* Posts by TonyJ

891 posts • joined 30 Dec 2010

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We've Amber heard a NASty rumour: Marvell man touts private cloud box

TonyJ
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"...

"The product is said to perform better if it is installed in front of a home router, rather than behind it.".."

How would you put it "in front" of a home router given that most people use the shite their ISP give to them which will include some kind of xDSL / PPPoE connectivity, does this thing act as a xDSL router in its own right?

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Samsung Galaxy Note 9: A steep price to pay

TonyJ
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Re: The one thing I wholeheartedly agree with Jobs on ...

Also handy for signing docs.

One company I was in used an online document vault and you could sign right in a browser. The stylus made doing it on your phone so much easier.

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Devon County Council techies: WE KNOW IT WASN'T YOU!

TonyJ
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Re: Actually back in the 1990s I was at a company...

"...you might have needed to order option.."

Anyone else repair HP printers in the 90's?

They (HP) seemed to have a mandate to single handedly destroy our forests. If you ordered a replacement spring that was, say, 8mm long by around 2mm diameter, it'd come in a small plastic bag. In a jiffy bag. In a box. In a larger box. In a MUCH larger box that could usually have accommodated the entire printer!

Along, of course, with a raft of printed compliance, warranty and other such documents. In 90 million languages, just in case the repair centre they shipped it to in the UK, from the UK might have used some ancient dialect of some long forgotten (and likely dead) language.

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TonyJ
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Re: Actually back in the 1990s I was at a company...

"...Or in really bad cases they'd lose the PCL formatting and start printing lots of pages with garbage on them..."

Or better yet, when people sent PS to a PCL printer and stood confused when the actual PS "language" was printed!

This kind of thing really does annoy and frustrate me.

And whilst we're at it, when my youngest lad goes back to school in September, he doesn't go on the "first" day back, as it's an inset day...what the actual...? You've just had x weeks off (because this seems to be a theme after every break, nowadays) and you now want an extra day to do the stuff you could have already done?

And...how come we can't bill the schools when teachers go on strike? After all, they didn't ask our permission and it often means parents have to suddenly change plans like take off a day of their own.

Sorry... /rant

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For all the excitement, Pie may be Android's most minimal makeover yet – thankfully

TonyJ
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Re: can you get updates only yet?

"...or the ability to mute the ring tone instantly by a quick tap of the power button..."

I can do that on my S7.

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Western Digital wonders why enterprise isn't keen on its solid-state drives

TonyJ
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Re: Supplier markup on new hardware

"... It looks like Dell put custom firmware on their own-branded SSDs. .."

Better than HP. Since their Gen8 ProLiants you need both a genuine HP carrier and genuine HP HDD/SSD.

Otherwise you get one of two issues: the first is a fairly benign warning in the logs. The second though, is to assume an overheat condition and spin every fan up to 100%.

It sounds like the entire server is trying for lift-off.

It's a crappy way to behave and does nothing to make me want to stick with a vendor that pulls that kind of stunt.

Fine - warn me but don't make the thing misbehave to such an extent.

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Is it OK if we call $53bn-a-quarter Amazon the Bit Barns and Ignoble?

TonyJ
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Re: Amazon is in my good books

"...What Amazon has and I mean retail arm is an enormous amount of customer trust gained by experience. Its kinda sad that in eCommerce you great simply by delivering what you promised, when you promised and compensate customers without making them hop extra hoops when you failed either of the first two..."

This is where they win, in my personal opinion. When things go wrong they're there for the customer first in almost every case.

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TonyJ
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Re: Amazon is in my good books

"...Well, used books are sold by retailers through Amazon. I had pretty good experiences with them as well, but also with used books stores that used to sell directly over the internet. What I really prefer is wander through the aisles between imposing shelves of such shops to browse - and then buy even more books. I need to build some new shelves....."

Ah the pleasure of a used book shop.

That quietness and calm.

But also and almost the key ingredient of it all, the smell.

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Well, well, well. Crime does pay: Ransomware creeps let off with community service

TonyJ
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Re: Actually, this seems proportionate

@AndyS: I tend to agree with you.

In this case, it seems that all a custodial sentence would have done would be to help to turn them into hardcore criminals and ruin any prospect of a future away from crime.

It seems that too often we forget the idea of rehabilitation and prefer the concept of revenge.

