* Posts by ShelLuser

2471 posts • joined 19 Dec 2010

Discredit a journo? Easy, that'll be $55k. Fix an election? Oh, I can do that for just $400k

ShelLuser
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If the media would do it's job....

The key thing for a journalist to do is to check their sources, verify that what you heard is true and actually possible. However, that part has been lacking in most mainstream media for years already and as a direct result you get scenarios like this.

Mainstream media cares more about being the first to bring a story (which hopefully will affect sales and/or advertisements) than being the one to bring reliable news. And as long as you don't break that cycle then we won't be seeing the end of this any time soon.

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Specsavers embraces Azure and AWS, recoils at Oracle's 'wow' factor

ShelLuser
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I can see clearly now...

The wow is gone. I can see no more obstacles in my way. It's gonna be a bright, bright, bright, bright sun shiny day :-)

I don't care too much about Amazon and Microsoft's online services, but I dislike Oracle even more. So yeah, I'm happy enough about that :)

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Lockheed, USAF hold breath as F-35 pilots report hypoxia

ShelLuser
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Trollface

Awesome...

I'm so happy that my government (Dutch) chose to go for the JSF F35 instead of showing some European cooperative mentality and deciding for the Eurofighter. Yeah, apparently people should only feel "European" (instead of Dutch) when it best serves the government.

Now we got a plane which we're not allowed to use on our own because the US basically decides everything (even where to send them for maintenance), the plane has a much shorter action radius and can carry less fuel than its Dutch predecessor the F16 Starfighter. So now it turns out that it will also suffocate the pilots, effectively doing the enemies job for them.

I wonder what will be next...

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Hotel guest goes broke after booking software gremlin makes her pay for strangers' rooms

ShelLuser
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I wonder...

If the credit card companies which put up dozens of rules what companies can and cannot do with credit card information are going to do about all this. Setting up rules is one thing, enforcing said rules is what really counts.

Something tells me we'll never hear from this again though.

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Hyperloop One teases idea of 50-minute London-Edinburgh ride

ShelLuser
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@R3

I think that's the whole point. People in the US are growing weary of all this so it remains to be seen how much more funding they'll be able to get, so now it's time to try and exploit new markets.

They might be in for a small surprise though I think.

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The internet may well be the root cause of today's problems… but not in the way you think

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

When people band together governments start worrying

You do realize that at one time in history governments also tried to ban the formation of unions? Because those would be bad; shifting the balance of power where it should not belong, according to the powers that be of course.

This is not much different. They're not targeting the Internet, they're targeting us humans banding together. Because in a sense we could become a threat to their existence. Because when politicians tell lies, and people debunk those and place their findings on the Internet for all to see...Then only 1 single individual could start a (virtual) riot (with riot I'm not referring to violence, only verbal violence of some sort).

I would have been much more impressed if the British police had actually been monitoring the recent attackers, but the story is that they were not. Another thing which the government would rather keep quiet I think.

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Who's going to dig you out of a security hole when the time comes?

ShelLuser
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Pint

Welcome to overregulation

"Am I alone in thinking that these latter items are what we system and network administrators have been doing for years?"

No, but the main difference (the way I see it) is that you had a healthy dose of common sense. Which is something that seems to be rapidly declining these days. Back in the days you had people who knew what they were doing. New admins would get into a new environment, have the patience to learn how this environment worked and study the whole thing and then (and only then) would come up with ways in which they thought the whole thing could be improved. That's how you can grow and evolve.

These days the mindset is much more self-centered. You know best because you got a paper saying you studied. Therefor when you get into a new environment you know all there is to it and will tell everyone how bad the whole thing is because it didn't meet your expectations. Because obviously you know best.

Cool job winning that paper, but it hasn't taught you shit about how things work in the real world. You know: where people are trying to make money and keep things working in the most optimal way.

Yet I get the impression that it is because of nutjobs like that why people stick to dry regulation these days. At least that way you can somehow control the damage, hold people accountable for screw ups a whole lot easier ("you didn't follow procedure") and also help keep those nutjobs I talked about in line.

Of course you're also hindering that evolve part which I mentioned earlier, but many larger companies couldn't give less about that. Which, in my opinion, is their loss. Because over-regulation (as I tend to call it) can also seriously demotivate.

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German court says 'Nein' on Facebook profile access request

ShelLuser
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Stop

@AC

"Facebook needs to die a fiery death."

Although I'm no fan of Facebook myself there's hardly enough information in the article to put the blame fully on Facebook.

For example: was she living with her parents or had she left the house already? This could make for a huge difference in the whole situation. Second of all: if she did live with her parents and all then isn't it safe to assume that the parents also gained control over the girls tech? So how hard would it be to try and get a password reset and gain access that way (I'm sure they'd also had access to her e-mail and cellphones)?

