* Posts by Paul

610 posts • joined 23 Oct 2006

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A slick phone Linux for your pocket PDA? Ooh, don't mind if I do, sir

Paul
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using my Gemini right now

using my Gemini right now

I reflashed over the weekend to triple boot android, debian and sailfish.

it was fairly easy. the only downside is I had to wipe android and I was too lazy to back up everything, but then I'd not invested too much time setting it up.

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Paul
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devuan

provided you don't need to replace the kernel, I'm quite sure you could load devuan onto the Gemini... or any other distro that's built to aarch64.

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UK.gov: Here's £8.8m to plough into hydrogen-powered car tech

Paul
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Re: ' Current industrial production of hydrogen gas'

RiverSimple claim to have solved the problem of pure H2 causing its container to go brittle.

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We wanted a camera, they gave us the eye of Gemini – and an eSIM

Paul
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Re: Key point. Not perfect at first availability but *improving*

it's an indiegogo project. if you want 100% certainty of the final feature set and availability, simply wait until it's finished and in retail stores like Clove.

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Paul
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Re: Sounds like many sites will publish enough hints

£600 is the starting price for off-contract/unlocked upper mid range smartphones.

It's about half the price of the top spec iPhoneX at £1150 (which has 256GB of storage, but a microSD card in the Gemini will close that gap).

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Meet TLBleed: A crypto-key-leaking CPU attack that Intel reckons we shouldn't worry about

Paul
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I've found that at best HT gives you 30% added processing power than one core.

When hosting VMs on linus, I'm careful to allocate virtual core siblings together to get some benefit from ht.

The competition from AMD's ryzen has finally forced Intel to start shipping complete cores in desktop and laptop processors again which is great.

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Have to use SMB 1.0? Windows 10 April 2018 Update says NO

Paul
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Turning of ipv6 doesn't earn you geek creds. However, if you're with virgin media you don't have much choice.

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Australia wants tech companies to let cops 'n' snoops see messages without backdoors

Paul
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secure for everybody, or secure for nobody

How often do we need to tell governments this...

repeat after me: communications are secure for everybody, or secure for nobody

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Did you test that? No, I thought you tested it. Now customers have it and it doesn't work

Paul
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Re: Had a close call

I had an urgent release to make and it was very close to christmas, and testing hadn't been done because people had already packed up and gone.

I was fairly confident my code was up to scratch, but then I was quite ill and really shouldn't have been working. I was talking to the head of software dev, X, over the phone and I didn't want to deploy as I hadn't had any sign off, no written record of any testing other than my own, and he told me to go ahead and announce it to the regular internal email list. Working for X had been a very unpleasant experience in general.

I made the deployment ready (java on tomcat). I sent a message to the release mailing list, which crossed many departmental boundaries - dev, sysadmin, testing, marketing - that I was deploying the release and that X had told met that it was OK despite the normal testing cycle not being done, then I hit the deploy button.

A few seconds later X rang, and said "you can't say that!". I replied "I don't understand, what can't I say?". X says "You can't announce that you deployed without the normal QA because I told you". I feigned a little innocence and said "but I was only repeating what you told me". He was exasperated and hung up. Fortunately the release was good and all was well. I think X had planned to throw me under the bus if it had been a disaster.

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Smut site offers VPN so you don't bare all online

Paul
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in some countries it's illegal to use a VPN service with severe criminal penalties. It can also be illegal to use VOIP services, including Skype.

Be sure to check before visiting countries in the middle east, but really, check for any country you intend to visit for any specific laws on internet use, whether you'd consider the use normal (vpn to work, cloud services, instant messaging and VOIP) as well as ahem personal (pr0n, movies, chat, social media).

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UK chancellor puts finger in air, promises 15 million full fibre connections by 2025

Paul
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I'd be happy with a full VDSL2/2+ 80Mb/s speed, but a long phone line means I can't even get the full 40Megabits/s lower tier, and my upload speed is just 5.5Megabits/second :-(

Needless to say, there's nothing that can be done, as Openreach won't deploy a closer cabinet, so that's as good as it's likely to get. Although the exchange has been unbundled, there's no competition for the last mile, and there's no virgin media service in the area either.

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The future of radio may well be digital, but it won't survive on DAB

Paul
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I recommend people have a play and build a TVHeadend server.

* listen/watch live

* set up timed recordinds

* keep your recordings indefinitely

* transcode recordings to other formats

* install minidlna and stream recordings across your LAN to various devices which support DLNA

* install Samba and make available over file shares for laptops and desktops

* set up a tool which scans directories and makes a podcast feed and then you can take your recordings with you on your phone/tablet etc.

of course, don't do any of the above if it will violate copyright. ahem.