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2FA? We've heard of it: White hats weirded out by lack of account security in enterprise

TonyJ
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Re: No Lockouts? Really???

The argument I've seen with lockouts usually revolves around one of two issues:

1 - it causes too many support calls (really...)

2 - we don't have enough support staff, especially if someone locks themselves out outside of normal working hours

Compounded with:

3 - there's no budget / lack of understanding for any kind of self-service password reset features

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TonyJ
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I can understand folks not wanting to use their own phones for work generally - i.e. calls etc - but for 2FA I'd prefer not to have to carry an extra device of any kind. But that's just me.

My own O365 and Azure (via MAPS) admin accounts use 2FA.

My lab servers are set up to email me if anyone logs onto them/unlocks them. That works for me as I should be the only person logging on. Anyone else would mean the machine is compromised.

Really don't understand why places don't use MFA at least for privileged accounts

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Psst, says Qualcomm... Kid, you wanna see what a 5G antenna looks like?

TonyJ
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Re: Who is this person

Haha..have an upvote.

's what I studied many many many (sigh) years ago.

Although I moved out of the field many, ma...oh you get the idea - quite a while ago, I'm still very much interested.

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Microsoft still longs to be a 'lifestyle' brand, but the cupboard looks bare

TonyJ
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Re: if you don't succeed...try, try, try, try, try, try try try again!

"..."doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result"..."

But...this is a company making US$110 BILLION...why, in their eyes, do they need to do something that is that different?

(Note..I said in their view)

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As Corning unveils its latest Gorilla Glass, we ask: What happened to sapphire mobe screens?

TonyJ
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Same with my Tag.

10 years old and the sapphire glass looks as good as the day I first put the watch on.

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Bonkers Azure bookings give Microsoft a record-breaking $110bn year

TonyJ
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Re: Great, just great

"...I think another factor is poor service from IT departments that might be driving companies to the cloud, particularly for software as a service.

A competent IT department can deliver great service, but building and keeping a team of competent staff is a non-trivial exercise. Compounding this are consultants who deliver crap and rarely stick around long enough to learn the business...."

Yeah but as others have pointed out, this move rarely negates the need for local IT staff to anything like the extent that managers seem to believe it can.

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TonyJ
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Re: Great, just great

"...Despite its failures, despite the security issues, The Cloud is milking it, ensuring that people will use it and companies will want their share of the pie..."

But this is the problem, really, isn't it?

PHB's eye up the potential savings without ever considering (or being given the data to consider) doing it properly.

Equally there's this rush to an all-in mindset whereby everything gets thrown over the fence and into the cloud regardless of whether it's actually suitable or not.

Cloud* based services have a place. But like in any other heterogeneous solution that place needs to be planned and designed rather than this shitty "it's their problem now" mindset. And just like any other solution it's not a panacea.

What we actually tend to see in this cluster-rush is the antithesis of a well designed, well planned solution.

*Another meaningless term I loathe. Call it what it is - utility-based computing (i.e. computing based on a utility model). When I come home at night and turn my light on, As an average consumer, I don't really care where or how the electricity is generated from or how it gets to me etc. I care that my light comes on. Reliably. And I care (quite a bit) that when I turn said light off, I stop paying for the electricity.

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Elon Musk, his arch nemesis DeepMind swear off AI weapons

TonyJ
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There were so many things wrong with the idea of the submarine in that cave (notwithstanding the divers in the video were atrocious - bits like their SPG dangling all over the place, poor time, crawling along the bottom of the pool etc - all of which are bad enough in a recreational diver, but in a technical and/or cave diver are unforgivable).

Given that the cave wasn't flooded for its entire length, it meant that people would have had to carry it as well as get it up and down near vertical sections.

It looked like it was too big - by which I mean too long in this case.

Bear in mind the smallest section of cave was a 70cm diameter. Again to put that into some context, the divers were forced to use sidemount equipment: when you think of a traditional scuba diver image, the cylinder(s) are on the back. Sidemount is just that - one on each side of the diver. This is necessary in this case so the diver could unhook each cylinder and pass them through the gap before they themselves wriggle through.

How would the sub have coped with that?

What was he trying to actually achieve with it? To my mind it was always going to make sense to bring them out pretty much the way they did (cave diver hat on). It just seemed to be an ego thing.

