* Posts by ShelLuser

2474 posts • joined 19 Dec 2010

BDSM sex rocks Drupal world: Top dev banished for sci-fi hanky-panky

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

El Reg is awesome!

I want to thank the Register team for bringing this to the attention of the people outside of the Drupal communities. Because it seems to me that this outside media attention is definitely starting quite an uproar and in my opinion rightfully so.

Personally I am somewhat surprised in how a so called "free" and "open" community as Drupal claims to be is now desperately trying their best at damage control. Yet not the kind one would expect from an open source project, no, the kind you'd expect from a big IT company which only sees a danger to their revenue and couldn't care less about the rest.

Maybe I'm ranting, I can't rule that out, but how else do you explain official comments which basically don't go much deeper then Stay for community. I quote (I kid you not!): "This seems like the perfect time for a singing, dancing, spandexed pageant about the Drupal community.".

And the worst part: "Do you think Larry was punished for thoughtcrime? Pitch in and help build a system where the next Larry can’t be treated that way. Do you think Dries and the DA deserve our trust in their decision? Join up and help make sure the next iteration preserves the strength of independent leadership.".

So basically, how I perceive this, is them saying "whatever you might think be sure to stay and/or join the community". Let's stop caring about Larry and instead put your effort into trying to prevent this from happening to the next Larry! And if you try hard enough then who knows: maybe you can be in the spotlight to play the role as the next Larry.

I think people seem to forget there's a whole company behind Drupal. And companies don't care about communities, companies care about revenue. And let's be honest: this backlash can have its affect on that, and that will scare them to no end.

Moments like these I am a very proud Register reader. Biting the hand that feeds IT.

Once again: thanks Reg for posting and informing us about this while also making sure we go to see both sides of this story so that we could make up our own mind.

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ShelLuser
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Pint

@Paul

Very well said, and don't forget feminists. I don't want to stir up a fire here but the extremists within those areas also have a tendency of proclaiming their believes as "right" and everyone who disagrees with them and speaks up is per definition guilty of harassment (at least that's the impression I constantly get).

Still... Salem... Not so much, I think this is more about a growing display of intolerance for other people's believes which we're seeing, and it's something which somewhat worries me from time to time.

Many people will agree that the dictators of the past (the likes of Stalin, Hitler, Hoessein) are bad news, yet many will easily stoop to their habits for themselves. I'm not talking genocide and all that monstrosity of course, but about spreading a sheer display of intolerance for any other opinion but your own.

Makes you wonder what's next. Hmm, people who play Minecraft should obviously be considered as very childish for playing such a weird retro-like game. Obviously you can't have those around within "serious" software projects which "matter".

How about El Reg readers? "Biting the hand that feeds IT"? Those sound very intolerant, maybe we should ban those from any "serious" projects as well.

I'm not using Drupal myself, but if I was then this display of intolerance would definitely be reason enough for me to dump it for something else.

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Time to make up: Realtime collaboration comes to Excel

ShelLuser
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Windows

Hardly new...

This was already possible with Office 2010 right after Microsoft launched SkyDrive (now OneDrive).

And I'm not just saying mind you, check this MSDN article from 2013. This involves Team Foundation, but even so that was still a way to perform team edits on Office documents.

Or what about this Office support article on co-authoring?

I quote: "When you're using Office and your document is on SharePoint or OneDrive, when everyone is done, you have a finished document, there's no need to copy and reformat.". As said: I've been using this with Office 2010 for years now.

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Creators Update gives Windows 10 a bit of an Edge, but some old annoyances remain

ShelLuser
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Windows

@ABC ;-)

"Hang on! Ads in Explorer?"

I was wondering about that myself as well. And it seems Microsoft even tries to add insult to injury because how do you combine that with this one: "Privacy and Windows 10 is a hot topic."?

Doesn't one, by definition, rule out the other here?

Anyway, thanks El Reg for a really nice insight article. I still don't like the very flat and dull looking interface, especially not when compared to my trusty rich looking Windows 7. I still don't understand why people would go along with that.

I mean... We've had years worth of development with graphic cards (GPU) and accelerators and all that. And what do you get with Windows 10? A flat, dull, colorless interface which sometimes makes me think back about Windows 2.0.

Even Windows 3.1 / 3.11 was better looking (in comparison), they really worked hard on some of the icons and some were honestly small pieces of art. This became especially true when the real fans started to release icon libraries of their own.

But now? I still have zero motivation to upgrade, and it's not because I'm unwilling to try something new but because the whole thing looks so horribly unappealing to me.

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Microsoft wants screaming Windows fans, not just users

ShelLuser
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Windows

Uhm, right.... suuure.

"Mehdi says the Windows Insider program now has over ten million participants."

Quantity doesn't make quality. I mean, there are also thousands (most likely more!) of Windows 10 users out there who would rather get Windows 7 back yet don't know how to do that (sometimes that would be impossible for them, think about laptops with a pre-installed Windows without physical installation media).

And are you sure that all the users who got forcefully upgraded to Windows 10 didn't automatically become a member of this insider program as well? Because I remember reading those stories about that automatically installed Windows 10 user hub software which could be used to provide 'much required feedback'.

