* Posts by AdamWill

1250 posts • joined 4 Nov 2010

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What can you do when the pup of programming becomes the black dog of burnout? Dude, leave

AdamWill
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we're not freaking magical wizards

Overall a good article, but can we please give up on this annoying and patronizing attitude?

"Working in IT is a magical, mysterious, and wonderful task. To the normals, it seems like the computers are demons machinating against them, but us nerds know they're just like big puppies pouncing and growling to get us to roll around on the floor. We bond with them, and we start to dedicate ourselves to the machines."

It's bullshit and it's been bullshit for a long time, and it's harmful, because if you believe it you believe you're some kind of magical wizard and no-one gets to tell you you're full of shit when...you're full of shit.

We're just people who have some expertise in a particular area and work in that area. We're not magical wizard gods. This isn't Snow Crash. Lots of people have expertise in a particular area and work in that area. My brother-in-law fits windscreens. I haven't got a fucking clue how to fit a windscreen. But I don't think he thinks of himself as a Windscreen Fixing Wizard God and me as a "normal". He's just a bloke with a job. So are we. Can we please stop thinking of ourselves as powerful sorcerors with unique knowledge interacting with a mysterious power and just think of ourselves as people with a perfectly commonplace specialist job, just like millions of other people? We're *all* "normals". Get over yourself.

(We also are, let's face it, pretty fucking bad at our speciality, aren't we? Windscreen fitters more or less have it figured out. I am yet to hear of a case where someone got their windscreen replaced, then thirty miles down the motorway it smashed into a million tiny pieces and cut them to ribbons, then the investigating authorities found it had been broadcasting their personal data to the world up until then. Yet this is more or less what we seem to do to everyone all the time...)

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'90s hacker collective man turned infosec VIP: Internet security hasn't improved in 20 years

AdamWill
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bzzt yourself

"BZZZTTT!! 1992 is *not* pre-internet"

did you try reading *the next goddamn sentence of the quote* or did you just skip immediately to the comment section with a big smile of anticipation at just how fucking clever you were about to prove yourself to be? That's pretty fking insufferable, you know. Jesus, just keep it in your pants and read the context.

"This is pre-internet, 1992. If you were on the internet then you've [either] got a corporate or academic connection. I was working at Lotus at the time and I was dabbling with understanding the internet..."

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AdamWill
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Hmmm.

"We the geeks and nerds ran things, we were like gods. The world and his wife all bought a PC or a Mac and they had no idea what to do with any of this kit. We strode the world like colossi"

Yes, and look what "we" did. Bit more critical introspection might go a long way there...

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Open Source Security hit with bill for defamation claim

AdamWill
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Re: Freudian slip?

Note, the article author beat you to this, and did it more subtly too. :P

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AdamWill
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call the fire brigade

"The security software biz may persist but the Electronic Frontier Foundation hopes to prevent the firm from prevailing."

Ten points for sneaky vocabulary burn, there. Excellent work.

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Microsoft commits: We're buying GitHub for $7.5 beeeeeeellion

AdamWill
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Re: How can it possibly be worth that much?

"Last lot of figures I've seen shows $140m in profit in 2016, up from $90m in 2015, and $70m in 2014."

Those numbers were *revenue*. Not profit.

https://twitter.com/EricNewcomer/status/809809075756273664

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-12-15/github-is-building-a-coder-s-paradise-it-s-not-coming-cheap

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AdamWill
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Re: RIP Github

"Didn't the new owners stop doing that?"

Mostly, I think, yeah. Sourceforge is probably not actively evil any more, it's just...awful. The sites for SF-hosted projects are horribly laid out and stuffed with ads, and their repository hosting is also painfully slow, you can usually make afternoon tea and read War and Peace in the time it takes to check out anything moderate sized from an SF-hosted repo.

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AdamWill
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?!?!?!?!?

"There are other alternatives – such as...SourceForge..."

ahahahahahaahahahah

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH

*stops to mop up flood caused by tears of laughter*

AHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAAHHAHAHA

hahahahahahahaha

that's a good one.

