* Posts by TonyJ

558 posts • joined 30 Dec 2010

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OnePlus cash equals 5: Rebel flagship joins upmarket Android crew

TonyJ
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"...I've got the barclaycard app on my OP5 and it works OK with 2 sims in..."

Perhaps Barclays have finally got around to understanding that dual SIM phones are a thing.

I'd be interested to know how long you've had it for though...mine would work for weeks on end then suddenly throw me to the new device registration screen.

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TonyJ
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By the way...if you have the Barclays mobile app don't go putting a second SIM in. They don't support it and after a week or so will revert to requiring you to re-register.

Took me a while to get to the bottom of that one on my OP2.

Don't know if that's still the case but worth bearing in mind.

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TonyJ
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I had a OPO & OP2

In fairness the OPO only remained in my hands long enough to list it on eBay as I'd had to replace my phone between ordering and delivery and it took many weeks.

The OP2...it started off as a decent phone. One of the reasons I purchased it was the promised regular security updates but they were few and far between coming roughly every 4 months.

No...my view of OP is that they're a massively successful marketing machine that just happens to produce a few phones.

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Microsoft hits new low: Threatens to axe classic Paint from Windows 10

TonyJ
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Re: Now just notepad, and we can write off builtin apps completely. @me

Let it go, 45RPM - these fora do seem to attract Mr/Miss/<insert your own title> Angry.

I got downvoted for pointing out that LIbreOffice now includes the option to have a ribbon bar.

I can only assume that, despite the fact I was simply pointing out an actual, factual, truth, that the ones who are still (ten years+) down the line foaming at the mouth of the temerity of MS to have added it with the release of Office 2007 - usually the same ones espousing the virtues of choice - hadn't noticed and will now have to turn that anger onto LibreOffice.

Me, personally, could see it actually helping the adoption of LibreOffice as I said earlier.

Anyway...let 'em vent and downvote mate. Life's too short.

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TonyJ
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Re: @TonyJ -- The end

You know that LibreOffice 5.3 has the option of a Ribbon Bar, don't you??

"...And you know that it's optional, don't you??.."

Let me add emphasis seeing as you clearly missed the word OPTION.

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TonyJ
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Re: The end

"...I can't believe anyone spent time creating that, but vive la differance, I guess..."

I can. If you take users of MS Office now - ones that have used it for the last decade (or longer in many cases) and plump any version prior to 2007 in front of them and they would ask where anything was.

I've tried it.

Other comments along the lines of being ugly are also mentioned.

If you want LibreOffice to really be taken up then it has to be compatible with* and even mirror newer versions of MS Office.

*Yeah I know...even MS can't guarantee compatibility at times.

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TonyJ
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Re: The end

Haha some of you need lives or at the very least to chill out more.

Downvotes for point out a fact.

Hilarious.

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TonyJ
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"...Mental note: before drinking the koolaid, save all the gadgets especially snipping tool...

Get a hold of Greenshot for that. You won't look back.

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TonyJ
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Re: The end

"...AND it WORKS BETTER because there's no GOSH DARNED FORNICATING FECAL-FACED DUCK-COITUS PILE OF EXCREMENT RIBBON BAR on it!!!.."

You know that LibreOffice 5.3 has the option of a Ribbon Bar, don't you??

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systemd'oh! DNS lib underscore bug bites everyone's favorite init tool, blanks Netflix

TonyJ
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Re: Crowdsource hit

"...Yeah, I really miss the times when you could make jokes and parodies on the internet without the secret police breaking down your door in the middle of the night...."

On the one hand I am in total agreement but that Lord or whatever he was actually put a statement onto (I believe it was) FB offering 5 grand for someone to run over a person he took a dislike to.

Imagine if you saw that about yourself. I think you'd be understandably upset and nervous and that's kinda beyond a joke.

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I've got a verbal govt contract for Hyperloop, claims His Muskiness

TonyJ
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"...A bomb or similar problem on a Hyperloop would probably be as devastating to the vehicle as one on a plane, and even more so to the support infrastructure, so I presume the "29 minute" journey will have 2 hours of security theatre and 30 minutes wait in baggage claim added to it? An ordinary high-speed train would probably be faster overall..."

