* Posts by ShelLuser

2402 posts • joined 19 Dec 2010

Game authors demand missing ZX Spectrum reboot royalties

ShelLuser
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Pint

I'm a little in between with this...

Personally I can't help wonder if we're not talking about a bunch of people who saw their long aged software being used and then smelled easy money in the making. And I'm not too sure they have any legal grounds either, it's the same with music: after 30 years the copyrights basically drop and it becomes public domain; open for everyone to use. Even if you're using it to make money for yourself.

Now, I do agree that the company in question seems a bit weird, blaming stuff on someone who has long left, but I also think it's fair to note that we're probably not talking about a multi billion company either. So I can imagine that mistakes can be made, or that they make stupid remarks because they're not sure how to handle the situation.

And that's the other side of the medal: if you get into these kinds of things you should be prepared. Study this, do your homework and if you do get called out have your statements ready so that you at least leave a solid impression instead of that of a bunch of goofballs.

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Debian bins keys assigned to arrested Russian contributor

ShelLuser
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@potemkine

Better Siberia than Guantanomo IMO.

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Code-sharing leads to widespread bug sharing that black-hats can track

ShelLuser
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Duh!

"Developers' enthusiasm for sharing code saves their colleagues' time, but also means they share security bugs they haven't noticed. And that means a smart attacker could follow who's shared what with whom to trawl the Web for vulnerabilities."

So researches have looked into this and came to conclude what most of us already knew for nearly 10 years now? Some slow researches those are...

I know of a solution though: hold people accountable for the stuff they post.

I've seen this so many times: a person has a somewhat common problem and someone else presents a small piece of code as the solution. Unfortunately that code comes close but doesn't quite solve the issue just yet. But despite that you'll see dozens of people copying and spreading it as if this solution was their own. For the simple reason that they have no clue what. so. ever. what they're doing nor copying yet hope to become more popular for sharing the solution to an infamous issue.

So yeah: hold people accountable. Post bad code? The kind of stuff you could have known doesn't work by simply trying? Bzzzt., penalty time.

I think some copy cats would be quickly gone

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'Nobody's got to use the internet,' argues idiot congressman in row over ISP privacy rules

ShelLuser
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Black Helicopters

Just wondering...

Wasn't voting often done in an electronic way, which included using the Internet to share the results? Interesting...

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Regulate This! Time to subject algorithms to our laws

ShelLuser
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Coat

It's much worse...

"And yet, if the last decades of open-source software have taught us anything, it is that simple availability does not incentivise investigation."

You don't have to look at open source for that, just look at much more substantial examples. How about projects which are basically build upon pseudo science and which can be proven to be bollocks by merely applying some simple mathematics on them.

For example: a project which will allegedly solve the worlds water scarcity by extracting it out of the air. People made a project, a nice presentation with featured unrealistic claims ("it'll easily extract 40liters of water per day") and as a result they managed to gain a lot of funding, including government funding. Even though it can be proven that the whole concept is flawed and won't work.

Project even made the news and hardly any reported bothered to also look at this from a scientific perspective or to get someone to do that for him.

This is about something in plain sight, fully out in the open, yet people still manage to allow themselves to be conned by it.

So then someone things that algorithms need to be more transparent? Uhm, right...

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Alert: Using a web ad blocker may identify you – to advertisers

ShelLuser
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So, uhm...

"The researchers account for the 2017 internet: they look at what browser extensions people have and what social media services they are logged into."

This seems more like a (well known) social media issue than something related to ad blockers. I'd thought it was common knowledge by now that if you visit a website you're often also downloading 3rd party contents, which allows said 3rd party to perform a bit of tracking. Especially when it's being used on multiple places (such as social media like buttons, Google Analytics javascript, etc.).

It's for that reason why I use both an Ad blocker but also the StopSocial plugin; a small plugin which prevents my browser from contacting any social media website whenever I'm on a website other than the social media site itself. Next using a reference blocker (NoRef) also does miracles.

The only risk is that some websites might break (sometimes they rely on references) but that's easily fixed with setting up a (small) whitelist.

Happy tracking that :)

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Drupal sci-fi sex scandal deepens: Now devs spank Dries over Gor bloke's banishment

ShelLuser
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FAIL

Buytaert opened pandora's box, and doesn't know how to close it...

I've been following this for a while now because I too became highly upset. The sheer display of hypocrisy really got under my skin a bit. Basically: I believe that the Drupal management is plain out lying through their teeth.

They keep saying that Larry was not expelled because of his sexual preferences while also sharing that part of the information they based their decision on was obtained through "unethical ways", that Larry did not violate the Drupal code of conduct, and that they cannot disclose the full reason why Larry got expelled, not even to Larry himself. Yeah, sounds very trustworthy to me indeed.

Next they also started a campaign (it's how I call it) to apply changes to the whole process. Basically making it so that the decision to expel someone is not solely made by Buytaert. Although an admirable effort it does come across as odd that this only happened after the whole incident started escalating. And the most important aspect is that this doesn't change anything to the current situation.