The way I see it they started with contacting Facebook, so how exactly would Facebook determine everything was legit here? For all we know the girl could also have been trying to get away from her parents mind you. And giving them access like this could then open up Pandora's box to them.

I'm not saying that this is the case, but with these things you need to rule out every possible scenario, including the nasty ones.

Thing is: if something were to happen to me then I'm pretty sure my parents will know exactly where to look for my password collection. They wouldn't need to contact website owners, all they had to do is use my passwords.

Why didn't that happen here as well?

As such my comment: there's hardly enough information provided to automatically put the blame on Facebook.

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Security company finds unsecured bucket of US military images on AWS

ShelLuser
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@AC

"Amazon needs to simplify their platform a little I think."

Have to disagree there. If you're using a certain product which is also publically accessible then you need to ensure that you know what you're doing. I can understand that things can become confusing at some point, but it's not really an impossible task.

This is of course assuming that all of this actually happened.

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Plastic surgery patients face extortion in wake of clinic data breach

ShelLuser
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Trollface

I'm sure they had nothing to hide...

Yes, the title is a bit of a troll, but think about it. This is exactly the kind of example why "I got nothing to hide" is utter bollocks. It's not about whether you have or haven't got something to hide, the real issue is how the obtained information is going to be (mis)used.

Many people seem to somehow overlook that very important detail.

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Does Microsoft have what it takes to topple Google Docs?

ShelLuser
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Actually...

"If you were to start a business today, would you bother buying desktop software for productivity and collaboration? Probably not, you'd employ some software option delivered as a service.".

Actually it heavily depends, but SaaS isn't exactly the holy grail you know.

Lets get one thing out of the way: I'm biased in favor of Microsoft Office when it comes to the desktop applications. I think it's really hard to beat that functionality, especially if you familiarize yourself with the VBA backend, then the sky can really become the limit.

Looking at online services though shows a huge difference. Google has a major advantage there, the userfriendliness which Google's online services have to offer is pretty much unrivaled. Look... If you see Google docs appear in areas where you can be assured that not most people aren't very tech-savy then that should be a clear signal that Google is definitely doing "something" right.

But back to that top sentence I quoted: generally speaking it's much more appealing for a company to buy into desktop applications instead of SaaS. First the obvious: SaaS may appear to be cheaper, but in the longer run it's not. If I wanted to get a business subscription I'd have to pay roughly E 10,-/month. A business version would cost me around E 230,- / month.

The thing is: there's more at stake than just 2 years worth of use. By buying the software you're also adding to your companies value (assets) which can influence the taxes you have to pay (depending on your country). Another important detail is availability. Offline means that you'll be able to work wherever you want, online means that you'll be depending on an Internet connection. Although a basic connection could do, if you end up with multiple employee's working online then you may also run into bandwidth issues. As such more costs involved.

Next: insurance. When working online you also have to cope with your data being stored outside your reach and basically outside your control. Normally you'd have that roughly covered with the global insurance policies for your company, but since it's in the cloud there will be more at stake here. Also more risks. Sounds crazy? Well, if everything is stored in the cloud then you'd better make darn sure that sales (for example) can't access files from HR, and vice versa. Risk assessment. Do I hear more work, as such also more involved costs?

Do note that I'm not trying to claim that online = bad, it doesn't have to be. Heck: in the higher 365 tiers you're even provided with offline tools. But claiming that online is per definition more appealing than the "old and traditional" offline approach is simply being narrow minded. There's much more at stake than that.

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Windows XP crashed too much to spread WannaCrypt

ShelLuser
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Windows

@Danny

"Now I know that XP is well beyond it's end of life"

You'd be surprised, Microsoft still maintains it. Just not for John Doe anymore, but only for those who are willing to cough up a big paycheck for all the hard work. Why do you think they released that patch in the open? Trust me: they didn't build that out of good will and such.

There are still many legit XP environments out there. Even my government quickly ensured the continued use of XP when it became clear that Microsoft was really going to pull the plug. Makes you wonder how skilled the people within those organizations are. I mean: the rest of the world had seen it long coming, yet within our wonderful world of bureaucracy they needed a good dose of the taxpayers money so that they could maintain the status quo.

And that's just one, I know there are plenty of other European governments where XP is still a thing. And Microsoft is more than happy to oblige (for the right payment of course). Always fun to know that plenty of your tax dollars get "well spent", right?

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Event horizons around black holes do exist, say astroboffins

ShelLuser
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Stop

@Symon

"It's remarkable how Newton's laws of motion describe the world around us. The 17th century was truly the age of enlightenment."

