* Posts by ShelLuser

2473 posts • joined 19 Dec 2010

Kaspersky cybercrime investigator cuffed in Russian treason probe

ShelLuser
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@AC

Just because El Reg tries to make that connection doesn't mean it's also actually there. Until they reveal what he has been charged with you simply can't draw conclusions like that.

Or to make this more obvious: as El Reg mentioned he worked in the cybercrime unit between 2000 and 2006. He joined Kaspersky in 2012. Leaving a 6 year long gap in between and many (bad) things can happen in 6 years time.

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Penguins force-fed root: Cruel security flaw found in systemd v228

ShelLuser
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@Gerhard

"Thanks to SystemD I finally have shared filesystem clusters booting correctly the first time without a ton of hackery. (dovecot depends OCFS2, OCFS2 depends on iSCSI, iSCSI depends on networking) "

You almost make it sound as if this wasn't possible without systemd. I guess it's a miracle then that the process of setting something like this up on FreeBSD has always been relatively easy. And FreeBSD knows nothing of systemd.

Instead of thanking systemd I can't help wonder if you shouldn't have been scorning some package maintainers for creating a dependency hell instead. Also: merely removing said dependency hell did not remove nor change the underlying mindset. Within that reasoning I think its safe to conclude that systemd didn't fix anything, it only postponed the inevitable.

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DDoSing has evolved in the vacuum left by IoT's total absence of security

ShelLuser
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Holmes

Welcome to monetary vs. ethics 2.0

Sure, the lack of security in those devices is indeed the culprit causing it all but in my opinion the actual underlying issue is money. Plain old cashing in, grabbing the cash without having to do too much in return.

Or to put this simple: companies don't care. At all. And to make this even worse our (European) governments are far too busy debating the risks of cookies and how that might track customers (which, in all honestly, does have a sense of truth in it of course!) but who will then also totally ignore any requirements of ensuring (or trying to ensure) Internet safety.

Now... Of course this is a very hot topic. I mean, I could easily argue that it might be a good idea to set up a European firewall which can be used to shield us from obvious hacked (Chinese & Russian) machines (the ones every sysadmin knows about when they go through their auth or mail logs), but we all know that's a very bad idea because it can (and will) eventually be used for other censoring purposes.

But why don't we have anything like this yet on a smaller scale? When I provide plenty of logs and evidence that a machine somewhere in Holland (where I happen to live) has been compromised and is actually causing problems on the Internet then it remains to be seen if the hosting company will actually take action. Some of those which value their reputation a bit will, but most who value their income more tend to ignore it.

And the worst part of this is that our political leaders have basically done nothing what so ever to try and put a stop to all that. If I take such a story to the police here then I'll have a very hard time explaining what exactly is going on and I'm 100% sure that the outcome will only consist of me losing a few hours of my time (assuming they'll actually listen to me for that long).

Yet on the other hand the government here is all too eager to utilize the Internet for their own gain. Government information? Websites. Tax applications? Digital. Heck, there has even been mentioning to try and remove snail-mail from our tax department entirely and move it all to the digital age. Although this may sound wonderful to some of us it also overlooks the main issue here: our government gladly accepts the benefits from the digital age (setting up information on a CMS is far more cheaper than having to print & post it to individuals) but cannot be bothered to take up their responsibility.

Oh, sorry mr./mrs. politician, my deepest apologies. Of course you did act on your responsibilities. If you hadn't then we didn't have to click yes on nearly every frickin' website around because of something as trivial as a cookie. Yet when it comes to ignoring signs of a compromised machine which could be used for god knows what then it's all different and no penalties or regulation exists. At all.

So yeah, picture me very surprised how this Internet of broken Things mess has come about. Because.. what negative effects will this have for the manufacturers anyway? None!

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Solaris 11.next plan brings continuous delivery of OS upgrades

ShelLuser
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WTF?

Enterprise != consumer market

"Continuous delivery is certainly what the cool kids are doing with software these days, so it's hard to fault Oracle on that front. And upgrades to major OS releases can be painful for ISVs and users alike. Removing the need to cope with big releases isn't terrible news."

