* Posts by ShelLuser

2631 posts • joined 19 Dec 2010

Kaspersky Lab loses the privilege of giving Twitter ad money

ShelLuser
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@Martin

Or the beginning of the end for social media. Facebook is already on its decline and if people use their gray blub they'll notice a pattern here.

For starters: this could be you. If they can block you from advertising for no given (proven!) reason then they can do a whole lot more. Basically: upset twitter and see your privileges decline, that is what this boils down to. What's next? You're too negative about women (because you said you hated The Last Jedi) so we'll just revoke some of your privileges because.. $reasons?

Why anyone would want to associate themselves with this twisted "social" media garbage is way beyond me. All they're doing is parasiting on your data.

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ShelLuser
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FAIL

I hope for a symbol in the making...

So basically what Twitter is saying: we have no proof but we still believe that you violated our policies so we'll hit you where we can. Get over it already: if they violated your policies block their account but not this half twitted idiocy. Oh wait.. I just though of something ;)

Warning:: This could be you if you rub twitter the wrong way!

Can't happen? Just look at Facebook and the gigantic well of misery which got opened there. Did you know that if you removed your account from Facebook then all your friends will get sent a reminder that you unfriended them? Social networks do many things except keep your best interests in mind and I have no doubt that twitter isn't any different.

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ZTE to USA: Sure, ban us, but you cannot afford such victories

ShelLuser
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@Hmmm

"You want to trade with the US, or even use the dollar then you trade by our rules."

If only... Because we all know that if China starts to pick up on this and starts pushing some weight around then the US will be the first ones to back down and comply.

... or did you ignore the fact that the US is heavily in debt to China because it has lend it hundreds of millions? And did you know that China is heavily befriended with countries such as Russia and Syria (you know, the one which got bombed by the US)? And also doesn't impose any trade restrictions on Middle Eastern countries such as Iran?

The relationship between China and Iran (or heck: any other Communistic country) had never been a problem before when it came to set out loans. Not even when communism was the root of all evil according to the US. But apparently it wasn't bad enough to accept their money in order to sort out the national debt a bit more.

Which is another thing... You do realize that technically speaking the US doesn't even own that dollar you talk about? Because your national debt is totally (and literally!) off the scale. I'm not even joking because a few years ago they had to extend the meter which shows it because it ran out of digits.

So... with a debt that high.. who the heck are you to make demands like this anyway? Even military might will become severely limited when other nations start pulling in debts, especially if no one will be able to pay said military anymore. Then what's going to happen?

You seem to believe the US holds all the trump cards but trust me: it doesn't. Modern warfare is fought on the financial markets as well, and the US aren't exactly in a very good position for that wouldn't you agree?

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CEO insisted his email was on server that had been offline for years

ShelLuser
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@terry6

"Some folks seem to want to keep every email they've ever received, for ever, just in case."

I'm sure many don't have a choice. European law demands that things such as e-mails are kept within companies for at least 2 years. Also known as the data retention directive, see here.

In Holland this has even been raised to 3 years. With special thanks to Europe of course.

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Oracle pledges annual Solaris updates for you to install each summer

ShelLuser
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Did I read that right?

So every year you'll get your batch of updates?

That's going to be fun; when a major exploit has been discovered then you'll have to try and keep your box secured for at least another 6 months before you can expect any updates?

Definitely sounds very appealing to me!

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Beware! Medical AI systems are easy targets for fraud and error

ShelLuser
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FAIL

It's an outrage in my opinion!

Just look at what companies charge as soon as they're operating in the healthcare sector. Many companies want to be active within this sector just because of the increased bills they can write up. And if you don't believe me just take a look at the actual production costs for some specific equipment (think about glasses, contact lenses but even a wheelchair) and then look at the attached pricetag.

Many people don't care because... "the insurance will pay for that" but without realizing that if this continues then there might come a time when even that will start to become a problem in itself.

And here we are... You think you can expect quality and some expertise to be involved but the facts are somewhat different.

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Oracle demands dev tear down iOS app that has 'JavaScript' in its name

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

What some companies need to realize...

First the obvious oneliner: Gee, I really wonder why Oracle has become so massively unpopular with geeks and other techies.... I knew it was bad news the very moment I saw my support subscription for Sun Solaris triple while I got a lot less service in return (note: mostly referring to SunSolve access which was Sun's hardware database on everything they ever made,it was awesome).

But this is just cringe worthy.

Oracle's definition of open source: "It's free as long as you're not making any money from it, but if you do we'd like our 55% cut please..". What a bunch of hyena's!

I really hope more and more geeks will come to realize that using (wh)Oracle products isn't the best of ideas and are therefor best avoided. I don't do this often because I truly believe in "the best tool for the best job" and I dislike zealous bias. Because of that I can honestly enjoy both Windows and FreeBSD. I enjoy tinkering with PowerShell just as much as I enjoy messing around on my trusty FreeBSD Korn shell. I don't discriminate. Heck; my Apache webserver is backed by both Tomcat for Java servlet pages ("jsp") as well as mod_mono ('Powered by Mono') for ASP.NET support. I admire both environments and enjoy using them.

But ever since (wh)Oracle started throwing weight around, this is yet another example, have I been very keen on moving myself and my company away from Oracle best as I could. MySQL has mostly been replaced by PostgreSQL but one instance remains for some specific web applications and we're even looking into what to do next. Can we do without the webapps or shall we move onto MariaDB...

Totally ridiculous if you think about it but what other choice do they leave you? The way I see it you'll always be at risk for those hyena's to come knocking at your door because they want their cut of your money. And for doing what? Apparently owning the rights to some name or some product.

I really hope more feel the same as I do and that eventually this is going to backfire on them. Never forget that bigger things always start slow. My endeavors probably don't harm Oracle at all, but me sharing them every chance I get and even pointing others to solutions such as PostgreSQL (personal favorite) and/or MariaDB can leave a mark over time. One that can only get bigger, and once that happens you never know what might happen next.