Hmm you are probably spot on there. Traditionally, bombs in tunnels aren't that effective at causing major damage to the infrastructure - the blast basically passes outwards along the tunnel but with these presumably being closed-in segments that would no longer be true.

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TonyJ
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"...and yet both promises I feel will be broken..."

To be fair...I suspect it will be your football team that break the promise first. Well, every time.

Forever.

:)

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Breathless F-35 pilots to get oxygen boost via algorithm tweak

TonyJ
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You learn very quickly on CCR diving equipment that it's not a good idea to eat spicy food prior to the dive.

Or belch. You're breathing that same gas for the duration of the dive...:)

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TonyJ
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Re: Hypoxia?

"...Well from dive training we had ANOXIA which is a lack of oxygen and HYPOXIA which is excessive oxygen..."

Try again.

Hypoxia - lack of oxygen in the blood supply and tissues. Also anoxia but that's generally considered a severe form of hypoxia

Hyeroxia - excess of oxygen in the blood supply and tissues

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TonyJ
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Re: Why oxygen generators?

Well it depends on how they supply the pilots oxygen.

If it's a closed loop system then that will mean the gas they breathe out is cycled back through the loop, scrubbed of CO2 and analysed. If there's a requirement to top up the O2, then the required amount to keep the gas breathable will be added.

If it's not a closed loop, then the gas they breathe out is just vented away but I'd suspect it's not open as this would mean over 90% of the oxygen breathed in by the pilot would be wasted on exhale. Plus it's presumably closed due to things like the cockpit being sealed.

A closed loop also has the advantages that a) that 90+% of O2 isn't wasted - it's recycled round the loop and b) any O2 tanks will be smaller than otherwise needed.

I am coming at this from the perspective of a hypoxic trained closed circuit rebreather technical diver. With a pair of 3l cylinders (one for O2 and one for a diluent mix) I could potentially get around 6 hours underwater - I say potentially because various things alter that such as how long the scrubber material can last when removing the CO2, how warm or cold the water is etc etc. But compare that to diving on "open circuit" with 2 x 12l cylinders - they'd tend to last me for an hour of diving.

Also even as a diver you are trained to spot hypoxia, CO and CO2 buildup, Nitrogen Narcosis etc etc so I'm amazed that these pilots aren't being thoroughly schooled in this!

Oh and just an edit: the rate at which an individual metabolises O2 doesn't change between any changes in atmospheric pressure so no matter how high you climb or how deep you go, you will still burn O2 at the same rate.

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Another Brexit cliff edge: UK.gov warned over data flows to EU

TonyJ
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Re: "The potential downside of not getting this right is very serious,"

"...I am still wondering why I am being called a "Re-moaner"..."

Probably because the majority of vocal remainers were adamant that another referendum should be taken (presumably over and over ad infitium) until they got the result they wanted. Despite democracy not working like that

"...I guess this is the adult equivalent of being laughed at for being in the A-Stream at school by the idiots in the lower streams.

It seems this country STILL laughs at people with more intelligence than them (I was going to say higher education)...."

Also notable that the remainers seem to take on a very patronising "we know better" argument biased towards the whole "If you voted to leave you are a) a moron of massive proportions and/or b) a massive xenophobic racist".

No. No one actually knows what the ultimate outcome will be.

Some things will hurt. No doubt about it. How much? No one can say, yet, but there's bound to be a LOT of pain.

Some things will be better off. What things and how much? No one actually knows yet but probably not as much as exit voters hope.

Bit of advice - step down from your ivory tower of thinking you know best and that you are more intelligent than everyone else and look around. And just perhaps, try to see what caused that anger in the majority.

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UK.gov snaps on rubber gloves, prepares for mandatory porn checks

TonyJ
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Re: Conjours up the image ...

"...A picture of Theresa May smiling beautifically..."

Oh ffs! Did you have to?

