* Posts by TonyJ

690 posts • joined 30 Dec 2010

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Putting the urgency in emergency: UK's delayed emergency services network review... delayed

TonyJ
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Re: FTMV (fiber to moving vehicle)

"...Think trams...."

Thank you...I now have the image of a 999 call in progress

"...ok and if you could now just drag them to your nearest stop..the address is...."

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Teensy plastic shields are the big new thing in 2018's laptop crop

TonyJ
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Come back to laptop after 10 - 15 minutes the USB drives plugged into it aren't seen by Windows any more. Unplug and plug back in and as is well.

Check device manager.

Probably has the little "Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power" box checked, under the Power Management tab.

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TonyJ
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Re: @Lee D

"...Did you know games are 64-bit only and demanding 16Gb+ RAM nowadays? That's not the top-end gamers only, but just to RUN the game on Steam..."

Gaming you say?

https://www.techspot.com/article/1043-8gb-vs-16gb-ram/page3.html

Ok, a little over a year ago and sure some things do benefit from more RAM for sure but the difference between 8GB and 16GB for gaming isn't half as big as most people seem to believe.

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This job Win-blows! Microsoft made me pull '75-hour weeks' in a shopping mall kiosk

TonyJ
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Re: The big question

"...Is about the role. Was it managerial and compensated as such, or was it just rated as managerial to avoid paying overtime?..."

You just reminded me of something else - I had a job for a large manufacturing company almost 20 years ago.

The salary and benefits (what few there were) was all agreed in the interviews.

When I got the contract to sign, the salary was 50 pence a year over the agreed amount.

I gave them a call to query it just in case (I was still fairly young and naive and had worries about things like would it change my tax rate or anything silly) and was told by their HR robot that it was just how their grading system worked and it's the salary band I fell into.

Fair enough I thought.

Except it turns out that 50p was quite important because it put me over the threshold whereby they stopped paying overtime...and it was quite a common practice they had going on.

Had they been up front, open and honest about it beforehand I'd have most likely accepted it for what it was as it was a job I really wanted but because they did it in such an underhanded fashion, I refused to do any overtime for the two years I worked there.

I'd forgotten that little gem til just now.

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TonyJ
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My own (UK) experience

I found early on in my career in IT projects as a lowly engineer that overtime was usually paid.

Moving up through the ranks in latter years, you'd be expected to put in extra hours as required (to a point) unpaid but the salary and benefits you got by that time tended to reward you for it.

However, once I'd stepped up to the really senior roles, it became untenable - I was finding myself working 14-16 hour days and often having to respond to calls at random times of the day and night for very little extra reward and it began to feel like my employer was starting to take the pee with their demands.

I spoke to them about it and was offered more money to compensate but that was missing the whole point of my lack of work/life balance.

So...I moved to another company with more money and fewer demands.

I don't totally blame my employers at the time - I could have refused to take on some of the extra work, or turned my phone off etc as well as take the extra money being offered.

But...never in a million years did it occur to me that I should sue them though as ultimately it came down to ME making the choices.

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Flight Simulator's DRM fighter nosedives into Chrome's cache

TonyJ
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Re: The path to hell

"...is paved with good intentions..."

What good intentions?

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Microsoft ends notifications for Win-Phone 7.5 and 8.0

TonyJ
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O2 sent me a Windows Phone 7

They sent me one back in the day to test.

Huge slab of a device.

Now the OS itself felt unfinished in many ways but was fairly intuitive.

But one of the things that I feel definitely helped it to an early grave was the decision by MS to release version 8 (I think it was - it might've been a 7.x - it was some time ago) but not have it compatible with the earlier hardware.

So anyone who'd bought into their platform was screwed over and why stick with a manufacturer that throws their devices under the bus one version later? Not even Samsung do that.

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UK names Russia as source of NotPetya, USA follows suit

TonyJ
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"...Malicious cyber?

Is that when the other person doesn't tell you their A/S/L?..."