Not so much about that 17th century, because it was much later when we finally had the courage (and drive) to stand up against the oppression by the church. When that ended it also truly started the rise of the whole mechanical revolution.

Many people fear the influence of Islam right now (in my opinion rightfully so), and many people also can't believe how that religion can so easily set out a death warrant (fatwa) solely because people expressed their opinion about something.

Well... It's easy to forget but our holy Christian church has done exactly the same. You say Newton, many people within the Christian faith said heretic, and it were only a select few who could stand up to that and still carry on their work (as good as possible of course).

Yet that oppression, that fanatic fear for science (or loss of power?) is what makes the 17th century hardly as great for science as these later times.

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US laptops-on-planes ban may extend to flights from ALL nations

ShelLuser
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@AC

"Seriously why even transit through the US, just go somewhere else...".

True, but for many people, including myself, that point has already been long reached. Nothing Trump did, the same applied during Obama, Clinton and Bush. I've refused a flight to the US a few times already for the simple reason that I will not allow myself to being treated as a potential criminal. The stuff they demand to know about you is mind blowing.

"I got something to hide?", you got that right.

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British prime minister slams Facebook and pals for votes

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

Dear prime minister...

While you take it out on Facebook and all then us citizens would be really delighted if the police would have taken the effort to look into possible terrorist threats when they get hold of information from several sources around the person (including from people in the Mosque he visits!) who tried to warn law enforcement that the person might seriously be up to no good. The person who has now followed up on his actions.

I think there can never be an excuse for the police not to follow up on leads if it turns out that those leads are indeed very serious (which you can pretty sure conclude when even the people running a Mosque start raising their concerns about someone radicalizing I think). Yet here we are. Although the bomber had been put on a list of suspected people we've now learned from (international) media that the police never followed up on more recent warnings and concerns about this person actually becoming a threat.

My parents always taught me that it's usually better to focus on the cause of a problem (and try to fix that) instead of focusing on the symptoms which this problem is causing and trying to remove those. Because although it may look as if you fixed things fact of the matter is still that the initial problem hasn't gone away and can only grow bigger.

But what do us people know, right? Its so much better (<cough>easier</cough>) to focus on Facebook and other social media for spreading nasty videos and helping radicals sort out their plans. Much better for the government to get full access into the backdoors of Facebook so that they can act when something risky takes place. If you guys got your way we'll soon really get a situation when if someone posts a tweet in the likes off: "Let's bomb the bass tonight!" he'll soon be tracked, located and picked up for possible threat speech. Better to be safe than sore, right? Who could have known the person was referring to some kind of lame dance track from the 90's. Collateral damage, safety first!

Yeah, safety first.... By NOT responding when several sources warn law enforcement that they're becoming really worried that a certain Muslim follower acts quite radical. They they even found out he had (indirect) ties into Al Quada and was frequently contacting sources in Syria about all sorts of things. When even his Mosque started to worry about the person (this one still baffled me, shouldn't all alarmbells go off when that happens and these people warn you?)....

And what did the British police do? They had the person placed on a list of people to watch out for. That'd show him! However now it turns out they never followed up in actually monitoring him.

But let's forget about this now, this is the kind of news you read on international media (my source being a Dutch newspaper who ran multiple stories) and which the British seem very protective off. They already scorned the US for allegedly leaking information about the whole thing to the press (I wonder why..). Seems to me the government doesn't want their citizens to know just how much they really did here. It's so much better to blame this on social media and encryption. Because those are evil things. Internet is to blame!

I call that damage control, and I think it's plain out disgusting.

(edit): I'm not claiming the police could have stopped the attack. But I do think it's plain out hypocritical to start a 'hate campaign' against social media when more could have been done. Social media is only the symptom of the real problem.

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Init freedom declared as systemd-free Devuan hits stable 1.0.0 status

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

Good show, down with systemd!

What many youngsters forget is that the Unix philosophy wasn't invented to make yourself look cool or to set you aside from other existing systems. The whole idea is to cope with the increasing rate in which (software) systems become more and more complex. Although several models exist to try and help you keep control and remain having a grip on the systems design despite its complexity (my personal favorites being UML and SysML) you can only go so far. Not to mention that in some cases those design models may require a whole study of their own.

So instead we have the Unix philosophy which can basically render UML/SysML completely useless (more or less anyway). Mind you: I say this as a pretty devoted fan of those modeling languages. For the simple reason that it's implementation is simple and to the point, prone to help people keep an overview of what it is they're doing: make something small, make it work well, make sure it can interoperate with other systems and make sure to maintain that. Sure, the downside can sometimes be a cascading effect: if something goes wrong with one small part (think of an exploit) then it might affect others which rely on that part as well. But because it is a relatively small part its fix shouldn't be too hard either.

