* Posts by ShelLuser

2403 posts • joined 19 Dec 2010

UK ministers to push anti-encryption laws after election

ShelLuser
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As if the government had done so much...

The fact is that the people around the suicide bomber have warned the government multiple times that he was an extremist and could be doing something bad. Source is this Dutch newspaper (Telegraaf) here.

Translation of the headline: "Authorities have been warned 5 times about Abedi".

With significant details I might add. That he was an extremist, that he had ties into Al Quada, that he had become a severe radical. Despite all those warnings he had been put on a watch list but wasn't actively monitored.

So I ask you, is social media and encryption really to blame here? What good is giving the government more access if they already ignore the obvious, as has been shown here?

Hypocrites, that's all I can say.

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Windows is now built on Git, but Microsoft has found some bottlenecks

ShelLuser
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@AC

Yeah, I was about to comment on that myself.

I think it's a sad display if you're selling items and then don't use them for your own setup. I mean: doesn't that tell us something about the items you're trying to sell us? I'm always very keen on that myself.

Back in the iPaq days the CEO of Compaq would give speeches and all and what was that one small detail which managed to caught my eye? He didn't use an iPaq, no way: he often used pen and paper to jot down notes. Errr, ok.... So it wasn't that revolutionary product which everyone could use afterall, eh?

Microsoft, back in the days (1990 - 2000), relied on Unix (Sendmail) to handle all their e-mail. Because Exchange just couldn't handle it, rumor even has it that they had tried to implement it a couple of times but that Exchange completely crashed because it simply couldn't handle the load. Now: in all honesty we need to keep in mind that Exchange was more than an MTA alone, so my example is a little bit flawed, But even so...

And there are tons of example. When a company tries to sell you a product after which it turns out that they're not using it themselves then I think something isn't quite right with the product ;)

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Attempt at building kinder, gentler Reddit downvoted off the Web

ShelLuser
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@Brass

"And things usually degenerate from there"

No, this is where the real social justice begins. Because after that display it's only a matter of time before plenty of people will start to ignore Blue thus declining their impact as time goes by.

This is also not a good example in my opinion. Everyone who has frequented forums (even those who moderate swearing) will have run into a situation where one person gets offended by what another person says. Even though that person might not have intended that in such ways, but was merely pretty direct. To use your example:

"Blue: Lovely fucking day, was that all you had to say or are you going somewhere with this?"

This is the kind of response which might offend plenty of people but which, in my opinion, is no direct need to take offense. Sure it's direct and definitely cynical, but you also got to keep in mind that not everyone has a way with words. This Blue guy could provide tons of interesting and good facts in other discussions, making him well known (or notorious? ;)).

My point: a "friendly and fluffy" site would probably filter out those messages. They're not calling names, they're not belittleling people, but some people might find them offensive. Well, I think it's a good thing that some places have raised that bar a little.

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EU ministers approve anti-hate speech video rules

ShelLuser
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@LDS

"Exactly what I meant. Parents can do a lot to teach and protect their children, but there are still issues outside their reach - and then society - the State - must step in, and help to stop criminal behaviours and protect the innocent."

The problem though is that they already have. There are already laws which can be used to stop all this. All the examples which are described above can be proven to be online harassment, and that is already a felony.

We don't need new laws, we need better law enforcement. Yet that's the part where things go horribly wrong. And because it's a whole lot easier to apply new laws (and thus also create a kind of 'status' because some politicians can now claim that they were behind that good law)...

My problem though is that new isn't always better. Take the description of this one: hate speech? What exactly accounts as 'hate speech'? Keep well in mind that to some people any comment which rebuttals their opinion or showcases just how impossible their fundraiser campaign is. Think about solar roadways (roads build out of glass which collect solar power and use leds to display indications), waterseer (one huge "condenser" which should be able to extract water from the air, according to the people behind it an easily 40l per day) and the hyperloop (a huge vacuum tunnel stretching out hundreds of kilometers to improve quick travel). All of those projects got quite a bit of criticism because of their impossibility. And all those critics were openly considered to be spreading hatespeech. Even though, in the case of waterseer & solar roadways some critics only used simple physics to clearly explain what the project would never work.

So how is this new law going to deal about that?

"Hate speech" is a too easy description. Because some people will imagine someone actually attacking another, whereas others will see someone merely criticizing another.

But most of all: we already have laws to fight online harassment, why don't we use those instead?