Showing our your age there! ;-)

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TonyJ
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Re: So it was Russia

"...Couple that with the threat of firing the person who clicks on a bloody link/attachment without thinking, and we have the start of proper on-site protection...."

Don't be bloody stupid. The only thing that achieves is a culture of fear and blame where mistakes - often ones that begin as simple for the right people/person to correct without much ado - get buried out of fear until they become much bigger, much more difficult problems to handle.

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Hate to ruin your day, but... Boffins cook up fresh Meltdown, Spectre CPU design flaw exploits

TonyJ
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Re: Oh that's just great

"...Our 'usual suspects' will once again prove that anything that is built can be 'mis-used' in 'interesting' ways and 'new' vulnerabilities will be found !!!.."

As E.E. 'Doc' Smith put it in the Lensmen books:

"Anything that science can devise, science can analyse and synthesise"

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Data scientist wanted: Must have Python, spontaneity not required

TonyJ
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Re: Salary isn't just a number

"...Well done you for learnings a life lesson, are you 12 years old or something...."

That all you have to say on it? Some pointlessly inane dig made (of course) anonymously.

You do realise that the majority of people tend to work close to where they grew up? Likewise they tend to make lives for themselves there so if that happens to be somewhere were the cost of living is high they tend to just get on with it and accept it as being one of the facts of life.

I was once offered the chance to move to the Southeast of England - my employer offered a decent uptick in salary along with offering to pay for certain essentials to help the move.

But when I did the maths - even with the salary lift I'd have had to downsize my home and I live on the edge of a national forest with access to both the A1 and M1 within less than 30 minutes of each. With trains I can be in London in less than two hours should the need arise.

So having thought about it all I chose not to make the move.

That make me 12 as well??

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TonyJ
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Wow...

All that effort and cost to get your masters or doctorate to earn such a small amount.

You have to wonder if ROI is worth it these days.

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Equifax hack worse than previously thought: Biz kissed goodbye to card expiry dates, tax IDs etc

TonyJ
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@Charles...A sadly true comment. And an equally sad indictment of the world we live in today.

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TonyJ
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Things will never change

I mean where's the incentive?

Oops you done f****d up gents. Time to go. Have a multi-million <insert currency> severance package and good luck in the next role. If you need a reference, we'll be sure to put a good word in for you.

Only - and really only - when it begins to hit both the company AND the directors' pockets will they sit up and take notice.

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Home taping revisited: A mic in each hand, pointing at speakers

TonyJ
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Oh my...

Showing my age now although by the time I got into music in any small way we had tape recorders as part of a massive hi-fi unit that you could use to record the top 40 off of Radio 1 every Sunday whilst you tried to avoid the gobshite DJ talking over the end of each track.

And then of course we got dual-tap sytems which meant you could just copy your mates' mix or even their most recently acquired computer game.

Ahhh happy memories.

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Wish you could log into someone's Netgear box without a password? Summon a &genie=1

TonyJ
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But...but...but...hard coded back doors are good for security. No one will ever find and/or compromise them and/or put them into the public domain.

Move on folks...nothing to see here!

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From July, Chrome will name and shame insecure HTTP websites

TonyJ
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Re: Meh

"...Man-in-the-middle malware attacks..."

Except, when you work at many places using Bluecoat et al, they are MITM appliances.

Amazing how many tech folks still don't get that concept.

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TonyJ
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Re: Good Strategy?

Have to agree here - why the hell they buried it under F12 -> move the tabs right -> Security is anyone's guess.

Much easier when users could just click on the padlock to get information about certificates.

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Laser sauce, cheat code, jam seshs: The Waymo vs Uber trial kicks off

TonyJ
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One thing I am intrigued by...

...is how his ex-nanny seems to have such a perfect recollection of the things Levandowski was shouting all night - specifically the names.

In my limited experience, people generally remember the gist of things being said and might even remember a name or two, but that all seems to be rather verbatim.

Meh - either way it'll be interesting to see where this goes.

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Tower ProLiants on the warpath: HPE takes on Dell 'n' white-box gang in SMB space

TonyJ
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Re: What's the deal with firmware updates?