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Facebook admits it does track non-users, for their own good

ShelLuser
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And this is why...

I'm using some Opera plugins. You know, for my own protection and all and I have to admit that they're doing a heck of a job.

I can seriously recommend these: StopSocial which does exactly that: it blocks all incoming crap coming from whatever social media site there is. Because let's be honest here: this doesn't stop with Facebook. Worse yet: one can even argue that the social media networks are more or less being transparent here because sites usually have those silly like buttons, which should be a good indicator as to what is going on. Stuff like Google Analytics is always hidden from plain sight. So with this plugin no more Facebook widgets, Google +1, Tweet buttons, VKontakte, Odnoklassniki (yeah, there's even Russian stuff) and all the rest: Addthis, LinkedIn, Sharethis, Yandex.share, and a whole lot more.

Second, because I like being paranoid: Ghostery. Blocks every advertisement source it knows about and will even warn you when certain plugins are actually slowing a site down. It can be set up to apply some basic logic: the moment a site gets slowed down then it will block the offending javascript code. A very good and easy plugin to see what is tracking you.

And last but not least, because I enjoy being paranoid: NoRef. This basically blocks HTTP referer headers which basically means that it will block a website from bringing in tons of external (3rd party) crap. Such as... you guessed it: social media, google analytics, and sorts of nasty stuff.

One of the reasons I enjoy these plugins is because you have more control than if you'd use NoScript while the combination still manages to block everything you need to. As intrusive or lenient as you want, which is just what I like.

Bye bye Facebook and others!

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Windows Admin Center: Vulture gets claws on browser-based server admin

ShelLuser
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@boltar

Well, in this case I can argue that it was actually effort put to some serious good use. I'll even go further and on the record by saying that I think Microsoft has actually done something right: looked carefully at the way Unix does this and adopted the model, which I actually applaud.

Or have you missed the fact that all of this is build upon Windows PowerShell? In precise: PowerShell remote? What SSH is to my FreeBSD server is PowerShell ('remoting') to a Windows server. And I say so because I use both every day.

I use PuTTY to log onto my FreeBSD server over SSH and I use PowerShell to log into my Windows server to check up on specific aspects but remotely (usually I don't even have to log on, for example: Get-EventLog -ComputerName Effortless -LogName application -Newest 16).

So the main difference is that instead of having to type get-eventlog you can now use a browser based GUI.

MS does a lot of things wrong but in this case I think they at least got the basis right.

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Whois is dead as Europe hands DNS overlord ICANN its arse

ShelLuser
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Meanwhile in Europe itself...

All whois databases are fully operational and still showing personal data.

Try looking up some Dutch (.nl) domains through SIDN.nl. Or check French domains (.fr) through afnic.fr.

Wouldn't this whole thing make more sense if they had started by sorting out all European whois databases first? Or do those suddenly not count or something?

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The true victims of Brexit are poor RuneScape players

ShelLuser
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Who would pay for online stuff anyway?

It's the one thing I don't get. Sure, I also play a few freemium browser games and they can definitely be fun. And I can definitely understand and support a small donation to get some better items and also help support running the game.

But there are games which take on donations starting around E 50,-. That's nearly the price you'd pay for a premium game. And what do you get after you've made such payments? Nothing. Everything you "own" is purely virtual, so the very moment they turn off the switch for whatever reason you'll be left in the dark and without your money's worth. Welcome to modern gameplay?

With the old fashioned (and probably boring?) concept of actually buying a game and getting physical media you can play your game for as long as you'd like. Want to 'donate' more? Look into DLC, most often that can even help you to get even more out of your game. But paying heavily for online contents?

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Gemini: Vulture gives PDA some Linux lovin'

ShelLuser
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@Christian

I can well imagine. I mean... Read the article: it basically only shares the keyboard and the clamshell model, that's all it has in common with the Psion 5mx. To me this translates to: they're trying to monetize on the Psion brand. But without delivering the same expectations.

Sorry, but I find it seriously awkward that I hear no one ever mentioning once how this device managed to handle their appointments. While keeping in mind that this is supposed to be a PDA.

For some people all the logic stops after they hear the name 'Psion'. Psion got big because it managed to deliver a highly functional product. Sure, you could do TONS with it, the 5mx was especially notorious for that (I even ran Norton Commander in a DOS setup) but it did so while still staying loyal to its primary objective: being a PDA.

The PDA functionality came first and foremost. The rest (ironically enough also the most impressive stuff) after.

But this... Sorry but I am not a fan. It sucks at being a PDA; it's basically an Android phone molded into a clamshell model. But as long as people keep calling it a Psion it sells because.. keyboard!

The 5mx was MUCH MORE than the keyboard thank you very much. And I am a little upset how low some "Psion fans" managed to set their standards. The 5mx was WAY MORE that just the keyboard, but stuff like this almost makes it seem as if that was its main selling point.

That's what you get when companies try to monetize on another product: the original often gets heavily disrespected because.. who remembers that anyway? Well, I do. And I am still passionate about it. I think this whole project doesn't do the Psion name much credit. It mostly credits the manefactories wallet. Where is that patent protection when you need it?

Isn't Psion a registered trademark or something? Some kind of protection to keep the real memories alive?

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Facebook admits: Apps were given users' permission to go into their inboxes

ShelLuser
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And here comes another blatant lie...

"Amid increased scrutiny, Facebook is trying to sell the idea that it’s sorry, that it has learned from its mistakes and that it is putting users first."

Sounds very noble and self-reflecting indeed. There's just one small problem with that statement: Facebook is listed on the stock exchange. Ergo they have an obligation towards their stockholders, and those generally care about one thing: revenue, aka money. So how are you going to put non-paying users first if the companies obligation is to secure its revenue?