Most importantly the Insider program, with very low application requirements, is also a sure way to get your hands on previews, aka free software. People looking for freebies don't necessarily meet the criteria for being a fan.

The fact that Microsoft seems to believe this is only a sign for me that they've become delusional.

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iPhone-havers think they're safe. But they're not

ShelLuser
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@Sooty

Although you're making an excellent point one should also not overlook the obvious: it doesn't always require a hacked phone in order to get some malware installed on it. There are way too many ignorant users out there who will easily install a good looking "free(ish)" game and simply click through the all the warnings that this game wants to access a whole lot of peripherals, which would raise quite a few alarm bells with people who actually think about what they're doing.

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Miss Misery on hacking Mr Robot and the Missing Sense of Fun

ShelLuser
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Pint

Never heard of it, but...

It maybe a bit grinchy for some people at some point but then you also have to remember that you're most likely someone with a background or deeper interest in IT which means that you'll approach some of the plot holes differently.

Even so... It's not something I'd go out to watch, have to agree that Hill Street Blues looks much better in comparison, and even that had a really high dose of "soap" for me, especially near the seasons where Furillo & Davenport started to become a very strange couple.

Still... I can't help get the impression that this series could very well be a much better message towards the general audience that "please use a password which isn't too easily guessable" than any written study can do. At least I hope so.

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'Windows 10 destroyed our data!' Microsoft hauled into US court

ShelLuser
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@AC

How does that apply when you were using Windows 7?

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ShelLuser
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Windows

@Will

For more than one reason too. Seriously: Microsoft has made the Internet a more dangerous place to be on, and caused a lot of collateral damage with this enforced update stunt. At least that's my opinion and impression (based on what I saw around me).

Thing is: many people have been thrown offguard and are now very suspicious of the whole upgrade procedure and tons of people I know off have forcefully turned off updates in order to prevent an unwanted update to Windows 10. Thing is: it's a whole lot easier to simply turn off the update process entirely than it is to track down (and block) the updates responsible for the Windows 10 update. I know there are 3rd party tools for that, not my point.

My point is that there are now plenty of legit Windows environments out there which won't be updated any time soon because the owner is fearful of being forcefed with Windows 10. Yet that also creates a risk because they also won't be getting any more security updates either.

Considering the massive amount of stories about exploits and discovered flaws I hope that it won't be too hard to comprehend why this could become a major problem. Sure... Unless you're not on the receiving end of a DDoS attack you have nothing to complain about, right? Yah, but what if you are and you didn't use any intervention from, say, Cloudfare?

When are we going to stop fighting symptoms and instead try to tackle problems at the source, like this one?

For the record: I'm a Microsoft fan (sort off), I seriously enjoy and appreciate some of the products (like Office and Windows 7) but I'm very opposed to their <self-censored> idea of enforcing their Windows 10 crap upon us.

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Inside OpenSSL's battle to change its license: Coders' rights, tech giants, patents and more

ShelLuser
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I don't see the problem...

Open source or not: there are only a few people who actually own or run the project. So if they want to change their license then they should be allowed to do so. And well, to be honest I think you can't go very wrong with the Apache license.

"For years, OpenSSL went largely unappreciated, until the Heartbleed vulnerability surfaced in 2014 and shamed the large companies that depend on the software for online security to contribute funds and code."

"Shamed companies"? Interesting choice of words, but I don't think it holds very true. Another thing: it also wasn't the first time something like this happened. In 2008 we had another OpenSSL disaster, but this time fully triggered by the Debian package maintainer who altered the code and by doing so introduced a vulnerability.

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Why do GUIs jump around like a demented terrier while starting up? Am I on my own?

ShelLuser
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@Unicornpiss

Microsoft should not be taken too seriously. Back in the days it wasn't even uncommon for them to display warnings such as: "Unable to delete files: disk full" idiocy. If they can come up with something like that, then obviously a progress bar is waay too complex :)

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It's happening! It's happening! W3C erects DRM as web standard

ShelLuser
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It's one thing to define a standard...

...it's a whole different ballgame to get people to actually use it. I hope that this may give some people a better impression of the importance of open standards. And for the record:

"That survey was sent out yesterday and member organizations, who pay an annual fee that varies from $2,250 for the smallest non-profits to $77,000 for larger corporations"

I don't consider "pay to win" very much of a reliable standard to begin with. Sounds to me that the more money you contribute the more things you got to say. But how does that ensure quality standards to be uphold?

Yet here also lies a bit of a concern. Google is one of those members and they got big pockets. Next you'll also have the Chrome browser which pretty much dominates the market. So, uhm, yeah, it's fun and all that Chrome is an open source browser but it's most definitely not much of an open and free standard. I'm pretty sure that when this vote gets accepted, and why shouldn't it considering the massive monetary interests, then it'll be a matter of time before Chrome and therefor a huge area of the Net has been switched to this new standard.

Basically putting Google into the same position Microsoft once was when they dictated the market. Major difference being that this doesn't involve one proprietary product but a full blown allegedly shared environment.

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What should password managers not do? Leak your passwords? What a great idea, LastPass

ShelLuser
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Holmes

"Access control"

Apart from my previous (small) rants on security and lack of understanding / insight knowledge from the users another important aspect is control and access.