But this monstrosity?

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ShelLuser
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@AC

They probably share the same narrow minded attitude of "I got nothing to hide" when the government demands even more intrusion on the private life of citizens (and usually for bollock reasons too).

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IBM asks contractors to take a pay cut

ShelLuser
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Ever heard of contract breach?

You can't have it both ways IBM... The whole reason companies rely on external contractors is "company security": when you don't need them then you can more or less dispose of them (depending on the contract) but there are certain areas where you cannot go.

A contract is basically a (legal) agreement in which both parties agreed that x amount of work would be performed for y amount of pay. You can't just change the deal and expect people to roll over. Because if this is how things worked then the contractors themselves would also be able to do the same thing: "Gee IBM, I think you're not paying me enough anymore and I now demand 10% salary increase. For the same pay of course, and the duration of the contract". Yet that's not the way it works because that's not what you agreed on.

Of course this is also assuming that there are no loopholes within those contracts.

Sure, it's a shame that things aren't going too well, but shouldn't you have thought about that beforehand? You can't have it both ways though: no employee obligations (contract can be terminated at any time) and still apply control over their payment? Sounds like foul trade to me.

Look... If a company gets into trouble and asks this from their employees then I think its definitely something to respect and consider. As an employee you also have a certain job security (at least in some countries). But as a contractor? No way! Business is business, and that's not what you agreed on.

I hope this backfires on them.

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UK ministers to push anti-encryption laws after election

ShelLuser
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As if the government had done so much...

The fact is that the people around the suicide bomber have warned the government multiple times that he was an extremist and could be doing something bad. Source is this Dutch newspaper (Telegraaf) here.

Translation of the headline: "Authorities have been warned 5 times about Abedi".

With significant details I might add. That he was an extremist, that he had ties into Al Quada, that he had become a severe radical. Despite all those warnings he had been put on a watch list but wasn't actively monitored.

So I ask you, is social media and encryption really to blame here? What good is giving the government more access if they already ignore the obvious, as has been shown here?

Hypocrites, that's all I can say.

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Windows is now built on Git, but Microsoft has found some bottlenecks

ShelLuser
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@AC

Yeah, I was about to comment on that myself.

I think it's a sad display if you're selling items and then don't use them for your own setup. I mean: doesn't that tell us something about the items you're trying to sell us? I'm always very keen on that myself.

Back in the iPaq days the CEO of Compaq would give speeches and all and what was that one small detail which managed to caught my eye? He didn't use an iPaq, no way: he often used pen and paper to jot down notes. Errr, ok.... So it wasn't that revolutionary product which everyone could use afterall, eh?

Microsoft, back in the days (1990 - 2000), relied on Unix (Sendmail) to handle all their e-mail. Because Exchange just couldn't handle it, rumor even has it that they had tried to implement it a couple of times but that Exchange completely crashed because it simply couldn't handle the load. Now: in all honesty we need to keep in mind that Exchange was more than an MTA alone, so my example is a little bit flawed, But even so...

And there are tons of example. When a company tries to sell you a product after which it turns out that they're not using it themselves then I think something isn't quite right with the product ;)

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Attempt at building kinder, gentler Reddit downvoted off the Web

ShelLuser
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@Brass

"And things usually degenerate from there"

No, this is where the real social justice begins. Because after that display it's only a matter of time before plenty of people will start to ignore Blue thus declining their impact as time goes by.

This is also not a good example in my opinion. Everyone who has frequented forums (even those who moderate swearing) will have run into a situation where one person gets offended by what another person says. Even though that person might not have intended that in such ways, but was merely pretty direct. To use your example:

"Blue: Lovely fucking day, was that all you had to say or are you going somewhere with this?"

This is the kind of response which might offend plenty of people but which, in my opinion, is no direct need to take offense. Sure it's direct and definitely cynical, but you also got to keep in mind that not everyone has a way with words. This Blue guy could provide tons of interesting and good facts in other discussions, making him well known (or notorious? ;)).

My point: a "friendly and fluffy" site would probably filter out those messages. They're not calling names, they're not belittleling people, but some people might find them offensive. Well, I think it's a good thing that some places have raised that bar a little.

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EU ministers approve anti-hate speech video rules

ShelLuser
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Pint

@LDS

"Exactly what I meant. Parents can do a lot to teach and protect their children, but there are still issues outside their reach - and then society - the State - must step in, and help to stop criminal behaviours and protect the innocent."

The problem though is that they already have. There are already laws which can be used to stop all this. All the examples which are described above can be proven to be online harassment, and that is already a felony.