You're right, it's not terrible news, it's horrendous. I'd like to know who those cool kids are, I assume Microsoft's Windows 10 is being addressed here?

The problem with this release model is that it makes things more dangerous and less controllable. It may work on a consumer level but most certainly not in the enterprise.

Example: FreeBSD's support cycle. As you can see there are 2 versions being maintained at the time of writing: 10.3 until April 30, 2018 and version 11 until 2021. Here's the thing: everyone knows where they stand here. When / if 10.4 comes out then you'll know that it won't contain major changes, new features to cope with, etc, etc. You'll know that it's still 10.x yet with several bug fixes. So upgrading is a relatively easily calculated risk.

This model also gives you plenty of time to prepare for an upgrade to 11, which will eventually be required. But as you can see here we have a whole year to plan for it. Actually a little more because 11 was released last year, and the end of support for 10.x has also been known for a while now.

But this new "hip(pie?) model" changes that. Now it can very well be possible that a minor release ships both a desperately required bugfix yet also comes with a totally undesired new or changed feature. That's simply not something which is always doable, depending on the environment of course.

What if the vendor decides to remove a specific functionality which is actually an extremely important detail within your environment? And don't say that it wouldn't happen, because those "cool kids" you spoke of have shown otherwise multiple times already.

For me this is far from providing better service to the customers, this is more or less shoving all required updates onto one huge pile and letting the customers sort out the mess. Less work, so lesser costs, for the provider and all the more burden for the customers / consumers.

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We've found a ‘vaccine’ for fake news. Wait! No, we really are Cambridge researchers

ShelLuser
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Black Helicopters

Is this about fake news, or hidden ways of censorship?

"The study, of more than 2,000 US residents, presented participants with two claims about global warming. Researchers found that when presented consecutively, the influence well-established facts had on people were cancelled out by bogus claims made by campaigners."

And what "facts" would that be, considering that global warming is one of the most hottest topics for debate around the world right now?

My problem with this study is that it fully avoids the main issue: not relying fully on a single source of information, but instead also being able to challenge and question it. Even if the news you hear is something you might like or can agree with. Always be a little skeptical about the things you see and hear around you.

But it seems that this study fully seems to focus on people who "need" to be able to follow (and trust) one single news source. Call me skeptical if you will, but all that will achieve is making it easier to apply censorship. If people stop being skeptical and blindly believe what they hear "because the news source is trustworthy" then it will only be a matter of time before someone feeds them with different news through that same "trusted" news source.

The kind of news which doesn't have to be totally untrue, but which might suit their purposes just a little bit better.

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Resistence is futile: HPE must face Oracle over Solaris IP

ShelLuser
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I don't understand HPE here...

Everyone who has been following the news around Solaris knows in what dire situation whOracle has maneuvered it. On a personal level I think it's an outrage to see how disrespectful Solaris is being managed here, a true Unix environment which has such a rich history behind it...

But enough semantics. I don't get it why HPE would even try to get into this hornets nest in the first place? I can understand that they smell revenue (support costs for Solaris became ridiculous after Sun was taken over) but surely there are much more profitable and reliable ways here?

For example by persuading companies to move away from Solaris. There are liable alternatives, even if you take ZFS and Zones and everything else into consideration. First I'm looking at a personal favorite of mine called FreeBSD, but the other BSD's should provide decent candidates as well. And what about HP's own Unix brand HP-UX?

But with the way Oracle has been manifesting itself as of late what else would you have expected to happen here?

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Welcome to the Wipe House: President Trump shreds climate change, privacy, LGBT policies on WhiteHouse.gov

ShelLuser
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@AC

"Real Americans are embarrassed this orange bag of trash made the cut for being a leader of anything other than a used car lot."

The funny thing though is that this same thing happened when Reagan had just been elected. People were certain that it would turn into a disaster because wasn't he merely an actor? That should get ugly really soon, because the guy had 0 political experiences.

And now most people around the world can agree that Reagan was one of the best presidents the US has had.

I'm not claiming that this is going to happen here as well, mind you. All I'm saying is that seeing is believing. The guy might just surprise you, if you give him a fair chance of course.

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Opera scolds stale browsers with shocking Neon experiment

ShelLuser
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Trollface

Win10!