It's the one aspect which I believe everyone fully glosses over.

Heck: this even dates back to the moment they went onto the stock market. I'm a small player on said market, but my first question nonetheless was: how do they plan to justify their market value? Sure they were well known, but that doesn't mean jack shit when it comes to revenue nor your business strategy.

And we all know how that fairytale ended...

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No password? No worries! Two new standards aim to make logins an API experience

ShelLuser
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OpenSSL

Did you know that the certificates created (and managed) by OpenSSL are merely sets of public/private keys? And that your certificate signature request is basically nothing more than a public key which gets signed by another party? And most of all: that the signature defines the trust in the eventual certificate?

Why I'm telling you all this? Simple: because this can be a very feasible form of authentication as well. Heck, I'm using this with my (hobby based!) VPN (powered by OpenVPN). Basically I have my own private CA which is trusted by several computers (FreeBSD, Windows and Linux alike), that signs off the allowed certificates for VPN use and those clients merely have to use this certificate.

Or what to think about SSH? I'm not using a mere password for that, I'm using public key authentication. So: my public key resides in ~/.ssh/authorized_keys and my private key is just that: private and used to authenticate myself. The only password I use is one to keep my private key safe.

Why can't we have this instead? You could even automate the certificate creation part and there would be no need for any centralized user tracking center.

My (cynical) take on all this? Revenue. Of course they won't use certificates because too many companies have financial stakes in those. It's much more beneficial to sell us that crap than to confess that it could easily be used in a different (and cheaper) manner. Money makes the world go round,eh?

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Nope, you're still a transport biz, top EU court tells Uber

ShelLuser
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@Noonoot

That's no way to talk about my chili! :D

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White House: Is it OK to hijack, shoot down, or snoop on drones? Er ... asking for a friend

ShelLuser
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Joke

@arachnoid

"If someone wanted to conceal a drone they would make it look like a large Bird such as a Seagull or American Eagle."

Exactly!

And because the backlash of us shooting down the American eagle would be devastating we need to keep this a secret at all times.

-- Uncle Sam

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'Disappearing' data under ZFS on Linux sparks small swift tweak

ShelLuser
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@disgustedoftunbridgewells

"Who uses a 0.X version of a filesystem in production?"

ZFS as a filesystem has been out of beta for years already. And I say this because I've been working with ZFS on FreeBSD for at least 5 years now and before that have been using it on Solaris 10/x86 for another 4 to 5 years. And no data loss because of filesystem hiccups I might add. Heck, on FreeBSD I can even put my whole operating system (so: including the root / kernel) on ZFS which used to be impossible on Solaris (note: it's been a long time since I last used Solaris).

Now, I'm well aware that you probably meant to address the project and not so much the filesystem, but even so I think this could easily be a reason why some people may be tempted to use this. ZFS has been available and extremely stable for several years and better yet: it's been an open source project as well.

So I don't think it's that crazy that people expect at least some stability, especially considering the age of the filesystem itself.

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Company insiders behind 1 in 4 data breaches – study

ShelLuser
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This is why it's so important...

... to always respect your users.

I've come across large environments where there was a seriously bad atmosphere of "us against them", because obviously the users are stupid (in all fairness: they often do behave that way) and therefor us admins are smarter / better / etc. and they need to listen to us. Generating a real "us vs them" scenario which - in my opinion - is a stupid thing to do on all fronts.

One reason being mentioned in the article. If you work somewhere and tech support mostly works against you than with you, in such ways that you sometimes circumvent the system merely to get your work done (I've seen scenarios like this), then wouldn't that make it all the more appealing if some stranger comes up to you and asks you to perform a simple and 'innocent' task? Maybe installing that small program can actually do speed up your machine up to normal speeds, something you've been asking support about for the past 4 weeks already.

Sure it sounds stupid and extremely naive. But that doesn't make it less feasible.

Now, I'm not saying that admins should give users everything they want, it obviously doesn't work that way, but the message can sometimes be presented much better. I mean...

"I need a faster computer" => "Sorry, we're not going to do that".

... can easily result in "Aha, so there ARE faster computers but they simply refuse to give me one. Even though I obviously need it".

"I need a faster computer" => "Sorry, we're not going to do that because we don't have any available.".

... which could set a whole different message. It's not because we don't want to give you a new PC, it's because we can't. Easy.

I know that this doesn't always apply. But sometimes giving a simple explanation to an end user with a little reasoning behind it can set a much different atmosphere.

It's not always about you, the admin, but your users as well.

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Mind the gap: Men paid 18.6% more than women in Blighty tech sector

ShelLuser
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@AC

"Kat Hall should be ashamed of her evident bias.

I suppose we'll have to make allowances as she's a woman ;)"

Sorry but this is just as bad as that bullshit modern feminist crap.

The author may be a woman, she may have her bias, but that is not something to criticize her for, and it's also not something I'm doing in my post above. My disdain comes solely from the "El Reg analysis". See: they share conclusions without sharing the data they based the conclusions on. While also making it perfectly clear that their conclusions are flawed because they look at a scenario where different genders perform different jobs.

I'll make this more obvious: In a hospital surgeons normally earn a lot more money than other jobs within the same hospital. So if a hospital has 3 male surgeons and 5 female nurses.... Do the women earn a lot less than man or do surgeons simply earn more than other hospital jobs? According to this article this would be a classic example of women earning less than man. And it's obviously an outrage otherwise they wouldn't spent a whole article over it.

That is why I wrote the above. Not because the author happens to be a woman (I wasn't even aware until you pointed this out) but because I think they're doing a piss poor job. El Reg usually bites the hand that feeds IT, meaning they criticise and reflect on things. They throw facts back at companies.

