* Posts by ShelLuser

2450 posts • joined 19 Dec 2010

Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP

ShelLuser
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WTF?

HP maybe the source, but Microsoft is still to blame

Simple reasoning: what moronic programmer parses and "just" applies properties without checking if their values are actually within the right limitations?

And the reason I use the word 'moronic' is because this is a classic example of how backdoors and exploits come to life.

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Downloaded CCleaner lately? Oo, awks... it was stuffed with malware

ShelLuser
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Avast is bloated itself...

In my opinion Avast went downhill the very moment they stopped being an anti virus program and insisted on becoming an "Internet protection suite". Their firewall was horribly bad, it had a major problem when it had to cope with many parallel connections (passive FTP anyone?) and would often put the whole OS to a grinding halt because it simply couldn't keep up.

If they're that bad with a simple firewall, then what would their other be like? That's what I wondered about anyway, and got rid of the whole thing. Never looked back.

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The developers vs enterprise architects showdown: You shall know us by our trail of diagrams

ShelLuser
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Pint

Awesome article

First off: I'm a huge advocate of modeling languages such as UML / SysML / BPMN and even though I realize not everyone values those standards I do think they're sometimes under appreciated. However...

"EAs are infamous for not having touched a line of code since, well, that time way back when they did all this DevOps stuff on mini-computers but didn’t call it “DevOps”."

I think this really nails the main problem.

I've been following a few seminars in the past and I'm (somewhat) active on a few fora dedicated to modeling practices and if there's one thing I can't help but notice it's that a lot of data analysts seem so stuck up with their rules ("guidelines") that they'll often spend more time debating (or researching) modeling standards than actually addressing the (theoretical ?) problems they're trying to solve.

And one reason for that, in my opinion obviously, is two fold. There's a huge difference between theory and reality. So having some kind of hands on expertise with the way things are done can seriously help to understand the reason for any possible caveats and/or problems. Yet most analysts will approach all this purely based on their precious modeling standards, thus theoretical.

Which is in my opinion another major problem within this field of work: the standards should be a means, not a goal. When it comes to modeling languages (such as UML / BPMN) I always try to draw parallels with real (spoken) languages. Despite the official rules (as laid out in the dictionaries) we often use the language in the way which works best for us. And sometimes the language changes and adapts a bit. So why can't the same thing apply to modeling languages?

I think that's a major caveat sometimes... I know of situations where people tried to change the way a company worked based on a pre-determined ruleset instead of basing themselves on what would be the most optimal way for the departments to work. Said company dumped this way of work within 2 months or so and then went back to their old ways. And I think that fuels the ideas of those 'weird diagram packed guys' who can recite a lot of theory but don't seem to fully understand how things work.

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WordPress has adverse reaction to Facebook's React.js licence

ShelLuser
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Very odd decision I think...

Note that I don't oppose the decision but I don't understand why it's being taken. Because I seriously doubt that the Apache ban will affect WordPress in any way. Thing is: Apache banned use of the library for all their new projects. But WordPress isn't a project hosted by Apache last time I checked.

The Apache decision also doesn't concern end users. After all: you pick up the software based on a license (an Apache license in this case) which doesn't forbid you to use any kind of library if you want to. That's also not the point, from what I understand the point is to forbid inclusion of the library in any of the Apache projects. So any new software project hosted on Apache can't have this library included. But that's all there is to it.

Like I said, I don't oppose the decision but I do think it's odd that WordPress thinks that this could ever affect their end users.

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Homeland Security drops the hammer on Kaspersky Lab with preemptive ban

ShelLuser
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Pint

I wonder who the real oppressor is here...

First of all this brings me back to the news surrounding the 50's and 60's. You see; although the US claims to be the "land of the free" it really should be mentioned that this is "the land of the free to do as we tell you". Back in those days, the days of the cold war, the US disliked everything even closely related to communism. But worse: plenty of innocent people (from civilians to more well known people) saw their careers and reputation getting ruined because... .. the government suspected that they might be sympathetic towards communism. In other words: thought crimes. They didn't condemn people for the way they acted and/or behaved, nope, but for what they might have believed. Of course this backfired eventually and many "high class" politicians were forced to step down, but the damage had been done nonetheless.

The witch hunts all over again.

Isn't this a bit of the same? See, there's another thing I have a problem with:

"The Department is concerned about the ties between certain Kaspersky officials and Russian intelligence and other government agencies, and requirements under Russian law that allow Russian intelligence agencies to request or compel assistance from Kaspersky and to intercept communications transiting Russian networks"

Doesn't the same apply to US laws? I mean... just look at the NSA and Apple encounter, Apple was pretty much forced to comply to their wishes and only after Apple went public with the whole thing and still stood their ground things went sour for the US (after which even the president started mentioning stuff like "unpatriotic acts").

Can we now conclude that it is official then? So it's down to "Do as we say, not as we do"?

There's a word for that... when you uphold double standards and double morales....

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Another reason to hate Excel: its Macros can help pivot attacks

ShelLuser
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Windows

Nothing to see here...

So a student found out that if you're a local administrator you can access a machine remotely. No shit sherlock.

There are also some serious flaws in his argumentation. For example the part where he demonstrates remote access through PowerShell. For starters: WSMan:\localhost\Client\TrustedHosts. Good luck creating instances through PowerShell remotely (or even starting new sessions) when the remote host isn't in the list of trusted hosts. Any remote access attempts would be rejected.