Now no one likes their hard work looked down on but to call the rescue diver a paedo the way he did was just incredibly obnoxious and in this case, I hope he gets the hell sued out of him, because equally when someone answers the call to help like these divers did, that kind of behaviour is unconscionable.

Underwater rescue is hard - ask any diver that has done, e.g., the PADI rescue diver course. Doing this in more technical environments is even harder and underground harder again.

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TonyJ
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Re: Pertly off the subject....

"...You need to put these things into context - it would no longer be ok to firebomb a city

Looking at the state of most of Syria, I'm having trouble accepting your premis..."

So you take one part of one sentence out of context?

Did you bother to continue to read to this bit: "...The problem, as others have pointed out, is when you get those naughty people that don't abide by these rules and lob weapons around that aren't considered "ok" any more..."?

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TonyJ
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Re: Pertly off the subject....

But I've never really understood why nuclear / chemical / biological weapons are considered as a seperate class of weapons that are more heinous to use than conventional ones. I get that in the case of nuclear it's also a matter of scale, but why should it be a matter of type?

Is it not OK to destroy Hiroshima with one nuclear bomb but OK to turn Dresden to ash just because many smaller bombs were used? Is it not OK to kill soldiers with sarin gas but A-OK to blow them to bits in a storm of metal shards travelling at high velocity?

You need to put these things into context - it would no longer be ok to firebomb a city and I don't think anyone would ever say dropping a nuke would be considered polite or the done thing again, either.

Indeed that was the whole idea of MAD - you nuke me, I nuke you, we all nuke each other. No one wins.

It's also one of the reasons most places switched to modelling their nukes in supercomputer simulations rather than actual tests.

Weapons of war are all awful, and putting so-called WMD in a taboo class of their own just legitimises the use of equally awful 'conventional' weapons.

Again - it hasn't been ok to use chemical weapons for an awful long time. Likewise there are all sorts of other rules of engagement: for example, you can't put faeces onto a bayonet and you can't shoot someone off the end of a bayonet.

The problem, as others have pointed out, is when you get those naughty people that don't abide by these rules and lob weapons around that aren't considered "ok" any more.

And it comes down to scale and collateral - nukes and chemical and biological weapons are massive in their impact and will hoover up innocent people as well as combatants with no control or regard. I believe, too, that NATO mandate an attack with a bio/chem weapon on a member constitutes an attack by a WMD and can therefore be responded to with a nuclear strike.

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Capita strikes again: Bug in UK-wide school info management system risks huge data breach

TonyJ
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"...Why are we outsourcing to Crapita? Can someone explain it to me?.."

Because it works out cheaper in the long run

Because Capita have such an outstanding record of delivering robust solutions on time, under budget and that perform exactly as required

Oh yeah - because it lines the pockets of various ministers with their pudgy fingers in the pies of these companies?

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TonyJ
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Re: That explains...

You know apart from a bit of semi annoyed bemusement I hadn't given it any real thought but yeah you're right.

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TonyJ
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That explains...

...why I've been getting notifications on the SIMS app on my phone that my son has had 100% attendance at school for the last few weeks...

...despite having left in June after his GCSE's.

I hate the damn app with a passion. Prior to migrating to it, the school used SharePoint. Not everyone's cup of tea but the customisations meant that I could track a LOT of info from my son - from achievement (positive) or behaviour (negative) points, and why they were awarded to whether he was above, on, or below track for a given subject and so on.

The SIMS app would tell me - well fuck all of any use basically. I'd get a popup on a Friday with a summary of his attendance from two weeks before...I could see if he'd had any of the above points but not in which subject or why etc. Nothing about progress.

Basically a waste of space on my phone.

So I do wonder who's kid has been in trouble for not attending the last few weeks :)

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Azure certifications are awful, Microsoft admits, so it has made new ones

TonyJ
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Re: Tech Training has lost all credibility

"...Thankfully in Game-Dev certification is pretty much shunned. So its portfolio work or nothing. Therefore outright cheating / fraud is rare!.."

You'd think that would follow as a general rule but last year I had to review a CV for a chap that had applied for a role at the gov. institution I was working at.

Now said place had c22,000 users globally and we were a good way down the route of various upgrades and migrations part of which was to move some users to Office 365 where security levels allowed it.

Imagine my surprise when the CV boasted front and centre that this person had successfully migrated over 50,000 users to O365...at the exact place I was working.