All people asked for was transparency. If that would have been given, then I doubt this would have escalated as much as it has. Yet this is what you get when you're not being honest (or: if you send out that strong impression) while the community you're part of keeps asking for that one simple thing: be honest and transparent about it.

Instead they got a fake apology. Buytaert apologized, not for the expelling but "for causing grief and uncertainty, especially to those in the BDSM and kink communities who felt targeted by the turmoil. This incident was about specific actions of a single member of our community. This was never meant to be about sexual practices or kinks, so it pains me that I unintentionally hurt you. I do support you and respect you as a key part of our community."

Of course only after the escalation. Initially he stated: "I cannot in good faith support someone who actively promotes a philosophy that is contrary to this (= equality). The Gorean philosophy promoted by Larry is based on the principle that women are evolutionarily predisposed to serve men and that the natural order is for men to dominate and lead.".

So what is it? And also interesting: what about all those (adult) women who knowingly and willingly participate in all this as well?

Not to mention the fact that Larry didn't promote anything, something which becomes painfully obvious when you read the dozens of comments on those blog posts: many people, including women, had no idea at all. Even (male & female) developers who had closely worked with Larry. How do you rhyme that with "actively promoting"? It just doesn't add up!

My take: they opened Pandora's box, got surprised by the massive backlash and are now doing everything in their power to apply damage control. While in the end not resolving anything at all, merely changing statements, changing opinions and throwing up a gigantic smokescreen.

I've said this on several places as well: it's the kind of reaction you'd expect from a multi-billion IT company caught with their pants down. NOT from a so called honest, inviting and transparent open source community project.

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Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

ShelLuser
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Joke

@Tom

"Dick move Microsoft, dick move."

As well in bird culture I can imagine! Errr, never mind, I've been watching too much Rick and Morty as of late. As you were ;)

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No more IP addresses for countries that shut down internet access

ShelLuser
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Yet as always...

It will be the people, the general populace, who gets to suffer from all this. "Sorry, no internet for you peasants, only for us government big shots. And don' blame us: they're <points at Afrinic> refusing to give them to you.".

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Troll it your way: Burger King ad tries to hijack Google Home gadgets

ShelLuser
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Facepalm

I'm getting tired of people constantly playing the victim role...

People leave their wifi open and get upset because other people start using it. Of course it's those other people who are to blame, right?

Other people leave their phone set to automatic wifi search and get upset when other other people start (ab)using this. Of course it's those other other people who are to blame, right?

Other other people leave their voice dictation on and get upset when other other other people actually say something to which the system responds. Of course it's those other other other people who are to blame, right?

Other other other people install a wireless gizmo, don't bother to set (or change) any passwords and find their network getting hijacked. Of course it's those other, other, other OTHER people who are to blame, right?

Well... In the last example I tend to fully agree, but in all fairness you could have done a better job as well in securing your stuff. Comparable to leaving your front door fully open and then get upset that some people simply walk in. Sure, you got a good reason to be upset, but you should also have realized that there was something you could have done to prevent it from happening in the first place.

And I see the same thing happening here...

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Prisoners built two PCs from parts, hid them in ceiling, connected to the state's network and did cybershenanigans

ShelLuser
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@Kain

Not sure if they have network cables that long ;)

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As you stare at the dead British Airways website, remember the hundreds of tech staff it laid off

ShelLuser
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And it's back up it seems.

Just tried ba.com and wham.

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Solaris admins! Look out – working remote root exploit leaked in Shadow Brokers dump

ShelLuser
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I wonder...

If the Oracle team is going to provide any solutions they're developing for free or if they'll be charging a lot of money for it. Because that's the kind of thing I'd expect Oracle to do in all honesty.

Oh well...

root@macron:/etc/defaults# rpcinfo

rpcinfo: can't contact rpcbind: RPC: Port mapper failure - RPC: Success

... at least my FreeBSD box is safe because it's not using anything RPC related.

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Finally a reason not to bother with IPv6: Uh, security concerns...?

ShelLuser
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I think bollocks...

""Tunnel-based IPv6 transition mechanisms could allow the setup of egress communication channels over an IPv4-only or dual-stack network while evading detection by a network intrusion detection system,""

So what exactly is stopping this detection system from unpacking the traffic and checking the real contents, also considering the fact that we're talking plain tunneling / encapsulating here and not so much encryption?

Back in the days we used to tunnel our IPSec data across GRE, but check the contents and you could see exactly what was underneath: encrypted data.

In this scenario you can rule out the encryption so... what gives?

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Payday lender Wonga admits to data breach

ShelLuser
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Thumb Up

Good for them to come clean!

Yeah, it's oh so easy to mock and make fun of someone but I think it's good for them to come clean about the whole incident. For the record: I didn't know about Wong or what they do but from visiting the website I got the overall impression.