We don't need new laws, we need better law enforcement. Yet that's the part where things go horribly wrong. And because it's a whole lot easier to apply new laws (and thus also create a kind of 'status' because some politicians can now claim that they were behind that good law)...

My problem though is that new isn't always better. Take the description of this one: hate speech? What exactly accounts as 'hate speech'? Keep well in mind that to some people any comment which rebuttals their opinion or showcases just how impossible their fundraiser campaign is. Think about solar roadways (roads build out of glass which collect solar power and use leds to display indications), waterseer (one huge "condenser" which should be able to extract water from the air, according to the people behind it an easily 40l per day) and the hyperloop (a huge vacuum tunnel stretching out hundreds of kilometers to improve quick travel). All of those projects got quite a bit of criticism because of their impossibility. And all those critics were openly considered to be spreading hatespeech. Even though, in the case of waterseer & solar roadways some critics only used simple physics to clearly explain what the project would never work.

So how is this new law going to deal about that?

"Hate speech" is a too easy description. Because some people will imagine someone actually attacking another, whereas others will see someone merely criticizing another.

But most of all: we already have laws to fight online harassment, why don't we use those instead?

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Last week: 'OpenVPN client is secure!'
This week: 'Unpatched bug in OpenVPN server'

ShelLuser
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I think the headline is way off!

OpenVPN consists of 3 components: OpenVPN Server, Admin Web interface / Admin UI and the Connect client. This comes straight from the quick start guide. This bug does not exist within the OpenVPN server, but with the web interface, which is a completely separate issue.

If you're using OpenVPN then this doesn't imply that you're also using the web ui. I had even forgotten that it had a web interface to begin with, also because I never bothered to install it. On FreeBSD the OpenVPN server is known as security/openvpn, the web interface on the other hand is: security/openvpn-admin.

And although you are right that we're basically using the exact same source tree there's another important detail to keep in mind... If you're using OpenVPN and compiled it from source then (from ./configure --help):

--disable-management disable management server support [default=yes]

So by default this service is disabled, only if you explicitly enabled it will it become a possible issue. Therefor I think the headline is all wrong: this has nothing to do with OpenVPN server, but all the more so with the OpenVPN management interface. Which isn't even used by default.

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What's got a vast attack surface and runs on Linux? Windows Defender, of course

ShelLuser
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But isn't the environment itself just as important?

What if you're using a DLL which already runs in an isolated environment and therefor blocks certain system and function calls? The DLL might contain certain bugs, but its impact would be quite different on both environments. So I can't help wonder if you're not effectively slowing things down. While you might be able to spot bugs more quickly it also means you'd have to test them in the original environment as well so that you can rule out flaws in the testing itself and determine their true impact.

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Go ahead, stage a hackathon. But pray it doesn't work too well

ShelLuser
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Pint

Uhm...

"Their attitude was that if you don't like a law, why not ignore it and force regulators to catch up."

Isn't that a clear signal that law enforcement isn't doing enough on the enforcement part?

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LastPass now supports 2FA auth, completely undermines 2FA auth

ShelLuser
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FAIL

Non issue?

"However, many companies, including Google, Facebook and Dropbox also offer the ability to generate one-off access codes from a device or app. You usually scan a barcode unique to your account, and this is used to calculate a sequence of access codes, with a new code every minute or so."

Yeah, if someone manages to get into your LastPass account, sure. But wasn't that advantage already removed the very moment when the user themselves opted not to use a device such as a phone but instead opted for a one-off access code which is being sent to the same machine which they used to provide their username and password on?

How is this any different?

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What is dead may never die: a new version of OS/2 just arrived

ShelLuser
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@david

"OS/2 was designed to run perfectly on IBM machines (esp. the PS/2 ones)"

Not really. I once spend a whole weekend trying to get OS/2 Merlin to work on an IBM Aptiva and it simply didn't work. No OS/2 drivers provided, no native support, it was a total failure.

Funny thing too: Compaq actually provided OS/2 drivers for some of their hardware, but not IBM.

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WannaCrypt: Roots, reasons and why scramble patching won't save you now

ShelLuser
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Re: Remember the Millenium Bug?

"Actually, the reason those risks appeared minimal or non-existent is precisely BECAUSE a lot of people were paid a lot of money for a long time prior to the millennium in order to fix it."

I hope you do realize that a majority of software relied on the underlying OS for their date calculation(s) and thus the only fixing required was the OS itself and not so much the applications.

There has been a lot of effort put into this, not denying that, but there has also been a lot of overrated effort put in for the sole reason of making money.

Plenty of functions still worked with the main issue of a wrong date showing. What most people are ignoring is that in most cases the whole system was affected. So "4 days from now" would still work even without a patch because both the OS and underlying software would still recognize 1900 + 3 days as just that: a time difference.