The more access you allow "security software" to get, the higher the risks you'll take. Sure, it's easy to have the whole thing automated within your browser, but it's also an extra hurdle which a potential attacker doesn't have to take.

Of course I'm highly old fashioned. My password manager consists of something I cooked up within VBA which utilizes some office components. No, not Office 365; the kind of Office which doesn't even fully realize the Internet actually exists. It doesn't even sync with my phone and other devices.

But I also don't have to. If I really, really, need a password I'll simply hook up to my VPN, connect to my PC and from there I can retrieve my stuff. Awkward? Maybe. But I'm also not the kind of person who needs to log on to his social media accounts or whatever other leisure stuff when I'm on the road either. That can wait until I'm back at home.

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SVN commit this: Subversion to fix file renaming after 15 years

ShelLuser
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Coffee/keyboard

Some comments are funny...

Just because you don't like a certain project doesn't mean that it has no value at all. And sure: there may be other environments which provide the same features (or maybe better, but "best" is nearly always in the eye of the beholder anyway), it doesn't mean that everyone who jumps ship will also gain all those advantages. For example: the very process of moving from one VCS to the other can be quite taxing in itself.

And if the overall advantages only end up to be cosmetic ("faster", "easier" (everything is easy once you know how), "smaller data storage" (with todays storage space how is that an issue?)) then it also remains to be seen how much real advantage you'll gain by switching. The classic "If it isn't broke, don't fix it" approach still works today.

I'm still using Subversion for my own projects as well as to keep up with FreeBSD's source and documentation trees and well, it simply works for me, therefor I see no reason to go through all the effort of learning something new when I'll only end up with marginal advantages (and a lot of extra effort).

I think its good to see that SVN is still being maintained and improved.

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Are you undermining your web security by checking on it with the wrong tools?

ShelLuser
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Pint

So, uhm...

"In other words, the user can only be sure that their connection to the interception product is legit, but has no idea whether the rest of the communication – to the web server, over the internet – is secure or has been compromised."

I think it boils down to a very basic issue once more: understand what the heck you're doing. Most modern operating systems (Windows Server, *BSD and even Linux) provide several tools which you can use to check connections and the state their in. Obviously it is sometimes preferable to do outside checks (like with port scans) but even that can be done by utilizing a second server (for example).

The main problem? Simple: you have to know what the heck you're doing. You need a basic underlying understanding of the encryption process, how to monitor network connections (I've come across too many people who had no clue how to use tcpdump or netcat for example) and interpret the results.

And that seems a bit too much for more "modern" companies, time is also money afterall, so they'd rather rely on out-of-the-box ready to use gizmo's like these. Without stopping to think about possible consequences.

Welcome to the modern world of ICT: where a lot of people stopped to think for themselves, don't bother to try and understand (learn) something new and where you totally rely on what others tell you without questioning nor challenging them.

PS: Doesn't this same risk apply when your HTTPS connection is using a reverse proxy (as suggested by an article some weeks ago)?

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Newly cloud-tastic Oracle sees hardware sales droop

ShelLuser
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Pint

I think it's much more simple...

"So what has depressed it?"

The article blames it on the market (and some of its other players) but I can't help think that Oracle played a huge role in this themselves as well. Just check some Oracle news stories over the past years and pay extra attention to the general tone of the user comments. More than often do you read stories about unhappy people. Some noticed how Oracle raised their subscription plans in triple (and many ran off), then we read stories about Oracle trying to push Java patents which shows even more comments about people getting turned off from Oracle, then a few months back yet another story about Oracle raising their prices tremendously....

Summing up: there are plenty of people around who have had negative experiences with Oracle in one way or the other which involved a huge increase in costs while hardly getting much back from it in return.

So here's a question for you: do you honestly think those people would seriously consider Oracle for hardware? Wouldn't you consider it possible that the moment they see other people using Oracle's services that chances become high that they might warn them about Oracle and their sometimes bizarre business model (and drastic price increases)? Basically and effectively scaring even more people away from them?

Never underestimate how quickly a bad experience with a company can travel and spread around.

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Barrister fined after idiot husband slings unencrypted client data onto the internet

ShelLuser
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FAIL

@ArrZarr

"The file could even have been password protected on the drive.

Now I hate to be the voice of reason when we could be laughing at lawyers but given that details in the story are scarce on how the information was stored, I think you may be going a bit far."

Which part of: "visible to an internet search engine and some of the documents could be easily accessed through a simple search" did you chose to ignore from the article?

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Russian! spies! 'brains! behind!' Yahoo! mega-hack! – four! charged!

ShelLuser
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@AC

I have to agree with you. Even the article does this: "Russians behind the hack", yet last time I checked charging or accusing someone of a felony doesn't automatically mean they also actually did it. You got to prove this too, in a court of law. Only after the judge has ruled can you conclude that someone was guilty or not.

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Microsoft urges PhD-grade devs to play Minecraft for money

ShelLuser
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Happy

Just a 'simple game, huh? ;)

I'm a decently vivid Minecraft player, been playing for three years now and I still haven't reached a point where I got bored with it. Of course it does help that I've never really had much problems with keeping myself occupied and entertained, but on the other hand I also think that Minecraft is a seriously underrated game.