Maybe also interesting to know: this setting can only be changed locally by the administrator.

You can see the whole thing if you check his script on Github.

This is a non-issue.

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Crackas With Attitude troll gets five years in prison for harassment

ShelLuser
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@AC

"There are two problems with this approach."

You sum up the problems and how it's all wrong, fair enough, but I'm missing your suggestions on how to make things better.

The system may not be perfect, but it does seem to do its job. You yourself shared some proof of that with your comment about "stay as far away from the US justicd system as humanly possible.". Wouldn't you agree that one way to achieve that is not doing the crime (or get associated with one) in the first place?

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Google will appeal €2.9bn EU fine

ShelLuser
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It's all about the money...

On one end most governments want to privatize certain aspects because it'll be cheaper on them. Sure they're 'selling' it as "competition will make things cheaper" but surely they're not that stupid? Not to mention that history proved them wrong there. But then again...

See, that's the one thing I don't get: everyone who has a basic understanding of economics will realize that a monopoly is basically the #1 goal to go for: it means you're more successful than the competitors. Best of all this is often achievable without any dirty tactics. But then suddenly the politicians realize that this isn't what they wanted. Which is strange because, as mentioned, in an open market this is the highest goal to achieve. Surely it should be obvious that this is what companies will go fot? But apparently not and so actions are required to "fix things".

But, uhm, first of all: how exactly is fining Google going to change anything?

Second: couldn't they have seen this coming for a long time already?

Sorry, but all I can see is that the EU needs money (read into it and you'll know why) and this is simply an easy way to do it. As said: what will this achieve or change anyway? Where is that money going? Isn't it ironic that right now the Southern European nations are in some heavy debts and the whole continent is somewhat struggling to get that balanced out? Coincidence? I have my doubts....

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The new, new Psion is getting near production. Here's what it looks like

ShelLuser
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Can we stop calling it a Psion please?

With all due respect but this really has little in common with a Psion at all. I used to own both a 3c and 5mx because Psion was awesome at what it did: keeping all my appointments and any other kind of information I needed on the road in a well organized manner. Back then I usually used public transportation and even though it did cost the company I worked for a little more (they never minded, because:) it also gave me time to work out a good draft (and later whole documents) about the meeting and all the things which were discussed there.

I still remember the look on my managers face after that first meeting and he asked me when he could expect a report about the thing. "How about now?", after which I gave him the whole thing. You go Psion!

But this is not a Psion. This is an Android device which can dual boot with Linux. I'm not trying to be overly negative here, but the reason I loved my Psion so much was because of what it could do and how quickly it could do it. An average Android / Linux Debian setup can also process stuff, but with the same ease of use and speed as my Psion did? I have a problem believing that. Think about booting, loading applications, and what about cross linking and referring back and forth between applications? Office and LibreOffice are good at that, but Psion took that to a whole different level. They had to because they had to compensate for the limited functionality they provided.

Yet this is basically your average Android / Linux environment on a palmtop. And palmtops aren't exactly new.

These days I often use OpenOffice on the road. It's installed on my (FreeBSD / Xfce powered) laptop which I use to diagnose network issues, and sporadically I type out a small report of my activities after I'm done. It works, nothing to complain, but still it's not comparable to what I did on my Psion at all.

Psion was good because they had 1 single goal: providing a personal digital assistant with ditto functionality. This isn't a PDA, it's a palmtop running either Android or Linux, which are both general operating systems; none of them are specifically tailored at providing PDA functionality. As such, I don't think you should call this a Psion, because it's not.

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Apache Foundation rebuffs allegation it allowed Equifax attack

ShelLuser
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Megaphone

Uh huh...

"Which has Apache antsy, as it's not willing to wear responsibility for a hack that took place before it knew it had a problem"

Meanwhile why the fight between companies began over legal rights and who was or wasn't (in)directly responsible no further attempts were made to backtrace the source of the attack in an attempt to catch the actual attackers. Because... effort?

Companies trying to put the blame on Apache is totally laughable, though at the same time poor comedy. They use the software for free, they cut corners by not having to pay, say, Oracle huge license fees for using stuff such as Glassfish, and they're still whining when something goes wrong. Because then it's everyone elses fault (not the attackers of course).

Companies like that truly and honestly disgust me.

And even if it was the other way around, so what? Sometimes people tend to forget that in the end Open Source is just that, open source and best effort at best. You need a fix? How about YOU try to fix it yourself, then you can gloat how cool and hip you are and about how others are slacking to keep up. Unless those whiners at qz.com can pull that off I think they should really keep their whining to themselves.

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Scientists, free software bods still worried about EU copyright proposals

ShelLuser
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What ever happened to...

Innocent until proven guilty?

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Boffins: 68 exoplanets in prime locations to SPY on humanity on Earth

ShelLuser
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@Voyna

"The reason I make this point is that human tool making evolved very slowly for a very long time (in our terms) and then some event accelerated it, which may have been the drying out of the Middle East and population pressure."

I think that acceleration has more to do with the evolution of the whole religious angle. Most people prefer to ignore all this but only a few hundreds of years ago the most brilliant scientists at that time were also considered to be heretics by rulers at that time. Because the (Christian) church was basically pretty much in charge and had massive influence in most governments. Unless you were rich or had some way of influence you'd better keep your mouth shut and accept the "facts" that the earth was flat and that everything in the universe turned around the earth, or else... Spanish inquisition anyone?