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TonyJ
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1984

One step closer.

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Radiohead hides ZX Spectrum proggie in OK Computer re-release

TonyJ
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Re: Only a British would use a ZX spectrum for music...

"..Only a British would use a ZX spectrum for music..."

"Only a British"? WTF kind of language is that??

Try "Only a British group" or "Only a Briton" or even "Only a Brit".

Gotta love Simplified English (aka 'Murkan English)

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PC sales still slumping, but more slowly than feared

TonyJ
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Re: Microsoft learned their lession?

"...They are here to stay like that infernal ribbon..."

You do realise it's been TEN YEARS since MS introduced that infernal ribbon? Time to get over it maybe?

If you reallllly don't want it, you can always (and yeah you probably do) use Libre Office.

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TonyJ
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Re: 2007?

And that's the other good point - sling a relatively cheap SSD into an older machine and it'll feel brand new again, adding years of longevity.

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TonyJ
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Re: In my neck of the woods

You could well be right there. I bought a custom laptop two years ago from PC Specialist in the UK.

According to a promo vid they had on their site recently, they alone ship around 4,000 units a month. I know this is small fry compared to the big boys out there but that's one custom build just in the UK, so globally it must be big numbers.

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TonyJ
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Re: How much influence did Microsoft have in this?

"...I think 2 things are happening - not much is changing in workplace software to drive new desktops so they're being used for much longer than in the past. On top of that, there's a move for more use of mobiles for email and browsing...

Couldn't agree more.

In the corp world, more and more back end systems are being ported to have a browser-accessible front end instead of a traditional fat client which also adds up to needing a less powerful day-to-day machine.

I'm seeing places that feel no need to upgrade their hardware after 5 years let alone 3 any more.

And in the consumer world, who wants to turn even a laptop on and wait for it to boot, login etc just to browse a bit of web or do a bit of online banking when their phone or tablet is instant / always on and can do just the same job?

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Uncle Sam says 'nyet' to Kaspersky amid fresh claims of Russian ties

TonyJ
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Re: "whom do you trust?"

"...Well, given UK and USA intelligence are far more likely to be spying on me than the Russians, and that I'd be far more concerned about UK police battering my door in if I said or did something the UK government doesn't approve of than a police force on the other side of the world that doesn't give a shit about me, the logical answer would be Kaspersky.

Not that anyone has ever given any evidence of collusion as far as I can see and Kaspersky would have a lot to lose if they did..."

Totally agree.

Also anyone else remember that Kaspersky have a habit of blowing the whistle on such things...wasn't it them that alerted the world to the equation group?

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Judge used personal email to send out details of sensitive case

TonyJ
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Re: This is a worry

"...The fact that the article references sensitive personal data indicates that this judgment could be a family court judgment..."

Your investigative powers are astounding given the very first line of the article was this:

Concerns have been raised over a judge's use of his personal email address to send out a ruling in a family court case, which contained sensitive personal information.

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TonyJ
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"...I've see this type of thing happen a lot when people add their personal email accounts to their work Outlook profiles. They then send a work email straight after looking at their personal inbox and don't realise it'll be sent from that account. Not saying that's what's happened here, but it wouldn't surprise me..."

That was my immediate assumption as well.

Having all of your email accounts in one place can be handy but with that comes the chance you could send the wrong thing, to the wrong person(s) from the wrong account.

Another place to take care too, being the autocomplete feature for mail addresses. You need to be sure you're sending that wholly work-inappropriate joke to the correct person(s)

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TonyJ
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Re: @ Why a gavel?

"...There are many reasons. I'm sure if you try really hard you can think of at least one related to this story..."

You do realise that the question was asked because in the UK, judges do not use and never have used gavels?

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Is this a hotdog? What it takes for an AI to answer that might surprise you

TonyJ
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Missing "not"?

"...First things first: all AI jobs are equal, and the skills you need as an AI practitioner will vary depending on role..."

Shouldn't that read First things first: not all AI jobs are equal, and the skills you need as an AI practitioner will vary depending on role.

?

