* Posts by FrankAlphaXII

769 posts • joined 12 Jan 2011

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IT plonker stuffed 'destructive' logic bomb into US Army servers in contract revenge attack

FrankAlphaXII

Wow. Just wow. What a moron.

Having been an Army Reservist (and Active Duty before that), this must have been the payroll system for Civilians that work at Army Reserve centers for the Army itself and maybe Unit Administrators when they're not called back to duty and militarized under Title 10 orders.

And given most UAs are retired First Sergeants and Sergeants Major, what a stupid target to fuck with. I would not want every UA in the country hot after your ass for making them miss a paycheck. At the same time, these people can likely handle missing a paycheck whereas a Private up to Specialist/Corporal really can't unless they're living in the barracks and most of their pay is disposable income.

Military pay for the actual servicemembers in an Army Reserve or Regular Army unit is (mis)handled by the Defense Financial and Accounting Service, which is an even dumber target to fuck with. The easiest way to wind up in prison if you have anything to do with the Department of Defense is to mess with Uncle Sam's money. They've even tossed the first commander of SEAL Team Six/DEVGRU into prison for misappropriating funds.

That being said, I'm amazed that the Clowns in Disguise (CID for the uninitiated, they're usually pretty inept) figured it out, and it didn't take the 902d Counterintelligence and NSA/CSS to do it, unless it did and the CID's just getting the public credit for it. Which could be the case.

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Attention adults working in the real world: Do not upgrade to iOS 11 if you use Outlook, Exchange

FrankAlphaXII

You must be new here. About the only "vendor" they don't do that to when something half works is to the Linux kernel developers. And that's usually because the use case that gets affected is something on the far edges. They bitch about MS, Apple, Oracle, HP, etc. All the time.

In other words, the iJunk vendor isn't special for getting snark.

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Bespoke vending machine biz Bodega AI trips cultural landmine

FrankAlphaXII

Stupid Bay Area Hipsters...

It's not a bodega unless someone working there is selling low quality weed with pigeon feathers or pubic hairs added in on the side. And somehow I doubt the robots will be doing that.

Call it what it is, a rip-off of the Shadowrun universe's Stuffer Shack.

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'Don't Google Google, Googling Google is wrong', says Google

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Google is the king of "Jank"

Funny enough it does the same on a Pixel using Chrome.

Or displays "local" news from Mountain View, when I live about a thousand miles away, which the phone surely knows.

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Confirmed: Oracle laid off 964 people from former Sun building

FrankAlphaXII

Re: I need new glasses..

Glad I'm not the only one who thought they saw that. Though to be fair, shit and slowlaris tend to go together in my mind.

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FBI probing Uber over use of 'Hell' spyware to track rival biz Lyft

FrankAlphaXII

Re: RICO

A Cartel. But don't call it that. People like the godawful Taxis here because they probably don't have to use them. If the Taxi cartel would fix their product Lyft and Uber wouldn't exist. But that makes sense. Can't have that. I will say that Lyft is better to work for, they had tipping about a year before Uber ever considered it.

Anyway, a lot of drivers work for both Uber and Lyft (and some of the smaller companies), so l really wonder how useful tracking the competition would be. I don't see much of a need for it when the same people work for both.

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Networking vendors are good for free lunches, hopeless for networks

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Fuck E.A

But we're all supposed to like pay-to-win and day one DLC. Get with the program!

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Solaris update plan is real, but future looks cloudy by design

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Sparc Emulator?

What are the chances of IBM selling the IP to Oracle? I've never thought of them getting along all that well. Not to say you probably couldn't get Rometty and her board to bark like dogs if you waved a few hundred million under their noses as Lenovo has a few times.

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Uber sued by Uber for tarnishing the good name of Uber

FrankAlphaXII

Like Jello says...

We sure can be Uber Alles, as long as we're in California.

And Jerry Brown's the Governor (again, though sans moonbeams this time), so go figure.

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Gather round, kids, and let's try to understand the science of 3D NAND

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Useful

You can do the same in Firefox and I believe also in Edge.

No idea about chrome.

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Oracle's systems boss bails amid deafening silence over Solaris fate

FrankAlphaXII

Re: This makes me sad

They're doing exactly that with OpenVMS y'know.

Never say never if there's a use case for a product.

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Our day with Larry Page: Embedded with one of the world's richest men

FrankAlphaXII
Coat

Re: Truth is stranger than fiction

Well hey, nobody said that being one of the world's richest people and being a dumbass, or at least more than a little awkward, were mutually exclusive.