That whole period delayed and / or stopped a lot of scientific (and industrial) progress.

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London Tube tracking trial may make commuting less miserable

ShelLuser
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One thing I always failed to understand....

Why people leave their phones to constantly search for wifi networks. Not only does it put quite a drain on your battery you're also exposing yourself to all sorts of possible nastiness.

Of course it's much more hip these days to place the blame on the people who didn't protect their wifi access point instead of the people who, in the end, basically tried to connect to it themselves (or by proxy of course).

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Looking forward to Solaris 11.next this year? Whomp-whomp. Check again in 2018

ShelLuser
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Pint

Oracle cares about one thing only...

These are sad days indeed. The problem is that Oracle cares about revenue above anything else, which (in my very personal and humble opinion) includes customer happiness. Sounds crazy, but just look at all the evidence around you.

When they took over support costs immediately went through the roof while you basically got much less in return (for starters no more access to SunSolve; one huge knowledge base which had pretty much background info on *anything* Sun had made and/or supported). That place was amazing. Trouble with your (6 year old) Blade server? No problem: full specs plus instructions on how to take it apart were all available. But after the takeover you could forget about all that.

I've said this for quite a while already, even though it honestly saddens me, but people who are still using a licensed version of Solaris are much better off with looking for alternatives. The most obvious alternative is of course OpenIndia or Illumos, the open source Solaris version which isn't fully controlled by Oracle (and therefor can't be shut down on a whim, which happened with OpenSolaris).

Another solid alternative is FreeBSD. Solaris is a direct descendant of a true Unix environment, AT&T's Unix Sys V to be precise. FreeBSD has its roots into Research Unix through BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution). But what makes FreeBSD a true replacement for me is because it supports everything which made Solaris great. DTRace or ZFS? Not only does FreeBSD fully support those (you can nowadays even have your root filesystem fully on ZFS without issues), the origin of some of these features comes directly from Sun Microsystems who at one point helped the BSD project with porting these over.

Even from a licensing perspective will you find that FreeBSD has much more in common with Solaris and the vision and ideas behind it, than others. You can get commercial support for FreeBSD if you need it, but you'll soon learn that you'll come across companies (and people behind those companies) who care for the operating system and your happiness over money. Sure: a SLA is a SLA and that has to be honored on both ends. But you'll have much less risk to be talked into something which in the end will only cost you more money while your benefits are slim at best.

Solaris really is at its end. You may think that the "continued support" sounds like a good thing but trust me: it isn't. They don't do that to make your life easier, they do that to reduce their own overhead costs as much as possible. Instead of sorting out an update which specifically meets certain demands and/or standards (like making sure you separate between optional and required updates) they'll now simply throw everything together and release it. Then it's up to you, their "valued" customer, to sort it all out.

And if it doesn't work? No worries: I'm sure that for only E 1500,- / month extra you can get on-hands telephone support but only during business hours and limited to those questions which apply to the continues upgrade process.

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Scotiabank internet whizzkids screw up their HTTPS security certs

ShelLuser
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Pint

Losing touch of reality?

Is it me or do we see a rather unhealthy trend developing as of late? I get the impression that more and more companies are much too busy doing "important" stuff right up to a point where they lose track of some of the essential parts which seriously matter.

... that is; they matter for their customers. And who cares about those, right?

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Oracle throws weight behind draft US law to curtail web sexploitation

ShelLuser
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Aren't there already enough laws?

I don't see the point here to be honest, and quite frankly I can't help wonder if some definitions aren't being heavily mixed up here to make the story sound more dramatic.

See: when we're talking about "sex trafficking" then I'm not thinking about online advertisements but about people who are being forced / coerced into sexual slavery. Who are being forced to have sex against their will. Are you telling me that this isn't already illegal under US law? Surely the US isn't that much of an underdeveloped country? Last time I heard prostitution itself is pretty much outlawed in several states. So why aren't those laws being applied to catch the culprits?

And speaking of those online advertisements... Isn't child labor pretty much illegal in most civilized Western countries (let alone working within the adult industry)?

I can't help wonder if there isn't much more at stake here than just protecting the innocent.

See: most of the crimes we're talking about are already illegal under current laws. Therefor I can't help wonder if the attention isn't being diverted away from the actual problem. Wouldn't it be fair to say that instead of more confusing laws we need better law enforcement instead?

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Must go faster, must go faster! Oracle lobs Java EE into GitHub, vows rapid Java SE releases

ShelLuser
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Faster != better

""For Java to remain competitive it must not just continue to move forward — it must move forward faster," he said in a note posted to his blog on Wednesday."

Which begs the question: why?

This sounds horribly stupid and worse: I have no doubt it has more potential to hurt the project than move it forward. Sure, other environments may have quicker release cycles, but with every new release you also introduce risks and overhead. Risks comes in the form of the risk of bugs. Now, that risk is of course always there, but will increase the very moment you start adding new stuff.

The other, much more important in my opinion, is overhead. A new release usually also means that people will need to check what changes and optionally may need to adapt to that. That's time spend on study / overhead instead of active development.

Now, quick releases don't have to be bad, but the way they present this I can't help get the uncomfortable feeling that to them "faster = better". So the release frequency has become a goal of its own, while that goal should be mainly focused around providing stable updates and adding stuff which actually makes sense.