Of course the reason why is obvious and fully understandable. Because let's be honest: at first glimpse things can look very simplistic and simple. Isn't this basically a virtual block collection to build with? Well, yes and no... Of course there is a building aspect in the game, and if you can set your prejudice aside for "pixelated environments" then you may come to appreciate a world which provides much more detail than you may give it credit for. Trees, flowers, rivers, cliffs, ravines, deserts, oceans, jungles... You can all find those within Minecraft.

But there's more. The Minecraft game mechanic itself is pretty special. Because it doesn't only allow you to play the game, it also provides all the tools you might need to create the game. Whatever game you might want but all within the Minecraft world of course. From more simple things such as four in a row, a maze, a dropper (jump down into a world and try to survive the fall) right to more complicated things like battleships (with 'real ships' which can be blown up and sunk) or puzzle / adventure maps where you need to perform specific actions in order to solve things.

There are players who have build whole computers within Minecraft, capable of performing basic mathematical operations. Creations which are at their core directly comparable to circuit board designs.

Within that context the vivid player in me wants to cry out to you guys and point his fingers to this while saying: "See? A bit more complex than you thought, huh?".

But even though I meant every word I said above we also need to be a little realistic. Because lets face it: the gaming environment eventually doesn't really matter. The real challenge will be the AI <-> player interaction, where the stage is simply set to Minecraft. An interesting stage, sure, but given the very nature of the game it also remains to be seen how much influence the environment is going to have.

In the end one could also approach this with the impression that Microsoft is now utilizing a rather famous name to draw more attention to their other projects.

Either way, I for one am not really looking forward to having to face even smarter creepers :P

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Oxford Uni boffins say internet filters probably won't protect teens

ShelLuser
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Holmes

Such awkward times...

When some people actually feel the need to study what society would generally consider to be plain out obvious. Worse yet: getting paid for it too.

What's next? Study which learns that forcefully forbidding your teenager kid to drink alcohol can very well drive them to do so behind your back. A lesson which the whole US has learned the hard way.

Who would have known all these things?

Reminds me of that "iBabe" scene in Movie 45. iBabe: an MP3 player which looks like a naked woman and to add insult to injury it has a high powered ventilator placed in a "certain private spot" resulting in obvious nasty issues. And the board of directors: "We could never have seen that coming, who would have known people would try to "mate" with an mp3 player?".

No shit sherlock :)

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Dungeons & Dragons finally going digital

ShelLuser
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@veti

"Why did nobody think of that before?"

They did, but then concluded that you can't make enough money out of that.

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Germany to Facebook, Twitter: We are *this* close to fining you €50m unless you delete fake news within 24 hours

ShelLuser
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@Danceman

"If this proposal about fake news were to be enacted, would Erdogan's German Facebook page consist of a lot of white space?"

Doubtful, but I do get the impression that the European leaders would be all too happy to keep sending fines his way. And after he paid the government then problem solved I guess.

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Naming computers endangers privacy, say 'Net standards boffins

ShelLuser
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A bit out of context perhaps?

"Think instead of a device that might interest a spook – “Donald's_Samsung_S3” or “Kellyanne's_Microwave_Oven”. If those names leak to the Internet, it makes surveillance significantly easier."

Uhm, any idea how many Kelly's and Donald's are connected to the Internet? If the name alone spreads then this will hardly have any impact. I mean, I don't automatically assume that the current president of the US appears to be using a Samsung phone.

I think it's not so much the name but the connectivity itself which creates a risk. You know, step into the train, turn on your PDA and let it search for points around you and you'll notice plenty of phones which you can try to connect to. That could be an obvious problem. But just because I now know a name doesn't imply that I can also pinpoint its location and such.

Then the article talks about analysing traffic. Seriously? If the situation is already dire enough that someone can eves drop on your data then I'm pretty convinced that the host name is the least of your worries.

And the reason why I wonder if they're not pulling this way out of context is because they also start talking about enterprise networks. It's also not uncommon for an enterprise network to provide deskless interaction. So basically you can log on anywhere you want and you'll then gain access to you data and desktop. Wouldn't that also lessen the importance of the hostname because there doesn't have to be a direct relationship between that and its user?

Speaking of hostnames in the enterprise... Most I've experienced were numbered clients. Just to keep administration easier: hr01, hr02, hr03. And sales01, sales02, sales03. So now that I leaked these hostnames onto the Internet you want me to believe that this network is in more danger than before?

Right....

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Microsoft nicks one more Apple idea: An ad-supported OS

ShelLuser
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Windows

Thanks Microsoft!

For making up my mind. Win10? No way, ever. You guys have fun now.

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Sad fact of the day: Most people still don't know how to protect themselves online

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

Not that surprising...

If the people who allegedly did want to look out for your welfare ended up to be more interested in your paychecks as well. I mean seriously: what do you expect?

But I agree, the market is in dire straits (awesome song though). And some of it started when 'some people' started to market Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD as the #1 solutions for security. Install that and you'll be safe for life. Yet as we all know: it doesn't work that way.

Look: keeping yourself safe also implies to get an understanding of what is going on. And hardly any Internet user will do that. Why should they? Their internet provider themselves advertised how easy everything was, right?