"..Do you have to sign up for a support agreement?.."

Not under warranty.

Register the device and you get access for the duration

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Women beat men to jobs due to guys' bad social skills. Whoa – you mad, fellas? Maybe these eggheads have a point...

TonyJ
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Re: Yet more contentless studies by academic hot air balloons?

The real world shows that engineering and abstract thinking is an occupation best left to the male brain. Other "brain-involving" occupations may show balanced or reversed ratios, it completely depends.

And it's a pretty well known fact that the way STEM subjects are generally taught from the earliest ages of childhood tend towards putting girls and women off. Perhaps, just maybe, if this were addressed as well as some of the rampantly stagnant sexist views that are clear in such industries, we'd see more women in them.

I don't know how LGBTUIOP brains would work, and I don't particulary care.

So...your sexuality changes your ability to think/do these jobs? Really?

As for brawn - yeah, the real world also shows things about that, in spite of gurrrll power propagandists telling whoever is ready to listen that women are excellent for firefighting, policing in diverse neighborhoods or military frontline duty (the last one is utterly retarded in more ways in one; also - want children? stay out of toxic industrial environments, lady!)

Seriously? I think the 1940's called and they'd like their ideas on sexual equality back.

Are you honestly claiming that women can't/shouldn't be able to choose careers in these fields? I know plenty of women who could kick the arses of, are fitter than and in many ways "better" than men. If you took your head out from your own posterior occasionally, you might notice them too.

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Knock, knock. Who’s there? Another Amazon Key door-lock hack

TonyJ
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Re: Hmmm....

"...The porch then provides cover for someone to attack the inner door by conventional means...."

Ah probably should've pointed out you can see right into it as the glass isn't frosted :)

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TonyJ
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Hmmm....

I would just about consider something like this on my outside door, as I have a porch and an inner door.

So for my very specific use case, having something on the outer door like this wouldn't be such a security risk as I can still utilise a good old fashioned physical lock on the inner door.

That said...rely on any of these IoT locks for the only point of security? Hell no!

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No Windows 10, no Office 2019, says Microsoft

TonyJ
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Re: just to it

"...Well, if you're forcing me to use MSAwful, I wouldn't want to be working for YOU either..."

We're on the same page.

I prefer to work with adults, not children who post stupid comments like that (anonymously of course) rather than accept basic truths such as the simplest that the vast majority of major business run mixes of systems chosen to fulfil the necessary function. That will inevitably be a mix of *nix and various flavours of Linux. It also pretty much inevitable they're going to run Microsoft software.

I absolutely love how so many espouse the freedom of choice. But not if that choice happens not to fall into line with their own narrow view of what is acceptable.

You realise this is how religions work right? Freedom to choose any you like but only this one is the right one...

Laughable.

And sure - downvote away but at least I have the courage to not post shit anonymously.

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TonyJ
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Re: just to it

Jesus christ...the ribbon has been around for 11 years.

The interface hasn't had a radical change since.

By all means bash them for the stuff they do. Not the stuff you didn't like over a decade ago.

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TonyJ
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Re: just to it

"...I've used LibreOffice for years. If my colleagues have a problem with the files I send them, it's their problem, not mine..."

What a frankly shitty attitude.

I bet they love the extra work you cause them just so you can sit in your ivory tower radiating smugness at them.

Back in the real corporate world, you wouldn't get within a mile of any of my teams. We're busy enough without needing another layer of complexity and stupidity making our lives more difficult. Frankly I wouldn't / won't tolerate such diva behaviour. Use whatever product you want, but with that approach it wouldn't be working with or for me.

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TonyJ
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“As the pace of change accelerates, it has become imperative to move our software to a more modern cadence. frequent and costly subscription based billing cycle”

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Amazon manages to find a mere sliver of profit – just $2bn – out of $61bn in end-of-year sales

TonyJ
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You make some good points there, Lost all faiith...

Throw in the inevitable extended journey to get to the town, where in our case, the parking is expensive in small bays.