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Google Chrome's HTTPS ban-hammer drops on WoSign, StartCom in two months

TonyJ
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Re: Does anyone still use Google?

"...I'm not sure about that... let me Ask Jeeves..."

Pah! I will see your Jeeves and raise you one dogpile!

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One-third of Brit IT projects on track to fail

TonyJ
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Re: PMs - mostly bad

Mr Overlord you're spot on.

But in my experience it's not just the PM - I've worked with some truly excellent ones and I've worked with some who've required their job doing for them.

I believe it's actually a combination of the PM and the lead on the project. You need a lead who is not afraid to do just that - lead. To take accountability and to be vocal enough to push things through and argue a point.

Real world example: I started a new role and my very first day on site, I walked in to be dragged into a major incident call.

It turned out that we (the company I was working for) had rolled out patches to the customers' two primary SQL servers.

At 9am on a Wednesday.

And forgotten to untick the reboot on completion box.

So fast forward a week or so when I am now the architect on the change calls and I instantly make a bunch of enemies by rejecting another change for following week where they wanted to roll out some more patches. In working hours.

When I pushed for an answer as to why in working hours I was eventually told because they didn't like to pay the overtime to do it out of hours.

Funny but when I reminded them all there and then that this approach had cost them a £15k fine just a week before and that they were frankly insane to take that approach, a different one was suddenly agreed on.

The CTO of the customer wanted to be informed of every change in the shared data centre - not to veto them as we made it quite clear he hadn't the power for that - but to at least know up front if there might be any outages.

When he (literally) shouted at me for wasting his time with trivia, I quite calmly reminded him that I was doing him the courtesy of informing him of changes to OUR data centre which HE had requested we do but from that point onwards, if he rose his voice to me or my team without a damn good reason then in future he would be told post-implementation.

All too often I've seen projects if not outright fail, then at least get into difficulty because no one was prepared to be a thorn in the side.

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Microsoft brings caregiver leave home to US, plans to finish global rollout soon

TonyJ
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I worked briefly for Microsoft in Belgium.

Whilst the Belgian contingent were very odd - they had some very odd ideals and ideas - Microsoft on the whole were a decent outfit to work for, even then (mid-late 2009) and I cannot recall meeting anyone who didn't enjoy working for them.

So yeah, whilst you cannot argue their odd decisions and shark-like business ideals at times, as a people-oriented business, they've always struck me as one of the better ones.

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See you in 2023 – Bitcoin exchange Coin.mx bigwig gets 66 months in the slammer

TonyJ
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Yeah I could've picked one of many, but for some reason the story from HSBC popped immediately into my head.

One report of it, amongst many: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/nov/17/hsbc-swiss-arm-fraud-money-laundering-charges-belgium

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TonyJ
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So when would will see HSBC et al execs in the dock for enabling money laundering and tax evading as widely reported?

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Latest Windows 10 Insider build pulls the trigger on crappy SMB1

TonyJ
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Re: Revisionist History

"..I call BS! Which world had no malicious actors? Human nature being what it is should give a clue to those designing any system. There will always be the curious, the thrill seekers and the bad actors. There have been locks on doors since there were doors. To claim that things were otherwise is stupidity or lies. To operate as if there are no bad actors now... well, we can watch that play out with IoT among an unfortunate number of examples..."

Whilst you're right, I would suggest it was a less spiteful time - viruses didn't usually look to trash your system but would pop up an annoying message, for example, and hackers weren't after your bank login details (well, primarily I guess because there weren't online banking facilities then, just the occasional dial-up-modem type of connections).

Also the internet hadn't taken off like it would do a few years later - I remember reading an article (might even have been here on el reg) that talked about the Times newspaper accepting online subscriptions - you had to send a cheque to them.

So in general, I think it probably was a less confrontational and destructive if slightly naive point in time.

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Ex-NASA bod on Gwyneth Paltrow site's 'healing' stickers: 'Wow. What a load of BS'

TonyJ
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"...Still, I suppose, if the only people getting conned are the people who are into this shit, and if they feel better once their wallet has been suitably lightened, where’s the harm?..."