Embellishment is one thing but to outright lie so outrageously is another entirely.

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TonyJ
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"...I was a CCEA around the same time (MetaFrame 1.8). I literally passed it one month, and the next they announced they were changing the program and I'd have to start again from scratch..."

Yup. Totally scuppered their own certs.

I recall doing the MF1.8 exams. Liberally scattered with WF1.6 questions. :)

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TonyJ
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I appreciate it's not just MS but most certifications that take the path I highlighted above.

And to add insult to injury the only time a company cares is that time of year when partnership is up for renewal. I have quite literally witnessed first hand where a manager has looked around a room, and picked whomever they thought would be most likely to pass the necessary exams in the time frame.

I was Citrix CCEA #54 way back in the very early 2000's.

My reward? Access to a CCEA only website. The only content on said site being a list of exams you needed to pass to attain CCEA...Not to mention that back then, it seemed the higher your certification with Citrix, the worse the quality of the certificate they sent - from the CCA with a gold embossed emblem to the CCEA which looked like it'd been self-printed on an HP DeskJet 500c on toilet paper - you could see through it when held up to the light.

Back in the day, at least MCSE gave you access to a free TechNet subscription which was handy to have.

Let's face it - no one in a serious position in a company gives a toss about certs. It's all about what you've done, where and for whom. Actually, I would go so far as to say I'm always a bit suspicious of those people with a list of certs longer than my arm...it makes me wonder if they ever have time to do their day job or they just spend it all with a nose in a book and sitting the damn things.

Certs != ability in the vast majority of cases.

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TonyJ
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Really?

Vendor exams don't test real-world capability and knowledge but rather memory and the ability to pick out a "new" feature?

MS exam responses usually consist of:

A - Woefully wrong option

B - Wrong option that might just be worded to trip you up

C - The way you might do it in the real world

D - Shiny new MS way of doing it

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Trump wants to work with Russia on infosec. Security experts: lol no

TonyJ
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Re: Well, with all of NATO being either personal foes or parts of the "greatest Foe"

"...

Well, with all of NATO being either personal foes or parts of the "greatest Foe"

Well, when Canada is a personal enemy and European Union is the greatest foe, you have to look for "friends" somewhere...."

And the crazy thing there is you're NOT talking about Russia!

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TonyJ
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Does this start with....

....allowing Kaspersky to do business in the US?

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Scam alert: No, hackers don't have webcam vids of you enjoying p0rno. Don't give them any $$s

TonyJ
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At last...

...they can send me my audition footage! :)

Got one of these yesterday in my junk folder though it made no mention of any passwords - just that they'd recorded me after infecting my devices with a virus.

To be fair I did find it fairly cleverly worded to maximise impact. and I can see how it might actually catch someone out and worry them.

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Tech support chap given no training or briefing before jobs, which is why he was arrested

TonyJ
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Training...

...it can take many forms:

You have the stuff you have to learn out of necessity - you know, where you basically train yourself by learning on the job when something goes wrong.

You have the stuff you do as part of your education (and I was very lucky BITD to be taught by some real giants who'd had decades of real-world experience before going into teaching). Of course, you also have to have chosen the right kind of course.

Then there's the stuff you can pick up with your own labs, tinkering and breaking stuff at home.

And my least favourite is the "official vendor" training which, as I've often said, is their simply to boost their revenue and in almost all cases is a test of memory not knowledge and which no company has any interest in following through with until their partner renewals are up.

Of them all, I suspect the first is by far the most common and by far the most effective - especially when the thing that went wrong was caused by your own lack of knowledge/experience and you have to dig your way back out.

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$100m sueball smacks Huawei over Facebook HQ infiltration claims

TonyJ
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"...

$5 million in lost wages? I'd work for Huawei for that kind of money..."

I'd even consider the subterfuge being asked ;)

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Nissan 'fesses up to fudging emissions data

TonyJ
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Re: 1.6 litre!

Yup...always amazes me that US vehicles can have a 92 litre engine and still only produce 12bhp and are only good in a straight line...

Yes, I poke fun, but Europe and well most of the rest of the world can produce excellent engines these days, emissions cheating aside, that are both low-capacity (by traditional standards) and high power.

I recently had a Honda Civic - it was either a 1.0 or 1.2l petrol turbo engine and it went like the proverbial brown stuff off of a digging implement.