That's not saying there wasn't an issue, but it was hardly as intrusive as people claimed.

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ShelLuser
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@Spudley

"Now you see, it's attitudes like that which are to blame for people today not upgrading from XP, and then getting hit by malware."

Or is it because tons of companies pay Microsoft to continue to support their XP systems and Microsoft complied to that (money talks after all) which is what some people see in their day to day live as well: they work with XP. So how bad can it be to keep that at home?

Money talks, as it always does.

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ShelLuser
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Re: Remember the Millenium Bug?

"Seriously - this is because a lot of people put alot of effort into analysing and dealing with the risk, just as you day in this article."

Have to disagree there. It was mostly because way too many people seriously over-hyped the actual risks and made it look like the end of the world while those risks were in fact minimal if not non-existent.

And why? Simple, because there was a lot of good money to made with y2k.

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ShelLuser
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Pint

The real solution is always ignored...

Raise awareness with your users. Take your time to inform the people who deal with incoming e-mail about the risks, explain (in terms they can understand, not everyone is a geek) what the danger is and why they should never "just" open any attachment and most of all: be there when it counts.

In other words: take them seriously. And take initiative. Have you been to certain points of risk this week to tell 'm about the possible hazards?

Most of time times when administration opens e-mails (and attachments) because they usually don't really care. Why should they? When they call for help IT staff is usually acting like a jerk towards them (in their perception anyway) so duh; their fault for not keeping the stuff secure.

Usually the best solution is also the simplest and therefor also one usually ignored.

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‪There's a ransom-free fix for WannaCry‬pt. Oh snap, you've rebooted your XP box

ShelLuser
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Pirate

How long before...

They start spreading ransomware while claiming it's an antidote?

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US court decision will destroy the internet, roar Google, Facebook et al

ShelLuser
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Stop

You're twisting words El Reg...

From this article: "Referring to the "safe harbor" provision of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) – which means internet companies are liable for what their users post online using their services so long as they respond to takedown requests from copyright holders".

That looked really out of place to me. So if you check the referred article you read something different (as I suspected): "In the first – Mavrix Photographs v LiveJournal – a fundamental piece of online liability is at stake, namely: should online publishers be held liable for copyrighted material on a moderated site?".

If you want a solid argument then at least present the correct facts to us.

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Chrome on Windows has credential theft bug

ShelLuser
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Windows

Not on Win7+ I believe...

"To retrieve the icon, the user's machine will present credentials to a server – their user ID and hashed password on a corporate network, or the home group's credentials if it's a personal machine."

I believe this to be a non-issue. On my home network I have quite a few machines which I use to connect to, and which shares are protected with a username/password combination. I also always click the "remember" checkbox to keep things easy on me.

So here's the thing: every time I reset my computer then Windows 7 will ask me for my credentials all over again. It literally doesn't remember squat whenever you rebooted. Now in all fairness I must point out that I'm using Windows 7 with a non-administrative account. But wouldn't that also apply to those computers in an corporate / enterprise network?

So yeah, I can't help wonder if this issue is really as big as is being claimed.

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MP3 'died' and nobody noticed: Key patents expire on golden oldie tech

ShelLuser
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@AC

"therefore you MASTER @ 24bit 96khz to ensure you don't lose any of it."

Ehm, no.

Mastering has nothing to do with audio degradation but more so with trying to enhance the audio signal. For example by 'pushing' lower audio frequencies when certain bass instruments are used (bass drum, bass guitar, cello, etc.). Another important aspect of mastering can be to try and ensure that certain higher signals don't "mix" or get canceled out. Sometimes that's done by pushing higher frequencies when lower regions dominate (think about your bass drum which can block higher frequencies).

Also: you optimally master material which sits around -6dB. Bit rate and/or frequency is pretty much irrelevant.

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74 countries hit by NSA-powered WannaCrypt ransomware backdoor: Emergency fixes emitted by Microsoft for WinXP+

ShelLuser
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Stop

@sad_loser

"This whole episode is microsofts' fault."

Bzzzt....

This whole thing is courtesy of Uncle Sam. Trying to keep us safe by NOT reporting discovered exploits to Microsoft and instead using them for themselves and their "greater good". What could possibly go wrong, right?

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For now, GNU GPL is an enforceable contract, says US federal judge

ShelLuser
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One point of criticism though...

"The license is designed to ensure software code stays free, as in freedom can be distributed for free, as in free beer; and can be used by anyone anywhere provided they adhere to the license."

Actually I always get the impression that the main intent is to get more software licensed under the GPL, simply because the given freedom is actually limited. You can't take a project licensed under the GPL, fork it, and decide to release it under another free open source license. Even though the software would effectively remain free.