I'm actually an Opera user and I really enjoy the browser as-is. I think you guys got it all wrong though, this is just their attempt to appeal to the Win10 users :D

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Microsoft's Blue Screen of Death dead in latest Windows 10 preview

ShelLuser
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Windows

@czrly

It's even worse than that:

"Screencaps can now be focused on a smaller area, so you don't need to grab the whole page for notes."

This is a non-feature, instead it's something which already exists within OneNote. I'm still using Office 2010 and guess what: OneNote allows me to do Win-S, a cross hair appears, and I can select exactly the area of the screen which I want to capture. It even allows me to use OCR on this picture (though.. it's not the best).

So how can this be a new feature in Win10/Office365 while Win7/Office2010 could already do this?

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Ransomware scum: 'I believe I'm a good fit. See attachments'

ShelLuser
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A little bit torn with my opinion...

Of course I don't condone this and those asshats should be taken care off by law enforcement.

But on the other hand I also couldn't help grin a little bit: "Here's hoping those Enterprise bosses didn't outsource their IT departments". Because that is in my opinion the other side of the medal.

It is definitely no excuse, but yeah...

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Assange confirmed alive, tells Fox: Prez Obama 'acting like a lawyer'

ShelLuser
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A bit transparent...

Regarding Ms. Palin all I can say is: "The enemy of my enemy is my friend". Now that Wikileaks targets people they don't like they're suddenly oh so sorry and fully supportive. Until that time when they show another blatant disregard of the rules and get called out for it again.

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Those online ads driving you bonkers are virtually 'worthless for brands'

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

Advertising in general is useless...

Some time ago in Holland a global company ("Unilever") wanted to get rid of a specific brand of butter ("Zeeuws Meisje") and so they decided to stop all marketing activities. They were convinced that this would be enough to slowly kill off the brand after which they could take it out of the market.

Result? After 6 months it turned out that the sales figures had gone up, not down.

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Apple sued by parents of girl killed by driver 'distracted by FaceTime'

ShelLuser
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"While it's perfectly understandable to sympathize with the Modisette family, it's hard to guess how this case will stand up in court."

The only thing I sympathize with is the loss of a child because some idiot didn't keep his attention where it belonged: on the road.

But unfortunately I can't sympathize with this family when it comes to their lawsuit because I consider that it to be plain out ridiculous. What's next? Sue a beer brand when a person has been drinking too much? If they would have targeted their anger at the moron behind the wheel, the one who killed their daughter then they would definitely have my sympathy, but not with this. This doesn't sound like a call for justice to me.

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Folders return to Windows 10's Start Thing

ShelLuser
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@MyBackDoor

how long can they keep their head turned?

Until that time when they realize the effects it's having on their wallet (income).

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Barcodes stamped on breast implants and medical equipment

ShelLuser
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Just a matter of time...

If they do start using NFC then I'll bet it's only a matter of time before we get to read "reliable" study results which tell us things like: "Women with a breast implant buy a lot more lingerie than women without".

No, that's not big brother, that's your honest marketing research. Honest! ;)

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How Google.org stole the Christmas Spirit

ShelLuser
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Megaphone

Nothing new...

It's always an issue with charity, some people really try hard to help out others in need while there are also those who try to make a (luxurious) living out of it (the well known directors and managers of charity organizations which get a fat monthly paycheck for all their "hard" work, while the volunteers are the ones who go through weather and rain to actually get things done).

I think a better example would be Bill Gates. He's known for his high donations to charity. However, most of those donations end up in a foundation run by none other than Bill Gates and his wife themselves. Now, that organization does a very fair share of helping out. But their expenses don't always match up to the large sums of money which are going in.

But no matter how you twist or turn it: bottom line is that there are a lot of people profiting from charity, and I'm not referring to those who actually need it.

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Netgear: Nothing to see here, please disperse. Just another really bad router security hole

ShelLuser
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Trollface

It's not a bug, it's a feature!

What has happened here is that someone accidentally discovered the NSA backdoor. That's right: this was an intended feature to be used by the NSA, probably thought off by some government drone.