Most of all.... Why do there always have to be updates in the first place? I don't understand that mindset at all. When a product is ready, when it does what it is supposed to do, then why can't it simply be left to do what it does without updates for a while? Nope! In this modern day and age your project apparently doesn't count unless you have at least several updates every once in a while.

Take Nethack.... That game hadn't been updated for years, and when a new version finally game out it was immediately big news. But after that... It's back to the usual release cycle where you don't get to see it in your list of updated software, and most likely for many more years to go. And why not? I play it on a regular basis and... it works, it does what I expect of it, why would I need more?

Just so we're clear: I base this comment not just on what we've seen here, I see it happening all around me. I'm a pretty vivid Minecraft player, I love that game, and for sure: when we haven't seen a new update for a while you can rest assured that plenty of people are going whine about "is it dying, why hasn't there been a new update, etc, etc.". So stupid... It's not as if you can't enjoy the game anymore without any updates coming in. I like new stuff just as the other guy, but I'm also happy with the stuff I already got. Anything on top of that is icing on the cake, not something which "should" be there.

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Oracle 'systematically denies' its sales reps their commissions, forces them to work to pay off 'debts', court told

ShelLuser
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Just when you thought...

So being a Solaris fan myself I have to admit that this is funny to read (note: right now my Unix-like OS of choice is FreeBSD, but it all started on Soalris for me, so that OS will always be my all-time favorite)...

But just when you thought your disrespect for whOracle couldn't get any worse (especially reading the massive layoffs on the Solaris departments) and all of a sudden this happens.

It does make me happy that Java is mostly open source based these days. So even in the (probably unlikely) event that Oracle goes titsup (which I definitely see happening some time in the future) then the good stuff (Java, ZFS, Solaris) wouldn't have to go to total waste.

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China crackdown: VPN vendor gets prison

ShelLuser
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Pint

Overplayed his hand?

There are many Chinese people who managed to break through the great Chinese firewall and who didn't get into problems. I read stories about situations where local law enforcement is fully aware of some breaches but will simply tolerate it as long as it's not being (actively) "abused".

And I think that's the main thing which got this guy taken out. It's one thing to breach the firewall, it's another to actively promote it and sell it as a service. Stupid, stupid, stupid.

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Well, whad'ya know? 'No evidence' that Obama wiretapped Trump Tower

ShelLuser
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So, uhm, dare I ask? ;)

So Obama wasn't spying on Trump.

But is Trump by any chance spying on Obama? ;)

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Hubble Space Telescope spies possibility of liquid water in TRAPPIST-1

ShelLuser
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@Pascal

"I seriously doubt that we have enough knowledge to declare whether or not some specific exoplanet still has enough water to harbor life."

Another issue I have with all this is that all theories are based on the theory that life can only exist as we imagine it. So: carbon based for starters.

Now.. I know you got to start somewhere and it's definitely the best idea to focus on what you already know. I'm not disputing that. But I do think we should keep a much more open mind about what we define as 'life'. There are creatures in the deep oceans which live in areas of which scientists were quite certain that life was impossible there. Yet mother nature proved them wrong.

Isn't this a bit of the same?

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Big Tech slams Trump on plan to deport kids

ShelLuser
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Then and now...

Sure, America was founded on immigrants. But the whole 'immigrant definition' has changed over the years. The Internet was also once a place where cyberbullying and online harassment meant something a "little" different than merely sharing your disagreement with someone else. Yet according to some people these days merely stating that "I think you're wrong" is parallel to online harassment. Others even take this a whole lot further by spreading plain out lies and halt-truths about heated subjects, and when they get called out for that they immediately switch to a victim role. Now all of a sudden they get attacked because of who they are, obviously not for what they were saying.

In my opinion this also applies here.

Sure, deporting children sounds horrific, I totally agree with that. But it's also a fact that plenty of people will easily use children as a means to further their own goals.

Would you, in your right mind, knowingly and willingly conceive children even if you know up front that you might not be able to support them because your status in the country you're in is uncertain? Would anyone in their right mind do that? Yet that is what you're often dealing with here...

People who have a foreigner status, who know that their stay is temporary at best and definitely not permanent yet still chose themselves to get children. Should that be a reason for a pardon and let the whole family stay? There are plenty of people who use this as a means to enforce a legal status. And once you give in you can rest assured that you'll get plenty more.

Despicable to deport children? Sure, I myself am also uneasy about the whole thing. But what does that tell us about people who willingly and knowingly take on the responsibility to raise children even though they can clearly know up front that they won't be able to support them?

That is the question most people are unwilling to ask themselves.

It's not fair towards the children, but it's not the government you should be blaming but their parents.

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Stephen King's scary movie reboot provokes tears from 'legit clowns'

ShelLuser
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Easily remedied I think...

"The WCA has expressed fears that adverse publicity surrounding the film's killer clown character Pennywise will lead to cancelled bookings and financial difficulties for its members."

Isn't that what an insurance is for?

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MongoDB quits Solaris, wants to work on an OS people actually use

ShelLuser
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Pint

Welcome to commercially driven open source...

Now, I need to put up a disclaimer: I don't use Solaris anymore myself and quite frankly I also seriously doubt that I ever will because seriously really dislike Oracle and the stuff they're doing. Fact of the matter is that I was a hobbyist Solaris enthusiast and because of that even maintained a license because that was my way of showing support for Sun (you could easily use Solaris free of charge as well).