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Smart bulbs turn dumb: Lights out for Philips as Hue API goes dark

AdamWill
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Re: What A Time To Be Alive

yeah, in a funny way this is kind of a *good* news story: at least they didn't design it so stupidly that it sends all your local requests to the internet Just Cuz, thus leaking unnecessary information *and* ensuring local control would go down in a scenario like this.

Low bar, I know! But I suspect at least some IoS products wouldn't clear it...

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Foolish foodies duped into thinking Greggs salads are posh nosh

AdamWill
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the queue to punch this guy...

"The avocado is so au fait at the moment, it definitely pops"

OK, that guy has *got* to be a plant. If not, the punchin' queue forms right over here. A quid a pop.

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Beardy Branson: Wacky hyperloop tube maglev cheaper than railways

AdamWill
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"Run Bi-level train cars - sure you have to raise the height of the odd bridge or lower the rail grade that goes under them, but that's all relatively cheaper than these interesting schemes - and hey presto you just doubled your passenger capacity."

As a Brit who moved to Canada, er, I have to say Canada doesn't have much to teach the UK about passenger rail. The UK rail network may be a bit tatty around the edges but it still kicks the stuffing out of anything we've got over here.

We can only run double-decker passenger cars in North America because our tracks are in such terrible shape the trains can't go very fast. Try it on the West Coast main line and you're just going to get bits of carriage all over the place in a hurry.

Dunno which bit of Canada you're in, but out here on the West Coast, there are Amtrak trains and the Sounder trains down in Washington state that run double-decker cars. The maximum speed of the Sounder system is apparently 79mph. The Superliner cars used on Amtrak have a rated maximum speed of 100mph and I don't know if I've ever *been* on an Amtrak train that managed 100mph; the two west coast trains, the Coast Starlight and the Cascades, again top out at 79mph, seems to be some sort of pattern there.

Pendolino trains on the WCML run up to 125mph, so yeah, not gonna work.

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AdamWill
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Re: Wacky?

They successfully suckered you into reading the article and leaving a comment, for a start. Which, you know, is sort of their job, them being journalists and all.

So...trebles all round?

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AdamWill
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Re: presumably...

"There goes Beardy's promise of it costing "about a third of building high speed rail" then! ;-)"

well yes, that part does seem like utter and complete nonsense. I have no idea at all how you could possibly cost building underground rail by *any* method whatsoever lower than building surface rail. That's just obviously silly.

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AdamWill
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presumably...

"Not to mention where would you route this in a crowded country like the UK? Hasn't Beardy noticed that HS2 has been massively delayed by all the objections from folk who don't want the thing anywhere near where they live?

well, you can argue that's an advantage for the hyperloop idea. If you can build the tube via tunnelling (not cut-and-cover) you could arguably put it in far more places, with far less objection from nearby surface-dwellers, than you can put surface rail. This is after all why we have the London *Underground* in the city centre, rather than sending trains through Leicester Square at surface level...

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Chief EU negotiator tells UK to let souped-up data adequacy dream die

AdamWill
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Re: Ha

"Didnt the EU cry about us not being clear on what we want?"

Yes. That doesn't mean that once we *are* clear on what we want, it is automatically the case that we get it. There are multiple requirements! I know, no-one told us it was going to be this hard, that we'd have to come up with negotiating positions that are *both* clear *and* vaguely sensible and remotely palatable to the other side, you know, the one that's in by far the better position in the negotiations. Terrible.

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UK Home Office's £885m crim records digi effort: A 'masterclass in incompetence'

AdamWill
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Government press release announcing report:

"Report on Disclosure and Barring Service calls it 'A masterpiece...'"

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Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

AdamWill
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Re: "opt-out was probably the best choice"

"if you have enough non-PII data on someone, then you can identify the person who generated it. And it's been shown repeatedly that "enough" such data is a shockingly small amount."

well, the definition of "identify" there is somewhat subtle, isn't it? You can *fingerprint* them, yes - in that if you see the same data profile again, you know it's the same person. But you don't actually know *who they are*, in the sense of 'this is Joe Bloggs of 41 Lark Terrace'. All you know is it's the same person (or, rather, the same computer) that sent the same profile before.