Surely you can't blame them for overlooking the possibility that others might attempt to use it as well? ;)

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MicroServices-friendly Java lands on Eclipse

ShelLuser
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I dunno...

I know Java has lost some serious love and gained a severe reputation dent due to the recent actions of (wh)Oracle (no, that's meant as: who? rcale :P) (yeah, sure!) :) Even so... I can't help still seriously liking the language for all its potential and provided options. Although I obviously am happy that all my (FreeBSD) servers fully utilize OpenJDK which doesn't suffer from the recent licence crapola.

But yah.. I can't help wonder: do we really need yet another Java container? I know they focus themselves on microservices, but I also think the gap between 'normal' and 'micro' (or embedded) has also become a lot more vague than it was in the old days.

And having said that I also can't help if it wouldn't have been a better move to put some extra weight onto already existing projects. In this case specifically Apache Tomcat (Java EE servlet container) and Apache TomEE (Java EE EJB container). The market is already pretty fractured and thanks to the Oracle overlords extremely fragile.

Just my 2 cents of course.

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Bad news: Exim hole was going to be patched on Xmas Day. Good news: Keyword 'was'

ShelLuser
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@Epoch

"This isn't a feature release: it's a time-sensitive security release which will disclose a security vulnerability upon publication."

Minor security release. It's not a remote exploit of some sort, but an information disclosure issue.

But even so: the same story applies. Do note that the complainers didn't do so because of the timespan (I can respect that people want to get the fix ASAP) but merely because it just so happened to be on a Holiday.

SSH is your friend here IMO.

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ShelLuser
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WTF?

Sysadmins, or....

"System administrators were stunned by the suggestion that a patch for the vulnerability would be released on December 25 when pretty much everyone working in IT will have the day off."

Do these people even realize what kind of software they're using? Open source, almost per definition, is a community effort and has never really bothered itself too much with commercial interests. Heck, I can even take this further: the Holiday season, or basically any day off is per definition a period where a lot of heroic geeks get a lot of work done on their beloved projects. Have we already sunk so deep that we totally forgot and ignore the very basics of open source and how it all started?

Boohoo, a MTA project which you can pick up for free and which also gets updated from time to time (also fully free of charge!) decides to release during a vacation. How inconsiderate! If only we had a way to log onto our servers from a distance and perform the update from there. Oh wait, we have. It's called SSH!

I think some people should think twice before complaining about things like these and stop to think how much they're actually contributing to these projects themselves for doing what they do. If you want a cozy release date which never conflicts with your precious vacation then please consider using a commercial product such as Microsoft Exchange. It'll cost you some, but at least you'll have solid guarantees that whenever you're celebrating Christmas so are the programmers. So no fear of any updates getting released at inconvenient times.

Sorry for the rant, but I think some people should seriously stop taking everything within open source projects for granted.

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EU accuses Facebook of providing incorrect info on WhatsApp buy

ShelLuser
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Why not actually demand a FIX for a change?

"Facebook has until Jan 31 to respond. The commission could impose a fine of 1 per cent of Facebook's turnover if its concerns are confirmed. Last year, Facebook earnings amounted to $17.9bn (£14.5bn)."

And here we go again: money talks. So how is handing out a fine to Facebook going to fix things for those consumers who might have been affected by this? The way I see it all this does is to help pay for the way too high paychecks these sleeping politicians get. And the people who it actually concerns... Well, they were simply out of luck.

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Why don't people secure their IoT gadgets? 'It's not my problem'

ShelLuser
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Vendors are to be blamed too

"Why such disinterest? According to Rouffineau, almost two thirds of respondents felt that keeping software updated – their security – was not their responsibility."

Well, duh. This is not something exclusive to consumers by the way. Have you ever tried to track down spam or break in attempts on your servers? I have. And I have warned many ISP's and data centers alike that something was "totally not right". With all the required logs to show them exactly what was going on.

The result? Well, nothing of course. At that time (I was still young) I couldn't understand and also eventually gave up my tracking efforts. At later times I finally started to realize the obvious: although it might have been an affected machine, it was still a paying customer. Dun, dun duuun.

But vendors...

How many times have we read already that some things stopped working after a Windows update? Now, Windows is something people can usually fix themselves, but what do you do when your cool "Internet gizmo" stops responding?