On the one hand, I tend to agree.

But on the other hand, you do get idiots who believe this kind of crap to the extent that they then start to believe the other crap about how medicines and medicinal science are all some big conspiracy to keep us ill.

Which, to be fair, if an adult is stupid enough to buy into it then good luck to them but then when they start to project those beliefs onto kids it becomes beyond harmful.

Silly us eh, preferring science and the scientific method over some random claims by actresses et al.

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OnePlus accused of installing cheat codes for benchmarks with new handset

TonyJ
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Just had a popup - downloaded and installed the June 1st security update

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TonyJ
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OnePlus 2 owner from new before swapping. In the 10 months of owning it, I got three OTA updates including the one to Android 7 - so TWO...yes, TWO security updates in almost a year... and I would check manually at least weekly as well as the automatic updates.

Contrast that to my Galaxy S7 (that was bought for me as a Christmas present - ironically the reason I'd moved away from Samsung to the OP was they committed to regular updates) which is on the May security patch and has patched monthly since December.

It is yet to be seen of course, at what point Samsung decide to stop patching it but so far it's been far superior to OP.

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TonyJ
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Oneplus... no compromises. Or security updates.

They do good marketing, I'll say that much.

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Stack Clash flaws blow local root holes in loads of top Linux programs

TonyJ
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Re: Unlock only the relevant bits for the relevant users.

Rubbish. You should be running the installer with administrative rights and I'm yet to find a piece of software that ordinary users run that re-writes the ACLs on either files or registry keys.

And even then... ever heard of documenting the fix?? Or perhaps scripting it. Old hat, eh?

And if you really find yourself in that position pit AppSense or heat (Lumension as was) on.

Come on. Stop perpetuating the lazy lie.

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TonyJ
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Re: User friendly solution

"...From the article: "The fix, by the way, is to rebuild and reinstall the dynamic library ld.so and executables with gcc's -fstack-check feature"

Again, this is why flavours of Linux have difficulty being accepted in the mainstream for use by Joe Public

/ Rejects asbestos jacket for shield of truth..."

No, I don't think it is.

That's the immediate fix and it will undoubtebly be rolled out as a mainstream fix at some point down the line and is only the same as MS releasing patches before patch Tuesday - it tends to be IT pros that go looking for them, not your average user.

The two things, in my personal opinion, that have held Linux back from the desktop have been the fact that your average Jill or Joe user goes to their local PC World, and buys whatever is off the shelf that slimy salesperson with no real knowledge sells them. That'll come with a copy of Windows.

And...they are happy because that's what they use at work.

Secondly, there's been a traditionally contemptuous barrier to entry on some of the more mainstream Linux forums, such that when they hear about it and decide to give it a go, they get shot down in flames.

Now I don't know if the latter is still true today, to be honest as I've had no reason to frequent any forums for some time.

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TonyJ
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FAIL

Re: Security 101: If they're sitting at the computer...

".. has to run with administrative privileges..."

The number of times I see this crap regurgitated.

Real world experience of putting Citrix in from the days of yore when most application vendors would ask "what is that?" prove this is utter, total, rubbish. I am yet to see an application that has to run under administrative access with just a little bit of work.

Get a hold of Sysinternals' tools (filemon/regmon as they were and now morphed into procmon) and run it filtered on the application executable and it will show you were access denieds are occurring.

Unlock only the relevant bits for the relevant users.

Job done. Applications that run without having to open the world.

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Ever wonder why those Apple iPhone updates take so damn long?

TonyJ
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Devil

Re: @TonyJ

No thanks. I stopped using iPhones about 3 years ago. Currently have a nice shiny S7 Edge with a much more intuitive OS on it, whatever Google's faults (and they are many).

More likely you lot are getting upset because someone (well, some ones, here) call Apple's shoinky practices out for what they are.

Or maybe I'm just holding it wrong.

Wanna herd sheep? Release a new phone.

Yet to see Android users drilling holes in their shiny...