Despite that I think this is still seriously bad news and why I've always been very skeptic about commercially driven open source projects. For simple reasons as shown here.... The drive is no longer to provide something good because you can. You no longer allow people to spend way too many of their evening hours to keep something going for the sole reason of "because we can" and because everyone enjoys it. Who cares if the audience is limited? It's all about the passion and the drive, of maintaining something good and doing it in a Unix-like fashion.

Instead the drive is money. And if something stops being a profit and risks turning into a loss (even if it's all theory and only on paper) then good luck to you. Heck, it often gets even worse. Remember that Drupal developer who got shunned from the whole project for extremely vague and peculiar reasons? No? He did, and the reason was none other than: "We didn't expel him because he's into SM and such, but we also won't tell you or anyone else (not even him!) what the real reason was either, so there!".

I've always wondered about the why part and honestly I can only conclude 1 simple reason: there's a huge company behind Drupal so if they see the slightest risk of something which could very possibly result in a loss then you can kiss your open source philosophies and any other moral motivations goodbye because greed will always prevail in the end.

In my opinion this is not much different. The company behind all this deems that "time = money" (quite a blasphemy within the world of open source in my opinion) and therefor this is no longer profitable so adios amigos!

Makes you wonder what'll be next. Oh, I know: FreeBSD, although quite popular in its own right, is probably hardly as popular as Linux is. I wonder how long it'll take them to axe that part of the project too. This may sound crazy now but with things like greed, commercial interests and such I wouldn't be surprised one bit if it actually happened.

Now, don't get me wrong here. I'm not claiming that they're doing something massively wrong. In a way I can even understand the reasoning behind this decision. Most of all: this is still an open source project so if people care enough about it they can always try and maintain their own Solaris fork of the whole thing and try to backport future patches themselves.

But that's not my point. The point is that in my opinion a true open source project hardly makes decisions such as these. It's not about "time = money" its about maintaining a cool project which can be run on anything that interests you or your userbase.

And I don't like decisions such as these, because generally speaking company / commercial driven interests are usually completely different from that of the regular enthusiasts.

NOT being driven by commerce and greed is what made open source projects great in the first place after all.

Or did you honestly already forgot about the time when Linux was in the same place as Solaris is in now? In that time and age when the open source community was far better off without projects like this in the first place. Because it wasn't about time = money, it was about maintaining one awesome environment (Linux in this example) because people cared and simply could. They believed in it.

THAT is what open source is to me. So yeah, I think it's a sad day indeed when an open source project gets driven by greed and all the nastiness that comes with it.

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NSA ramps up PR campaign to keep its mass spying powers

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

You only need to remember one thing...

These are the guys who were directly responsible for the massive ransomware outbreak which cost plenty of innocent civilians a lot of money and/or effort to fix.

If that's their definition of protecting nations and saving lives then god help us ;)

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Bombastic boss gave insane instructions to sensible sysadmin, with client on speakerphone

ShelLuser
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@Lewis

"So why didn't he just run that and get out of there in the first place?"

For the record: I totally agree with you.

However... Hindsight is a wonderful thing, isn't it? That's the part we both ignored at first. Heat of the moment, you don't always think straight and perfect. Especially not with that kind of manager looming over your shoulder.

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DreamHost smashed in DDoS attack: Who's to blame? Take a guess...

ShelLuser
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uh huh...

One mans asshat is another mans hero.

Guess you never stopped to think about that one.

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Node.js forks again – this time it's a war of words over anti-sex-pest codes of conduct

ShelLuser
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Hmm...

"Would someone call a grown up please?"

Quite frankly I can't help wonder if the project isn't better off without those guys. I mean... Sure, I get it that someone sometimes doesn't like someone else. It happens. But why would comments made on Twitter (or anywhere else for that matter) affect how you're working together within a project in the first place?

But the main reason why I think the project is better off is because of how this ended. People asked for a vote, got it, people voted, they lost. And instead of taking their loss and respecting the majority vote they're now bailing out.

I realize that we probably got a brief cover of the incident or maybe somewhat of a one sided story at best but... meh...

How did that song go again? "o/~ You can't, always get, what you want... o/~".

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Vital fair use copyright defense lands – thanks to warring YouTubers

ShelLuser
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Pint

Some people need to inflate their ego

After reading this article my first reaction was simple: "Meh, one youtuber mocking and making fun of another. Of course that's going to piss some people off...". Then I actually watched the re-uploaded video and... As said: some people really should put some work into keeping their ego in check I think.

I mean.. they weren't negative, they weren't mocking the guy or his video or anything, but merely commented. It's the golden rule of the Internet: if you don't like people commenting on the stuff you do or share then maybe not comment and share in the first place.

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Oops! Something went wrong: There's nothing to see here

ShelLuser
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Black Helicopters

Yet the real problem is overlooked..

It's one thing to set up a series of laws and agreements in order to prevent nasty stuff from happening, but it's another to actually have people follow up on them.

Take nuclear warheads. Regulations state that only a select few countries are allowed to have these, yet reality shows us that plenty of other countries also own this technology.

So where does that leave you?

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How are you improving software development and deployment?

ShelLuser
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Pint

Maybe old fashioned but still an UML fan here...

I'm not going to fill out the form because I have no intention of acting as a speaker. I was under the impression that it was only a form to send in specific ideas and/or experiences and such.