But let's not assume too much. Where there's money there are people trying to obtain that money for themselves, so obviously there are forces at work here. I wouldn't be too hasty to blame the whole thing on cheap labor. Thing is: banks I don't trust too much because they more or less get their money handed to them yet still ask for more.

But companies like these are a bit different. They also take risks (to some extend).

One thing though:

"The FAQ offers contradictory advice on the incident, offering assurances that “We believe that your account is secure and you do not need to take any action" but also says “if you are concerned you should change your account password."

No it doesn't. The first is not an advice but an opinion: they believe that... Yet if you do feel concerned then you should change your password, which is always a good thing to do every once in a while.

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Ex-IBMer sues Google for $10bn – after his web ad for 'divine honey cancer cure' was pulled

ShelLuser
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Pint

People like that...

Are in my opinion a danger to our rights for free speech.

Sure, we have a right to free speech. But that doesn't automatically imply that you can blabber your mouth just anywhere you like.

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Reversible head transplants coming back to Windows Server 2016

ShelLuser
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Let me fix that for you...

"the reason for the feature's removal was “one of those challenging functional trade-offs that sometimes need to be made during product development.”".

Actually I think you meant to say: "The reason for the removal was because we think change sells, and if the change is disliked enough we can even sell the solution again with the next release, both options somewhat guarantee next release sales".

And this is why I only rely on open Unix-like environments for my servers.

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Boeing-backed US upstart reckons it'll be building electric airliners

ShelLuser
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Facepalm

Reality check time?

I sometimes wonder if schools actually still teach physics these days or if that's all turned into "let's learn how to turn on the computer and ask our questions on Google", haven't these guys ever used their brains? Or studied on what they're trying to do?

Almost every year there's a World Solar challenge held in Australia and the idea is to build a solar powered car which will take the contestants around the continent. Here are some of the highlights of 2015, notice anything peculiar?

If you look closely you'll notice that most cars are literally packed with solar panels and batteries, often hardly providing any room for the driver. We're talking Australia where the sun is almost literally burning, it's hot there. Yet even here do you come across cars which despite all the batteries, despite the massive solar panels (which are state of the art, when a country participates you can bet that they got some solid government backup) and despite the seering sun cars still manage to fail due to lack of power.

And these are merely cars which are very aerodynamic (as you can see), and build solely for the race itself. Their only obstacle is (air) friction, and their challenge is power consumption.

Think about what would happen if they had to bring passengers along....

Think about what would happen if these had to become trucks to actually transport goods around the continent.

And then think about the challenge of defying gravity.

So yeah, time for a reality check I think...

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Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

ShelLuser
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Re: Solution

Get a juicy enough machine, install Linux, install VirtualBox and then run Windows inside it.

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ShelLuser
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Windows

@cb7

"But we seem to bash MS more for this slurping than the others. I wonder why?

Well, I wouldn't be surprised if one part of that would be the fact that this slurping was pushed down people's throat. We all know about big brother Google but you can protect yourself and not use their services, you can block google-analytics.com in your browser, you can block pretty much everything else from Google in your browser. All it takes is a little googling (bad pun, I know ;)).

Speaking of which: you might also want to use a search engine like Duck Duck Go.

But Windows 10 got forced on people, and there are plenty who would rather use Windows 7 but don't know how or simply can't (think about a machine with a pre-installed OS which didn't include installation media and the owner also never made any copies).

So then comes Microsoft along, dumps Windows 10 on that "because" and then tells the owner: "Oh right, we'll be keeping an eye on you from now on".

Obviously people will get more upset about that.

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ShelLuser
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@AC

"I just wish I could completely turn off Google Analytics and avoid being treated like Alphabet's guinea pig."

You can. Step one is not to use Chrome or something build on Chromium. Step 2 is to add the google-analytics.com domain to a Javascript blacklist (most browsers have that). While you're at it you might want to add googleadservices.com as well.

That completely stops your browser from running any kind of Google Analytics mess.

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Ubuntu UNITY is GNOME-MORE: 'One Linux' dream of phone, slab, desktop UI axed

ShelLuser
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An open source projects needs to be good, not sell good....

I believe that one of the main problems of todays market are the open source projects which have a company behind them. The problem should be obvious: a company, per definition, has a completely different agenda than those involved with an average open source project.

A company needs to generate revenue and in order to do that they need to sell something.

But an open source project is usually driven by passion; people who believe in the project and who want to make the best out of it. This often works as expected, but as soon as something clashes with the main goal, the revenue, then you'll soon learn where the true priorities lie. I think a good example is Drupal which removed a well respected developer from their project for reasons which have never been fully explained, but the general believe is that it was because of his private life and how people in general might feel about that. In other words: people could become upset about what this developer does in his free time, and that could affect revenue. As such he had to go.

This situation is different, yet comparable. "One GUI to rule them all" is a good marketing phrase: it sells, and if it sells it might generate revenue and thus is then bound to become a key target. So you'd run into 'talking reason' vs. 'talking revenue'. Guess which wins? So now it has been deemed unprofitable, so obviously it had to go. Bye Unity, you're fired. That's pure company talk for you.