But there isn't one single solid fact in this whole article, despite what the author tries to make us believe. And that's why I think this article is extremely poor and the author did a poor job.

But Ms. Hall has no reason to be ashamed of her bias. The El Reg editor though should have done his job, done some solid fact tracking and then have denied this article to be placed because of all the loose ends and loopholes. Not to mention the push of an agenda. They should have told Ms. Hall that this isn't the kind of article worthy of El Reg.

Those editors have something to be ashamed off. But not Ms. Hall. I may not agree with her conclusions, I may think she wrote a poor article, but that doesn't mean she should be ashamed for her apparent opinion. In fact, I think it's a good thing she apparently stands up for what she believes in. But I also believe El Reg is not the right place for that.

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ShelLuser
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Mushroom

Is this about equality or supremacy?

Back in the day, the days of true feminism, the whole morale was women who demanded equality. Being allowed to participate in and/or compete with the same things men did. Quite frankly a goal which most people wholeheartedly agreed with. Let's be honest here: in the general sense of the word women were being oppressed to a certain degree. I mean... not being allowed to vote in the US around the 60's? How does that add up?

But haven't we long passed this stage already? Women are here, women are accepted and we do get a diverse working environment. Women aren't only secretaries these days but also work in tech, as managers, and even as officially recognized athletes.

This is when we get to what I perceive as "modern feminism". Women who suddenly feel entitled to certain things because... well, they're a woman so because. Take this poor excuse of an article for example:

"The gender pay gap does not compare the same job roles because it would be illegal to pay women with the same jobs less, which can make it a contentious measure in some industries."

This line alone sets the whole tone of the article for me, and it's also why I call this a dimwitted article. First the most obvious: just because it would be illegal doesn't mean that it can't happen. That would be an honestly interesting subject, one which I being a massive critic of "modern feminism" would even fully support. But we're not going to do that because... I suppose no one breaks the law?

Yet this also means that we're now basically comparing different genders and different jobs. We now have 2 unknown variables and every mathematician can tell you that this makes it impossible to draw solid conclusions from that.

But in true modern feminist fashion the lack of consistency and logic doesn't seem to stop the writer at all from drawing their far fetched conclusions and pushing this as some kind of twisted truth. Even worse: it also showcases a massive double agenda here. I mean....

"BT was the only company to pay women more than men, paying them 2.3 per cent above their male counterparts' hourly median rate."

So, translation: when men get paid less than women it's perfectly fine because "reasons". But when the suspicion arises that women get paid less than men then there's a massive problem to address. Whatever happened to that sense of equality all of a sudden? Does the author even understand what equality actually stands for? Because I have my doubts about that to be honest.

"Ryanair topped the charts as one of the worst-performing companies, paying women 71.8 per cent less than men."

Based on what exactly? See, I see the author spout of a bunch of statistical conclusions while not even trying to back those up with any actual facts. I say that because of the line I quoted earlier: the article highlights the paycheck of different genders performing different jobs.

Wake up call: if you perform a different job you often get paid a different salary. That isn't something which only happens to women in comparison to men, it also happens if you compare 2 men doing different jobs or 2 women doing different jobs. But that would obviously not make for a compelling article so we'll simply ignore that fact and focus on the conclusion which we want to push forward: Women get paid less than men! (for doing different jobs and something you also see amongst men but we're not telling you this).

C'mon El Reg... I expect much higher standards from you than this bullshit half-truth sharing article.

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ShelLuser
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WTF?

@AC

They did give some context (I quote): "The gender pay gap does not compare the same job roles because it would be illegal to pay women with the same jobs less, which can make it a contentious measure in some industries.".

The only problem is the narrow minded conclusion they drew. Basically all this article is saying that people working in different jobs get different paychecks. But because some of these people are women this is suddenly a very bad situation. Because "women" and then all the rules of logic need to be thrown out the window it seems.

Different jobs, different paychecks. I fail to see the problem. Especially if you keep in mind that this situation also happens amongst men and amongst women themselves.

So women should get higher paychecks because they're a woman and not because of the job their doing? And here I was thinking that the whole drive behind feminism was for women to be treated equally and more seriously. Like I said: I know plenty of men who make less money than their colleagues.

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Facebook dynamites its own APIs amid data slurp scandals, wrecks data slurp applications

ShelLuser
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@AC

"There's no way! Everyone is being tokenized all the time, and that activity is then tracked / traded / shared and leaked!"

Well, there is definitely a way: block Facebook entirely. For example using a plugin or blacklisting it in your browser.

The only reason they can shadow track you is because your browser contacts Facebook to pick up any left over data (or to sent confirmations). But if you have their servers fully blocked then this won't happen which means there's no way left for them to track you other than actually going over the webserver logfiles.

This is also the reason why I have google-analytics.google.com blacklisted in my browser.

Which is my comment: I think it's a bit weird how everyone is now getting highly upset over Facebook and demanding action and what more, while totally ignoring the stuff Google does. That Google analytics tool for example isn't just something to make things easier on website owners you know. It makes your browser execute a piece of Javascript code which tells it to phone straight home to Google, that's how it manages to keep track of you. (note: which is why it's blacklisted in my browser).

But do you really believe that only the website owner is going to be using that data? ;)

Facebook is only the tip of the digital iceberg.

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Spring is all about new beginnings, but it could already be lights out for Windows' Fluent Design

ShelLuser
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Windows

It doesn't need the same interface

All you need is the same experience.

See: this is why I think Windows 8 could have worked IF Microsoft would actually have used their brains when setting us up with it. They should never have replaced the start menu with the start screen, but instead made the start screen ("Metro") into a new 'dimension'.

So basically: a layer "on top" of your desktop where you could switch out into. Comparable to switching desktops. Then they could have made that into something fully (or closely) comparable to the interface of the Windows Phone (a device I still genuinely enjoy). So your Windows desktop would merely be an option within the Metro interface. BUT... when working with said desktop there would be no need to switch to this extra layer.