The bar to actually *figure out where that computer is and who owns it* is somewhat higher. Facebook and Google can do it, of course. I can't see how Canonical possibly could, from this data.

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AdamWill
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Re: Ok, I concede

"As long as you opt me in by default into anything, opting out is all you're going to see from me, even if your goddamn survey is going to magically save all Somalian children forever. ASKING is fine; the moment you PUT YOUR FOOT in the door and assume consent I'm reaching for the shotgun, pal."

I hate to break it to you - but you're a tiny minority. That's why Canonical did this. They need representative data.

Lots of internet commenters say the above, but most people don't actually behave that way, as anyone who's ever designed a system like this will tell you. If you make it opt-out, very few people opt out. If you make it opt-in, almost nobody opts in. That's human nature, apparently. That doesn't mean it's *right* to make things opt-out, of course. It can't answer that question. It's just a fact: opt-out always results in more participation than opt-in.

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How could the Facebook data slurping scandal get worse? Glad you asked

AdamWill
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good looks

"The revelation comes as Facebook is trying to rehab its image in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Having another Cambridge-based outfit caught harvesting details from millions of users is hardly a good look for Zuck and Co."

Also not a particularly good look for the university, is it? I'm surprised how little that angle's really been pushed in the press so far, but maybe that'll change now...

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No top-ups, please, I'm a millennial: Lightweight yoof shunning booze like never before

AdamWill
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Re: Frankly,

"and it fucking cures cancer"

No. No it doesn't.

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AdamWill
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unwarranted scepticism

"but unlike the wise scienticians who get paid to tell us what's good for us, we are not health "experts", are we?"

well, no, you're not. That's sort of the point. Your frame of reference for not considering four pints of beer to be binge drinking is...well...that you like beer, apparently? Whereas the frame of reference the scientists are using is...a well-publicized recent history of high quality, huge scale studies which pretty solidly indicate that drinking at that rate is damaging to your health.

So: yes, they're the experts. What this means is they're right.

You don't have to *like* it. You don't even have to drink less because of it: you are entirely free to decide that the benefit to the You Right Now of drinking large quantities of beer outweighs the benefits to Future You of You Right Now *not* having drunk large quantities of beer. It's your choice. But you don't get to just scoff and say "well obviously they're wrong to say it's bad for me cos I like drinking beer so they must be wrong".

This column is going to age about as well as one from the mid-70s scoffing about this so-called "lung cancer research"...

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Another quarter, another record-breaking Tesla loss: Let's take a question from YouTube, eh, Mr Musk?

AdamWill
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Re: If you skip that preliminary step and like to play with fire to scam the investors ...

Well, that number needs a bit of context. I don't *think* it's literally the case that it costs them $22k more to build a car than they can charge to buy that car, exactly. I think the analyst just took the overall company's losses and divided them by the number of cars produced during the same period, I think. It's not an invalid number, but it's not exactly precise, either, as it's really counting in things that don't have anything directly to do with the precise work of building those individual cars, like R&D and marketing costs.

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Ahem! Uber, Lyft etc: California Supremes just shook your gig economy with contractor ruling

AdamWill
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Do they have to be either?

It sort of seems to me like this is difficult for the law (in many places, not just Super Cali) because the law is required to decide whether gig economy victims^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hworkers are employees or contractors. The law can't make up an Option C: it only has those choices.

To me this is a bit of a problem because they're not *really* either. Of *course* they themselves would like to be considered employees (at least for the purposes of deciding how much they should get paid and whether they're entitled to protection from being arbitrarily fired and all the rest of it, if not necessarily when it comes to the question of their working hours). And of *course* the companies want them to be considered contractors, because that means the companies basically have zero responsibility to or for them whatsoever. But neither of these things seems to be what they, in actual fact, *are*, which is something in the middle. They're obviously not contractors in the traditional sense: no-one sets up as a Self-Employed Stuff Deliverer and then negotiates for Stuff Delivery Contracts with these companies. No. There's clearly a much more involved relationship going on. But it's clearly not *really* quite employment either; while they obviously deploy the argument cynically, the companies *do* have a point that they don't have as much control over the working circumstances of these workers as they would over those of a traditional "employee".