When there's a company involved with an open source project then there's always a double agenda. And in my opinion that generates a very toxic and unhealthy environment where open source ethics are concerned. Because open source is not about revenue perse. And it's that key aspect which made it such a strong force to be reckoned with.

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Goodbye, cruel world! NASA's Cassini preps for kamikaze Saturn dive

ShelLuser
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Pint

Don't mind me, just fantasizing...

I know it's impossible and won't happen, but... Can you imagine what could happen if Cassini would break through the atmosphere, only to suddenly spot images of what appears to be a whole city down there, populated by who knows what? Closely followed of course by a visit from the galactic federation to Earth so that they can complaint about us littering their science station outpost :)

Oh well... a man can dream, right?

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WWW daddy Sir Tim Berners-Lee stands up for end-to-end crypto

ShelLuser
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Black Helicopters

Populist government comments...

It's plain out a fantasy that using weakened encryption... You know what? Lets just to the chase: that giving the government full access to our day to day Internet presence will change much or even helps to stop terrorism.

Because: who's going to monitor all that data? And even if you do manage to monitor all the available data, and perhaps also automatically look for keywords do you really think that those will be used when people know they're being monitored? Do these guys have any idea how easy it is to simply substitute words and phrases so that you're uttering totally harmless things yet with a whole different underlying meaning?

It used to be the number one hobby for some of my friends and me in the 80's (we were 14 - 18) back when we were very busy swapping Commodore 64 games around. Because you also often read stories about copy parties which got raided by the police and all. Of course not realizing that those were parties where people sold cracked software for hard cash whereas we simply copied and swapped whatever we could find.

Even so... We could talk for quite a while on the phone about homework, while in fact we were talking about removing a nasty copyright protection :)

Quite frankly I think Ghost in the Shell - Stand Alone Complex, first season totally nailed this problem of data amounts. At one time they were hot on the trail of the Laughing Man and at even played "Big Brother": relaying and analyzing all the data accessible to them from the Net in order to try and find a trace. As a result several AI's crashed at the result of the sheer amount of data they had to process and it became immediately clear that they could only keep it up for so long....

Even though that was total fantasy of course I still think it does a good job on showing the actual problem with all this.

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It's 30 years ago: IBM's final battle with reality

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

IBM was its own worst enemy

It's been a while but back in the days I was a serious OS/2 advocate. Look, if you even get other people to end up trying out OS/2 because they became sick and tired of Windows 3.11 often bodging up and not being able to network properly then yeah...

But IBM more than often didn't even seem to care all that much. Looking back I think it was a bit the same as the stories we get to hear about Microsoft now: how divisions in the company do different things, don't always work together and in some rare cases even compete. Even at the expense of customers if they have to!

But IBM... I enrolled in the OS/2 support program (I seriously don't remember how I pulled this off anymore, I think I asked (and got) permission from my work to look into all this and also use their name) which ended up with IBM sending me several beta versions of OS/2 products. Including several OS/2 server environments. It was awesome. OS/2 server (a green covered double CD, that much I remember) was basically OS/2 with additional user management and network configuration settings.

Yet the funniest thing: IBM couldn't care less about your test results. At one time I got an invitation to go to IBM in the Netherlands for an OS/2 server demonstration which would also showcase some of their latest product (I recall being showed a very lightweight laptop). At arrival you had to search for the entrance and where it all was, because any announcements or directions were no where to be found on site.

I bought OS/2 3.0 Warp and the 4.0 Merlin and it always worked like a charm. I seriously liked OS/2 much better than anything else. So when I had the opportunity to buy a PC through my work it was obvious what I would need to get, right? An IBM Aptiva. That would be an ultimate, the thing to get for OS/2. Because obviously an IBM OS will definitely run on IBM hardware, right?

Context: this was at the prime of my OS/2 endeavors. I could optimize and write a config.sys file from mind if I had to, I knew what drivers to use, which to skip, what each command did. Memory optimization? Easy. Bootstrapping a *single* floppy disk to get an OS/2 commandline? Hard, yet not impossible (try it, you'd normally get multiple disks to boot with).

It took me one whole weekend, dozens of phonecalls to the IBM support line, and the conclusion was simple: IBM did not care about OS/2 for their own hardware. And with that I mean not at all. It did not work, no matter what I tried. Even they told me that this wasn't going to work. Compaq out of all brands did care. Compaq, the brand which tried extremely hard to appeal to the general customer by making their hardware "easy" to use and also "easy" to customize (comparable to Dell a bit) didn't only target Microsoft and Windows. Noooo.... When I eventually ditched my IBM I got myself a Compaq and I also purchased an extra set of drivers and installation media (3 boxes of 3.5 floppy disks, approx. 37 in total) and guess what? Next to a full Windows 3.11 installation plus a different program manager and dozens of drivers it also included several disks with OS/2 drivers. I removed Windows and installed OS/2 that very same evening.