But as soon as you got a phone it would make sense because this would allow you to alter your setup with that of your phone. I dunno: maybe even allowing you to swap (drag and drop) data between your Windows desktop and your Metro environment.

That could have worked. 2 separate environments each aimed at what is most needed but combined within Windows. But this... Meh.

"With Fluent Design, Microsoft has a new goal. It wants to discard the multiple, disparate user interfaces of the past for a single, focused, and attractive user interface that will woo users used to cleaner and focused interfaces from macOS and mobile platforms."

No, it wants to design something new to appeal to users in order to sell even more stuff to us. We already had Metro, why would we need something new yet again?

Does Microsoft even realize how much generations of phones people bought? I now refer to those who are more into WIndows Mobile than I am (read: who bought into every generation)?

Who cares about the past: let's do something new yet again! Ready your wallets everyone!

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Facebook want us to believe banning Putin's troll army safeguards Russian democracy

ShelLuser
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Black Helicopters

Getting tired of the whole "anti Russia" campaign

Don't get me wrong here: I'm not claiming Russia is a completely misunderstood nation where everything is as it should be. But I am growing extremely tired of the constant display of double morales and the plain out bias against Russia. No, their government may not be perfect, but can you really say the ones in the "free" West are?

I mean... When Putin gets (re)elected you can pretty much be sure what his line of thought will be and his vision to rule the country. Here in the West we often get told that we should vote for "Party A" because they plan on doing Y. Which is important and therefor deserves our vote. Yet once they do manage to find themselves elected it's not uncommon for them to do a 180 degree turn and apply the unpopular Z instead. Because yeah, things change and all. I call that plain out lying in order to get into office, but... obviously they will never take action against that because it seems everyone is doing it.

So how exactly is this "democratic system" any more fair in comparison with that of Russia, hmm?

Oh, I know: Russia is bad because they annexed the Krim (a part of the Ukraine where everyone spoke Russian in the first place anyway). Of course we'll just ignore the US false flag invasion of Iraq and pretty much ruling the whole country by force.

Or think about the last incident in England: they were sure that the Russian intelligence had performed an assassination with nerve gas. The British government has even removed several Russian diplomats. And now there's the result of the investigation of said nerve gas and what a shock: there is no hard evidence that the gas originated from Russia at all.

I mean... What we're seeing here is that if someone shoots someone else with an AK47 ("Kalashnikov") then there will be plenty of politicians who will immediately blame Russia because it's obvious that they were behind it given the Russian origin of the weapon. How is that any fair?

To me this whole Facebook campaign is merely another chapter in the Russian hate campaign and I really hope it backfires. This is merely (ab)using the constant negative bias against Russia in hopes of scoring one for your own.

Once again: I'm not claiming Russia is the perfectly innocent misunderstood country. But I also think they do not deserve this constantly ongoing hate campaign. All based on speculations, rumors and "what if's".

Heck, if you think Russia is bad go look at some South African countries. Not only are they usually ruled with an iron fist (meaning: it's not uncommon to get shot dead without any form of trial "because"), they also often let the population starve to death because it's easier to control them. While the rules live in luxurious mansions the general population merely tries to get enough food on the table every single day.

Yet we're not talking any action against that. Naah, instead we'll sent them tons of money every once in a while so that the rulers become even MORE wealthy. Hmm, maybe we can blame that on the Russians as well?

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Furious gunwoman opens fire at YouTube HQ, three people shot

ShelLuser
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@Blank Reg

"One of the problems with the gun laws is that they vary by state. So if the laws are slowing you down just go to the state next door and come back with whatever you need."

No, the problem with gun laws is that only people who actually respect the law will follow it, the rest will continue to do whatever they like.

I say that because I happen to live in a country (Holland) where weapons are outlawed. Not merely guns, even if you have a baseball bat sitting at a funny spot in your store (for self protection) then you still risk the police fining you because it's illegal to own any kind of weapon. In the surrounding countries (Belgium, Germany, Luxembourg) weapons are also illegal, all under a European law.

Yet that doesn't stop shooting incidents from happening. And decently frequent too. Only last Thursday did the country get shocked (yet again) because a store owner got killed during an intake meeting.

Gun legislation is fun and all, but these kind of shooters didn't care about the law in the first place. Also: take away the guns and people will find something else to use. Not to mention that this also makes it much easier to use fake guns and pretend their real. I mean, if the store you're trying to rob follows up to its reputation of being law abiding then you can be sure that they don't own any guns. Easy taking!

And as this incident shows ones again: there are many fruitcakes roaming the streets. And I, as a regular citizen in Holland, am not allowed to defend myself if I have to. Which I think is messed up.

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39

Wanna work for El Reg? Developers needed for headline-writing AI bots

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Trollface

I prefer to send my application online

As you can see I have all the necessary coding skills:

10 print "Breaking news, read all about it!!!"

20 goto 10

./mono headline.vb | mail -s "here ya go you negative negatives!" editorial@theregister.co.uk -b chief@theregister.co.uk.

I got a solid pair of headplugs and my phone is loaded with mp3's so the moment a discussion would erupt then I'll just go "ya da yayayayayayayaya CAN'T HEAR U lalalalalalallalala". That should do the trick just fine, trust me, I'm an l33t xpert!

Why you should hire me? Because I love working on April 1st, that date is always special to me. Heck, I might even be persuaded to work for free during that day on the condition that you guys provide some beer. That's right: I need a pint on the workfloor. Just make it happen, ok?