Or what to think about games which get updates which change the entire nature of the game?

I think that those reasons should be taken into consideration as well.

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Backup Exec console goes AWOL

ShelLuser
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This is why...

You don't back up to the cloud or use online backup software. Instead get yourself something which can be used offline. Also get yourself a cheap NAS or even an external USB disk will do, then you can plug it in and back up your stuff to it. Just leave your computer running for the night and you should be fine.

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Brussels cunning plan to save the EU: No more Cookie Popups

ShelLuser
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Too little, too late!

Do you really think that websites are going to change their current cookie routines? That takes time and time is money, so I sincerely doubt it. The damage has been done, and we all know which "geniuses" we have to thank for it.

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Oracle finally targets Java non-payers – six years after plucking Sun

ShelLuser
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Minecraft?

I can't help wonder how much Microsoft and/or Mojang are going to get involved with this. Also considering how Minecraft, one of their main products, is totally build on Java.

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ShelLuser
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@James

"Sounds like a good way to alienate people you should be develping a good relationship with."

Ayups, and this is one of the main reasons I seriously dislike (wh)Oracle. Their approach is the sole reason why my company completely stopped using Solaris and migrated to FreeBSD (a move which we never regretted): right after the takeover we were told that we could renew our support license for Solaris, but it would "only" cost us 3 times more. Of course with getting less service back in return.

Well, it worked: we dropped Solaris and in the mean time (between then and now) also advised many of our customers to do the same. Many did. Some decided to migrate to Windows Server, others started using Linux and some also followed our example of using FreeBSD.

But at this time none of our clients is using Solaris anymore to my knowledge.

I guess this is Oracle's way of ensuring that less people continue to use their products.

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Sysadmin 'fixed' PC by hiding it on a bookshelf for a few weeks

ShelLuser
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Pint

So did he get a transnote or...

"But this user had leverage and “the call came from above that he absolutely needed this and we were to order it in immediately.” So Aaron swapped it for his perfectly functional laptop and got on with other things."

So picture me confused: would I be right when I assume that Aaron did order the Transnote but then swapped it with his own laptop and gave that to the user? There's a description for that: swindling.

And it also makes me wonder if the user was really making user errors, or if things simply didn't work right because of the change in hardware.

Either way, Aaron is not fully without fault here.

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Learn your way round the Internet of Things in a day? Course you can...

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

Let me fix that for you...

"Building IoT London"

Don't you mean: "Building IoBn London"? The Internet of Botnets?

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Is your Windows 10, 8 PC falling off the 'net? Microsoft doesn't care

ShelLuser
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Joke

@Gert

Are you kidding? It's working like a charm and the end results are even better than expected.

You see: the whole underlying reasoning here goes much deeper. All those users who fell off the Internet? It's easy: they shouldn't have bashed Windows 8 and Windows 10 and kept on using it. If you hate Windows 10 you don't use it. Everyone knows how to downgrade to Windows 7, it's easy! (please look at the icon! ;)). So if you continue to use Windows 10 and make Microsoft look bad you're a hypocrite.

And so, to protect us from the hypocrites, Microsoft has finally launched their latest product: Microsoft HypoWay. It artificially scans your Windows environment for any back traces of Windows and Microsoft negativity and if it finds some then your Internet connection will be throttled for an X amount of time. That will teach you not to hurt an already fragile business model by spreading bad rumours!

So obviously Microsoft won't "fix" this because there's nothing to fix, this isn't a bug: it's the latest feature! And what an amazing one it is, Microsoft Answers has never been so relaxed as it is now!

Now, if you'll excuse me, I have a Java project to work on. It's going to be amazing: we're building a desktop application which has web based support (Java EE through Tomcat) for specific features. It's going to be exciting: Enterprise JavaBeans to support the JavaBeans inside my application. I like c# and ASP.NET a lot as well, but this interaction between the desktop and a web service is where Java can seriously have the upper hand in my opinion. And also... eouwiofpunj128739@&*()@

<connection reset by peer>

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Ransomware scum offer free decryption if you infect two mates

ShelLuser
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This sounds serious!