Anyway... When I started looking deeper into Java development (quite some years ago) I decided to start with Sun and whatever they provided. I discovered both SunONE Studio and NetBeans (both Java IDE's). The fun thing about SunONE Studio was that it also provided support for UML diagrams. A little crude but quite usable. At that time I already had some experience with flowcharts but knew very little about UML. Just for context: my job has always evolved around systems / network administration and sometimes part-time software development.

SunONE got replaced by NetBeans and although they tried hard to port the UML plugin over to NetBeans they eventually gave up due to several problems and started pointing users to Visual Paradigm ("VP"); a company which developed an UML modeling tool which now shares the same name. The cool thing about this software (in my opinion obviously) is that it can fully integrate itself with the most common IDE's out there. From NetBeans and Eclipse right down to IntelliJ and Visual Studio.

I really liked what I saw and got myself a modeler license then and there, even though VP also provides free of charge community licenses.

All this happened approximately 8 years ago and in the mean time a lot of new developments and improvements have been made. VP is still my de-facto choice when it comes to working with modeling languages, the current version 14.1 supports pretty much all of them. From UML and SysML right down to BPMN (Business modeling), ERD and/or ORM (Database modeling) to requirements capturing.

Sorry if I sound like a marketing drone but I'm honestly still very enthusiastic about the stuff you can do with VP.

But the main reason why I still heavily favor UML / SysML is because it really helps me to create (and keep!) a solid overview of my software project(s). The classic "a picture usually tells more than a thousand words" principle. Using this methodology also somewhat forces me to think about my designs before actually coding and implementing it. This is a big help for me personally, also because I'm not a full time developer. Which, for me, is the beauty of UML: you can basically make it as large and complex or as small and to the point as you want.

In the past I sometimes even took things so far and utilized UML for some of my network topology diagrams (basically "ab"using a deployment diagram for that).

I'm well aware that UML (/ SysML) is often considered as a dated way of working and a lot of people have moved on to other (more "hip"?) methods for software design (or simply totally dropped software design in its entirety), but yeah.

Although I am familiar with methods such as AGILE and SCRUM, for some reason that never really clicked with me although I sometimes do use AGILE on a smaller scale. Yet that is often more aimed at project management than software design. When it comes to design I still favor UML / SysML and prefer using those methods if I have a choice.

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Microsoft president exits US govt's digital advisory board as tech leaders quit over Trump

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But what do they think the effect will be?

Running away basically means you lose all your options to make any kind of difference at all. Staying onboard might help you get your grievances across and things could actually change.

Sure, I also doubt that the administration would actually listen, but running away practically ensures that none of your arguments will be heard or used.

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Don't panic, Chicago, but an AWS S3 config blunder exposed 1.8 million voter records

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Trollface

Still got nothing to hide?

A wee bit offtopic, sorry I know, but with news like this I always wonder if people still feel that they "got nothing to hide" when the government tries to get even more access into our personal lives.

Yes, this is a bit of a troll but also meant quite seriously.

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FYI: Web ad fraud looks really bad. Like, really, really bad. Bigly bad

ShelLuser
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Pint

Advertising is often overhyped...

Sure, if you got a new product and need to draw some kind of attention to it then advertising might work a bit. Of course in this day and age what's even better is to make sure that your product is well known within the "incrowd" and gets at least some mentioning and/or attention. This way people who are looking for "Product X" will also come across your brand.

Yet most advertisings are for already established products and quite frankly.. Overrated, overhyped and annoying too from a spectators point of view.

Several years ago Unilever (a huge food concern in Holland) considered to cancel one of their brands called "Zeeuws Meisje". In order to facilitate this they decided not to put any funding at all into marketing, assuming that this would eventually divert public attention after which they could can it.

Yet 6 months later, much to their surprise, sales figures had gone up instead of down. With no advertisement at all....

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I say, BING DONG! Microsoft's search engine literally cocks up on front page for hours

ShelLuser
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Joke

Maybe...

The author of this artwork might want to take note and sue Microsoft for a good amount of money because they obviously used their intellectual property without consent :)

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PayPal, accused of facilitating neo-Nazi rally, promises to deny hate groups service

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@AC

"I don't really care what they push but I do very much dislike the way they attack anyone who doesn't agree with them."

I think you raise a fair concern but I also think you're missing the point as well.

It's not uncommon for online payment services to deny you their services based on the services you're providing. For example.. A somewhat comparable service to Paypal would be 2Checkout. According to their website the best you can get for integrating e-commerce on your website (supported by oscommerce, Magento, WordPress, etc.).

However, if you check their prohibited product list you'll notice that there are many things they will not support. Adult entertainment is a major no, same goes for firearms and armament (even though this can be fully legal in the US), tobacco related products, medical services, financial services or advice (including consultancy, debt collecting, credit card protection) and this even goes so far that they also won't condone social media advertising and online gaming or trading with in-game items.

Now, some may seem a bit obvious (like firearms and tobacco) but there's normally nothing illegal about online gaming, advertising or consultancy. Yet those services are plain out denied here.

Prohibited services (you'd need to ask their permission first): events / seminars, dating / social networking and donations. Once again things which are perfectly normal and totally legal.

And this is just one online payment provider, there are dozens more which also have their specific set of rules, including Paypal. The Dutch variant of this link clearly mentions that activities which involve around hate, violence, intolerance and racial discrimination won't be permitted. And the last change of that webpage is said to be from 2015. Long before the recent happenings.

So yeah, don't be too hasty here with accusing Paypal for being politically correct. Chances are high that it's not so much about the political ideas which these groups have, but more so how they're trying to monetize on it.