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Last week: 'OpenVPN client is secure!'
This week: 'Unpatched bug in OpenVPN server'

ShelLuser
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I think the headline is way off!

OpenVPN consists of 3 components: OpenVPN Server, Admin Web interface / Admin UI and the Connect client. This comes straight from the quick start guide. This bug does not exist within the OpenVPN server, but with the web interface, which is a completely separate issue.

If you're using OpenVPN then this doesn't imply that you're also using the web ui. I had even forgotten that it had a web interface to begin with, also because I never bothered to install it. On FreeBSD the OpenVPN server is known as security/openvpn, the web interface on the other hand is: security/openvpn-admin.

And although you are right that we're basically using the exact same source tree there's another important detail to keep in mind... If you're using OpenVPN and compiled it from source then (from ./configure --help):

--disable-management disable management server support [default=yes]

So by default this service is disabled, only if you explicitly enabled it will it become a possible issue. Therefor I think the headline is all wrong: this has nothing to do with OpenVPN server, but all the more so with the OpenVPN management interface. Which isn't even used by default.

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What's got a vast attack surface and runs on Linux? Windows Defender, of course

ShelLuser
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But isn't the environment itself just as important?

What if you're using a DLL which already runs in an isolated environment and therefor blocks certain system and function calls? The DLL might contain certain bugs, but its impact would be quite different on both environments. So I can't help wonder if you're not effectively slowing things down. While you might be able to spot bugs more quickly it also means you'd have to test them in the original environment as well so that you can rule out flaws in the testing itself and determine their true impact.

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Go ahead, stage a hackathon. But pray it doesn't work too well

ShelLuser
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Pint

Uhm...

"Their attitude was that if you don't like a law, why not ignore it and force regulators to catch up."

Isn't that a clear signal that law enforcement isn't doing enough on the enforcement part?

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LastPass now supports 2FA auth, completely undermines 2FA auth

ShelLuser
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FAIL

Non issue?

"However, many companies, including Google, Facebook and Dropbox also offer the ability to generate one-off access codes from a device or app. You usually scan a barcode unique to your account, and this is used to calculate a sequence of access codes, with a new code every minute or so."

Yeah, if someone manages to get into your LastPass account, sure. But wasn't that advantage already removed the very moment when the user themselves opted not to use a device such as a phone but instead opted for a one-off access code which is being sent to the same machine which they used to provide their username and password on?

How is this any different?

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What is dead may never die: a new version of OS/2 just arrived

ShelLuser
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@david

"OS/2 was designed to run perfectly on IBM machines (esp. the PS/2 ones)"

Not really. I once spend a whole weekend trying to get OS/2 Merlin to work on an IBM Aptiva and it simply didn't work. No OS/2 drivers provided, no native support, it was a total failure.

Funny thing too: Compaq actually provided OS/2 drivers for some of their hardware, but not IBM.

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WannaCrypt: Roots, reasons and why scramble patching won't save you now

ShelLuser
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Re: Remember the Millenium Bug?

"Actually, the reason those risks appeared minimal or non-existent is precisely BECAUSE a lot of people were paid a lot of money for a long time prior to the millennium in order to fix it."

I hope you do realize that a majority of software relied on the underlying OS for their date calculation(s) and thus the only fixing required was the OS itself and not so much the applications.

There has been a lot of effort put into this, not denying that, but there has also been a lot of overrated effort put in for the sole reason of making money.

Plenty of functions still worked with the main issue of a wrong date showing. What most people are ignoring is that in most cases the whole system was affected. So "4 days from now" would still work even without a patch because both the OS and underlying software would still recognize 1900 + 3 days as just that: a time difference.

That's not saying there wasn't an issue, but it was hardly as intrusive as people claimed.

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ShelLuser
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@Spudley

"Now you see, it's attitudes like that which are to blame for people today not upgrading from XP, and then getting hit by malware."

Or is it because tons of companies pay Microsoft to continue to support their XP systems and Microsoft complied to that (money talks after all) which is what some people see in their day to day live as well: they work with XP. So how bad can it be to keep that at home?

Money talks, as it always does.

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ShelLuser
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Re: Remember the Millenium Bug?

"Seriously - this is because a lot of people put alot of effort into analysing and dealing with the risk, just as you day in this article."

Have to disagree there. It was mostly because way too many people seriously over-hyped the actual risks and made it look like the end of the world while those risks were in fact minimal if not non-existent.