So it seems like requiring the courts to resolve this dilemma is sort of setting them up to fail. What *ought* to happen is that legislatures should be drafting new legislation that covers *what these workers actually are* - whatever term they want to come up with for that - and addresses it specifically, with appropriate rules. It's not actually *necessary* for the state to declare these folks to be 'employees' in order to grant them appropriate protections - it could just pass a law that defines them as a group, gives that group a name, and grants appropriate rights and protections to that group. Done right, it could work out better than trying to twist the rules about employees to apply to them, even.

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Tech bribes: What's the WORST one you've ever been offered?

AdamWill
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Re: On another topic...

Well, yeah, there's the nice little sanitized bit where there's the BBC office and the Lowry and some bougie canalside apartments and stuff. And then there's the rest of Salford!

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AdamWill
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On another topic...

...ever since the BBC and the Nasty Party conference (ugh) moved in, Manchester's really not that bad. I grew up there in the 90s and it was a right shithole, but now I actually quite like it when I go back, at least where the hipsterization hasn't got *too* far out of hand. Still a hell of a lot cheaper than London, too. Give it a try, you might be surprised. (You're still going to want to give Salford a miss, though.)

No-one ever offers me any bribes. What am I doing wrong? Anyone got any tips?

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Car-crash television: 'Excuse me ma'am, do you speak English?' 'Yes I do,' replies AMD's CEO

AdamWill
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"but it's still the pinnacle of racing. The speeds achieved are INSANE and only the LeMans LMP1 class comes close, even the slightest error can mean these guys miss a brake point, clip the inside curb on the apex then lose the back end on the exit ending up in the gravel or the wall"

Yes, but that doesn't mean it's particularly interesting to watch, that's the thing. All those things are perfectly true, but watching it happen still winds up being dull as hell 95% of the time. This is not at all unusual, is it? 99% of people wouldn't want to watch the 'pinnacle' of software engineering played out in real time for two hours. Or tax accounting. Or sewer maintenance (actually that'd probably make a pretty good History Channel show...)

All of the following things can be true at the same time:

* Building a fast F1 car is insanely difficult and expensive and technically advanced

* Driving one fast is extremely difficult, dangerous and skilled work

* Watching it happen is boring

Weirdly enough for me one of the bigger blows recently was the removal of pit stop refuelling. All the arguments for it make perfect sense - remove a non-actually-driving-a-fast-car-fast factor from being able to influence race results, avoid people having to handle large volumes of highly flammable fuel at ridiculously high speeds in close proximity to extremely hot race cars, etc. etc. - but at least when we had refuelling strategies and more potential for pit stop mess-ups it gave the commentators something to talk about for the 15 laps at a time when absolutely nothing else of interest was happening and added a bit more unpredictability to keep you watching after lap 2...

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AdamWill
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Also

"F1 yawn. MotoGP, rally cars, sidecars or the hillbilly OZ V8s offer far more entertainment"

Also more entertaining than F1: that channel that just shows a fireplace the whole time. Also, reading the minutes of European Commission subcommittee meetings. In all the official languages.

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Exposed: Lazy Android mobe makers couldn't care less about security

AdamWill
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"Surely standard security updates are common code across all devices?"

Nope, not really, due to the fact that the boundaries between 'what Google looks after', 'what manufacturers look after', and 'what third parties like driver vendors look after' have always been terribly fuzzy in Androidland; there just isn't a reliable shared core bit of Android in all Android phones which Google can update directly and which no one else touches. Phone manufacturers cook up their own system images from the Android sources and all sorts of other bits, and then it's up to them to re-build the things with updated Android components when Google sends updates out to the Android trees. If the manufacturers don't, you're just not getting those updates (unless you run a third-party ROM).

Android One is (in part) an attempt to address this, but there aren't many Android One devices available outside the developing world, and they aren't that desirable.

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UK 'wife'-carrying champion named

AdamWill
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Re: Where's the IT Angle then?

"How lucky we are that the over paid under-worked over-paid arseholes of the BBC can force feed us their personal opinions"

That's funny, I wasn't aware there was a law requiring you to listen?