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Web-enabled vibrator class action put to bed

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Facepalm

Users e-mails?

So... how did the company get hold of the e-mail address? Did the vibrator somehow shake it out of its user or something?

That's the part I often don't get: if you're so concerned with privacy and such, then why do you supply the company with your e-mail address in the first place? Not just that: but also ensure that the software you're apparently using is also aware of said e-mail address?

Is it really that difficult to think straight and add 1 and 1 up? How hard can it be?

I own a Windows phone, older model. I like it, it does what I need, not too bad, but has one flaw: every picture I take is stored locally, but cannot be transfered directly from the phone to my (Windows) computer. Don't ask why, that's the part I never understood myself either. Instead you need to dump it to OneDrive, and then you can download it again using the PC. A Windows Phone which can't directly connect with Windows, leave it up to Microsoft to come up with such a genius concept.

My point though: the very moment I realized this I also knew that I was never going to use my phone for more personal pictures. Because.. Internet and such. Even though I honestly trust Microsoft to keep my stuff safe. Instead I'm using a digital camera whenever I need to (one which can act as USB mass storage).

And this is only about pictures, not about something a whole lot more private and intimate as a sex toy!

What were those people thinking?

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Red Hat banishes Btrfs from RHEL

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@AC

Stallman is going to blow a fuse if ZFS gets widely adopted.

Being a huge fan of ZFS myself I'd pay to see that ;)

But I'm not sure I fully understand though. I mean, all because of a license? Because ZFS uses a license (CDDL) which people don't happen to like or anything? What happened to the free software philosophy? Because CDDL is just as much an open source license as the GPL is. Sometimes I can't help worry that certain people completely lose focus of the eventual goals.

Seems like more and more people are willing to mix code under different licenses even if they're incompatible.

Can you imagine that... People apparently like the freedom to use the (open) source as they want to use it. One important note though: it's the GPL which is usually incompatible, not the other licenses. Many open source licenses (I'm mostly familiar with the BSD, CDDL and Apache licenses) have no problem at all with mixing things together, as long as the license continues to get respected.

I think that's an important aspect here. GPL demands that everything gets redistributed under the GPL (all newly entered code) whereas the other licenses only demand that the original software simply continues to stay licensed under the same license it was given out with. Hardly an unfair demand to make I think, especially if you keep in mind that mixing that with another license is usually no problem.

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Outage outed: Bing dinged, Microsoft portal mortal, DuckDuckGo becomes DuckDuckNo

ShelLuser
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@Justin

"Meh, I stopped using DuckDuckGo and started using StartPage instead, when DuckDuckGo started ramming "reminders" into their page real estate for "how to increase privacy"...

You definitely have a point but it's false to assume that every cookie placed in your browser can also be used to track you.

In this case DuckDuckGo clearly states that they advice you to use https://start.duckduckgo.com/ to avoid the issues of those reminders. You're right of course: when visiting that page it'll leave 4 cookies behind (ak, al, ao and aq on my end). However, all of which contain -1, and are set to expire somewhere in 2025. I checked and they don't get updated or anything.

So yeah, they're using cookies but not the likes which can actually track you. At best sites can find out that you used DuckDuck somewhere in the past, but that's all there is to it. A form of tracking for sure, but not the kind I'd be worried about (for now).

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Google bins white supremacist site after it tries to host-hop away from GoDaddy

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@Just Enough

"This isn't about hosting the objectionable material, it's about their domain name registration. So this is more analogous to being denied a corner to screech from, because you don't have the documentation that will allow you out on the street."

Not sure I agree with that, though I definitely see your point.

Thing is: they only got booted once they started disrespecting a deceased woman. Always easy to talk about someone who can no longer talk back, and in my opinion it's not only disrespectful, it's disgraceful too. Freedom of speech, sure, but that has its limitations and in my opinion rightfully so. It's a thin line, but still there...

<small side step>

I dislike systemd (that's putting it mildly) and I also have no love lost for Poettinger who made this all happen and who appears to be extremely arrogant. If I can I will definitely raise my voice about how stupid and plain out arrogant Poettinger is in my opinion and how we're all better off without his services. But I don't wish him dead. I don't start making it personal, I don't shout crap such as "I hope someone would kill him" because that's taking things waaaaay too far. And if he somehow would get into an accident of some sort then you won't see me celebrating. In such a situation I might share that I'm glad for the whole project to be over, but I'd also immediately mention that I don't like the way it happened one single bit. There's a huge difference between disliking a person, and disrespecting him or worse.

</shell rant>

So to use your analogy...

In my opinion they weren't denied to stand on the street corner because of what they had to say. They were denied because they themselves had already demonstrated not to respect the rules which were in effect when standing on that corner.

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ShelLuser
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@Snow

"This is a bad thing, regardless of your political alignment."

Have to disagree with that, there are limits to tolerance and rightfully so. In my opinion there's a huge difference between outing political statements or plain out slandering a deceased woman. And the last is what got these people kicked from GoDaddy in the first place, not their political ideas.

I definitely don't approve with Google's firing of an employee who merely stated how men and women are different, something which nature itself already shows us. That was definitely a weird and in my opinion very bad thing.

But this... This has nothing to do with political correctness, more so with upholding certain standards and protecting the general audience from hate slurs and speeches.