And why? Simple, because there was a lot of good money to made with y2k.

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ShelLuser
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Pint

The real solution is always ignored...

Raise awareness with your users. Take your time to inform the people who deal with incoming e-mail about the risks, explain (in terms they can understand, not everyone is a geek) what the danger is and why they should never "just" open any attachment and most of all: be there when it counts.

In other words: take them seriously. And take initiative. Have you been to certain points of risk this week to tell 'm about the possible hazards?

Most of time times when administration opens e-mails (and attachments) because they usually don't really care. Why should they? When they call for help IT staff is usually acting like a jerk towards them (in their perception anyway) so duh; their fault for not keeping the stuff secure.

Usually the best solution is also the simplest and therefor also one usually ignored.

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‪There's a ransom-free fix for WannaCry‬pt. Oh snap, you've rebooted your XP box

ShelLuser
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Pirate

How long before...

They start spreading ransomware while claiming it's an antidote?

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US court decision will destroy the internet, roar Google, Facebook et al

ShelLuser
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Stop

You're twisting words El Reg...

From this article: "Referring to the "safe harbor" provision of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) – which means internet companies are liable for what their users post online using their services so long as they respond to takedown requests from copyright holders".

That looked really out of place to me. So if you check the referred article you read something different (as I suspected): "In the first – Mavrix Photographs v LiveJournal – a fundamental piece of online liability is at stake, namely: should online publishers be held liable for copyrighted material on a moderated site?".

If you want a solid argument then at least present the correct facts to us.

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Chrome on Windows has credential theft bug

ShelLuser
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Windows

Not on Win7+ I believe...

"To retrieve the icon, the user's machine will present credentials to a server – their user ID and hashed password on a corporate network, or the home group's credentials if it's a personal machine."

I believe this to be a non-issue. On my home network I have quite a few machines which I use to connect to, and which shares are protected with a username/password combination. I also always click the "remember" checkbox to keep things easy on me.

So here's the thing: every time I reset my computer then Windows 7 will ask me for my credentials all over again. It literally doesn't remember squat whenever you rebooted. Now in all fairness I must point out that I'm using Windows 7 with a non-administrative account. But wouldn't that also apply to those computers in an corporate / enterprise network?

So yeah, I can't help wonder if this issue is really as big as is being claimed.

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MP3 'died' and nobody noticed: Key patents expire on golden oldie tech

ShelLuser
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@AC

"therefore you MASTER @ 24bit 96khz to ensure you don't lose any of it."

Ehm, no.

Mastering has nothing to do with audio degradation but more so with trying to enhance the audio signal. For example by 'pushing' lower audio frequencies when certain bass instruments are used (bass drum, bass guitar, cello, etc.). Another important aspect of mastering can be to try and ensure that certain higher signals don't "mix" or get canceled out. Sometimes that's done by pushing higher frequencies when lower regions dominate (think about your bass drum which can block higher frequencies).

Also: you optimally master material which sits around -6dB. Bit rate and/or frequency is pretty much irrelevant.

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74 countries hit by NSA-powered WannaCrypt ransomware backdoor: Emergency fixes emitted by Microsoft for WinXP+

ShelLuser
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Stop

@sad_loser

"This whole episode is microsofts' fault."

Bzzzt....

This whole thing is courtesy of Uncle Sam. Trying to keep us safe by NOT reporting discovered exploits to Microsoft and instead using them for themselves and their "greater good". What could possibly go wrong, right?

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For now, GNU GPL is an enforceable contract, says US federal judge

ShelLuser
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One point of criticism though...

"The license is designed to ensure software code stays free, as in freedom can be distributed for free, as in free beer; and can be used by anyone anywhere provided they adhere to the license."

Actually I always get the impression that the main intent is to get more software licensed under the GPL, simply because the given freedom is actually limited. You can't take a project licensed under the GPL, fork it, and decide to release it under another free open source license. Even though the software would effectively remain free.

Don't get me wrong here... I'm not trying to imply that this is a bad thing. But I do think it's fair to say that the given freedom is actually limited. Which always makes me wonder how 'free' it really is?

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Space upstart plans public cloud in low Earth orbit

ShelLuser
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Call me skeptical but...

I don't see this taking off.