Yeah, you heard that right. Who's fault is this? Well => the big bad companies I say. "go online with a click of your mouse", but of course if you click on the wrong section.. all hell breaks loose, but everyone knew that, right? Bzzzzt.

Of course said companies made sure to safe guard themselves. Such a fun world we live in....

"I'm the only one who gets you on the internet and I demand that you agree to my terms. Which are: all I do is good, you do not hold me accountable. You click on everything you want!"

<user clicks on phishing mail and loses 40k>

So what other options were there?

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Can you ethically suggest a woman pursue a career in tech?

ShelLuser
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There's always 2 sides to every story

When it comes to getting insulted over something then there are 2 forces at work: intent and impression. Sometimes people can make a remark which may seem rude or insulting but most definitely isn't meant this way. At one time I was part of a tech support team and we had the silly habit of calling each other out whenever something bad had occurred. There was no meaning to it.... For example: You'd fix a problem with someone's PC, then they'd call again to complain about something else not working. That would sometimes result in internal teasing: "Some idiot forgot to close Mr. Doe's browser, but fortunately I'm here!". Harmless, and most often plain out fun.

So here's my problem: let's say a woman was added to the team. Would she pick up the "insults" just the way we did (obviously she would be treated just like one of the guys) or would this result in "They're calling me names because I'm a woman". That is sometimes the other side of the medal. There are also women around who expect to be treated differently within these areas only because they're a woman.

And sometimes things which are quite harmless can be picked up in the wrong way.

Of course I'm not saying that there's no truth to any of the abusive stories. I mean, just look at that article about the marine where people snap pictures of their female co-workers in secret and then spread those around without consent nor approval. That's just plain out disgusting and an obvious display of harassment.

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'Password rules are bullsh*t!' Stackoverflow Jeff's rage overflows

ShelLuser
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Pint

He has a point, but also contradicts himself

For starters: security doesn't begin with a long and secure password, the real security comes from a sane mindset. For example: how secure will your 10 character, alpha-numerical password become when the user applies this everywhere? And wake up call for Mr. Atwood: most users do not think beyond the annoyance of having to fill out a password. As such there's nothing bullshit about trying to steer them in the right direction.

Then there's a huge difference between passwords on a public network (such as the Internet) or those on a local LAN/WAN. Risk assessment at its finest: when the password becomes too difficult for an end user you can bet he'll write it down somewhere. Most probably on a sticky note attached to the monitor. At work you can't use the comforts of a password manager.

At least these "bullshit rules" still prevent John Doe from using "password01", "password02" and the infamous "password03" as his 10 length password.

His rant is based on interesting theories, but there's still a difference between those and the real world.

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Favored Swift hits the charts: Now in top 10 programming languages

ShelLuser
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Joke

Gives a whole new meaning to...

So Swift hits the charts, then I guess it's now officially a thing to get Swifty? So far I only know how to get swifty thanks to Rick and Morty, but something tells me that's not what they went for here ;)

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WikiLeaks promises to supply CIA's hacking tool code to vendors

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

I can't help wonder...

How all the people feel who criticized Apple when they denied adding a backdoor on the iPhone?

Back then the US government said they would never use it illegally, after which the news about government agencies hacking and compromising just about anything which suited their purpose almost kept going in an endless media stream. This being yet another example.

Seems Apple was quite on the mark back then, history sure proved them right.

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Brit ISP TalkTalk blocks control tool TeamViewer

ShelLuser
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@FlamingDeath

"There are only two real ISPs in this country, BT and Virgin."

Yet the only reason why their subscription prices are reasonable (assumption on my part) is because they got competition on the market. Competitors like TalkTalk I might add.

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ShelLuser
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WTF?

This is hilarious...

Not for those people who got affected by this mind you, but...

So I wondered what kind of ISP would do this and did some research. Here is the official thread on their forums. If you read closely you'll notice that they didn't even bother to inform their support staff either.

Several posters describe how they contacted support with their problem ("teamviewer doesn't work") and they were advised to reset their modems. One customer (into the 2nd page) even mentioned getting into "trouble" because he was using his own router instead of the provided one, so support put the blame on that.

W.T.F.?

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ShelLuser
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@AC

"I wonder where the scammers got hold of their client telephone numbers from in the first place."

And I wonder how long it'll take those scammers to use this situation to their advantage.

"Hello, im with talktalk. u got problems with teamviewer right now? yeah, we know, but we got fix for u. you just need to run as root and all will be good. u dont have root? np, we soon will!"

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ShelLuser
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Stop

@Leah

"Unfortunately VNC is not up to the task of easily connecting basic users through firewalls etc."

Yes it is, and it has been this way for years now. Both the original VNC as well as the spin off which I prefer: TightVNC.

The trick is to set up VNC on your client as usual, then set up a so called listening viewer on your end with all the right port forwarding configured. Call your client, ask them to right click on the VNC icon and then use "attach listening viewer" (TightVNC) or "Add new client" (vanilla VNC). Make them enter the name (I often used vnc.mydomain.com or remote.mydomain.com) and done.

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'Nigerian princes' snatch billions from Western biz via fake email – Interpol

ShelLuser
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Basta Neveneffecten

Belgian TV studio Woestijnvis once made a satirical program called "Basta" in which a couple of performers addressed issues in real life with the government (and other issues) and showed just how ridiculous some of them was.