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Paul
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my amazon wishlist contains "Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio" by Tom Lewis, which looks good.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0060981199

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Xiaomi the way: Hyped Chinese giant begins its battle for Britain

Paul
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El Reg missed a trick, the headline could have been

Xiaomi The Way To Google Home

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Show_Me_the_Way_to_Go_Home

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Sysadmin hailed as hero for deleting data from the wrong disk drive

Paul
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I was helping a friend rip out his old kitchen and move light sockets etc.

He drilled into the wall and the drill bit suddenly jumped, and he commented "oh, I didn't intend to go deep enough to hit the cavity". I knew that his kitchen wall was an internal single-skin, and I looked through the hole and said "no, you've drilled into the lounge".

He thought I was joking. Then he looked through the hole and simply muttered "oh, bugger".

Fortunately his wife wasn't leaning against the wall at the time, which she had been only a few minutes before!

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Samsung ready to fling Exynos at anyone who wants a phone chip

Paul
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given that RiscV is coming along nicely, I would have thought that all the companies who paid Arm a fortune to licence their designs will be wanting to get as many design wins as possible in order to recoup their investment before RiscV renders it moot.

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Oculus Go: Capable kit, if the warnings don't put you off

Paul
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It's US$250 st Bestbuy in the USA, and £250 in the UK, which even after accounting for sales tax in the USA, means a hefty markup!

This article also failed to mention it's made by Xiaomi, so I imagine in due course when the exclusivity contacts lapse, you'll be able to buy one without the Facebook branding and spyware.

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Mobileye's autonomous cars are heading to California. But they're not going to kill anyone. At least not on purpose

Paul
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Re: Too many "accidents"

Here in the UK, the police say "incident". There are very few actual accidents, by which I mean a freak combination of wholly innocent steps which couldn't have been foreseen to lead to the crash.

Most incidents are due to specific mistakes which could have been prevented and lead to an unavoidable collision.

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Typical cynical Brits: Broadband speeds up, satisfaction goes down

Paul
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Re: Failure to understand "up to"

Part of the problem is that they simply have no clue when it comes to how to tell a good ISP offer a bad one.

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Paul
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Re: People are liars

Indeed, my son is always commenting enjoy his friends "lagging out" when playing online. Most of them have the cheapest internet service. It seems the British want to buy cheap so they can bitch about it.

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NASA dusts off FORTRAN manual, revives 20-year-old data on Ganymede

Paul
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Re: The problem probably wasn't the software...

I remember downloading stuff to the VAX at work and then using Kermit on my Amiga to copy the files over.

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Whoops! Google forgot to delete Right To Be Forgotten search result

Paul
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Re: Sounds like many sites will publish enough hints

The "Streisand Effect"

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DON'T PANIC! America's net neutrality won't be ending today after all

Paul
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The "boiled frog" strategy works in all walks of politics and big business.

"Trust us, hop into this lovely pot of cool water."

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Sysadmin unplugged wrong server, ran away, hoped nobody noticed

Paul
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I haven't been to Telehouse in a long time, but in the original building there were areas where cables under the floor caused the floor tiles to bulge up!

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Two's company, Three's unbowed: You Brits will pay more for MMS snaps

Paul
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I just deleted the mms settings

I just deleted the mms settings off my phone, I'm a three customer. I never use it, and want to ensure I can't accidentally use mms.

I don't care if I cant receive mms. Also, chances are receiving mms messages is still a security risk.

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BT pushes ahead with plans to switch off telephone network

Paul
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Re: Yeah right

VOIP doesn't need much bandwidth at all, a few tens of kilobits/second if that.

what it does need is power. old fashioned analogue phones are powered by the phone line, you don't get that with an optical fibre, and so a SIP ATA needs a mains adapter and battery backup.

how many people have cordless phones at home where the base station has no battery backup? I think probably 99% of cordless phone base stations have no battery.

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Scissors cut paper. Paper wraps rock. Lab-made enzyme eats plastic

Paul
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Re: Passing the buck

yes, recycling and waste disposal is an externality for many businesses.

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Airbus plans beds in passenger plane cargo holds

Paul
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given the way security is going, I think airports and airlines will simply sedate passengers and load them into coffin-shaped pods and stack them up. You'll get loaded like cargo, and then woken up at the other end of the journey. If the plane ditches, the pods will be ejected and can float. If the plane crashes, you can be buried in the pod, no need to scrape out the hamburger meat inside!

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Gemini: Vulture gives PDA some Linux lovin'

Paul
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Re: It's still rather disappointing

there are different sets of keycaps for different countries, but you had to tell Planet before they made them and shipped them out!

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Paul
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I use a smartwatch which means I don't need to touch my phone to see who's calling, and a collar-style always-on bluetooth headset means I can quickly pop an ear bud to make or receive a call. To make a call I just dab a button on the headset and say "ok google... call Andy Aardvark mobile" and voila! My phone can stay in my pocket. Being able to safely ignore calls discretely during meetings is very handy, especially if it's a recruiter I want to talk to ;-)

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Paul
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Did the reviewer not realise you can fit a camera?