Have you ever tried to manually position a dish to pick up a satellite signal in the most optimal way? That can be quite tricky; not everyone has a dish which can automatically align itself. So how is this going to work for a satellite which will only be available for a limited amount of time? Half a centimeter out of alignment can already be a cause for a broken up signal.

I also can't help wonder that this might be pretty tricky to actually set up for a customer. Once again: if you only got an X amount of time to set things up... Depending on the server and the services you wish to set up you can sometimes be looking at hours of work. Yet it sounds to me as if this system does not provide for that (at least that's the impression I get). After all: those satellites are constantly on the move.

So what if you're busy setting it up and all of a sudden it moves out of range? Wait for an x amount of hours before you can continue setting things up again?

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Microsoft touts next Windows 10 Creators Update: It's set for a Fall

ShelLuser
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Pint

Set for a fail?

Ooooh, a fall. Sorry, my beer got the best of me :)

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Microsoft backtracks: 'We are going to support .NET Framework with ASP.NET Core 2.0'

ShelLuser
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Coat

Sorry, but....

"'You do not abandon your users' .NET Foundation chief tells El Reg"

HA HA HA HA HA HA haaa haaaa ha ha ha...... <insert more laughter here>

So, uhm, question... When thousands of developers complain about a drastic change of their developers interface (Visual Studio) and/or one of its disliked features and Microsoft basically does nothing about it other than reversing small bits and pieces and selling that in the next version.... How do you call that?

Oh wait... I get it: I'm talking about developers here, you're talking users. Yeah, that must be it... <sigh>

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Microsoft's .NET-mare for developers: ASP.NET Core 2.0 won't work on Windows-only .NET

ShelLuser
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Windows

Why not stick with Mono?

When it comes to web development then I personally actually prefer using ASP.NET in favor of more commonly used environments such as PHP. I've been using Visual Studio together with IIS for quite a while now and it has always worked reliably for me. For both professional as well as personal use.

But I don't get why you'd want to bother with this. Maybe to conform yourself to certain set standards which might be important to customers or others, but for everything else you seriously don't have to.

When it became common knowledge that Microsoft was discontinuing TechNet the IT department in my (small!) company started looking around for alternatives, simply because the company couldn't afford 2 server licenses where the 2nd would be hardly used (mostly for testing purposes). However, we did more than just look at Microsoft based alternatives (like discontinuing the use of a test server), we also looked into the Mono project.

Which is my point here... Why bother with all the overhead when there's already a pretty mature and most of all: fully usable and open source(d) solution available right now?

It may not be 100% compatible with the latest standards, but it can sure as heck get the job done. Right now I'm using Mono + Apache with a PostgreSQL backend on a FreeBSD environment running several ASP.NET powered websites (developed using Visual Studio) and so far Mono has hardly failed me.

In fact, I can recommend it to everyone else who's looking for alternatives other than Microsoft.

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Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

ShelLuser
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Facepalm

Welcome to the real world....

"Facebook is emphatically not a free and open platform for sharing. It’s more like the online equivalent of a Venus Fly Trap, luring us in with sweet nectar, only to suddenly snap shut, then slowly digesting and monetising everything nutritional we've fed it."

Actually you can swap Facebook out for any other major online social media website out there. And add others to the fold as well. Google with their awesome web services for example.

It all boils down to a simple realization which in my opinion everyone ought to know by now: Nothing is free on the Internet.

There are a few exceptions, for example you can pick up software for free. Especially within the regions of the Free Software Foundation and others closely related to that philosophy. But in the end even that isn't really free either. Because... who paid for your Internet connection in the first place?

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'Crazy bad' bug in Microsoft's Windows malware scanner can be used to install malware

ShelLuser
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Windows

So now we can only hope...

Hope that those Windows 7 and 8 users see the need for this update and will also actually update their machines before it gets run over. Problem being that there are still dozens of users out there who no longer trust Microsoft not to try and push Windows 10 down their throats ...again.

And this is only a flaw that we now know off, I'm pretty sure many will follow without hitting the news and without the fix finding its way to the affected machines. Because not updating your Windows 7 or 8 machine is the easiest (and thus best) way for many to ensure they're not forcefed with Windows 10.

Congratulations Microsoft, for making the Internet a much more dangerous place. One step at a time.

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Opposable thumbs make tablets more useful says Microsoft Research

ShelLuser
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Loss of freedom

This may seem like a cool idea at first but all it really does is restrict your options. The more the interface is going to rely on this new selection option, the less you can do while holding the tablet in your hand when you're standing.