In their finale they actually invited a scammer to come to Belgium so that a fictional company could invest several thousands of Euro's into this firm. Yes: they scammed the scammers. The meeting was set up (totally ridiculous things going on) and at the end the meeting got raided by the (fake) police. You should have seen the look on the guys face. Everyone got "arrested" and the police warned the scammer that he was about to get scammed, but they saved him. Hilarious.

I just found the video on Youtube. It's Dutch ("Vlamings") but maybe subtitles can help you. Around 6:00 the fun begins when the scammer is allegedly given E 3,000 in cash with another E 10,000 being promised. Around 12:20 the "Federal police" is crashing the party :P

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MAC randomization: A massive failure that leaves iPhones, Android mobes open to tracking

ShelLuser
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Pint

@ZSn

"I presume that if you turn the WiFi on your phone off none of this works and you are secure?"

Exactly.

This is also why I made sure to get Internet access through my broadband provider instead of having to rely on wifi. Wifi, per definition, is a power drain. I recently set up wifi on my FreeBSD powered laptop (it was a bit tricky) and read a lot about the whole thing.

Basically every broadcast you make will consume power. When looking for hotspots (so trying without being able to connect) will gobble up even more power. And then there are the hidden SSID's, which can be even worse.

And let's also not forget risk assessment. I once had a few customers who refused to use encryption on their tablets because it was so difficult. They went to Italy on vacation and guess what happened next? Yups: happily used open wifi spots and a few days later my servers spotted weird connections originating from Italy and trying to send out viagra advertisements through these accounts.

Open wifi is a major security risk. Yet it seems no one bothers to stop to think about that. Which makes sense of course: larger broadband providers make money out of it, so obviously we need to be told that "open wifi = good" and "paid open wifi = better".

I'm also leaving things turned off.

4
1

Microsoft to close its social network on a week's notice – and SIX people complain

ShelLuser
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Pint

It had #fail written all over it

I decided to give this a try for myself as well during the start. It was fun while it lasted (I recall two very nice chats with strangers) but equally frustrating. Because in the end there was no 'you', or 'your work' or 'your exposition' it was all joint venture so to speak. And that could go bad really quick.

The idea was simple: you search for contents, and you might think other people are interested in those results as well. So then you can start a collection of said contents and share it on so.cl. So far, so good. Being an anime fan myself I tried to set up a nice NGE (Neon Genesis Evangelion) kind of search with pictures and some articles (Wikipedia, fansites, etc. link), cool! I even attracted a few followers.

Then suddenly someone decided that NGE had a completely different meaning and started adding offtopic nonsense to my Neon Genesis "tribute", of course without any means for me to remove any of it. So in a few more days what was once a nice (starting) tribute section had turned into a mess, a mixture between anime, stock market, a private firm and some people complaining that they couldn't make heads or tails of things. And so it also lost interest and followers. Not because of me, but because others made a mess and I couldn't do a thing about it.

Well, that was my first and only run on so.cl. I didn't even care anymore if Microsoft was going to fix things, since I had already decided that this was a waste of my time.

13
0

Next Generation Security: No, Dorothy, there is no magic wand

ShelLuser
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Pint

Know your environment!

The main problem with security (or lack thereof) in my opinion is people no longer taking the time (nor effort) to get to know whatever it is they're using. And with that I mean actually knowing what you're doing; actually understanding the underlying logic.

I see too many people who know exactly that in order to do "A" you need to perform "B" but unfortunately without having the foggiest clue as to why that is so. The same kind who would approach security as if it were a product instead of a procedural environment.

6
0

After 20 years of Visual Studio, Microsoft unfurls its 2017 edition

ShelLuser
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Windows

Visual Studio is awesome, BUT....

I think Visual Studio is a very solid environment which can even be fun to use. I started using it back in 2012 when I finally decided that ASP appealed more to me than Java EE, especially because I wouldn't be fully tied to IIS (right now my ASP.NET powered websites run fully on Apache + mod_mono). I was using a (paid) version of Expression Web & Expression Design (I still use those) and decided that the move to Visual Studio was the most logical step to take.

VS takes getting used to. If you're using it for Web development (which is quite likely considering that Microsoft discontinued Expression Web and fully pushes Visual Studio) then you may have to adapt a bit because at first it might all feel a bit "static" (for example: code above, preview below, no customization possible). But once you looked past that you'll find a very inviting and most of all professional, well documented, environment. It's not perfect, it has its flaws, but Microsoft Help is quite useful. I also always welcomed the option to keep offline copies of the documentation, so that I wouldn't be tied into always having to use Internet.

But there is a 'BUT', as hinted at.

For starters I could never understand the logic of insisting to follow the GUI layout for their consumer platform. It always struck me as arrogant. VS 2012 was aimed at Win8 but I kept away from that horror story best as possible. I'm using it on Windows 7. Ergo: I have a rather alien looking development environment in comparison to the style of Windows 7. That's just weird.

And it also shows you just how chaotic Microsoft operates. See the menu in the article screenshots? My menu consists of EASY TO READ MENU OPTIONS (VS 2012). Most people immediately labeled that as fail, Microsoft insisted there were advantages and here we are now. It's confirmed: #fail.