Compaq... which often advertised that they made Windows easier. And also delivered OS/2 drivers for their harware...

IBM, which made OS/2 also made hardware, never even bothered to provide OS/2 drivers for their own PC's. Not even if you asked them.

Does that look like a company which cared?

IBM was its own enemy sometimes.

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Yee-hacked! Fired Texan sysadmin goes rogue, trashes boot business

ShelLuser
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@Will

Muppet is too friendly.

Morons like that also ruin it for the serious IT staffers, because there will be employers who may start worrying about all this. The classic "can you really trust the IT department?" and that could have its affect an plenty of others.

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Microsoft taking CodePlex behind the shed and shooting it by Christmas

ShelLuser
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FAIL

@Mage

"Win10 isn't popular in terms of "liked", but unlike codeplex it's unavoidable."

I'm still running Windows 7, so how did that happen?

And when support for Windows 7 eventually drops I can move to Linux, BSD, or even get myself an Apple. So, uhm, unavoidable how?

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Reg now behind invisible HTML5 Bitcoin paywall

ShelLuser
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Brilliant

This was a good one and I fully support the idea!

Please blurr out more stories about stuff I don't like reading about anyway, it makes the world a better place :)

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BDSM sex rocks Drupal world: Top dev banished for sci-fi hanky-panky

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

El Reg is awesome!

I want to thank the Register team for bringing this to the attention of the people outside of the Drupal communities. Because it seems to me that this outside media attention is definitely starting quite an uproar and in my opinion rightfully so.

Personally I am somewhat surprised in how a so called "free" and "open" community as Drupal claims to be is now desperately trying their best at damage control. Yet not the kind one would expect from an open source project, no, the kind you'd expect from a big IT company which only sees a danger to their revenue and couldn't care less about the rest.

Maybe I'm ranting, I can't rule that out, but how else do you explain official comments which basically don't go much deeper then Stay for community. I quote (I kid you not!): "This seems like the perfect time for a singing, dancing, spandexed pageant about the Drupal community.".

And the worst part: "Do you think Larry was punished for thoughtcrime? Pitch in and help build a system where the next Larry can’t be treated that way. Do you think Dries and the DA deserve our trust in their decision? Join up and help make sure the next iteration preserves the strength of independent leadership.".

So basically, how I perceive this, is them saying "whatever you might think be sure to stay and/or join the community". Let's stop caring about Larry and instead put your effort into trying to prevent this from happening to the next Larry! And if you try hard enough then who knows: maybe you can be in the spotlight to play the role as the next Larry.

I think people seem to forget there's a whole company behind Drupal. And companies don't care about communities, companies care about revenue. And let's be honest: this backlash can have its affect on that, and that will scare them to no end.

Moments like these I am a very proud Register reader. Biting the hand that feeds IT.

Once again: thanks Reg for posting and informing us about this while also making sure we go to see both sides of this story so that we could make up our own mind.

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ShelLuser
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Pint

@Paul

Very well said, and don't forget feminists. I don't want to stir up a fire here but the extremists within those areas also have a tendency of proclaiming their believes as "right" and everyone who disagrees with them and speaks up is per definition guilty of harassment (at least that's the impression I constantly get).

Still... Salem... Not so much, I think this is more about a growing display of intolerance for other people's believes which we're seeing, and it's something which somewhat worries me from time to time.

Many people will agree that the dictators of the past (the likes of Stalin, Hitler, Hoessein) are bad news, yet many will easily stoop to their habits for themselves. I'm not talking genocide and all that monstrosity of course, but about spreading a sheer display of intolerance for any other opinion but your own.

Makes you wonder what's next. Hmm, people who play Minecraft should obviously be considered as very childish for playing such a weird retro-like game. Obviously you can't have those around within "serious" software projects which "matter".

How about El Reg readers? "Biting the hand that feeds IT"? Those sound very intolerant, maybe we should ban those from any "serious" projects as well.

I'm not using Drupal myself, but if I was then this display of intolerance would definitely be reason enough for me to dump it for something else.

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Time to make up: Realtime collaboration comes to Excel

ShelLuser
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Windows

Hardly new...

This was already possible with Office 2010 right after Microsoft launched SkyDrive (now OneDrive).

And I'm not just saying mind you, check this MSDN article from 2013. This involves Team Foundation, but even so that was still a way to perform team edits on Office documents.

Or what about this Office support article on co-authoring?

I quote: "When you're using Office and your document is on SharePoint or OneDrive, when everyone is done, you have a finished document, there's no need to copy and reformat.". As said: I've been using this with Office 2010 for years now.

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Creators Update gives Windows 10 a bit of an Edge, but some old annoyances remain

ShelLuser
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Windows

@ABC ;-)

"Hang on! Ads in Explorer?"

I was wondering about that myself as well. And it seems Microsoft even tries to add insult to injury because how do you combine that with this one: "Privacy and Windows 10 is a hot topic."?