But hey... it's about that time of the year when Microsoft needs to introduce something new in order to try and rekindle software and hardware sales I guess.

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Fake news is fake news, says Google-backed research

ShelLuser
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Pint

And real issue is left unaddressable.

People need to be less gullible and more skeptic about most topics.

Personally I believe that people do tend to allow themselves to be (mis?)led. For example: if it were up to me then all the political polls would be banned from the main stream media during the week an election takes place, just to ensure that people choose based on their own impressions and opinions and not based on news other than those they sought out themselves.

Which, once again, leads up to the question I keep asking: what exactly is fake news? To continue with my set example here: most Brexit polls predicted a 'Nay' majority. So looking back can we conclude those to be sources of fake news? Surely a fine is in order now?

And the good ole US of A. Several polls there predicted Clinton as an easy winner. Fake news for sure, and as such...

Or is that all "different"? That wasn't fake news, it was "wrong" news perhaps?

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Windows 10 S forces Bing, Edge on your kids. If you don't like it, get Win10 Pro – Microsoft

ShelLuser
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And after 15 years...

Not to worry folks, our governments are right on their tail. And you can rest assured that after 15 years or so they will have concluded their investigations and will then demand that Microsoft provides another browser together with Windows.

Even though no one really cares anymore about it because at that time we will have moved onto something new.

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Microsoft, Oracle sued: Tech duo accused of trampling DB patents

ShelLuser
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Pint

Begun...

... the quest for more money has.

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Apache OpenOffice: Not dead yet, you'll just have to wait until mid-May for mystery security fixes

ShelLuser
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Go

I admire their spunk!

Context: I'm a Microsoft Office 2010 user, I never got a click with both OpenOffice and LibreOffice. I do have LibreOffice installed on my FreeBSD powered laptop but that's it. On my desktop it's Word, Excel and all from 2010.

So first of all: a major security flaw? I can see the risks but you honestly need to take this within context as well. It's not as if OpenOffice actively reaches out across the Internet. Also: cause & effect? You conclude that the change was made because of your probing, but can you really be sure of that without having checked what triggered the change?

See, I can do better than you guys here ;)

"OpenOffice is DOOMED, they shown refusal to fix an important flaw in the software. Previously they promised to include one security fix within their next release, but while thinking about writing this message (which took me one week at least, honest! <fingers crossed>) all of a sudden they changed the release notes and removed mentioning of this!"

Sure, I am kidding with the "one week preparations", but if you take that out of the equation doesn't this sound at least somewhat plausible as well? Better yet: it's even hurting the project even more! win win! or.. maybe not.

My stance is simple: just because a project doesn't use the same release cycle as their competitors doesn't mean it's dead. I also couldn't help notice that there wasn't one single link to back up your claims about said security risk. Which leads up to another possibility: there was no risk in the first place and so it got removed. Which is what you noticed, and then drew ridiculous conclusions that it had something to do with yourself.

Tunnel vision much perhaps?

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Just delete the internet – pr0n-blocking legislation receives Royal Assent

ShelLuser
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FAIL

It never stops to amaze me...

Website involved around horror shows plenty of gore, dismembered bodies, blood flowing and dripping everywhere and yeah, that's just life for you buddy.

Website shows a female's boob and then all the alarm bells go off. Because heaven forbid, how on earth can you show something so upsetting and distasteful!?!?!

I think some people should seriously sort out their priorities here.

I don't have children myself, but honestly... I'd be more bothered if my little dipper would be confronted with the first website than the second.

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Facebook decides fake news isn't crazy after all. It's now a real problem

ShelLuser
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Pint

Fake to who?

We're living in a time where some people will even label a simple and polite sharing of a disagreement as online harassment. When they're confronted with simple (sometimes scientific) facts they'll easily shrug it off with whatever argument they have, and consider that fake. In this day and age some will even go so far as to dismiss plain and simple physics.

As funny as that might be it also raises an important question when you label something as fake: "Fake to who'm?".

And another thing: what exactly qualifies as fake news? The article is quite vague here: "efforts to spread misinformation to hurt a cause, sow mistrust in political institutions, or foment civil strife". What cause? How about an example cause to ban all violence from video games? I'm pretty sure that can trigger some (in my opinion well deserved) heated comments.