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Tired sysadmin plugged cable into wrong port, unleashed a 'virus'

TonyJ
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Not a loop, but...

About 10 years ago I did a piece of work for a council. New Windows 2003 servers, new Active Directory domain from NT4 and a new bunch of Citrix servers.

The servers were all HP ProLiant DL360's and a nice pair of shiny new Cisco switches for them to be plugged into.

We completed all the work and the customer was happy.

A few weeks later, I got a call to say Citrix had ground to a halt.

I'd got an account and RSA token to support them remotely so I duly connected and indeed it was terrible but from the remote session. I couldn't see anything wrong.

Of course, nobody had changed anything...

So I drove all the way to site (a 5+ hour drive). On arrival, I went into the server room, and right there in front of me, two cables came out of the front of server cab from the uplinks on Cisco switches. They went overhead into another cab which held an ancient (even by then) 100Mb half duplex 3Com switch.

Their network manager their had decided for some reason it was needed/a good idea.

I was amazed the lot even ran. But obviously popping them back into their correct switch ports and a reboot later, everything was resolved.

I was somewhat annoyed at the stupidly unnecessarily long drive for that visit .

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TonyJ
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Re: Network related

"...When they took smoke breaks off us (as it wasn't fair to the none smokers) I found a handy correlation between database crashes and the network socket my PC was plugged into. All I had to do was 'accidentally' unplug the network lead whilst a query was running and could then have as many smoke breaks as I wanted!.."

I've always argued that smokers - as addicts - are selfish.

Had many an argument with my father-in-law when the law came into force banning smoking in pubs etc. His argument was that "non smokers don't have to go in there" and "it should be optional".

And yeah - regular smoking breaks outside of normal breaks are hardly fair to non-smokers.

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Every step you take: We track you for your own safety, you know?

TonyJ
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"...I think the concept that people actually used to be able to get something repaired is more of a stick poked at a dusty synapse..."

It was the early 90's, so yeah...you're right. :(

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TonyJ
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Corporate tracking devices, courtesy of Dilbert: http://dilbert.com/strip/2011-05-27 :)

Forgot to add that to my post

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TonyJ
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I once worked at a company and amongst other things, we repaired camcorders (remember them?).

One day one of the guys was panning one around and he noticed that the new clock that had appeared recently in the workshop had a white spot.

The CCD sensors in even mobile phones pick up infrared as white light - try it sometime if you are bored: flip your phone to camera and point a tv remote at it whilst pressing a button on the remote.

Anyway, it turns out the company owner had decided to buy a covert spy camera.

He pulled a couple of still stunts like that over the years - turning off the beep on the front door so he could sneak in when people were doing overtime; putting a clocking in and out machine in just for the engineers (that backfired catastrophically as people went from staying to fix whatever the were working on to working to the clock).

It's not new behaviour even if it's abhorrent.

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Distie bosses tuck 7-figure settlement into Cisco's top pocket

TonyJ
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Re: cutting

"...But say it costs an extra $5 to prevent the device from catching fire, and the EU says "product must not catch fire", then you don't really want the cheaper version from outside the EU ....."

That's a relevant point.

I've mentioned before that I scuba dive on a rebreather. My particular one is made by a company called JJ.

In Europe you have to buy the CE version. Outside of Europe you can buy the non-CE version.

On the face of it they look identical. But the CE version, for example, has to comply to certain criteria such as the "work of breath" - how hard it is to breathe on the unit at various depths, in various positions.

But also, the CE version won't allow you to build the unit up incorrectly - the gas in a rebreather is in a closed loop and never leaves said loop. In order to keep you breathing, the unit analyses the oxygen content and tops it up as required, as well as scrubbing out the waste CO2.

On the non-CE units, there's nothing to stop you connecting the breathing loop on backwards*. This would lead to a build up of CO2 and hpoxia. It's bad.

The non CE units are considerably cheaper as they never have to be put through the same destructive tests that CE calls for (5 units, I believe, are all tested all the way to destruction).

In Europe at least, you can't buy one from the manufacturer unless you can prove you are trained on the unit - this may also be true outside of Europe but I am not sure.

*This may have changed since I got mine, but certainly was always the case.

So...I guess to contradict my own earlier posting, you are right to say that sometimes all is not actually equal, globally.