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My PC makes ‘negative energy waves’, said user, then demanded fix

AdamWill
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Re: qotw

As an approximate rule of thumb, I've found that every $100 spent on woo opens up the sound stage by 2.37%...

(I've always been a fan of the geniuses who did a double-blind trial of extremely expensive speaker cables versus...clothes hangers. Guess how much difference there was.)

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Fatal driverless crash: Radar-maker says Uber disabled safety systems

AdamWill
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Re: Cause of Death: Ostrich Algorithm

These are all good principles to apply if you're a pedestrian interested in staying alive. However, in the case that a pedestrian *doesn't* apply them, that does not automatically excuse the driver (human or robot) that hits them, if they could have reasonably avoided doing so. Death is not the legally mandated punishment for jaywalking, nor is Joe Random Person/Robot Driving By the legally mandated agency of punishment for jaywalking.

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18.04 beta is as good a time as any to see which Ubuntu flavour tickles your Budgie, MATE

AdamWill
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Re: Watch out for Netplan!

"eth0 *is* the unpredictable name"

having watched this play out for several years, my conclusion is this: there's two different sets of people meaning different things by 'predictable'.

what things like udev 'predictable' names, biosdevname etc. mean by 'predictable' - what they're trying to achieve - is something like "each specific network adapter in this machine will always have the same name". The problem they were trying to fix is something like "I have six ethernet adapters in this machine, and I can't guarantee which one will be eth2 and which will be eth5 on any given boot".

The problem is that more or less anything you can do to make interface names *more* predictable in that sense, makes them *less* predictable in a different sense. This is the sense that "on any given machine with one network adapter - I don't care what model it is, or what slot it's in, or what bus it's attached to - that adapter will be eth0". Which turns out to be a sense of "predictable" that a *different* group of people were relying on.

In conclusion, software sucks and we should all go buy yak farms.

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Air Canada's network soars back up after Monday morning death dive

AdamWill
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well...

"The famed politeness of Canadians was put to the test on Monday after the nation's largest airline suffered a massive computer outage, leaving travelers stranded."

You'd be hard pressed to identify the famed politeness of Canadians in just about anyone working for Air Canada anyway, in my experience. Much better off on Westjet...

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Slack bots have the keys to your processes. What could go wrong? Well...

AdamWill
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Re: What is the point of Slack

It's hosted IRC (so you don't have to teach people to run proxies) with an API. That's about it. That's a useful thing. It's not revolutionary.

What's happening in some companies is that it becomes used so widely that all sorts of stuff which really isn't part of its job at all is being bolted into it, because it's as convenient a place as any.

This then becomes one of those "it works fine until it doesn't" things, as the article actually did a good job of covering. If not done carefully, all those random little bits getting built on top of Slack can also be seen as a gigantic pile of tech debt that's going to cause all sorts of pain a few years down the road, when there's so many of them no-one quite remembers how they all work together any more, or even what some of them were for, or what the consequences are when they go wrong, or how to fix them...

The fact that you have now tied your business to a hosted platform with extremely questionable terms of service (last I checked, they still reserve the right to delete all your data at any time with no notice and for any reason; yes, also for paid customers) is just the cherry on top.

There are F/OSS alternatives that are worth looking into if you think the basic idea is a sound one (which, really, it is: there is nothing particularly *great* about IRC, it's a creaky antiquated protocol, and it certainly *can* be done better), like RocketChat and MatterMost.

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Wileyfox goes TITSUP*: Smartmobe maker calls in the administrators

AdamWill
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Re: So what's next?

"Apologies for asking silly questions, but what are the options for Swift owners? Can it be updated from another source, or switched to a different operating system?"

There are official LineageOS ROMs for the Swift - https://download.lineageos.org/crackling - and Storm - https://download.lineageos.org/kipper .

There are other ROMs for the Swift 2 at xda-developers: https://forum.xda-developers.com/swift-2/development (Swift 2, has an unofficial LOS 14.1 ROM last updated in September)

xda-developers device-specific forums should also have instructions on bootloader unlocking (if they didn't ship unlocked, I don't know), recovery install and ROM flashing, it's not that hard but make sure to follow the instructions carefully if you've never done it before (or even if you have!)