Doesn't one, by definition, rule out the other here?

Anyway, thanks El Reg for a really nice insight article. I still don't like the very flat and dull looking interface, especially not when compared to my trusty rich looking Windows 7. I still don't understand why people would go along with that.

I mean... We've had years worth of development with graphic cards (GPU) and accelerators and all that. And what do you get with Windows 10? A flat, dull, colorless interface which sometimes makes me think back about Windows 2.0.

Even Windows 3.1 / 3.11 was better looking (in comparison), they really worked hard on some of the icons and some were honestly small pieces of art. This became especially true when the real fans started to release icon libraries of their own.

But now? I still have zero motivation to upgrade, and it's not because I'm unwilling to try something new but because the whole thing looks so horribly unappealing to me.

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Microsoft wants screaming Windows fans, not just users

ShelLuser
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Windows

Uhm, right.... suuure.

"Mehdi says the Windows Insider program now has over ten million participants."

Quantity doesn't make quality. I mean, there are also thousands (most likely more!) of Windows 10 users out there who would rather get Windows 7 back yet don't know how to do that (sometimes that would be impossible for them, think about laptops with a pre-installed Windows without physical installation media).

And are you sure that all the users who got forcefully upgraded to Windows 10 didn't automatically become a member of this insider program as well? Because I remember reading those stories about that automatically installed Windows 10 user hub software which could be used to provide 'much required feedback'.

Most importantly the Insider program, with very low application requirements, is also a sure way to get your hands on previews, aka free software. People looking for freebies don't necessarily meet the criteria for being a fan.

The fact that Microsoft seems to believe this is only a sign for me that they've become delusional.

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iPhone-havers think they're safe. But they're not

ShelLuser
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@Sooty

Although you're making an excellent point one should also not overlook the obvious: it doesn't always require a hacked phone in order to get some malware installed on it. There are way too many ignorant users out there who will easily install a good looking "free(ish)" game and simply click through the all the warnings that this game wants to access a whole lot of peripherals, which would raise quite a few alarm bells with people who actually think about what they're doing.

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Miss Misery on hacking Mr Robot and the Missing Sense of Fun

ShelLuser
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Pint

Never heard of it, but...

It maybe a bit grinchy for some people at some point but then you also have to remember that you're most likely someone with a background or deeper interest in IT which means that you'll approach some of the plot holes differently.

Even so... It's not something I'd go out to watch, have to agree that Hill Street Blues looks much better in comparison, and even that had a really high dose of "soap" for me, especially near the seasons where Furillo & Davenport started to become a very strange couple.

Still... I can't help get the impression that this series could very well be a much better message towards the general audience that "please use a password which isn't too easily guessable" than any written study can do. At least I hope so.

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'Windows 10 destroyed our data!' Microsoft hauled into US court

ShelLuser
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@AC

How does that apply when you were using Windows 7?

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ShelLuser
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Windows

@Will

For more than one reason too. Seriously: Microsoft has made the Internet a more dangerous place to be on, and caused a lot of collateral damage with this enforced update stunt. At least that's my opinion and impression (based on what I saw around me).

Thing is: many people have been thrown offguard and are now very suspicious of the whole upgrade procedure and tons of people I know off have forcefully turned off updates in order to prevent an unwanted update to Windows 10. Thing is: it's a whole lot easier to simply turn off the update process entirely than it is to track down (and block) the updates responsible for the Windows 10 update. I know there are 3rd party tools for that, not my point.

My point is that there are now plenty of legit Windows environments out there which won't be updated any time soon because the owner is fearful of being forcefed with Windows 10. Yet that also creates a risk because they also won't be getting any more security updates either.

Considering the massive amount of stories about exploits and discovered flaws I hope that it won't be too hard to comprehend why this could become a major problem. Sure... Unless you're not on the receiving end of a DDoS attack you have nothing to complain about, right? Yah, but what if you are and you didn't use any intervention from, say, Cloudfare?

When are we going to stop fighting symptoms and instead try to tackle problems at the source, like this one?

For the record: I'm a Microsoft fan (sort off), I seriously enjoy and appreciate some of the products (like Office and Windows 7) but I'm very opposed to their <self-censored> idea of enforcing their Windows 10 crap upon us.

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Inside OpenSSL's battle to change its license: Coders' rights, tech giants, patents and more

ShelLuser
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I don't see the problem...

Open source or not: there are only a few people who actually own or run the project. So if they want to change their license then they should be allowed to do so. And well, to be honest I think you can't go very wrong with the Apache license.

"For years, OpenSSL went largely unappreciated, until the Heartbleed vulnerability surfaced in 2014 and shamed the large companies that depend on the software for online security to contribute funds and code."

"Shamed companies"? Interesting choice of words, but I don't think it holds very true. Another thing: it also wasn't the first time something like this happened. In 2008 we had another OpenSSL disaster, but this time fully triggered by the Debian package maintainer who altered the code and by doing so introduced a vulnerability.