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TonyJ
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"..."Nobody that sells any sort of tech hardware should be in any doubt about the regulations governing imports." Well said by El Reg. Seems the posters didn't really absorb that bit like they really should.

Whether you like it or not, the established law is clear. If you are in the EU, it is legal to gray market within the EU, it is even legal to gray market outside of the EU, but - and get this - it's illegal to import gray marketed material into the EU.

This has nothing to do with Trump, cartels, price fixing, Ciscoborg or whatever. Everyone in the channel just needs to get as much legal knowledge as El Reg and they'll be fine ....... can't believe I wrote that ........"

You are, of course, right. But you have to wonder why it's illegal? And presumable, it is because the corporations you've listed have lobbied to make it so.

These are the very same companies that claim they want open global trade with no barriers...sure...as long as it's only open enough to ensure they can charge much greater prices in one area than another.

Don't get me wrong - market forces, etc etc and all that but if a company wants to be a global entity, then people should be free to move their products around... globally.

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Security guard cost bank millions by hitting emergency Off button

TonyJ
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Re: Kim or Ken?

@Nick - I came to say the exact same thing. What if he hadn't pushed the emergency stop and the entire place had burned down?

And generally in what appears to be an emergency with smoke, fumes and flames, people don't tend to stop and have a quick chat first - they act.

No way that poor chap should've been fired.

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Who fancies a six-core, 128GB RAM, 8TB NVMe … laptop?

TonyJ
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Re: Hope they More Reliable Than The Old Model...

"..As for the laptop, the main driver for the beasty was the multi-monitor support, the loadout for the devs here are 3 19" panels on a monitor arm + the laptop, Expensive on CAP-EX but it doesn't take much of an increase in throughput to justify it on an OP-EX basis..."

Ta for that.

I have a custom job at home - A PC Specialist 15.6" Defiance II (they're onto the V now).

The main driver behind the purchase was the ability to have 4 x SSD/HDD (2xm.2 and 2xSATA).

But it turns out to have HDMI and two mini DP ports. I was running the internal display + 2 external from it very comfortably.

One thing I actually miss is Citrix XenClient - a bare metal Hypervisor for desktops/laptops. The ability to boot my virtualised corp image, my own gaming image (XC could do GPU passthrough to one of the VM's) and my CentOS and switched between them with a keypress was brilliant.

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TonyJ
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Re: Hope they More Reliable Than The Old Model...

"...Company policy is everybody gets laptops for DR reasons so we don't have to lug em around much, they also issue us all with rucksacs so the weight is not too obnoxious for short runs..."

I get the whole "Laptop for DR" idea, but what drove them to supply you with a mobile server??? :)

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IBM fired me because I'm not a millennial, says axed cloud sales star in age discrim court row

TonyJ
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Re: Take the money

"Being made redundant is unfortunate, especially if you're an older person. Mr Langley has been working for IBM since 1993 so hopefully he has built up a retirement pot and potentially a redundancy package. No details are mentioned in the original article, nor were any conditions attached to such a package. Given he's already proceeded with legal action I imagine the package, whatever it was is off the table.

WTF ? He either resigned or retired, according to IBM systems.

From the article:

Langley was unable to get a role elsewhere within IBM, and its HR system marked him as having "resigned," it is claimed. In early July, days after he left the business, Langley got a letter congratulating him on his "retirement."

If IBM cannot make up its mind, I dunno what can. Actually, I think the official plan was "anything but a redundancy", because of the expensive package attached to such a move ... and middle manglement went "either retirement or resignation" and since they failed to communicate, different systems at IBM had different reasons for his departure ;-).."

And not only that, but they're dragging his otherwise seemingly good name and performance through the mud. Can you imagine him getting a reference under those circumstances?

He was given the push, and yet retired. Or resigned. Let's assume for a moment that HR were told that he'd retired/resigned...what package would he get? One would presume nothing, as it wasn't redundancy.

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Smash-hit game Fortnite is dangerous... for cheaters: Tools found laced with malware

TonyJ
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Re: Can't feel too upset about this

"...Yes, I'm sorry that people are downloading malware, but not that sorry.

What is the point, really, of downloading a cheat code to improve your chances of winning, when the only thing you get from winning is satisfaction and kudos?

This is a serious question. It seems to be rife in gaming, as far as I can tell - people play for a while and as soon as they get stuck, they search the internet for the clues and cheat codes. Call me old-fashioned, but it seems to take the point away from the whole thing.