"tells users they have a week in which to pay one one bitcoin (US$770) in order to have their files decryoted."

Having them decrypted is one thing, but decryoted makes it sound so much more bizarre!

(sorry, couldn't resist) :)

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Linus Torvalds releases 'biggest ever' Linux 4.9, then saves Christmas

ShelLuser
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Windows

@AC

Apart from the above comments, what's wrong with a cli anyway? One of my most used keyboard combo's on Windows is Win-R cmd. You do the math ;)

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Software can be more secure, says NIST, and we think we know how

ShelLuser
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Black Helicopters

Start by actually writing your own code!

I can't help wonder if a lot of problems aren't caused by the over(?)usage of libraries. Sometimes certain libraries even utilize other libraries so then you have to deal with multiple dependencies.

Now, don't get me wrong: sometimes using a library or API is simply the only way to go. I'm not denying that fact. But sometimes people obviously don't use a certain library to gain certain functionality, but more so to gain easier functionality. Where the library they're using merely provides an easier way to utilize the (original) library which the programmer (in my opinion): should have been using.

The problem with this approach is that you're only expanding possible risks. The more external libraries you use, the higher the risk that one of them could cause a problem.

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Chap creates Slack client for Commodore 64

ShelLuser
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Facepalm

Re: Major Technical Mistake!

That's a Commodore 128.

You really need to get your facts straightened out. A C128 consisted of both a keyboard and a "PC-like" case, not a single keyboard. And this is most definitely a C64, I know because I own one myself as well. That ribboned back was ideal to put the 5.25" in, especially when messing with multi-floppy games.

Of course this C64 also had a caveat: the SID chip in this one is upgraded. It still has the famous C64 sound, but it's still different. And such I ended up with more C64 machines because I also wanted the old one :)

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SHIFT + F10, Linux gets you Windows 10's cleartext BitLocker key

ShelLuser
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@Daniel

Well, this isn't something limited to Microsoft you know. Linux & BSD have also had their fair share of local exploits.

Which is why I think your comment isn't fully fair. I mean: no computer is safe when an attacker has physical access. Including those which have applied HD encryption.

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What's the first emotion you'd give an AI that might kill you? Yes, fear

ShelLuser
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Barriers?

Wouldn't it be more feasible to simply apply barriers into the programming which determine to which extends a mechanism is allowed to operate? Because isn't this exactly what we teach our children? You teach them their limits and to respect those limits. Failing to do so can result in punishments.

But with an AI I would think that you have much more control over it. After all, you can program it and therefor influence its behavior. As such: why not simply apply barriers?

Like the classic 4th rule in Robocop or the 3 laws of Robotics.

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The Internet Society is unhappy about security – pretty much all of it

ShelLuser
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Its a double edged sword...

Sure, I agree that recent developments have shown us that user security can be quite lacking within some companies. I'm sure we all remember the classic stories about those companies who stored their user credentials in plain text, which included passwords. Way to go!

But on the other hand I also think it's fair to say that in some cases users also allow themselves to get compromised. The classic "I use the same passwords everywhere, even when I'm trying to download this game hack from that website which has a reputation of hacking". Some users will easily do that without thinking, only to end up seeing their beloved game accounts getting compromised (or worse).

Security isn't a one way street where we can simply shove all the responsibility into the lap of the "big bad companies". Sure, users should be protected, but users should also stop every once in a while and think about what valuable information they're about to give away.

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Sysadmin denies boss's request to whitelist smut talk site of which he was a very happy member

ShelLuser
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So where was the save?

You talk about a boss saving story, but considering the fact that the boss now uses the site in his own time and apparently gets scammed I really fail to see where the save comes into the picture here. Wouldn't it have been a better idea to also inform him about the scamming caveats of the website?

From what I read no one got really saved here, you merely postponed the inevitable a little bit.

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Facebook recruits some help to fight fakes, but doubles down on wisdom of the crowd

ShelLuser
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Censorship?

This may sound like a good idea, but in the longer run all I see this doing is apply a mild form of censorship. And a stupid one at that. For example: if a "trusted source" marks something as fake, then what? Just because a source is trusted doesn't automatically imply that they can never be wrong themselves either.