But doesn't that mean you're creating an impasse? I mean: the cause itself is basically out to hurt another cause; namely the selling and enjoyment of video games. So are those heated reactions now an effort to spread misinformation, is the example cause itself spreading mis-information or...

I think Facebook is slowly digging a hole here where it might become quite difficult to get out of.

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SourceForge: Let's hold hands in a post-CodePlex world

ShelLuser
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@AC

"Nobody mentioned gitlab yet"

I think there's a very good reason for that.

It's still a mind blow for me: making backups and then not even bother yourself to check if anything happened at all? Totally inexcusable.

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iPhone lawyers literally compare Apples with Pears in trademark war

ShelLuser
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@Frank

No. But I do remember a time when the EU wasn't on a road to become equally stupid to the US patent administration. Well, it seems to me they managed to do even better on that front. And some people wonder why I'm anti-EU :P

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Don't stop me! Why Microsoft's inevitable browser irrelevance isn't

ShelLuser
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Pint

It's funny how the governments works...

Actually it's not, it's very weird at times. Hypocrite even.

So back in the days Microsoft provided their browser with Windows and that was obviously "bad". Even though having this browser allowed you to immediately grab something else to install if you wanted to.

Nowadays Google is pushing hard for ChromeOS. An "operating system" which runs fully from the web. Of course you'll need Chrome in order to use all this.

Now, I realize that you can't fully compare these two examples one on one. But the bottom line is still that Google also provides many services which are only usable (sometimes just better usable) using Chrome instead of another browser. So how is that not "bad" considering the dominance which Google has these days?

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ShelLuser
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@Will

Well, one nice alternative to Chrome could be Opera. From what I can tell by reading some of the previous posts it seems less bloated than Chrome, it doesn't try to push things in your face (the browser interface is pretty slim, the only 2 visible clickable options are the Opera menu and the browser tab button).

The main reason I run Opera though is because I like a browser which isn't IE, FireFox or Chrome. Although, in all fairness, Opera is build upon Chromium so it obviously has some ties into Chrome.

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Microsoft plans summer CRM war opener against Salesforce

ShelLuser
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Windows

@AC

So much that!

I can't believe Microsoft, I honestly can't. I'm the kind of nut who doesn't have any social media accounts. The only ones I had access to were two commercial accounts (Twitter / Facebook) but that section of the business has long stopped and those accounts have been disabled / deleted and aren't used anymore.

The irony is that I have briefly considered getting a LinkedIn account. Never followed up on it, but I have seriously considered it considering the fact that I did enjoy and appreciate MSN back in the days and to some degree I can also appreciate and sometimes actually like some of Microsoft's services.

Well... Consider me cured now. Time to go over my Microsoft account again to verify all the privacy settings. Just in case...

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Dark times for OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source Solaris project

ShelLuser
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Devil

@asdf

Well, have to agree with you regarding Linux and POSIX. However, it's not the end yet. Although you can't officially call it Unix (mostly due to licensing issues) I stil think its fair to say that the BSD variants remain in a position which places them very close to that of a true Unix environment. Most definitely closer than your average Linux distribution (<cough>, systemd, <cough>).

And when looking at my personal favorite, which happens to be FreeBSD, I think it becomes more obvious why a project as this has little chances (personal opinion though). You see: several things which made Solaris great have slowly but steadily also found their way into FreeBSD. ZFS? These days I can even boot from a ZFS filesystem. DTrace? Full support available in the kernel. Zones? Well, it's not fully comparable to Solaris' zones but FreeBSD's jails do provide a very solid way to implement virtualization.

If you then look at the OS history then I think it's fair to say that FreeBSD has a larger one in comparison to OmniOS, and it's roots are already fully tied into open source. Even more important: there's no company involved with the FreeBSD project which also rules out possible double agendas (think about commercial interests).

I'm sad to see Solaris fade away like this though, it's always been my favorite Unix operating system both professionally and personally, but yeah... We got Oracle to thank for that one.

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Alert: If you're running SquirrelMail, Sendmail... why? And oh yeah, remote code vuln found

ShelLuser
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@Doug

And by the tone of the whole article I also wonder if they really meant Sendmail the MTA or the sendmail executable.

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Script kiddies pwn 1000s of Windows boxes using leaked NSA hack tools

ShelLuser
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Windows

@Bongo

"Bit of a sod for those forced to maintain XP machines due to third party application compatibility issues."