The local council has all but killed the market due to increasing rents to unsustainable levels and to be honest, I'd much prefer not to be in a place where it seems like every third shop is either a charity store one selling random cheap clothing and "jewellery" or a pound tat emporium.

I can browse from my home, in comfort and read reviews etc before I commit to buying stuff.

It also tends to mean, as someone who mostly works away in the week, that I can actually spend my weekends being a dad to my kids and a husband to my wife.

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Dodgy parking firms to be denied access to Brit driver database

TonyJ
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Re: Petty Speeding

There's a stretch of road near my home that's had several fatal crashes in the last 18 months.

Despite lowering the speed limit to 50, it continues to happen.

So...for stretches like this, if the only way to save lives is to have cameras, so be it.

But how about more box junction cameras? The number of stupid, unobservant or simply selfish drivers that sit blocking junctions and adding to traffic problems is ridiculous.

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TonyJ
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Perhaps block the directors from having access too

Eventually they'll run out of friends and relatives to act on their replacement companies.

Funnily enough I've just responded to the courts about a parking fine issues in 2016. I parked at the same car park for weeks, paying on an app.

One evening I was poorly and fell asleep missing the alert on my phone.

As soon as I noticed the next morning, I paid again but by then I'd had a ticket.

The car park was 99% empty at night.

The best bits are that I have all the receipts up to and beyond the incident, I have the automated responses from the legal company showing I've tried to contact them and a copy of a their letter explicitly claiming I didn't.

I also have a screen shot of their own site not actually allowing me to pay when I decided it might be easier in the long run in a moment of weakness.

So all in all I am quite looking forward now to seeing them in court. Even if I lose at this point, it's only another 50 quid and some time so really worth having a go.

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IT 'heroes' saved Maersk from NotPetya with ten-day reinstallation bliz

TonyJ
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Pint

I hope

That all the staff that pulled this off were well rewarded.

Because frankly that's a phenomenal effort that deserves it.

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Death notice: Moore’s Law. 19 April 1965 – 2 January 2018

TonyJ
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"...Back in the 8-bit days of 64kB of RAM and no HDD, programmers learned to make neat and optimised code to work within the constraints. As memory increased, these skills withered and atrophied..."

I remember reading an article back in the day about the guy who was tasked with converting Sim City from the Amiga to the humble BBC.

Apparently, there was one routine in the Amiga that used considerably more memory than was wholly available on the Beeb.

And yet (apart from graphically of course), he pretty much nailed it with a like-for-like reproduction.

At college I had to learn to program in assembly - in hex - on "development boards" with <8KB RAM so it was imperative that anything you tried to do was neat.

Mind you I was never very good at it myself but some of the others there had a natural gift for it that was staggering.

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TonyJ
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Joke

"...It actually was comparatively slow 15 or 20 years ago. .."

Not like El Reg commentards to hold onto views they formed 20 years ago...

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Aut-doh!-pilot: Driver jams 65mph Tesla Model S under fire truck, walks away from crash

TonyJ
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Re: anti-collision

@John Arthur. I hit a lamp post last year. Slow (waking speed impact) - it managed to be in both my visual (turned head AND mirrors) and parking sensor blindspots.

It mashed the back quarter of the motor up unbelievably. Thank god I was going so slow.

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TonyJ
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Re: Darwin Robbed Again

@Lee D

A few years ago the motoring programme that used to be on Channel 5 (5th Gear?) did a little test where they towed a smart cart up to 70mph (might even have been more) and let it crash head on into one of those huge concrete "temporary" motorway barriers you see during roadworks.

Amazingly there was very little deformation of the car itself and even less of the safety cage. They could actually open the doors.

My immediate thought - actually later articulated by the presenter - was that as impressive as that was, the simple fact was that you wouldn't walk away from such an impact.

I think it was last year that NCAP celebrated 25 years of being around with some stats on how much more likely you are to walk away unhurt from a collision at various speeds than you were back then and it's staggeringly better.

They also had some videos of then and now vehicles - the vehicles back then just folded, effectively.