24
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Fresh Microsoft Office franken-exploit flops – and you should have patched by now anyway

ShelLuser
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Windows

Still, in the end...

It all boils down to using some common sense when opening stuff from unknown sources. Yet that's the thing people keep failing at over and over and over again despite the tons of warnings and example cases.

4
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Facebook pulls plug on language-inventing chatbots? THE TRUTH

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Pint

If that's AI...

Then I guess IRC was waaay ahead of it's time. This somewhat reminds me of getting 2 chat bots to "talk" to each other. Sometimes you could get the most hilarious "conversations" from that stuff ;)

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Creditors urge Toshiba to consider bankruptcy – reports

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Coat

The world never stops to amaze me...

In Holland we have cable operators, for example the previous UPC and Ziggo. Back in the days they provided services through the cable such as Internet, telephone and television. But the bizarre thing is that especially in he beginning those companies only managed to generate revenue, but not a single dime worth of profit. And that went on for years and years to come. To make matters worse the customer service and overall happiness wasn't exactly that great as well. A company like UPC almost held a permanent place in "lists of shame" on television programs which kept consumer rights in mind.

Right now Ziggo is still a thing yet it has been taken over by UPC which has been taken over by Liberty Global, and UPC more or less got merged into Ziggo (something I still consider somewhat of a sad development) and only recently did they manage to actually create a bit of a profit.

Unfortunately not too many people bother to look at the global picture. Although they do manage to generate profits now (as far as I know) I always wonder about all those previous years where they effectively wrote down losses and revenue and not much else.

I guess this is the modern way of doing business... Generate a gigantic depth, but ensure you become too big to just drop off and you can continue for the next dozens of years to come.

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Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg: Crypto ban won't help trap terrorists

ShelLuser
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Mushroom

And what if they could access those messages?

"Governments and law enforcement agencies are increasingly going public with their frustration that encryption prevents them accessing electronic messages."

Meanwhile citizens are increasingly going public with their frustrations whenever they spot a potential threat and the government doesn't do anything to look into it.

I'm not just saying; that last British terrorist attack? Several people around the suicide bomber, including people from his own mosque, had raised concerns several times already. According to multiple sources the police had been warned at least 5 times about the individual and in the end he ended up on a list of people to look out for.

Note... I'm not trying to suggest that if the police had done more they could have stopped the bombing because those are not fair comments to make in my opinion (also always easy after the facts).

But it does raise a fair concern I think: what good is giving the government even more access into our lives if they have already displayed severe ignorance when it comes to dealing with reports about current threats?

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Systemd wins top gong for 'lamest vendor' in Pwnie security awards

ShelLuser
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@Dan

"but he's not even particularly good at it, he's just stitching together some kind of Frankenstein's monster."

No, that would be an insult to doctor Frankenstein who's name is even now still well known :D I mean, at least his monster actually did what it was supposed to ;)

12
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Latest Windows 10 preview lets users link an Android to their PC

ShelLuser
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Windows

But uhm...

"The "link your phone" feature works like this. In Windows Settings, you add your phone, currently Android only but with iPhone support to follow soon."

What about Windows Phone?

8
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GitHub wants more new contributors, because that's what GitHub is for

ShelLuser
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Joke

Best feature of them all...

Working backups, unlike GitLab.

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Kid found a way to travel for free in Budapest. He filed a bug report. And was promptly arrested

ShelLuser
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@ac

"you can notify a company of a breach WITHOUT using the weakness."

You honestly think they'll believe such stories and would bother to look into them? I don't.

To me this is no different than playing on a Minecraft server and finding a bug. First you try it again to ensure that it was really a bug or a glitch and not an oversight on your end. Once you got that out of the way you get all you need to report it.

The #1 rule of bug discovery is the reproduction of the glitch. If you can't reproduce a bug then you also can't be 100% sure it actually was a bug.

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Firefox doesn't need to be No 1 – and that's OK, 'cos it's falling off a cliff

ShelLuser
Silver badge

Don't always blame others...

"Gal believes a big part of the problem is Google's monopoly on search and its aggressive marketing of Chrome."

Just like so many others I also used Firefox many years back and it wasn't Chrome but Firefox itself which made me bail out. I liked Firefox, a lot, together with Thunderbird it was my de-facto solution to turn to web and e-mail. The main problem: update, after update after update. And some updates were plain out intrusive, sometimes you had to re-learn how your browser worked! No problem if you got time for that, but as a geek who likes to know how his stuff works while also getting tired of spending time on something as trivial as a browser...

I discovered SeaMonkey and started testing that which was also around the time when Firefox actually changed their appearance to a Chrome look-alike. Gone were the easy toolbars, the buttons, the menus. Only 1 tab and that's it. That's when I figured: "If I wanted to use Chrome I'd use Chrome, this is bullshit" and deinstalled everything. If I recall correctly it was around the time Thunderbird introduced tabs for e-mails, a feature I seriously despised, also because I couldn't turn it off. Firefox/Thunderbird had "change because of change" written all over it, and I didn't want that anymore. I grew tired of it.

Been using Seamonkey for a long time (for both web & e-mail) and the best part: it still looks the same now as when I picked it up 5 or so years ago. In the mean time I also discovered Opera (the one build on Chromium) and its easy to see why Chrome has such a high market share. It's much more than merely aggressive advertising.

But other than Opera I never looked back at Firefox. I also don't miss it and I've always been hesitant to try it out again, mostly because of all the bullshit updates they pushed forward.

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