Mine's the one with the Pixel in the pocket, and I wonder why its smoking.

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FrankAlphaXII

Re: Biting the hand, indeed

Christ on a crutch, I feel like I'm talking to myself but Its called satire Frank.

Read the deposition. It makes about as much sense as known unknowns and unknown unknowns.

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FrankAlphaXII
Alien

Re: This is fiction, right ?

Hate to be the bastard the ruins the joke, but read the deposition transcript from last week.

It'll all make sense. Or not.

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Red Hat acquires Permabit to put the squeeze on RHEL

FrankAlphaXII
Thumb Down

Re: "Yes, FreeBSD doesn't have Wifi"

The hell? FreeBSD certainly has Wi-Fi and Bluetooth

In regard to fingerprint sensors, libfprint exists but I've never used it. It probably works fine.

Maybe educate yourself before spouting a bunch of uninformed garbage. You Linux people used to get so pissed off about MS' misinformation about the capabilities of Linux to turn around and do the same thing is unsurprising, but still not acceptable when you should know better.

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Linus Torvalds pens vintage 'f*cking' rant at kernel dev's 'utter BS'

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Linus' biggest mistake

Its bastardized Mach, which they call XNU. And its also not a microkernel.

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Take that, gender pay gap! Atos to offshore hundreds of BBC roles

FrankAlphaXII

Are you sure it was Crapita doing their TV licensing bullying?

I'm an American so I don't know if you guys even have them, but could it be a Code Enforcement officer from your council? Happens here in New Mexico a lot. Code Enforcement stakes out building sites and sometimes even goes to check licenses for regulated trades like Electrical, Plumbing and Irrigation, as well as HVAC. Code enforcement are usually real dicks about it too, they like their threats even more than regular cops because usually the only way to contest anything is with an Administrative Law Judge who will side with the Government nearly every time.

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Intel is upset that Qualcomm is treating it like Intel treated AMD for years and years

FrankAlphaXII

Re: More nonsense "Oh poor AMD ... Intel is so evil" crap!

Yeah because Intel is such a shining beacon of light, cooling, quality and how they treat their employees, and because everyone just loves a monopoly. Moron.

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FrankAlphaXII

Re: Uh, *raises hand*

That's nice for their labs. AMD was first to market with something usable. If Intel had their way those chips would probably still be in the lab.

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Presto crypto: IBM releases gruntier, faster Z14 mainframe

FrankAlphaXII

Probably who they're targeting it towards, as well as banks, credit card companies, and others who need to do a lot of near real time encrypted transactions.

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Feelin' safe and snug on Linux while the Windows world burns? Stop that

FrankAlphaXII

Re: I Feel Safe Today

>>Good for me though. Job security.

Exactly. Dinosaurs will die. And good riddance.

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Roland McGrath steps down as glibc maintainer after 30 years

FrankAlphaXII

I know where he is

Prison

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FrankAlphaXII

Well in Linus' case, I'm pretty sure Greg Kroah-Hartman or maybe Andrew Morton would take over, or turn development leadership into a committee sort of like how FreeBSD governs itself.

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Migrating to Microsoft's cloud: What they won't tell you, what you need to know

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Days?

Im not British, but two words. OpenReach.Thats the explanation for their shitty speeds. And it's a pretty good one. There's less of an excuse in the US, I mean I guess you could blame AT&T for it considering they were promoting FTTP/FTTH in the early 90's and it's still really fuckin rare even with uVerse, which is generally overpriced ADSL that might potentially be FTTP one day in the distant future but usually isn't yet

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Yahoo! cleanup! will! cost! Verizon! half! a! billion! bucks!

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Mayer for Prez

She'll have a run for her money when HPE finishes its death spiral, same for IBM. Honestly our man Vlad has quite a few real winners to pick from next time.

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Situation normal, blurts T-Mobile, while network continues to crap itself

FrankAlphaXII

I don't seem to have been affected. I'm on Project Fi, switched when I got a Pixel, but I keep my phone locked on T-Mobile with carrier switching disabled because Sprint's network in Central New Mexico kind of sucks and US Cellular doesn't serve this area. I had no idea there was an outage until I read this actually and if prepaid was/is affected it probably should have affected Project Fi users, even though Fi is the most postpaid-like prepaid MVNO there is.

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FrankAlphaXII

Re: Time zones

No kidding. UTC exists for a reason.

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Teen texted boyfriend to kill himself. It worked. Will the law change to deal with digital reality?

FrankAlphaXII

>So, with "gross negligence manslaughter" she's looking at 1-6 years in prison...