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TonyJ
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Re: anti-collision

@Tom Paine

Indeed...to bring their insurance costs down, a company I worked for some years ago sent all company car drivers on and advanced driving course.

I still remember seeing pics of - and being told that - a tree (even a relatively small one) is just about the single worst thing to collide with in a car as they are almost entirely immovable and are just the right kind of shape to cause the maximum amount of damage.

Stuck with me ever since.

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HMRC dev support team cc blurtfest: Over 1,400 email addresses blabbed

TonyJ
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Re: The CC error

It staggers me that so many people still don't realise there is something called MailTips built into Exchange that can do this kind of thing.

Since 2009!

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/exchange/2009/04/28/introducing-mailtips/

They can even be customised so there really is no excuse where Exchange and Outlook are in use.

Of course...that doesn't prevent someone sending them out in a badly written script.

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Smut site fingered as 'source' of a million US net neutrality comments

TonyJ
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Re: American democracy

"...Is it time to get the Brits in to run the place again?..."

Thanks for the vote of confidence but really...we can't run our own country properly right now.

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Mozilla offers sysadmins a Policy Engine for roll-your-own Firefox installs

TonyJ
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Re: ADMX files or go home.

1. Firefox is a cross-platform browser.

> Yes indeed but most corporations run Windows clients connected to an AD and it would be nice to have native controls from the actual software vendor

2. It is not a particularly onerous task to integrate policy files with / into your LDAP system, whatever schemata you use.

> It really is. First you have to know which files to target, as FF uses quite the mix to configure your settings. Then you have the massive issue of how do you actually target the correct FF user profile, since when you create a new one, it creates a randomised folder name to drop them it.

3. One gets the impression you are whingeing about something you do not have to pay for and likely were not going to use anyway.

> Well it wasn't me whinging but it's nice to have choice. Not everyone wants to use IE, Edge or Chrome but these are the browsers you are limited to right now if you want to manage via GPO. And trust me - I had to deliver FF into a high secure gov environment last year. It's a PITA

4. https://github.com/n8felton/Firefox-ADMX

> Yep not bad but in some environments such as the one above you have to be able to have full transparency of all software and add-ons. That's being able to trace right back to whom and where they originate from etc and that's not always easy.

Plus you run the risk of a new version of FF breaking third party tools (same as anything).

It was only recently that FF included the ability to utilise the Windows certificate store on a client machine. Before that, you had to package every certificate you wanted into FF (again, CCK2 becomes a godsend here) but then if you change one of them, you had to repackage it and then blow away users' FF profiles...so all their personalisations would be lost.

Ultimately, FF is simply not enterprise ready. Nor would I ever expect it to be.

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TonyJ
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Not sure what they mean here as you can already do the things listed with config files and although it's been a while since I was doing it, I seem to recall at least one of those files were JSON. Happy to be corrected on that though.

I know, Mozilla - how about actually providing a mechanism to manage FF from AD Group Policies?

I'd suggest anyone thinking of deploying FF in any kind of commercial/production environment get a hold of CCK2 to do it.

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Two things will survive a nuclear holocaust: Cockroaches and crafty URLs like ғасеьоок.com

TonyJ
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Joke

Joke

The version of that joke I heard recently was the three things that will survive a nuclear holocaust would be bacteria, cockroaches and the DFS sale

(one for Brits...for our cousins across the pond, DFS is a furniture store that seems to have a never ending sale of one kind or another being advertised)

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Make Apple, er, America Great Again: iGiant to bring home profits, pay $38bn in repatriation tax

TonyJ
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Re: Android

Re: Android

"Cheaper - worryingly so in some cases"

Worrying for whom? If you can't afford £1,000 for a top-of-the-line iPhone or £700ish for a top of the line Android (or you have more sense than money) then why not buy cheaper? If you don't need or want the latest 'features', again why not buy cheaper? Not everyone is dumb enough to buy into the annual "upgrade" mania.