Oh, also important: I need CVS as version control system and we're going to BAN the use of GIT throughout the office. I'll also demand a mandatory rule be put in place to block access to github.com. This way you'll never be able to tell where my excellent code will be coming from.

errrr, how did that get in there? As you can see I'm also a very good typist which should also be important. Because the moment the AI refuses to sent in headlines then I can take over for it! :)

So now some stuff found on my resume:

Extra, read all about it!

El Reg goes bonkers, lets AI take over despite Steven Hawking's warnings!

To beer or to AI? Ask El Reg!

April fools will never be the same again with your new AI overlords!

To AI or beer? That is the question.

This headline was sponsored by the April Fool society!

Amazing isn't it?

So when do I start?

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0

Why you shouldn't trust a stranger's VPN: Plenty leak your IP addresses

ShelLuser
Silver badge

@JohnFen

Thanks for acknowledging this. For a moment I was wondering if I should be surprised that Opera (my favorite browser) allows me to disable WebRTC completely. Guess not.

The article almost makes it sound as if this is seriously difficult but within Opera (and I imagine Chrome as well) it's merely an issue of disabling the right setting. It's under "Privacy & security" so very hard to miss.

1
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Happy as Larry: Why Oracle won the Google Java Android case

ShelLuser
Silver badge

And here I was thinking...

That Java had been released as an open source project. Wasn't that the sole reason why it eventually got implemented within the several Linux distributions? I'm sure I overlooked something and that this applies to other parts of the runtime but I can't help but wonder what damage this is going to do to the Java platform if more people start thinking in this line of direction.

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ShelLuser
Silver badge

@AC

Although I do agree with you it does raise another interesting question: why build the API in the first place? Isn't that usually done in order to allow others to use your software? And doesn't that more or less imply a less restrictive setup?

9
1

Fed up with Facebook data slurping? Firefox has a cunning plan

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Too little, too late...

I guess Mozilla also suddenly feels the need to jump on the anti-Facebook bandwagon.

Seriously though, I fail to see the need. I've been using StopSocial on Opera for quite a while now and never looked back. It doesn't just block Facebook but every single trace of social media meddling. No tracking for me thank you very much!

6
1

What the @#$%&!? Microsoft bans nudity, swearing in Skype, emails, Office 365 docs

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Windows

This is fucked up

One simple word: censorship.

Instead of holding people accountable for their own actions Microsoft prefers to take the easy way out and consider everyone guilty until proven innocent. And in doing so validated my expressed concerns when this whole 365 subscription model started: "What if... Microsoft suddenly decides that you can no longer have an option which you really need?".

So basically... If you're working on the next erotic bestseller in succession to Fifty Shades of Grey and you're using Office 365 then you might want to be careful. Because if your work hits the market and does become a bestseller then you can bet that Microsoft will come knocking at your door because you violated their policies and are therefor now requested to cough up a huge fine.

Or, a more likely scenario, they'll just trash your work while you were working on it. Who cares about intellectual property?

But yeah, one again a solid example why software as a service is pretty much the dumbest thing you can get yourself into. Because there's no guarantee what so ever that the rules of the game don't get changed somewhere in between, leaving you pretty much empty handed.

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1

Java-aaaargh! Google faces $9bn copyright bill after Oracle scores 'fair use' court appeal win

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Oracle's definition of "open" source and/or standard is...

Its open and free unless you can make money from it. In that case we'd like our 80% cut please.

Who said that Oracle weren't greedy?

12
1

Parents blame brats' slipping school grades on crap internet speeds

ShelLuser
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Coffee/keyboard

Welcome to modern society

... where it's always someone elses fault.

Darn you El Reg, me typing this message is obviously your fault so now you owe me a new keyboard :P

5
1

Meet the open sorcerers who have vowed to make Facebook history

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Uhm, pushing your own agenda much?

"The OX plan is more subtle, and entails extending IMAP (b.1986) to create secure, authenticated group chat. "

As others also stated: why IMAP? My theory? To enforce this whole idiocy onto people. Dovecot is a pretty popular e-mail server and this way you can more or less force this new "standard" onto users without them even realizing it. It'll be much easier to persuade people to use something new if it turns out that they already have it installed and don't need too much extra effort in comparison to trying to motivate people to install something new.

Instead of changing existing current protocols and risk generating more gaps between services (do we really need multiple IMAP protocols?) why not try to come up with something new instead?

Or better yet: try to elevate an already existing design and make that yours! That's what open source and open standards were made for, is it not? And there are dozens of projects which try to utilize chatting and communication services.

Alas... I read about this before and as a result we removed Dovecot from all our servers and replaced it with Cyrus IMAPd. Despite its name it supports IMAP, POP3 (and the encrypted variants) as well as smpt and lmtp. The best feature, in my opinion, is that this project has no ambitions into creating the "next big Internet hit" but instead focus themselves on what they're good at and which really matters: providing one heck of a mail server!

This may sound like a negative rant to you but if you look at Dovecot's history you will notice that it has "change because of change" written all over it. Take for instance the sudden configuration format change: from one easy to administrate config file (well documented and well segmented too) into the conf.d crap which it is now: dozens of different config file parts, and good luck to you in guessing the right file(s) and section(s) to edit! And why? How exactly enhances this my administrative experience? Wouldn't it have been enough to merely provide an include feature and (here's the big one:) let me decide if I want a one or multi -part config file instead of shoving it down my throat because you needed something "new"?

Yes, I'm aware that I can revert back myself. That's not the point: because after every upgrade you'll be force to go over the multipart crapola again in order to check for changed and/or new parameters and options.

And these are the people who now want even more shiny new stuff in the form of IMAP socialized media? Pardon me for not being a believer here ;)

9
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World celebrates, cyber-snoops cry as TLS 1.3 internet crypto approved

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Great article! Security = effort, simple..

I'd like to compliment the author for their very keen choice of words: "while banks and similar outfits will have to do a little extra work to accommodate".

And my favorite: "In short, it's a win-win but will require people to put in some effort to make it all work properly.".