>I'm not sure 6 years of counseling is long enough to fix her malfunction.

There ain't much counseling in prison. There's plenty of dope, and plenty of violence, but not much in the way of any non-essential service. These are felons we're talking about here, nobody who matters or decides such things is shedding any tears about not throwing tax dollars down the toilet trying to unfuck someone who's completely fucked and has only gotten worse after their multiple convictions. Maybe we could have prevented it by getting these people treatment when they were teenagers, but that would require being proactive instead of reactive, and I'm yet to see a human society where people take mitigating hazards seriously.

Ain't much medical care in prison in general, and they certainly are not gonna pay a shrink to deal with a bunch of felons who are there because they've generally got something wrong mentally (usually addiction). And that's at a Government managed prison which is like heaven compared to a private prison.

Private prisons don't usually have so much as a damn aspirin or a doctor. I hope she winds up at a prison owned by CCA or Geo and mouths off to some bad bitch who happens to be a sicario from a cartel or gang. Even if she lives through the assault, she probably won't live much longer than that because the Private Prison assholes won't call the EMTs unless they know they won't get in trouble for it or the victim's already dead.

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IBM marketeers rub out chopper after visit from CEO Ginni

FrankAlphaXII

Re: I was so hoping for her to demonstrate a new innovation

We only tested that on the XH-56 Cheyenne and only for the envelope expansion tests. It replaced the gunner's seat on Airframe number 9 during a phase of tests, but the program got cancelled immediately following those tests. And no, it ejected downward. I think you're talking about the Kamov Black Shark, which has a rotor blade or the entire hub explode off and then the pilot/gunner eject.

The Cheyenne never made it out of testing, though it did have a permanent model number assigned, the AH-56. It wasn't a good idea but it wasn't because of the Harrier or the promises Bell and Boeing made about the stupid Osprey, its not a good idea to have light aircraft pulling CAS duties. The Kiowas were barely usable in Afghanistan, when your air support is below you most of the time, there's a problem but at least they could actually somewhat fly.

The Cheyenne would have struggled with the jobs that the Army wound up handing to the Kiowa, Blackhawk and Apache, though it probably would have made an excellent light, high speed reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition aircraft. Thats not good enough though, not for the modern Army anyway, as the Armed Scout Helicopter and Light Helicopter Experimental projects have proven over and over.

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'Major incident' at Capita data centre: Multiple services still knackered

FrankAlphaXII

It seems that Crapita don't believe in Business Continuity otherwise an outage at one datacenter wouldn't take down part of the NHS and a number of local governments. As you stated, there should be no such thing as a single point of failure in 2017. That doesn't bode well for UK emergency preparedness at the most important level. If something as simple as internet communications get taken down that easily what happens when more than one of their datacenters fails and can't/won't be restored for weeks or months?

I work in Emergency Management for a government agency at a local level plus I develop BC/DR plans for SMBs on the side so I see this kind of shit out of government outsourcing contractors all the time, beancounters that run businesses like Crapita (looking at you Serco, Egis, and Leidos) don't get really simple preparedness and mitigation concepts and if they do understand them, they'll be first to balk at the price tag associated with them. Until they've had their "effeciencies" blow up in their faces. Thing is, in this day and age fault tolerance and providing an emergency level of service for data when something does happen isn't hard or expensive and it's really unforgivable that a supposedly first in class outsourcing contractor can't provide it's expected level of service because their infrastructure's shit and their planning's worse.

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Intel pitches a Thunderbolt 3-for-all

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Dare I ask

I use FreeBSD and Thunderbolt 2 works on it. I'd imagine that Intel won't have an issue with getting Thunderbolt 3 supported in Windows, Linux, MacOS and at least FreeBSD either. Now the question remains whether anyone use it as far as the manufacturers go.

Intel making it royalty free will probably spur adoption of Thunderbolt for some devices. Blazing fast external SSDs maybe. I really don't think its going to be resounding success Intel are hoping for but I'm sure it will find a place.

Right at the moment its really kind of a pain finding anyone using devices that come with it unless they're using brand new Apple iJunk so honestly Intel's got their work cut out for themselves. Intel does have the money to waste on it though, so maybe they'll force it into products if it isn't successful on its own. Hard to say with them.

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Kill Google AMP before it KILLS the web

FrankAlphaXII

Re: How to switch it off

Might just be your version of Android, your permissions, or even the app itself. I don't use Chrome myself, but I've always been able to toggle that particular setting.