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TonyJ
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Re: @TonyJ

How do you know exactly what they did or did not change? Please give authoritative sources;

They didn't "fix" the location they explained what they use it for;

Go check the past stories about the other "diagnostics" functions I am referring to.

Meh. You clearly know more than the rest of us. I bow to your supercilious superior knowledge of all things Apple.

Personally I think they're all as bad as one another. I just don't get butt f*ck*d by my chosen provider minus sufficient lubricant whilst claiming it feels sooo so goo because they tell me it is.

In the kingdom of the blind, the one eyed man is king. I don't see anyone bowing to you yet.

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TonyJ
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Re: I wonder

"...Sorry, this is Apple we're talking about not Google. They actually respect user's privacy..."

Hahahahahaha!

Hahahahahahahahahaha!!

Seriously...get off the koolaid. You think it's ok to test on every device out there without express permission?

You think it went well, despite the article and other posters explicitly stating that they had issues and Apple themselves rushed out an additional update?

You casually forget all the times it's been reported in the past about Apple's tracking movements, having telemetry subsystems that despite being outside of their own security models and working at such low levels as to be all but invisible are just harmless diagnostics?

Your blind faith in the cult of Apple is astounding.

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HPE hatches HPE Next – a radical overhaul plan so it won't be HPE Last

TonyJ
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And here we go...

A once giant of engineering in the truest term - R&D being carried out by truly ingenious persons to bring genuinely innovative products to market being torn apart by an accountant who probably thinks that IT/Engineering just "get in the way of business".

What is wrong with these companies? They hire people in at the top who clearly neither understand nor care about the businesses they are pulling down around them as long as they get it on their C.V.s and get their handsome bonuses and exit payouts.

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France and UK want to make web firms liable for users' content

TonyJ
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This really is taking the piss.

So known radicals, including one who went on a fucking television programme to tell the world his views and all of them already known to authorities would have been stopped if only Facebook and Google et al could be held accountable?

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Sharp claims Hisense reverse-ferreted its US telly licence deal

TonyJ
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Ah Sharp

I used to work in their (part-owned by Sharp) third party repair outfit.

Some things about Sharp back then (over 20 years go this, mind you):

They had a genuine customer-first mentality. If the customer said it was faulty, it was. Repair or replace it.

The quality of their kit varied. The business side of things (laser printers [yup...they made them back in the day], photocopiers and laptops were superb and I was told back then that Sharp created the first colour TFT screens. The story went that they had an initial 98% failure rate so to recoup costs, they chopped them up and sold them to Casio for use in things like mini TVs) were generally well designed, well thought out and worked reliably.

There consumer side of things was hit and miss - higher end gear tended to be on a par with your Sony's et al back in the day.

But they also bought into some fads that didn't take off - they had a Newton-type thing (as I recall, a rebadged Apple but memory could be failing), they made a large range of usable PDA's but lost out to the excellence of Psion and they invested heavily in mini disk technology and camcorders.

All that aside though, unless there was something written into the contract that HiSense could and would market the Sharp brand as the premium of the two, I cannot see how Sharp can win this one.

Oh and I have a 40" Hisense too - not the best out there with a lot of backlight bleeding on dark images but for the ridiculous low price I paid at the time, it's not a bad piece of kit.

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UK ministers to push anti-encryption laws after election

TonyJ
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Re: Haystacks

"I think it is about being able to monitor and control dissent in society. "

Not quite. More like:

I think it is about being able to monitor and control dissent information flow in society.

Namely being able to censor what the great unwashed public get to find out about our elected leaders.

Cos...think of how the expenses scandal unfolded...now think of the children and how we could've protected them from that awful mess if only they hadn't been exposed to the facts...

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TonyJ
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Re: Known to Authorities.

And let's not forget that apparently TWO people he went to university with called a terrorist watchline to report his extremist views and behaviour.

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DeX Station: Samsung's Windows-killer is ready for prime time

TonyJ
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Meh

Re: Linux

"...Can it run generic Linux.."

The Register's version of "Can it run Crysis?"

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