I think it hits the nail right on the head: keyword being effort. The problem is that plenty of people would rather take the easy way out, but if you truly care about security then you'll man up and work your way around it. Providing good security takes effort, plain and simple.

I welcome our new TLS 1.3 overlords :P

18
1

Fake news is fake data, 'which makes it our problem', info-slurpers told

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Fake is in the eye of the beholder..

The main problem is that everyone is talking about "fake news" as if the definition is all out clear, but truth of the matter is that context and perspective are equally important to determine if something is fake, bended or maybe true yet misunderstood.

And then we also have things such as half-truths, politicians love those; simply don't tell the full story so that you're not lying but... in the very sense of the word also not very honest either.

Seriously though, this shouldn't be the problem of the carrier. Nor should those outlets try to make it theirs because that can only lead to one simple outcome: censorship.

Who cares if news is fake or not? If people would stop being so gullible and taking the easy way out then it would be a lot harder to sell this fake news nonsense. Because that's what it is. And even if your news organization is mostly reliable then that by itself is no guarantee that everything you share will be fully true or on par with general perception. I mean... I still remember El Reg carrying that story about how some vague research institute had determined that Microsoft Explorer users had a general lower IQ than Firefox users. Of course within 2 weeks the story got debunked as nonsense, but in the mean time several outlets had carried it and even more funny: several people heavily defended it too.

But yeah, as long as people don't bother themselves to dig a little deeper into what's real and what's "tainted" then nothing really changes. And that's not even touching the issue of opinionated articles.

7
1

Probe: How IBM ousts older staff, replaces them with young blood

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Megaphone

But isn't that discrimination?

Just for the youngsters amongst us: discrimination doesn't only have to be applied on race (which is the most obvious thing people think off) but can just as easily apply to other areas such as gender and age. And correct me if I'm wrong but discrimination is against the law I think ;)

Of course companies should be free to hire who they want, it's their paycheck afterall. But even so the whole thing is utterly stupid because by doing this you're also throwing away years worth of expertise. It doesn't matter if someone has documented all their work, even the best documentation out there is in no way comparable to pure hands on experience.

I wouldn't be surprised if that all that money they may be able to save on the payroll will get burned up anyway because people are now busy re-inventing the wheel. It's inevitable, that's just the way things work.

7
1

Mozilla pulls ads from Facebook after spat over privacy controls

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Advertising is borderline scamming per definition

Although I definitely agree that the whole thing isn't very ethical I also believe people should really clue up already. I mean... they're using "free" services on the Internet but as one should know by now there is no such thing as "free", there's always a price and/or a catch.

This ranges from Facebook right down to Google's online services. Take GMail. Yeah, it might seem free enough but it's not: you pay through advertisements and other commercial crap which they spew all over you. People get really upset with Facebook all of a sudden while simply totally ignoring that Google, Twitter and pretty much every other online "media platform" does exactly the same thing.

If you don't want your data to be sold by 3rd parties then... well, here's a weird idea: How about not placing it online in the first place?

5
3

'R2D2' stops disk-wipe malware before it executes evil commands

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Re-inventing the wheel?

Now, I'm all in favor of methods which can prevent nasty software from achieving its goal(s) but the whole snapshot mechanic isn't exactly new, so quite honestly I don't understand what the big fuss is about.

Snapshotting file systems has become pretty mainstream, even Windows has supported this service for many years already (starting in Windows XP and it become more mainstream in Windows Vista / 7). I've encountered quite a few malware infections (ransomware) on Windows where the solution was simply to roll the system back to a previous snapshot. Which, out of precaution, were made every 2 hours.

6
3

Hip hop-eration: Hopless Franken-beer will bring you hoppiness

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Happy to be living near Germany

In Germany there is this nice law called the Reinheitsgebot which so much dictates that if you label your beverage as "beer" and want to sell in Germany then it had better be made with the three main ingredients of beer: Water, Hops and Barley.

Needless to say that this mockery wouldn't be allowed there, which I only consider to be good news!

"And, as beer aficionados are all too aware, hops can subtly change in flavour from year to year, resulting in some deeply unpleasant surprises."

In other words: brewers need to know what the heck they're doing. And if they screw up then that could have its result in the drink they're brewing. Welcome to real life!

Seriously: this is how it's supposed to be. Sure, the flavor can change, but that's what makes the whole thing great. A beer from 2 years ago could taste slightly different than this year. I don't see the problem.

To me it's just like saying that all wine should taste the same. Because oh dear: some people don't like certain wines so in order to cater to them we'll just make all the wine taste the same!

Are we sure this experiment wasn't secretly done in an attempt to get people to stop drinking beer?

43
2

Mozilla's opt-out Firefox DNS privacy test sparks, er, privacy outcry

ShelLuser
Silver badge

@batfastad

"DoH is actually a very cool technology. Many people already ditch their ISP's DNS servers because they are unreliable."

It can also be a dangerous technology because the single point of failure is now fully pointed as such a master cache. If, for whatever reason, that suddenly fails or get compromised then you'll get a really nasty situation on your hands.

Just take a look at how well creating a centralized advertisement service has worked for providers, including Google (if Google can't keep their ad service safe from virusses and malware, then who can?).

10
1
ShelLuser
Silver badge

Well, they need to get the data somehow...

I can actually understand an opt-in for dev. builds, for the simple reason that people who grab those should know what the heck they're doing in the first place. If they have carefully documented this aspect then I really don't see the big problem; as mentioned in the header they need to get some kind of usage data. In the end it simply boils down to: "read & check what you're using before using it".

However, I do have some concerns about the concept in general: "We posit that integrity and confidentiality protected access to well provisioned larger caches will help our users.". Help how? All I see happening here is that you create a larger single point of failure. Because as soon as those caches get compromised then many people will experience major issues at the same time.