I have a Pixel and the way I've got it set up doesn't include AMP links as above (Open in Browser, its a Google Setting, not a browser setting) and defaults to opening whatever links it comes across in Firefox (as its the default web browser) or Outlook (default mail client) or the SMS app as appropriate, whether its from the Google app, the Pixel's dumbass artificial idiot, Outlook or another MS Office program, whatever.

I also have a great addon for Firefox (aside from ABP and a number of others) that forces the desktop version of whatever site I'm using. It tends to work pretty well for me. Then again, I'm on Wi-Fi most (95%) of the time and if data usage gets to be an issue when I'm not, I can always turn it off and go back to the mobile versions of whatever.

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US Coast Guard: We're rather chuffed with our new Boeing spy drone

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Is the U.S, Coast Guard lending personnel to the RN?

>>Plus the U.S. Coast Guard is not part of the armed forces of the United States, except in wartime

I think you're a little confused.

They're DHS, and formerly DOT, but they're still an armed force that exists under Title 10. They are also one of the seven uniformed services alongside the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Public Health Service, and NOAA Commissioned Corps, though honestly the National Disaster Medical Service should be considered by the law to be a uniformed service on its own, they do have a lot of USPHS people who work for them such as the first Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (as well as the Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Teams [or DMORT] for dead folks) and what not but not everyone in the NDMS is a PHS employee. For example, I used to be a member of an NDMS DMAT when I was an undergraduate but I've never worked for the USPHS.

What I think you mean is that they're not part of the DoD unless there's a declared war and the Secretary of the Navy requests that the USCG be transferred to the US Navy. Otherwise their chain of command flows from their Enlistedmen to their Officers to the Commandant of the Coast Guard to the Secretary of Homeland Security.

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MP brands 1,600 CSC layoffs as the 'worst excesses of capitalism'

FrankAlphaXII

Re: DXC

Yeah, sure. And it was also written by a man from Ohio while he was in NYC. He eventually wrote the US Army's fife and drum manual and was rather pissed off about the Confederate States government and army using his song.

So yeah, real Southern there, huh?

And if you're going to rip off Wikipedia, at least link it or cite it.

1
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Ex penetrated us almost 700 times through secret backdoor, biz alleges

FrankAlphaXII

or esnowden, jassange or even bmanning. Though someone would have probably noticed.

1
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'I'm innocent!' says IT contractor on trial after Office 365 bill row spiraled out of control

FrankAlphaXII

Re: Devils and details.

Pray tell how is a Chamber of Commerce a charity?

They're a semi-public special interest group representing business interests. Nothing more.

Though some CoCs are funded by local government they're usually not controlled by them, if you're British the best way of looking at a CoC is as a quango with a large degree of independence from their funding sources.

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Xen Project wants permission to reveal fewer vulnerabilities

FrankAlphaXII

Lack of disclosure isn't going to win many, if any, friends, especially when it comes to a hypervisor that's been riddled with vulnerabilities as of late. It just makes me wonder what they're trying to hide and for what reason.

Transparency is not the enemy, especially not in an open source software project.

Overall, it sounds like a really good reason to stay the hell away from Xen, as if we needed more.

7
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Oracle refuses to let Java copyright battle die – another appeal filed in war against Google

FrankAlphaXII

Y'know, Einstein said that doing the same thing over and over again while expecting a different result is a definition of insanity.

Oracle is clearly insane, but who here didn't know that already?

I mean really, would you hire an ex-HP CEO? Or buy Sun?

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Trump decides Breitbart chair Bannon knows more about natsec than actual professionals

FrankAlphaXII

I have a book for Trump and Bannon, if either of them actually read.

Its called Seven Days in May, and its the story of what an overempowered Military does when it gets slighted by a President who thinks he knows better than them. In the end, the JCS doesn't win, but its because of the President's advisors that they don't. I wouldn't have that much faith in Flynn, Bannon, Tillerson, and Prebius.

At this point, it wouldn't take a Brigade to seize the National communications infrastructure like in the book either. NSA has its hooks in everywhere and they could just flip the switch.

If Trump doesn't terrify you enough, the prospect of the reaction to him going in that direction as well as the fact that the American people trust the Military more than officials in either branch subject to elections should.

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FrankAlphaXII

Based on how spineless Congress is, not a fuck of a lot would be my answer.

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PS4 Pro woes: Random display blackouts caught on camera

FrankAlphaXII

I had issues with the PS3's HDCP to that point that HDMI wasn't usable on my old one with any Vizio TV. Worked fine on any other manufacturer's but not Vizio for some reason.

Magically when I bought a PS3 slim, it worked just fine. I've owned a PS4 Pro since it came out, and I've had no issues with it, but I don't doubt that there are HDMI issues with Sony products.