Anyone got any insight into this?.."

I think it's just another symptom of a world where no one wants to work for reward but expects instant gratification no matter how it's achieved.

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Automated payment machines do NOT work the same all over the world – as I found out

TonyJ
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Re: Similar experience in the USA

US petrol stations are the devil incarnate.

My first trip to the states and my mate went to prepay (we had a big SUV and the woman behind the till laughed her head off when my mate said "Erm...80 dollars?" whilst replying "No hun...45 should more than cover it"

Only for him to have to go back in and do the same again after I managed to put in a bout 20c worth!

All manner of levers and stuff on the pump!

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UK Home Office sheds 70 staff on delayed 4G upgrade to Emergency Services Network

TonyJ
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"...Let's hope an Ambulance doesn't need to contact anyone anywhere..."

I have to play a bit of devil's advocate here I feel.

I had a business mobile contract with O2 and watched as their customer service went from truly exceptional to truly awful (right when they moved it to Azzuri). Their signal went from patchy to non existent.

When the time came to move, I did a lot of looking around and reading reviews. Weirdly, EE were getting an absolute panning for consumer contracts whilst simultaneously winning awards for their business contracts.

So, 3 1/2 years ago now, I made the jump. And they've been fantastic - on the few occasions I've needed to call to speak to them, they answer in seconds from UK based call centres and have always answered my queries well.

My signal rarely drops out - there are dead spots, of course, but not anything like there were with O2 (or even further back, with Vodafone on my works mobile).

I'm not dumb - I know there will inevitably be large areas of no or poor signal but so far I've been lucky enough to rarely find them.

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Relive your misspent, 8-bit youth on the BBC's reopened Micro archive

TonyJ
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Boolean Algebra!

Ahh I hated Boolean Algebra and truth tables with a passion. Something about it never went in properly.

Gimme a good Karnaugh map any day of the week :)

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TonyJ
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Re: Coding inspiration

"...I grabbed a copy of the source code to Christan Pinder's "Eltite: The New Kind" back when Braben had it taken down despite (or perhaps because of) Bell's endorsement. I've kept it compiling as newer versions of the Allegro library have been released, so I guess I should send a pull request to that Github repo...."

I believe he asked for it to be taken down because someone used the source to create a copy on a handheld device, and was selling them - in the back of my mind, it might even have been flogged as some king of "official" version.

0
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Google leaps on the platform formerly known as Firefox with $22m splurge for KaiOS

TonyJ
Silver badge

Re: More money equals more good

"...My (horribly expensive) contract with Three runs out soon - I'm genuinely considering the HMD/Nokia 8110 as an option now if I can find a decent sim-only contract that allows unlimited tethering. Having extra apps for services that my family use in the near future would cement this as an option - even if it means ceding a bit of privacy (because whatscrapp exists, and the phone comes bundled with farcebook).

Pair it with a chromebook/light laptop and I'm still spending less money over the length of a contract than I did with my current phone, and the functionality is at least the same, with the benefit of fewer things calling home, and the prospect of being able to do a lot more much more easily..."

Well...I hate to say it but 3 do a 30 day rolling contract on SIM only that has unlimited data for £35 a month that allows tethering.

I have on for my eldest lads' phone - he's done as much as 50GB tethered to his PlayBox and they never bat an eyelid.

I don't know (but would be happy to be corrected) of any other in that ballpark.

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On Kaspersky’s 'transparency tour' the truth was clear as mud

TonyJ
Silver badge

Re: Seriously?

"...For anyone to back the Russian government about anything is just ridiculous. It also means you don't have any regard for human rights.

It's amazing how people will hang on to conspiracy theories about MI6, CIA, NSA and believe Russia is okay. How stupid can anyone get?..."

Where has anyone stuck up for Russia and/or said they behave ok in comparison to other nation states?

What people are saying is that other governments don't always behave in ways that are either transparent or necessarily benevolent beyond serving their own needs and whilst it may be more prevalent, and even easier, to do and get away with in Russia, it's not solely them that misbehave.

You only have to read the information that Snowden leaked, or even look at the laws being passed in the UK that make snooping the norm to see our own governments' treatment of their own citizens.

People have also, quite rightly, asked the question of where's the proof that Kaspersky have done anything wrong?

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