And just because you're grouping many people together basically marks such caches as a very feasible way to compromise. I'm pretty sure malware authors would have a field day here.

Another issue is how this would really enhance security. Most users will use the DNS services from their direct uplink providers (so Internet providers). So how is this going to help them other than generating a bigger target?

0
4

Addicts of Facebook and pals are easy prey for manipulative scumbags – thanks to tech giants' 'extraordinary reach'

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Yeah right...

Misinformation, really bad news indeed. It's not as if political Europe has ever done that, right?

Speaking of Europe... Peculiar isn't it how many people within Europe were told that the Brexit was bad news because this is going to cost Europe a lot of money now that Great Britain no longer contributes anymore (I know of local media reports in Holland, Germany, Italy and Spain).

But people in the UK were told that the Brexit was bad news and things would become more expensive because now they would no longer get any funds from Europe for several projects. Heck, even El Reg reported those articles.

Yet up until now no one managed to explain how this was actually possible. If the Brexit means less funds going into Great Britain then that should be a cost reduction for the rest of Europe. But apparently it isn't. But if this isn't a cost reduction for Europe then it should be one for Britain. But that's also not the case.

So what was all this about false news again? I can't help think about a black kettle and a pot for some reason.

8
6

No, Stephen Hawking's last paper didn't prove the existence of a multiverse

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Joke

Of course he didn't talk about multiverse...

Otherwise we might find out that he used one to power his wheelchair. As seen on Rick and Morty ;)

12
1

Space, the final blunt-tier: Binary system ejected huge 'spliff' asteroid, boffins reckon

ShelLuser
Silver badge
WTF?

Phobos 2

Have you heard? Latest rumors I picked up was that this asteroid is (allegedly!) also visible on the latest pictures taken by Phobos 2. Because... both show long slim shapes and both cannot be explained so.. aliens. Makes sense, right? :)

2
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Airbus CIO: We dumped Microsoft Office not over cost but because Google G Suite looks sweet

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Well, let's just hope...

Their Internet connection never fails. And I mean never because if it does then there will be plenty of people who can't access their administration anymore. Doesn't sound like the brightest of ideas to me.

5
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Mulled EU copyright shakeup will turn us into robo-censors – GitHub

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Mushroom

Let the police to the police work already!

The main reason why I am heavily against proposals like these and would even label them as utterly stupid, narrow minded and a plain out scam is because this is yet another classic example of a government which gets TONS of money in the forms of taxes yet seems quite busy in coming up with ways to do less. While still getting paid the same insane amounts of taxes of course. Don't expect to get a tax break anytime soon.

When they feel that the law is being violated then they should act against that. That's in its very essence why the population is paying taxes: to allow the government to act on our behalf and work on the best interests of the community. That's it! The police are actually paid by us, you and me, and the idea is that they enforce the rules which have been set out so that we can have a safe and pleasant society.

So my problem with this, even though I can only look at what's happening in my country, is that I see the police do less and less. No kidding: if you want to report a crime in Holland then chances are high that you'll be told to either do this online, or to make an appointment; they can probably squeeze you in somewhere after 3 weeks. In all fairness: this does heavily depend on the police station you visit. But even so it still makes one wonder how much chances there will be left to solve a crime after 3 weeks.

I'm not out for a police state mind you, absolutely not, but I do think its fair to demand that the police does what we're paying them for. And that does NOT include getting bystanders to do their work for them, like in this case. Shouldn't these rules supposed to be here in order to protect us?

Instead of "working hard" to come up with new proposals which allows the government to do even less, why not come up with solid solutions which can help the police address these 'crimes' (assuming there actually are some, copyright infriction usually only boils down to monetary problems).

And I also feel a little bit insulted, even though I have hardly any ties with GitHub, but it's yet another (indirect!) attack on the freedom of expression to me. I mean... GitHub is mostly used to host open source projects, and people are mostly sharing their intellectual property in a way which can benefit everyone.

If you have a problem with someone's work take it up with them or with GitHub. But don't come up with stupidity like this. Especially because all this nonsense does is cater to some cry babies who - generally speaking - can't even provide a solid showcase in how much revenue was "stolen" from them when being asked to.

15
3

Bad blood: Theranos CEO charged with massive fraud

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Not all is lost ;)

Next time she should just stick with Indie Go Go for her future fundraiser company campaign. There people more or less expect to scammed (or so it sometimes looks to me at least) so she should fit right in.

4
0

Developers dread Visual Basic 6, IBM Db2, SharePoint - survey

ShelLuser
Silver badge

And yet...

Microsoft has actually added the Visual Basic runtimes to their latest Windows products (Windows 8 and Windows 10). Something tells me that they didn't add a runtime for a long time obsoleted product just to make them look cool.

7
1

UK.gov urged to ensure punters can 'still roam like at home' after Brexit

ShelLuser
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Coffee/keyboard

Europe - the Next Generation

Although not directly related to the topic it's still something which the headline triggered. Something which I cannot help but wonder about: the biggest problem with the EU, in my opinion obviously, is that we're also entering the era of the next generation so to speak.

There are plenty of people, some may even have become El Reg readers, who grew up with the EU environment and simply don't know any better. No matter if you're in favor or against the EU I think that this bias, although quite understandable, is still something to keep in mind here. Personally I can't help wonder if this isn't something which some politicians are actually relying on in order to safeguard the whole EU structure. Well, that and taking away the options for the general public to protest (even more offtopic: in Holland the politicians are doing their best to take away our options to organize a public referendum).

It probably also doesn't help that a seemingly growing amount of people are totally uninterested in history. I can well understand that not everyone enjoys reading up on (maybe boring) dry theory but in reality one classic saying is still very much relevant today: "People who ignores their history are doomed to repeat it..

Maybe food for thought?

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