0
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How Lexmark's patent fight to crush an ink reseller will affect us all

FrankAlphaXII

What the hell does AARP care about this? I can see why Mozilla and EFF do, but the American Association of Retired People? Really? Does it disproportionately affect Granny or something?

1
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Make America, wait, what again? US Army may need foreign weapons to keep up

FrankAlphaXII

When I was in the Army still one of my two rifles was made by FNH, which is a Belgian company.

Same company that makes the M249 and M240 light machine guns that every branch uses as a matter of fact. The Army's recently selected the H&K G28 for the Compact Semiautomatic Sniper System, Delta and DEVGRU use the MP5 and MP7 for CQB. The Army's new pistol is made by Sig Sauer, and the one its replacing is made by Beretta. German and Italian respectively.

And its not just small arms either, they've used Bofors cannons in the Navy and Air Force for a very long time, and those are Swedish. Sweden isn't even a NATO country. The Marine Corps camo pattern is based on the Canadian CADPAT, which itself is based on the Rhodesian and later Zimbabwean standard pattern, and the Army's hand to hand combat methodology is Brazilian.

Its not that far out to buy from International vendors to a point, we don't usually buy vehicles foreign anymore (even though the US Navy was exceptionally good at taking Foreign Prizes and integrating them with the fleet in the 18th and 19th centuries) though there are exceptions like the English Electric/Martin B-57 Canberra, the C-23 Sherpa which is British, and the Pilatus PC-12. We also don't usually buy much in the commo or cryptographic arenas from foreign vendors either since we backdoor everything and assume everyone else is too which is a reasonable assumption.

So really, what's the point you're trying to make? And picking the M93 (its not an XM93, and hasn't been since the 80's) as an illustrative example is an odd choice because of how niche it is and how rarely it gets used.

Either way, If you think one or two terms of a President is going to change anything like that, you have a lot to learn about the way Acquisitions routinely doesn't work.

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Stallman's Free Software Foundation says we need a free phone OS

FrankAlphaXII

Re: srsly?

Wouldn't that be 25 cents?

0
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FrankAlphaXII

High Priority must translate into something like this in GNUspeak:

"Lets bitch about everyone else (while offering nothing constructive but whining), while restricting your freedoms in the name of freedom (stay away from those nasty permissive BSD licenses, use GPLv3 and be sure to sign your copyright over to FSF!), make something half baked and nearly unusable (Have you tried Gnash?), and then drop it off the list in a couple of years"

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CIA boss: Make America (a) great (big database of surveillance on citizens, foreigners) again!

FrankAlphaXII

He should be. If he serves a full term I will be very surprised.

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FrankAlphaXII

Re: The Phoenix Syndrome

So everyone in Canada voted for Trudeau then? How about Harper?

Didn't think so.

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Seduced by the Docker side: Microsoft's support could be first shot fired in the Container Wars

FrankAlphaXII

Re: I read most of the article

And you'd be right, its usually based on emotion. Especially in regard to this author. Funny how they don't mention his background or who he works for here anymore. It has nothing to do with open source, in fact it has to do with making the internet more dangerous and more expensive, he's a VP at Adobe.

For someone who is supposedly trying to get people away from proprietary software (though he works for one of the largest proprietary software companies there is), he sure spends a lot of time writing about Microsoft and how they're so terrible.

HTH. HAND!

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Google loses Android friends with Pixel exclusivity

FrankAlphaXII
Holmes

Y'know maybe....

Google wouldn't be doing this if Android OEMs actually updated their phone's software after about a year. Most of which, especially anymore, are perfectly capable of running new versions of Android hardware wise. The vendors aren't compelled by anything to support their older products so they don't, and there are millions of vulnerable devices which should not be vulnerable for any reason but forced and highly artificial obsolescence.

Its like if Dell or HP sold you a server and less than a year later told you, "Welp, if you want some semblance of security, like the current version of whatever, you'll need entirely new hardware, and if not, tough shit". In that realm it would not be tolerable, and should not be tolerable on a phone that for all intents and purposes is a computer and a pretty powerful one.

I don't give a flying fuck about multibillion dollar Samsung and their supposed "pain" and difficulty doing something that the AOSP and the forks have no issue with. Because of that alone I bought a Pixel. I get software updates as they come out. I'm not paranoid, but I did live through the 2003/2004 era of Windows when worms and trojans were king and MS didn't do shit. Its nice to see the OS vendor actually trying to fix an issue, instead of ignoring it or pushing onto third parties or users.

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