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Paul
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there's an active forum discussing the Gemini, especially linux, here:

https://www.oesf.org/forum/index.php?showforum=192

it used to be a forum for the Sharp Zaurus, so there's many old-timers who've woken up (like me!).

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2018's Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon laptop is a lovely lappie

Paul
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Any technical information?

Does it run Linux?

User replaceable battery?

Expandable memory or soldered in?

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Windows Server 2019 coming next year and the price is going up

Paul
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The problem with using a GUI to set up and manage your os is that you send up with a bunch of snowflakes - each one individual and special.

By scripting the deployment you can reproduce a machine exactly as many times as you want.

There's many benefits. E.g, you only need worry about backing up your data and not the OS.

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Developer mistakenly deleted data - so thoroughly nobody could pin it on him!

Paul
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Many years ago I inherited a Sun workstation to look after because I'd shown some interest in learning about it. I was fairly proficient in DOS, and had used unix a bit at university. It was the only unix box in the company, and had been installed with the new fangled Mosaic web browser and had a 4800 baud modem to attach to the internet, wow! People would login and spend 15 minutes doing this new email thing!

One job was to apply a bunch of patches to upgrade the system. The instructions said to reboot into single user mode, and make sure the /tmp directory was empty. I did that, and deleted all the files in /tmp. But I did "ls -la" and there were a load of files starting with a dot. So I did "rm -rf .*". After a long time, I wondered what it was doing. I ran "ls" and it failed, I forget, but it was clear the machine was f**ked. The rm command had traversed to .. and had deleted pretty much everything.

The boss asked why I'd not backed it up, because the machine had a floppy drive! I think it had an amazing 40MB drive, so I said it was impractical to feed 60 floppies in (720K), even if we had them. He wasn't impressed. He later bought an adaptor card to use with a Plasmon (I think) optical disk storage thing.

So, I ended up reinstalling the system from scratch.

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Ofcom to networks: Want this delicious 5G spectrum? You'll have to improve 4G coverage

Paul
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Re: Too right, here here

you mean like the success that Railtrack has been, renting access to the railway lines?

or the success that attempting to open BT's infra by forcing BT to rent access using Openreach?

hmmm.

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Oracle UK's profits have more than halved

Paul
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I'm so, so sad for them.

Oh wait, I'm not.

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British clockwork radio boffin Trevor Baylis terminally winds down

Paul
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Sad news. BBC news really positive about his life, and showing him meeting Mandela and others, but failed to mention he was ripped off.

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OK, who is shooting at Apple staff buses in California? Knock it off

Paul
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William Tell Apple turnover

Surely if you're shooting at Apples, you should be using arrows and your name should be William Tell

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Alexa muted, Twilio taps out, and Bitbucket kicks the, er, bucket amid AWS data center hiccup

Paul
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availability zones

And now we find out how many companies blindly use Amazon without reading the documentation and understanding they need to use multiple availability zones!

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Cryptocurrencies kill people and may kill again, says Bill Gates

Paul
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they didn't get to ask what he thought about languages where whitespace was part of the code?

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Apple to devs: Code for the iPhone X or nothing from April onwards

Paul
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Just as well Apple are so benevolent

When the level of control that Apple have over their closed ecosystem, it's just as well they're so benevolent and caring towards developers and customers.

Imagine how it would be if they ignored customers' needs and raised their prices every year and obsoleted useful features, or made their products unrepairable?

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Huawei claims national security is used as plausible excuse for 'protectionism'

Paul
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ah yes, we can definitely trust GCHQ to ensure products are secure...

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/01/19/key_voice_encryption_protocol_has_backdoor/

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Yorkshire cops have begun using on-the-spot fingerprint scanners

Paul
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agreed, we now have a mobile Big Brother to follow us around

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Military techie mangled minicomputer under nose of scary sergeant

Paul
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they had some Pr1me computers for CAD software at Leeds University. I think I might even have the little "getting started" booklet they issued of common commands.

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Paul
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I once had a sparky fit an emergency power off button for the bank of UPSs in our computer room. It needed to be somewhere near the door.

So this is where he fitted it:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12629882@N05/2984032016/in/album-72157626308470071/

And if anybody banged the door open too quickly...

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Tall, slim models are coming to take over dumpy SSD territory

Paul
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Re: Isolinear

Never let logic and reasoning get in the way of a movie plot line.

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Paul
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Re: Height Correction

I think that's nano-furlongs.

https://youtu.be/r7x-RGfd0Yk

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Paul
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Yeah, also my server doesn't have an emoji bar like the Macbook Pro, so I can't display the server status on the front in pretty pictures.

Also, its memory isn't soldered in, which means I don't get the opportunity to throw it away but have to keep them damn thing and upgrade it instead, which is a real nuisance.

I really don't know what the server designers are up to, surely they should be copying Apple better.

That's sarcasm by the way.

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