My point? If you're a home developer and/or Microsoft enthusiast then do yourself a favor and stick with the VS community versions. At the very least try those first before even considering to apply for a license of your own. Using professional or above has some advantages, definitely, but if there are serious caveats which make VS usage awkward for you then don't expect Microsoft to try and help you out. I'm not kidding. Back in 2012 hundreds if not thousands of developers cried about about the obnoxious and plain out distracting interface and Microsoft did what they did best: ignored the whole thing.

Of course in the next version did they address some problems and presented those as listening to their customers. However, while also presenting you a bill for yet another license, because a company like Microsoft knows nothing about upgrade (or loyalty!) discounts (for example: new VS license could cost you E 800,-, but as a returning customer you'd pay E 200,- or E 300,- instead for an upgrade).

This will probably be less of a concern if your company provides these or if you got an MSDN subscription. But as an enthusiast you might want to keep this in mind: Microsoft wants your money first, and your happiness second. They haven't reached that point yet where companies realize that these go one on one.

Now, don't get me wrong... I'm critical, sure, but not negative. Visual Studio is an exciting development and Microsoft honestly does their best to get us the best tools to help get us going to get things done. No arguments there. They're also not so childish by trying to tie us fully into their own environments (think cloud, Azure, etc.) but will easily allow you to set up your own environments as well. As mentioned above I use VS together with an Apache server using Mono, PostgreSQL all powered by FreeBSD and I can deploy my web projects easily from within Visual Studio with the click of a button. That is professional.

But... I'd personally still recommend using the community versions instead of getting yourself a license. You'll most likely get less headaches and won't have to worry about possible issues which Microsoft then doesn't fix.

2
0

Spies do spying, part 97: Shock horror as CIA turn phones, TVs, computers into surveillance bugs

ShelLuser
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@Hollerithevo

"Ha! Who has the last laugh now, spied-on dupes?!? Answer me that!!"

The government. Because you obviously have something to hide which is highly suspicious. Just to be on the safe side I would recommend ignoring any possible (legit) lottery offers which suddenly declare you the winner of a free vacation to Cuba :P

0
0

US Marines seek a few supposedly good men ... who leaked naked pics of a few good women

ShelLuser
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@Treko

Although I fully agree with your comment there's not enough info in the article to draw those conclusions here. It's the one thing I'm confused about as well: did these women pose themselves (and allowed to be photographed) or (which I'm suspecting): did someone sneak up on them and took pictures while they were (partially) undressed?

I think the latter, especially considering the comment about the woman who stated that "he could smell my perfume". That makes me believe that people snook up on them and took those pictures without any consent or approval.

19
0

1.37bn records from somewhere to leak on Monday

ShelLuser
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Pirate

So what's next?

So, according to MacKeeper this whole thing involves one huge list used by a group of spammers calling themselves River City Media (RCM). They abused servers and set up a network capable of sending out millions of spam messages.

What bothers me though is reading things like: "Led by known spammers Alvin Slocombe and Matt Ferris, RCM masquerades as a legitimate marketing firm". Known spammers?

A spammer these days is known to abuse network security in order to gain relays to send off all their mess. It's a known fact, even this article speaks about it, using hacking techniques in order to overload and mass send e-mail through legit mailservers.

But apart from detecting all this what are they going to do next? I mean, it's good to read that Spamhaus will be adding the whole RCM structure into their blacklists, but what about the culprits behind all this? Has law enforcement been involved, can the police actually do something, will they actually do something, what?

Although it is good news that MacKeeper opened up the lid of the can here I can't help wonder if this will only result in a temporary setback for these spammer guys. How else can you gain notoriety as a "known spammer" if it wasn't for the fact that you can simply continue what you do best?

Meanwhile our European overlords still haven't decided about the new cookie law reversal. Because yeah, obviously those cookies are far more intrusive than any of this.

3
0

Microsoft wants you to plan a new generation of legacy systems

ShelLuser
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The worst part (IMO)

Is that this service is very likely mostly going to be used by governments. You know: those big overseeing agencies which are all too eager to scoop up your taxes because they need their money income. Desperately. For example to sustain their XP machines for yet another few years (I'm not joking here; it has become well known that areas within the Dutch government still operate with Windows XP).

1
0

Linus Torvalds lashes devs who 'screw all the rules and processes' and send him 'crap'

ShelLuser
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@kain

Assuming it actually happened.

I'm in no position to judge on that part but I do consider it a bit odd to read that someone wouldn't even test their own stuff. Making you all the more curious to who Torvalds is shouting at yet today this detail wasn't being shared. Even though he was previously all the more eager to directly address RedHat representatives and call them out for their horrid update. Yet now he choses to keep up anonymity?

I have no reason not to believe him, but it would have made more impact on me if he called out the people who actually did it.

In my opinion: seems some are good enough to be scolded at in public and some are special enough to be kept safe. Takes away the impact and reeks of double standards.

Of course: calling 'm out in public also gives the other party a platform to actually talk back.

8
21

Euro Patent Office puts itself on Interpol's level, demands access to staff phones and laptops

ShelLuser
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Black Helicopters

Just wait...

