only half the device, it will be VERY fast for writes thanks to the SLC write cache. If it fill it up, it loses that advantage and is up to 88% slower. Pretty clever, and a good compromise between price and performance.

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Say what you will about self-driving cars – the security is looking 'OK'

DougS
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Re: "Know where every tree, curb and stop sign is"

It doesn't all change at once, though.

Sure it does. Never have road construction where you live?

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DougS
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Facepalm

"Know where every tree, curb and stop sign is"

Good thing none of that ever changes then.

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Space, the final Trump-tier: America to beam up $8bn for Space Force

DougS
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Re: Which is worse ...

It is almost like Trump is trolling us. The "Space Force" name is stupid enough, but you gotta be kidding me with those logos.

One can only hope he's impeached before Space Force is actually formalized, because once it is there's no hope of ever getting rid of it even though no one other than Trump really wants it. We ought to be reducing the branches, not adding to them. There's no reason for the Air Force to exist, when all the other branches already have their own air wings. The Coast Guard shouldn't be a service branch, they should be lumped in with Customs, INS, etc. under "Homeland Security" (another terrible name that we're unfortunately stuck with) and the Marines arguably are simply a cross between the Army and Navy...

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DougS
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"Budgets cut" ???

You obviously aren't familiar with how the DoD budgeting process goes. They will get $8 billion extra. In fact, they'll probably get $18 billion extra, with the excess $10 billion distributed to the other branches to soothe any hurt feelings.

Then they'll ask for $50 billion to build the Hexagon, because clearly six branches don't fit in the Pentagon... BTW, I got that price by taking the $5 billion Apple's spaceship reportedly cost, and then multiplying by 10 as per standard defense contracting procedure.

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The last phablet? 6.4in Samsung Galaxy Note 9 leaves you $1k lighter, needs 'water cooling'

DougS
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Water cooling

Without a fan to get the heat out of the device, what's the point? I guess if the SoC was a hot spot that will distribute the heat more evenly, but the glass in the all glass designs typical today for wireless charging tends to work against letting the heat out.

The overall limit of how much power a cell phone can use isn't going to be affected by this - no one wants a phone that feels hot in their hands, or against their head. Especially not a Galaxy Note, given what happened to the one a couple years ago...

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Oh, fore putt's sake: Golf org PGA bunkered up by ransomware attack just days before tournament

DougS
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Re: What a bunch of ...

Not that I buy that researcher's conclusion, but I don't think golf (especially as played here in the US, where most people ride a cart) is exercise on the same level as running or lifting weights.

And yeah, people should play faster - unfortunately too many take their cues from what they see on tour. It makes sense the pros play slow, when one stroke over 72 holes can mean hundreds of thousands of dollars difference in your pocket! I think playing in two hours might be asking a bit much though unless you are playing alone and walking fast. Most people would probably take 90 minutes to walk four miles carrying a bag or pulling a cart, and 'four miles' assumes you hit the ball straight all the time (I've had days where I probably walked six :)) That leaves only 30 minutes for actual shots, criss crossing the green, etc.

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If for some reason you're still using TKIP crypto on your Wi-Fi, ditch it – Linux, Android world bug collides with it

DougS
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WPA3 won't fix it, but it will sure help

Not only will it fix the known attack on WPA2, it will encrypt passwordless wifi as well as passworded.

You should still make sure something secure like HTTPS or a VPN is in use if you are connecting to anything where you wouldn't want the traffic sniffed - but that's already true for most things. You'd have to work hard in 2018 to find webmail, online shopping etc. where you can enter a password or credit card number in the clear.

Think of it this way - everything that's in the clear on a passwordless wifi today is in the clear when you are sitting at home once it leaves your ISP. The odds of getting sniffed at internet exchange points by the NSA or GCHQ is probably 1000x greater than getting sniffed by someone sniffing your wifi in the coffee shop. Worry about the right things!

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Bank on it: It's either legal to port-scan someone without consent or it's not, fumes researcher

DougS
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So put up a warning

WARNING: Connecting to this page will result in a network scan of your computer/phone, clicking Accept indicates consent to this.

Then set a cookie after you've consented, begin the scan, and do it silently on future visits thanks to that cookie (or every time if you have your browser set to not remember cookies)

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Motorola strap-on packs a 2,000mAh battery to appease the 5G gods

DougS
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Re: Shannon

5G doesn't get you any closer to the Shannon limit. It has the same maximum bits/Hz as the most recent version of LTE, so it isn't making more efficient use of spectrum at all. The only advantage over LTE it has is reduced latency - which is a good thing, but it isn't getting you any more bandwidth.

The promises of huge bandwidth from 5G come from all the new spectrum that is being opened up for it on higher frequencies, as high as 39 GHz. AFAIK there's no reason LTE couldn't use those higher frequencies, but since those high frequencies are much less useful for voice (you'd constantly lose connection while walking as you passed a tree or building) it makes sense to dedicate them to 5G with its advantage of reduced latency.

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DougS
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I wonder what the pricing is

How much sense can it make to spend a couple hundred bucks (likely) to upgrade an outdated phone? They're just doing this for publicity for this ridiculous 'mods', and to claim 'First!' to 5G. Not that there are any 5G base stations for it to connect to yet...

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DougS
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The extra power is necessary for 5G

Very likely its mostly because first generation 5G chips promise to be extremely power hungry and run very hot. Just like first generation LTE chips did, and like first generation 3G chips did...