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Why do GUIs jump around like a demented terrier while starting up? Am I on my own?

ShelLuser
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@Unicornpiss

Microsoft should not be taken too seriously. Back in the days it wasn't even uncommon for them to display warnings such as: "Unable to delete files: disk full" idiocy. If they can come up with something like that, then obviously a progress bar is waay too complex :)

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It's happening! It's happening! W3C erects DRM as web standard

ShelLuser
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It's one thing to define a standard...

...it's a whole different ballgame to get people to actually use it. I hope that this may give some people a better impression of the importance of open standards. And for the record:

"That survey was sent out yesterday and member organizations, who pay an annual fee that varies from $2,250 for the smallest non-profits to $77,000 for larger corporations"

I don't consider "pay to win" very much of a reliable standard to begin with. Sounds to me that the more money you contribute the more things you got to say. But how does that ensure quality standards to be uphold?

Yet here also lies a bit of a concern. Google is one of those members and they got big pockets. Next you'll also have the Chrome browser which pretty much dominates the market. So, uhm, yeah, it's fun and all that Chrome is an open source browser but it's most definitely not much of an open and free standard. I'm pretty sure that when this vote gets accepted, and why shouldn't it considering the massive monetary interests, then it'll be a matter of time before Chrome and therefor a huge area of the Net has been switched to this new standard.

Basically putting Google into the same position Microsoft once was when they dictated the market. Major difference being that this doesn't involve one proprietary product but a full blown allegedly shared environment.

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What should password managers not do? Leak your passwords? What a great idea, LastPass

ShelLuser
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Holmes

"Access control"

Apart from my previous (small) rants on security and lack of understanding / insight knowledge from the users another important aspect is control and access.

The more access you allow "security software" to get, the higher the risks you'll take. Sure, it's easy to have the whole thing automated within your browser, but it's also an extra hurdle which a potential attacker doesn't have to take.

Of course I'm highly old fashioned. My password manager consists of something I cooked up within VBA which utilizes some office components. No, not Office 365; the kind of Office which doesn't even fully realize the Internet actually exists. It doesn't even sync with my phone and other devices.

But I also don't have to. If I really, really, need a password I'll simply hook up to my VPN, connect to my PC and from there I can retrieve my stuff. Awkward? Maybe. But I'm also not the kind of person who needs to log on to his social media accounts or whatever other leisure stuff when I'm on the road either. That can wait until I'm back at home.

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SVN commit this: Subversion to fix file renaming after 15 years

ShelLuser
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Coffee/keyboard

Some comments are funny...

Just because you don't like a certain project doesn't mean that it has no value at all. And sure: there may be other environments which provide the same features (or maybe better, but "best" is nearly always in the eye of the beholder anyway), it doesn't mean that everyone who jumps ship will also gain all those advantages. For example: the very process of moving from one VCS to the other can be quite taxing in itself.

And if the overall advantages only end up to be cosmetic ("faster", "easier" (everything is easy once you know how), "smaller data storage" (with todays storage space how is that an issue?)) then it also remains to be seen how much real advantage you'll gain by switching. The classic "If it isn't broke, don't fix it" approach still works today.

I'm still using Subversion for my own projects as well as to keep up with FreeBSD's source and documentation trees and well, it simply works for me, therefor I see no reason to go through all the effort of learning something new when I'll only end up with marginal advantages (and a lot of extra effort).

I think its good to see that SVN is still being maintained and improved.

13
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Are you undermining your web security by checking on it with the wrong tools?

ShelLuser
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Pint

So, uhm...

"In other words, the user can only be sure that their connection to the interception product is legit, but has no idea whether the rest of the communication – to the web server, over the internet – is secure or has been compromised."

I think it boils down to a very basic issue once more: understand what the heck you're doing. Most modern operating systems (Windows Server, *BSD and even Linux) provide several tools which you can use to check connections and the state their in. Obviously it is sometimes preferable to do outside checks (like with port scans) but even that can be done by utilizing a second server (for example).

The main problem? Simple: you have to know what the heck you're doing. You need a basic underlying understanding of the encryption process, how to monitor network connections (I've come across too many people who had no clue how to use tcpdump or netcat for example) and interpret the results.

And that seems a bit too much for more "modern" companies, time is also money afterall, so they'd rather rely on out-of-the-box ready to use gizmo's like these. Without stopping to think about possible consequences.

Welcome to the modern world of ICT: where a lot of people stopped to think for themselves, don't bother to try and understand (learn) something new and where you totally rely on what others tell you without questioning nor challenging them.

PS: Doesn't this same risk apply when your HTTPS connection is using a reverse proxy (as suggested by an article some weeks ago)?

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Newly cloud-tastic Oracle sees hardware sales droop

ShelLuser
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Pint

I think it's much more simple...

"So what has depressed it?"