Don't get me wrong here... I'm not trying to imply that this is a bad thing. But I do think it's fair to say that the given freedom is actually limited. Which always makes me wonder how 'free' it really is?

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Space upstart plans public cloud in low Earth orbit

ShelLuser
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Call me skeptical but...

I don't see this taking off.

Have you ever tried to manually position a dish to pick up a satellite signal in the most optimal way? That can be quite tricky; not everyone has a dish which can automatically align itself. So how is this going to work for a satellite which will only be available for a limited amount of time? Half a centimeter out of alignment can already be a cause for a broken up signal.

I also can't help wonder that this might be pretty tricky to actually set up for a customer. Once again: if you only got an X amount of time to set things up... Depending on the server and the services you wish to set up you can sometimes be looking at hours of work. Yet it sounds to me as if this system does not provide for that (at least that's the impression I get). After all: those satellites are constantly on the move.

So what if you're busy setting it up and all of a sudden it moves out of range? Wait for an x amount of hours before you can continue setting things up again?

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Microsoft touts next Windows 10 Creators Update: It's set for a Fall

ShelLuser
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Pint

Set for a fail?

Ooooh, a fall. Sorry, my beer got the best of me :)

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Microsoft backtracks: 'We are going to support .NET Framework with ASP.NET Core 2.0'

ShelLuser
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Coat

Sorry, but....

"'You do not abandon your users' .NET Foundation chief tells El Reg"

HA HA HA HA HA HA haaa haaaa ha ha ha...... <insert more laughter here>

So, uhm, question... When thousands of developers complain about a drastic change of their developers interface (Visual Studio) and/or one of its disliked features and Microsoft basically does nothing about it other than reversing small bits and pieces and selling that in the next version.... How do you call that?

Oh wait... I get it: I'm talking about developers here, you're talking users. Yeah, that must be it... <sigh>

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Microsoft's .NET-mare for developers: ASP.NET Core 2.0 won't work on Windows-only .NET

ShelLuser
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Windows

Why not stick with Mono?

When it comes to web development then I personally actually prefer using ASP.NET in favor of more commonly used environments such as PHP. I've been using Visual Studio together with IIS for quite a while now and it has always worked reliably for me. For both professional as well as personal use.

But I don't get why you'd want to bother with this. Maybe to conform yourself to certain set standards which might be important to customers or others, but for everything else you seriously don't have to.

When it became common knowledge that Microsoft was discontinuing TechNet the IT department in my (small!) company started looking around for alternatives, simply because the company couldn't afford 2 server licenses where the 2nd would be hardly used (mostly for testing purposes). However, we did more than just look at Microsoft based alternatives (like discontinuing the use of a test server), we also looked into the Mono project.

Which is my point here... Why bother with all the overhead when there's already a pretty mature and most of all: fully usable and open source(d) solution available right now?

It may not be 100% compatible with the latest standards, but it can sure as heck get the job done. Right now I'm using Mono + Apache with a PostgreSQL backend on a FreeBSD environment running several ASP.NET powered websites (developed using Visual Studio) and so far Mono has hardly failed me.

In fact, I can recommend it to everyone else who's looking for alternatives other than Microsoft.

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2

Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

ShelLuser
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Facepalm

Welcome to the real world....

"Facebook is emphatically not a free and open platform for sharing. It’s more like the online equivalent of a Venus Fly Trap, luring us in with sweet nectar, only to suddenly snap shut, then slowly digesting and monetising everything nutritional we've fed it."

Actually you can swap Facebook out for any other major online social media website out there. And add others to the fold as well. Google with their awesome web services for example.

It all boils down to a simple realization which in my opinion everyone ought to know by now: Nothing is free on the Internet.

There are a few exceptions, for example you can pick up software for free. Especially within the regions of the Free Software Foundation and others closely related to that philosophy. But in the end even that isn't really free either. Because... who paid for your Internet connection in the first place?

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'Crazy bad' bug in Microsoft's Windows malware scanner can be used to install malware

ShelLuser
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Windows

So now we can only hope...

Hope that those Windows 7 and 8 users see the need for this update and will also actually update their machines before it gets run over. Problem being that there are still dozens of users out there who no longer trust Microsoft not to try and push Windows 10 down their throats ...again.

And this is only a flaw that we now know off, I'm pretty sure many will follow without hitting the news and without the fix finding its way to the affected machines. Because not updating your Windows 7 or 8 machine is the easiest (and thus best) way for many to ensure they're not forcefed with Windows 10.

Congratulations Microsoft, for making the Internet a much more dangerous place. One step at a time.

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Opposable thumbs make tablets more useful says Microsoft Research

ShelLuser
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Loss of freedom

This may seem like a cool idea at first but all it really does is restrict your options. The more the interface is going to rely on this new selection option, the less you can do while holding the tablet in your hand when you're standing.