And sometimes the media can be wrong too, horribly wrong. Then what?

Instead of trying to label stuff people should take their own responsibility and determine the validity for themselves. And yes, sometimes that means <gasp> actually checking some different news sources yourself.

Stop trying to be so lazy all the time!

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Why I just bought a MacBook Air instead of the new Pro

ShelLuser
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Windows

Lock in = less freedom

I think there's one thing we all really need to understand: companies need revenue to survive, and in order to create that revenue some will take this to extremes in order to make that happen. And that usually goes at the expense of your freedom. The less options you have the more depending you'll become on the supplier and that means... A good chance that the supplier created its own returning customer.

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Microsoft's cmd.exe deposed by PowerShell in Windows 10 preview

ShelLuser
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Windows

Weird move...

I consider myself a PowerShell fan, I think it's one of Microsoft's best developments so far. Giving the techie's the ability to administer almost everything from a commandline? It's awesome. Well documented, and also provides plenty of options to extend on it. Adding a few functions to your profile? Just add some documentation lines (#.SYNOPSIS [next line:] # Short explanation of my function) and it'll look and feel as if it was a native feature.

It's for a good reason why I have PowerShell pinned on my taskbar.

But here's the problem: in comparison to cmd.exe PowerShell is extremely bulky. For good reasons: the entire .NET library gets loaded and placed at your fingertips. But that comes at a price: performance. Just start PowerShell, then try this: Get-ExecutionPolicy -List (remember that tab completion works). You're using a controlled environment which constantly checks if you're actually allowed to run certain scripts or programs. And that's but one example.

PowerShell is a very good thing when you're running scripts which handle server administration, but it gets annoying if all you need to do is run a simple batch file which performs some common tasks. Or if you simply want to do some basic things yourself like copying a file, running sc.exe to check on a windows service or using vssadmin to clean up any used shadow copies.

It is for weird changes like these why I don't use Windows 10. Because how long will it take before the choice which we have now is taken away from us?

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Microsoft ❤️ Linux? Microsoft ❤️ running its Windows' SQL Server software on Linux

ShelLuser
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Target audience?

I can't help wonder who their intended target audience is going to be. Because I can't imagine that there'd be a large market for this. When it comes to databases then you can use all the performance you can get (depending on the database of course). So layering it with virtualization seems like a lot of overhead to me. Especially when the Linux box itself is already running in some kind of virtual environment.

Maybe Azure?

10
0

Firefox hits version 50

ShelLuser
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@Mage

"Why the high usage of Google's Chrome?"

I assume the same reason as why so many people used FF back in the days: if you find something which works you usually stick with it. I'm quite pleased with Opera myself (build on Chromium, so comparable to Chrome I guess) and one of the reasons (in comparison to Firefox) is that the interface hardly ever changes.

Now, please note that the last time I've used FF was back in 2008 - 2009 or something, so my experience is dated, but the main thing which drove me away were the heavy release cycles combined with a seemingly constantly changing interface.

4
1

Secretions on your phone reveal your secrets

ShelLuser
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And this part of the reason why...

I always wipe the keypad (usually with my hands) after I used an ATM or electronic payment terminal. Because although it seems far fetched you never know how far some people will go to try and get access to your codes.

0
2

Adult FriendFinder users get their privates exposed... again – reports

ShelLuser
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FAIL

Uhm, right...

I guess, and can understand, some people get highly aroused by some penetration (pun intended) but the fact which really wonders me here is that this is the second time this has happened. Sure, they haven't officially confirmed it yet (as they did last year) but it would appear as if they learned nothing at all.

But the thing which bothers me the most: where is the regulation in this? A bunch of (IMO) idiots claim that cookies are the source of all privacy evil (I have to be honest: they can be) so right now almost every site bugs you about cookies. Highly annoying and it usually doesn't solve anything because it basically boils down to "do it our way, or go the digital highway". "We use cookies", well, that's fun but it doesn't tell me anything about what cookies.

Yet when it comes to data security then it almost appears as if there are no rules and regulations at all. There are strict rules to comply to when it comes to handling credit card information, but I get the distinguished feeling that those rules are all theory and are hardly getting enforced at all. How else can you expect that a website gets millions of accounts stolen, and the next year piratically the same thing happens yet again?