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NAND we'll send foreign tech packing, says China of Xtacking: DRAM-speed... but light on layer-stacking

DougS
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Re: interleave

That's pretty much how you see SSDs with speeds of multiple gigabits per second even though the individual chips have speeds measured in hundreds of megabits. The only advantage of faster chips is you can make smaller devices faster...making bigger devices faster than SATA's 6 Gbps max has been possible for years now.

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Dear alt-right morons and other miscreants: Disrupt DEF CON, and the goons will 'ave you

DougS
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Re: Alt-left

The leftists who want to censor 'inappropriate speech' aren't far left in the way the alt right is far right. The far left are still anarchists like they were in the anti Vietnam days, but the far right now increasingly shares that anarchist viewpoint, which is a departure from the past.

This is simply a reflection of the fact that the extremists on both sides don't like what they see from the government or society today. During the cold war, especially during the time of McCarthyism, the far right wasn't against the government, they were against those who were trying to change the government (i.e. integration, civil rights, protesting Vietnam, etc.)

Since the left was successful in changing the government and society, that mindset has gone mainstream - i.e. "me too". As a result the far right no longer sees anything in the government/society worth preserving. They either want the government gone (the far right who falsely considers themselves libertarians, thinking libertarian=anarchist) or they want to turn back the clock to get the government and society of the past - that last is the anger Trump has been tapping into. "Make America Great Again", to them, means bring back the America before civil rights, before it became frowned upon to call someone a faggot or a retard.

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DougS
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Re: "Came here to read about tech"

But you'd only influence that minuscule percentage of techies who attend hacker conferences. That's like trying to influence the opinion of people who watch Marvel cinematic universe movies by staging a false flag at ComiCon. You'd reach something like 0.01% of the people who watch those movies, though at least ComiCon has enough press around many people who didn't go would hear about it.

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DougS
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"alt left"

One of the leaders of the "alt right" movement - Richard Spencer, an avowed white supremacist - coined the term himself, so applying it to people with those views is appropriate. Therefore someone who is on the extreme right isn't necessarily part of the alt right - having white supremacist views or Nazi ideography is part of the definition. You can be far to the right of the republican/conservative mainstream without believing in the superiority of the white "race", and wouldn't be "alt right", just "far right".

So I'm not sure what the definition for alt left would be, since there aren't any extreme left white supremacists or Nazis (before someone says that "socialist" is part of the name of Nazis, "democratic" and "republic" is part of name of North Korea, and they are clearly neither of those) Clearly it can't be fairly applied to everyone far left of the democratic/liberal mainstream, but applying it to those who advocate violence to achieve their goals would probably be as close as you can come (even though Spencer has been pretty careful to avoid crossing that line, many of his followers have had no problems doing so)

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"Came here to read about tech"

And the article IS about tech, it is about issues confronting hacker conferences. If you have your feelings hurt that some Trump supporters who cross the line from the political right to the alt-right are acting like jackasses and that's being called out in a Reg article, maybe READ THE TITLE before clicking on an article.

As for the "false flag attack" theory, I don't buy it. The point of doing false flag in the political sphere is to get noticed and make the news. If El Reg is the best press they're getting for this, it wasn't worth their trouble. Better to disrupt something that will have representation from the national press in the US, so it actually makes the news.

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Alaskan borough dusts off the typewriters after ransomware crims pwn entire network

DougS
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"Manual procedures" are less and less possible

What's Amazon's manual procedure supposed to be when their web site goes down? What's the backup plan for a company that runs a fleet of self-driving taxis if GPS goes out?

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DougS
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Re: Because no one has ever stolen records from a filing cabinet before.

Not from halfway around the world they haven't.

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Porn parking, livid lockers and botched blenders: The nightmare IoT world come true

DougS
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Ring doorbell for elderly or disabled

That's a great use case, the problem is that's not how they're marketed or who is buying them. Is it even possible to restrict it to your local network - for a normal person, so don't say "configure the firewall in your DD-WRT router to block it". That's how it should work by default, and if you want to be able to see who is at your door when you are at work or on vacation you can enable that functionality.

But of course Ring is owned by Amazon, and like Google and Facebook they want to collect every scrap of data about you they can possibly can, and leaving a possible entry point for hackers isn't something they care about.

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Drink this potion, Linux kernel, and tomorrow you'll wake up with a WireGuard VPN driver

DougS
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Re: "It is time, therefore, for WireGuard to be properly integrated into Linux."

It IS a module, the article is written in a bit of confusing fashion. Currently it is an out of tree module, so if you get a Linux distribution you don't get it like you get xfs or drivers for <insert random 15 year old network card>. You have to track down the source and compile it yourself, or find (and trust) someone who has already compiled it for your Linux kernel version.

They are simply putting the module in the tree, so it'll be on equal status with those other drivers, and most Linux distributions will include it by default. It won't actually load unless you make that happen, of course, just like xfs won't load unless you use it or the 15 year old network card driver won't load unless you have that hardware.

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'Unhackable' Bitfi crypto-currency wallet maker will be shocked to find fingernails exist

DougS
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Business plan

1) Create super cheap device using off the shelf parts, enabling high margins with minimal design costs

2) Announce to the world that it is unhackable, challenging security professionals to hack it

3) Sell hundreds of them to security researchers who want in on the bounty, plus probably thousands more to amateurs or fools from the publicity

4) Close up shop after the sales dry up, no more company means no payouts need be made

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