Yes and no. Of course it can be a drag, but there's also something people could have done about it for a long time already. Windows 7 Professional got shipped with "Windows XP mode", which is basically a virtual Windows XP version which you can run on top of Win7 through "Windows Virtual PC".

Although not as extensive as VirtualBox it has one very interesting feature: software integration / propagation. So: software which is installed within the virtual machine can also be added to the Windows 7 start menu. When clicked on it will run the VM in the background and only show the application with the same look and feel as the VM it's running in.

If you wanted to you could have gotten rid of XP a long time ago and have replaced it with Windows 7 + Windows XP.

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systemd-free Devuan Linux hits version 1.0.0

ShelLuser
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Facepalm

@Andy

"Apache is laughing at you right about now."

Since when did Apache turn into a Unix(-like) operating system?

Some larger projects covered by the Apache foundation may target Unix(-like) environments, but that doesn't mean that those Unix(-like) environments are also involved with those Apache projects as well.

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ShelLuser
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My hats off to you guys!

Just mentioned for context: this isn't for me because I stopped using Linux a long time ago, slowly turned into a veteran FreeBSD user.

But that doesn't mean I can't appreciate and admire all the work and effort which must have gone into this. I love it! I read so many (bad) stories about systemd and having my roots fully tied into Unix as well as the Unix philosophy I don't think it should come as a surprise that I dislike systemd as well, even out on principle alone. In my opinion systemd is better described as usurpd, because that's all it does.

So yeah, I really admire the effort that must have gone into this and I really hope they can keep it up. Let the community decide what they want. And pardon me for laughing it up when it turns out that this will become more popular than other systemd affected environments ;)

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Cuffing Assange a 'priority' for the USA says attorney-general

ShelLuser
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So what about....

"United States attorney-general Jeff Sessions says the Trump administration will make it “a priority” to arrest leakers, including Julian Assange."

And what about all those people who were proven to break the law, conduct very dubious practices and all that?

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Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

ShelLuser
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So what's next?

I don't think it's a bad decision, but it does strike me as a bit odd. And I can't help wonder how long it will take before Ubuntu is going full speed ahead into Mono based development again. That would basically really set the clock back quite a few years.

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Microsoft promises twice-yearly Windows 10, O365 updates – with just 18 months' support

ShelLuser
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@Lord

Well... Linux also has its issues depending on your distribution. I still recall upgrading from one Ubuntu LTS version to the other, it was a total nightmare because I was actually skipping 3 major releases at once and it didn't go smoothly.

But I do agree: this move is bound to push more people away from Windows. Once again Microsoft doesn't take note of the past. Because although not directly comparable I see direct comparisons with Firefox back in the days: one of the things which drove plenty of users mad was its almost constant stream of updates where tons of stuff changed.

And then there's the big one: what if you don't want a certain change. For example: I despised Windows 8 so I completely skipped it. With this new update model that would be completely impossible.

Replacing Windows with an open-source environment and using Wine for whatever Window needs you have is getting more tempting every month.

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Google's 'adblocker' is all about taking back control

ShelLuser
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Trollface

Google's idea of freedom: "No one gets to have ads but us".

Yes, the title is a bit of a troll but think about it.

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Online ad scam launders legions of pirates and pervs into 'legit' surfing

ShelLuser
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@Mage

"Web advertising is broken because of how it's done with 3rd party sites and scripts instead of a simple banner image and link hosted on the viewed website. "

That's why I love it. A mere hostname in your javascript blacklist can sometimes do so much more than the most advanced adblocker.

As to Google not caring: they do, once it starts affecting their revenue.

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Trump's self-imposed cybersecurity deadline is up: What we got?

ShelLuser
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Easily explained...

Security through obscurity. Because.. what could go wrong? ;)

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Tesla hit by class action sueball over autopilot software updates

ShelLuser
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I wish the old Top Gear was still around :(

I can only imagine them testing out these new features and telling us all about them and how they add up in comparison.

Personally I'd imagine them driving a Tesla with full speed into the 'Hammerhead', turning this feature on and then waiting for disaster to happen :) And although it might be a little unfair it would be highly entertaining :)

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Mastercard launches card that replaces PIN with fingerprint sensor

ShelLuser
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@Tony

Worse (theoretical) problem: How about cold blooded killers who just chop off someone's hand in order to gain access to their fingerprints so that they can clean out the creditcard?

Assuming they don't know already then they'll need you alive to obtain your PIN, which could give you some leverage.

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