BUT... I'm sure they warned me about the use of cookies, so that's good. Right?

I'll just get my coat now.

3
0

Panicked WH Smith kills website to stop sales of how-to terrorism manuals

ShelLuser
Silver badge
FAIL

Good job... or not...

When that stuff got sold in the open the people behind it also had a pretty legit way of checking which kind of customers bought that stuff. Maybe it would have been possible to set something up that whenever someone did buy such books you'd run background check (or let law enforcement handle that).

But nah, this stuff is too dangerous so we're shutting it down. Effectively forcing possible terrorist-want-to-be's to go underground and download all their stuff from the Internet. Unseen nor noticed by anyone.

Good going!

7
0

Britain must send its F-35s to Italy for heavy overhauls, decrees US

ShelLuser
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Hypocrites..

They keep preaching how we have a united Europe and how we should all join forces and work together. But when it comes to army requirements it's every country for themselves (sort off). Instead of the Eurofighter (a European project) we'd rather turn to the US and get this mess. Even US experts have shared concerns and warnings and this plane, but naah.

Holland got the F35 to replace the F16 Starfighter, but as it turns out the "obsolete" F16 is superior to the F35 in many ways (such as its action radius and amount of ammo it can carry).

So we get a plane which costs more, can do less and we don't even have full control over what we can do with it. Such a bargain :P

34
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Kotkin: Why Trump won

ShelLuser
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Coat

@TeeCee

"It's the "We know what's best, you should vote how we tell you to vote because it's the right choice because we say it is" types who the hate is for."

And I fear some people will never understand, they truly seem to be living in a fantasy world of their own without any ties to the real world. You see the same thing happening in Europe right now. A lot of politicians are "shocked" but there's no reason to change their policies.

And this lack of insight manifests itself on many levels. Has anyone noticed how often all the polls get it wrong these days? I'm not talking incidents, I'm talking repeated massive mistakes. The Brexit was never going to happen, bzzzt. Clinton would win easily, bzzzzt. And that's only 2 obvious examples.

I think the people behind those polls are often just as alienated from the world as those politicians are. Yet too stubborn to realize or admit to this. And the media where they sent their poll results too are often just as bad because most journalists don't bother to check their sources these days. Resulting in incidents where total nonsense can make the front page.

And when the deed is done everybody is so "shocked" and "surprised". Yeah...

14
1

Trump's torture support could mean the end of GCHQ-NSA relationship

ShelLuser
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Hopefully some people finally realize...

That the statement "I got nothing to hide" is bollocks. You might have felt comfortable with Obama being able to access your private data, how do you feel about Trump going over your personal history?

As to Trumps statements regarding torture... Yes, there's a huge issue with IS in the Middle East. But let's not forget which country triggered the whole thing in the first place: that was none other than the US of A who deemed Saddam Houssein had to go. He might have been a tyrant but he also kept the region in check and under control.

According to the US they liberated Iraq and the people are now free. Well, I'm not getting the impression that they're enjoying it very much.

17
2

Windows Insiders are so passé, Microsoft now has Skype Insiders

ShelLuser
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Skype?

The only time I (sometimes) use it is through the Outlook.com website (text only), but I'm never installing that garbage on my PC again. I still don't get it: MSN Messenger worked just fine and was hardly as intrusive as my last Skype session (now several years ago). I even accepted the advertisement display because... Well, it was a free chat client.

Now I mostly use my phone :)

3
0

IPv4 is OVER. Really. So quit relying on it in new protocols, sheesh

ShelLuser
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@Fibble

It depends per country I guess but in some consumer routers are indeed set up with IPv6 in mind. I see the same with my broadband (cable) provider (Ziggo). However, those scenario's also clearly show why this IPv6 adaptation is such a mess: it has never been about co-existence (well, maybe now) and that is in my opinion a major issue.

For example: my IPv6 router (WAN side) only spits out IPv4 addresses on the LAN side. So obviously my browsing is mostly done with IPv4. Even 'whatismyipaddress.com' shows me using IPv4.

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