In a few months time (when this particular news has blown over) we'll suddenly get some new positive stories about how much good work EPO is doing (I always thought EPO was illegal while cycling) and it'll probably soon followed by a bill.

Because this kind of quality obviously comes at a cost. These guys don't work for free you know.

And then a few months later you'll learn that it has all come to pass. Carefully kept outside the media.

1
0

Passport and binary tree code, please: CompSci quizzes at US border just business as usual

ShelLuser
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Happy

I'll get you code...

10 print "you smell funny!'

20 goto 10

There, did I now prove my worth as a C64 fan? :D

4
0

Frustrated by reboot-happy Windows 10? Creators Update hopes to take away the pain

ShelLuser
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Windows

@bazza

"MS screwed it up and is now trying to find a way forward that still results in updated being installed behind the user's back."

Well, one small advantage: all of this is made available free of charge. Which may sound logical, but don't underestimate the kind of idiocy which Microsoft can provide. Visual Studio? They even once ruined the whole interface in a commercial version, (its license costs around E 800,-), somewhat patched it and in the next release revoked the whole thing and started spouting off how much they listened to their customers. ... of course while still requiring another E 800,- for a new Visual Studio license.

I honestly think that some of Microsofts products are actually quite good, for example I'm quite a fan of their Office series (especially all the stuff you can do with the VBA backend) and really enjoy using it. But they're really horrible when it comes to listening (and respecting!) to what their customers might want or need.

10
0

One IP address, multiple SSL sites? Beating the great IPv4 squeeze

ShelLuser
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Doesn't a proxy defeat the purpose?

This is exactly why I'm not a big fan of the sudden push for HTTPS; the issue with the dedicated IP addresses which is less of a problem with HTTP and name based virtual hosting.

Sure, a reverse proxy can help, but doesn't it also basically create a new weak link? What is to stop attackers from pointing their attention on the proxy so that they can use that as leverage to gain access to the rest of the traffic? It's not as if we haven't been down that path before...

0
13

Planned 'cookie law' update will exacerbate problems of old law – expert

ShelLuser
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Coat

What is this all about anyway?

Or put differently: what is the underlying intent exactly? Is this still about protecting customers from getting tracked, or is this about throwing weight around and patting yourself on the back on how great you are? Maybe secretly trying to secure a nice income in the form of fines?

I mean, really? 10 million fine for something as trivial as a cookie? Who comes up with those braindead ideas?

And while thousands if not millions of Euro's are wasted over endless debates about this whole trivial issue the "European citizens" have yet to get any formal ruling or law on how Europe will deal with compromised servers and all the problems those generate. I've yet to see a politician suggest better safety and regulations around all the modern IoT crapola.

But a vending machine which is capable of knocking out an entire network is obviously much less important than a cookie on a website. A cookie which any modern webbrowser knows how to get rid of in this day and age I might add...

9
6

Amazon's AWS S3 cloud storage evaporates: Top websites, Docker stung

ShelLuser
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@Geek

"Too many people (non IT folk) seem to think that the cloud is this magical place that never has an issue."

True, but who's fault is that? Isn't this exactly their whole selling point to begin with?

I also don't think you should dismiss the whole argument that easily, because when properly set up you can get a redundant environment if you want to. The fact that it now doesn't work this way at AWS tells me more about their infrastructure than the (in)abilities of virtualized hosting.

3
0

Up close with the 'New Psion' Gemini: Specs, pics, and genesis of this QWERTY pocketbook

ShelLuser
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@e-mouse

"Please don't insult the Psion keyboards by saying they're just like a Blackberry."

The original keyboard most definitely wasn't but to be honest I also have some doubts about this new model. Also because the whole emphasis seems to be focused on the keyboard and hardware, but that alone does not make a good PDA.

It does provide one heck of a system though. I actually used it to wrote up 70% of a report which had to be finished in the weekend (because of quality tests held at the customers place) while riding in the train. That thumping sound when I slowly (but steadily) got used to the smaller size and actually started using 4 - 6 fingers to type... It was amazing.

But let's be honest: a netbook can do that too these days. The main reason why Psion was awesome was because it was functional as heck. Straight to the point, no confusing riff raff.

And well, I too share some concerns which people have raised over this device. I mean, the hardware looks good and all, but in the end it's all about functionality. And when I read comments like these:

"Two great innovations make Gemini a successor to the Psion: the keyboard and the hinge."

I can't help have some doubts too. Because.. The hinge was important on the Psion 5mx but no one seems to stop to think why that was so. Because the keyboard actually folded out. It slided across the bottom and slided out of the casing which gave you a lot more space to type, as well as the extra "button bar" below the screen for quick and easy access to most important applications.

When you look at the screenshots of the Gemini you'll notice that it really is just a regular clamshell model. There is no extra space, there is no sliding keyboard, it's merely a 2 piece device which can fold shut. It has a hinge, but in all honesty: so does my Toshiba Portege.

But bottom line: the hardware can be awesome, but in the end its the functionality of the system which counts. And I'm a little puzzled that hardly anyone seems to pay any attention to that.

How will the PDA functionality differ from your common Android device, also considering that this thing was designed for Android. That's the part I'm interested in yet which no one seems willing to address.

1
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