The article blames it on the market (and some of its other players) but I can't help think that Oracle played a huge role in this themselves as well. Just check some Oracle news stories over the past years and pay extra attention to the general tone of the user comments. More than often do you read stories about unhappy people. Some noticed how Oracle raised their subscription plans in triple (and many ran off), then we read stories about Oracle trying to push Java patents which shows even more comments about people getting turned off from Oracle, then a few months back yet another story about Oracle raising their prices tremendously....

Summing up: there are plenty of people around who have had negative experiences with Oracle in one way or the other which involved a huge increase in costs while hardly getting much back from it in return.

So here's a question for you: do you honestly think those people would seriously consider Oracle for hardware? Wouldn't you consider it possible that the moment they see other people using Oracle's services that chances become high that they might warn them about Oracle and their sometimes bizarre business model (and drastic price increases)? Basically and effectively scaring even more people away from them?

Never underestimate how quickly a bad experience with a company can travel and spread around.

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Barrister fined after idiot husband slings unencrypted client data onto the internet

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FAIL

@ArrZarr

"The file could even have been password protected on the drive.

Now I hate to be the voice of reason when we could be laughing at lawyers but given that details in the story are scarce on how the information was stored, I think you may be going a bit far."

Which part of: "visible to an internet search engine and some of the documents could be easily accessed through a simple search" did you chose to ignore from the article?

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Russian! spies! 'brains! behind!' Yahoo! mega-hack! – four! charged!

ShelLuser
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@AC

I have to agree with you. Even the article does this: "Russians behind the hack", yet last time I checked charging or accusing someone of a felony doesn't automatically mean they also actually did it. You got to prove this too, in a court of law. Only after the judge has ruled can you conclude that someone was guilty or not.

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Microsoft urges PhD-grade devs to play Minecraft for money

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Happy

Just a 'simple game, huh? ;)

I'm a decently vivid Minecraft player, been playing for three years now and I still haven't reached a point where I got bored with it. Of course it does help that I've never really had much problems with keeping myself occupied and entertained, but on the other hand I also think that Minecraft is a seriously underrated game.

Of course the reason why is obvious and fully understandable. Because let's be honest: at first glimpse things can look very simplistic and simple. Isn't this basically a virtual block collection to build with? Well, yes and no... Of course there is a building aspect in the game, and if you can set your prejudice aside for "pixelated environments" then you may come to appreciate a world which provides much more detail than you may give it credit for. Trees, flowers, rivers, cliffs, ravines, deserts, oceans, jungles... You can all find those within Minecraft.

But there's more. The Minecraft game mechanic itself is pretty special. Because it doesn't only allow you to play the game, it also provides all the tools you might need to create the game. Whatever game you might want but all within the Minecraft world of course. From more simple things such as four in a row, a maze, a dropper (jump down into a world and try to survive the fall) right to more complicated things like battleships (with 'real ships' which can be blown up and sunk) or puzzle / adventure maps where you need to perform specific actions in order to solve things.

There are players who have build whole computers within Minecraft, capable of performing basic mathematical operations. Creations which are at their core directly comparable to circuit board designs.

Within that context the vivid player in me wants to cry out to you guys and point his fingers to this while saying: "See? A bit more complex than you thought, huh?".

But even though I meant every word I said above we also need to be a little realistic. Because lets face it: the gaming environment eventually doesn't really matter. The real challenge will be the AI <-> player interaction, where the stage is simply set to Minecraft. An interesting stage, sure, but given the very nature of the game it also remains to be seen how much influence the environment is going to have.

In the end one could also approach this with the impression that Microsoft is now utilizing a rather famous name to draw more attention to their other projects.

Either way, I for one am not really looking forward to having to face even smarter creepers :P

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Oxford Uni boffins say internet filters probably won't protect teens

ShelLuser
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Holmes

Such awkward times...

When some people actually feel the need to study what society would generally consider to be plain out obvious. Worse yet: getting paid for it too.

What's next? Study which learns that forcefully forbidding your teenager kid to drink alcohol can very well drive them to do so behind your back. A lesson which the whole US has learned the hard way.

Who would have known all these things?

Reminds me of that "iBabe" scene in Movie 45. iBabe: an MP3 player which looks like a naked woman and to add insult to injury it has a high powered ventilator placed in a "certain private spot" resulting in obvious nasty issues. And the board of directors: "We could never have seen that coming, who would have known people would try to "mate" with an mp3 player?".

No shit sherlock :)

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Dungeons & Dragons finally going digital

ShelLuser
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@veti

"Why did nobody think of that before?"

They did, but then concluded that you can't make enough money out of that.

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Germany to Facebook, Twitter: We are *this* close to fining you €50m unless you delete fake news within 24 hours

ShelLuser
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@Danceman

"If this proposal about fake news were to be enacted, would Erdogan's German Facebook page consist of a lot of white space?"

Doubtful, but I do get the impression that the European leaders would be all too happy to keep sending fines his way. And after he paid the government then problem solved I guess.

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