But hey... it's about that time of the year when Microsoft needs to introduce something new in order to try and rekindle software and hardware sales I guess.

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1

Fake news is fake news, says Google-backed research

ShelLuser
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Pint

And real issue is left unaddressable.

People need to be less gullible and more skeptic about most topics.

Personally I believe that people do tend to allow themselves to be (mis?)led. For example: if it were up to me then all the political polls would be banned from the main stream media during the week an election takes place, just to ensure that people choose based on their own impressions and opinions and not based on news other than those they sought out themselves.

Which, once again, leads up to the question I keep asking: what exactly is fake news? To continue with my set example here: most Brexit polls predicted a 'Nay' majority. So looking back can we conclude those to be sources of fake news? Surely a fine is in order now?

And the good ole US of A. Several polls there predicted Clinton as an easy winner. Fake news for sure, and as such...

Or is that all "different"? That wasn't fake news, it was "wrong" news perhaps?

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Windows 10 S forces Bing, Edge on your kids. If you don't like it, get Win10 Pro – Microsoft

ShelLuser
Silver badge

And after 15 years...

Not to worry folks, our governments are right on their tail. And you can rest assured that after 15 years or so they will have concluded their investigations and will then demand that Microsoft provides another browser together with Windows.

Even though no one really cares anymore about it because at that time we will have moved onto something new.

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Microsoft, Oracle sued: Tech duo accused of trampling DB patents

ShelLuser
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Pint

Begun...

... the quest for more money has.

1
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Apache OpenOffice: Not dead yet, you'll just have to wait until mid-May for mystery security fixes

ShelLuser
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Go

I admire their spunk!

Context: I'm a Microsoft Office 2010 user, I never got a click with both OpenOffice and LibreOffice. I do have LibreOffice installed on my FreeBSD powered laptop but that's it. On my desktop it's Word, Excel and all from 2010.

So first of all: a major security flaw? I can see the risks but you honestly need to take this within context as well. It's not as if OpenOffice actively reaches out across the Internet. Also: cause & effect? You conclude that the change was made because of your probing, but can you really be sure of that without having checked what triggered the change?

See, I can do better than you guys here ;)

"OpenOffice is DOOMED, they shown refusal to fix an important flaw in the software. Previously they promised to include one security fix within their next release, but while thinking about writing this message (which took me one week at least, honest! <fingers crossed>) all of a sudden they changed the release notes and removed mentioning of this!"

Sure, I am kidding with the "one week preparations", but if you take that out of the equation doesn't this sound at least somewhat plausible as well? Better yet: it's even hurting the project even more! win win! or.. maybe not.

My stance is simple: just because a project doesn't use the same release cycle as their competitors doesn't mean it's dead. I also couldn't help notice that there wasn't one single link to back up your claims about said security risk. Which leads up to another possibility: there was no risk in the first place and so it got removed. Which is what you noticed, and then drew ridiculous conclusions that it had something to do with yourself.

Tunnel vision much perhaps?

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Just delete the internet – pr0n-blocking legislation receives Royal Assent

ShelLuser
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FAIL

It never stops to amaze me...

Website involved around horror shows plenty of gore, dismembered bodies, blood flowing and dripping everywhere and yeah, that's just life for you buddy.

Website shows a female's boob and then all the alarm bells go off. Because heaven forbid, how on earth can you show something so upsetting and distasteful!?!?!

I think some people should seriously sort out their priorities here.

I don't have children myself, but honestly... I'd be more bothered if my little dipper would be confronted with the first website than the second.

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0

Facebook decides fake news isn't crazy after all. It's now a real problem

ShelLuser
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Pint

Fake to who?

We're living in a time where some people will even label a simple and polite sharing of a disagreement as online harassment. When they're confronted with simple (sometimes scientific) facts they'll easily shrug it off with whatever argument they have, and consider that fake. In this day and age some will even go so far as to dismiss plain and simple physics.

As funny as that might be it also raises an important question when you label something as fake: "Fake to who'm?".

And another thing: what exactly qualifies as fake news? The article is quite vague here: "efforts to spread misinformation to hurt a cause, sow mistrust in political institutions, or foment civil strife". What cause? How about an example cause to ban all violence from video games? I'm pretty sure that can trigger some (in my opinion well deserved) heated comments.

But doesn't that mean you're creating an impasse? I mean: the cause itself is basically out to hurt another cause; namely the selling and enjoyment of video games. So are those heated reactions now an effort to spread misinformation, is the example cause itself spreading mis-information or...

I think Facebook is slowly digging a hole here where it might become quite difficult to get out of.

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