"faster - maybe, for the first month or two, but degrades over time and, ime, ends up unresponsive"

Hahaha...really? I've either kept or passed on all of my Android phones for years and whilst none of us are into playing games etc on them, they've remained pretty much as fast as when bought with a little care and attention - even after the (admittedly few, in most cases) OS upgrades are applied. Apple...slowed down some of their older phones in the background because of battery wear. Or openly admit that newer OS versions will be feature limited and/or slow on older kit. So really horses, for courses, eh?

"fuck rounded corners - oh, I see, still upset by Apple vs Samsung......"

hmmm...'kay. You're holding it wrong.

That said I just looked around the office and funnily enough every handset in view has rounded corners...go figure. Who knew that lawyers are not like most other people?

I suspect the view from up on your soap box is a little low on the details. Perhaps climb down and take a look around occasionally?

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TonyJ
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Re: Academics

Iprofit, WeProfit, YouProfit

Business as usual.

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'No evidence' UK.gov has done much to break up IT outsourcing

TonyJ
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Government outsourcing...

The perils of outsourcing!

(Perfectly safe for work Dilbert strip)

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TonyJ
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Re: Endless

@AC, Re Endless:

Here's the thing though. About ten years ago I did my first foray into (relatively) large public sector working.

The company I was employed by at the time wasn't huge. It turned over around 30-35million a year.

The full value of the contract was around £15m

The contract was written such that it had checkpoint payments. So after each successful phase, a payment was due. If the payment didn't arrive, work would (and more than once, did) stop.

The contract was delivered ahead of time and under budget despite these occasional issues and large parts of it are only just being considered for renewal.

There is a perception that there is no control for the smaller companies but that isn't always true.

Now I do agree that had the costs being incurred were in the tens of millions then no, the company I worked for couldn't have funded it up front, but an awful lot of contracts aren't of this size but still go to the usual big companies that still fail to deliver and still get paid. And that needs to change

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Private submarine builder charged with murder of journalist

TonyJ
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How awful...

...for her but also for her family.

I can never (and truthfully hope to never) understand either what motivates people into such crimes to begin with but then the lies and manipulation of what they do/do not "remember" and the ongoing mental anguish that causes loved ones of the deceased is unfathomable.

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UK's Just Eat faces probe after woman tweets chat-up texts from 'delivery guy'

TonyJ
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So...

The driver was clumsy in his approach and should have had more common sense and this was not the right approach to try and talk to a woman. It was a creepy invasion of privacy and I'm not justifying it.

Given most of the readership here work in IT related fields I am sure we all know someone (or even many someones) who aren't that confident around the opposite sex face-to-face but find it much easier to communicate via other media.

I'm equally sure we've all come across similar creepiness over the years.

Given the driver has to have the customers' address by virtue of them delivering the food that's one thing you can't get away from but surely it's not beyond the realms of the likes of Just Eat to add some kind of text or voice based messaging to their app that is single session for the duration of the order then destroyed? That can also be tracked and stored for just this kind of incident.

JE's response to the complaint (and I agree it wasn't really their fault, directly) was still not good enough - it was very lacking in all the important areas.

But...let's not end up in a world where one sex trying to "chat up" for want of a better term a member of the opposite sex automatically becomes an offence. :(

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Veeam buys AWS EC2 instance backup and recovery biz

TonyJ
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"in January 20217"

Looking a long way into the future then........."

Gotta have a strategic vision.... ;-)

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Microsoft extends patent protection shield on-premises

TonyJ
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Re: Protection shield

"...or racket. "It'd be really bad if something bad happened to you so consider joining our platform" says MS..."

Unfortunately though, in a world where you can get sued for putting rounded corners on something or where patent trolls abound it's possibly not such a bad racket to have.

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Remember those holy tech wars we used to have? Heh, good times

TonyJ
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"...Am I showing my age if I bring up the holy tech wars of the 80s & 90s? ZX Spectrum vs C64 or ST vs Amiga..."

How dare you forget the Acorn crop! BBC and erm mumble Electron.

Some of us had parents that believed we should have an educational based machine, thank you very much! :)

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