Dunno about any other models.

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AdamWill
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Joke

waitaminute

waitaminute, what is this administrator bloke on about?

"...in terms of distributing monies outside of Russia, that tap was proverbially turned off."

I mean...that's a very odd placement of "proverbially", there. The turning off is proverbial, fine, but the tap isn't? Is he telling us there's an actual physical Russian money tap somewhere - and one which has only *proverbially* been turned off? Inquiring minds want to know!

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Home Office admits it sent asylum seeker’s personal info to the state he was fleeing

AdamWill
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Re: AC Cognitive Dissonance

"Not all refugees are illegal immigrants, and not all end up working illegally"

*No* refugees are illegal immigrants. Anyone granted refugee status is, ipso facto, a legal immigrant. That's more or less what refugee *means*.

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AdamWill
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Re: Cognitive Dissonance

"Maybe we should put the onus on asylum seekers to provide evidence to prove their cases, and stop trying so hard to help them?"

We *do* put exactly that onus on asylum seekers. This asylum seeker *did* provide the evidence. Then the immigration service decided it wasn't sure it believed them, so it sent the documents *to the government of the country the poor sod was trying to escape from* for "verification". That is what the case is about.

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Intel AMT security locks bypassed on corp laptops – fresh research

AdamWill
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Re: Staggering

But there *IS* some security! It's got a password! A PASSWORD!

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Black & Blue: IBM hires Bain to cut costs, up productivity

AdamWill
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question

Does anyone know precisely how much of your soul you have to sacrifice to the devil before you'll understand this?

"Some 6,000 of GTS people (g & h) are to be moved to help IBM cut costs as it tries to in-source or eliminate vended services and in-source subK (sub-contractor) roles. The company wants to stop hiring cross-company resource and external services, a contact told us."

I mean...wot?

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IBM melts down fixing Meltdown as processes and patches stutter

AdamWill
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Re: Potentially worrying

Just in case anyone was waiting for an update: seems that so long as this is just second-hand news about internal IBM documents, we don't want to comment on it. Of course, if you're a paying RH customer and you're concerned about the consequences of updating any of your systems, please contact the relevant support folks and they'll certainly be able to help you with it.

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AdamWill
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Re: Potentially worrying

I work for RH, but not on this stuff exactly (I work on Fedora, which we haven't deployed any Spectre fixes to yet). I've poked some people internally about this story to see if we want to come up with a response or something.

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Everything running smoothly at the plant? *Whips out mobile phone* Wait. Nooo...

AdamWill
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Re: Yes, and...

wait, what? people are running industrial control systems using an interchange format which is notable for no-one entirely agreeing on what the hell it means?!

http://seriot.ch/parsing_json.php

getting closer and closer to moving to a cave in the woods, here...

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Meltdown, Spectre bug patch slowdown gets real – and what you can do about it

AdamWill
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yes

...ask yourself why browsers are being patched for this. Browsers. How are browsers affected? Keep thinking. Do browsers, perhaps, allow execution of untrusted remote code? Go on, you're nearly there...

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AdamWill
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Re: Calling BS on the CPU graph

Also, as I mentioned in an earlier comment, the date doesn't make sense: the jump occurs on 2017-12-22. I haven't seen any suggestions Amazon was patching AWS for Meltdown on 2017-12-22.

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AdamWill
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Re: so, er...

I'm not disagreeing with you. But what I was really commenting on here was the *journalism*, not Intel's quote.

The Intel quote isn't new - it's been quoted and referenced tons of times, including in at least three Reg articles. So anyone who's paying attention has already seen it. El Reg has also already explained, more than once, how it's more than a tad disingenuous. So when El Reg prints a *new* article, includes the quote *again*, and surrounds it with text like:

"The patches being put in place to address the Meltdown and Spectre bugs that affect most modern CPUs were supposed be airy little things of no consequence. Instead, for some unlucky people, they're anchors."

that reads to me like El Reg is suggesting something new - either that they can now somehow show that far more cases are going to affected than we previously thought (i.e. there are, for some reason, more syscall-dependent workloads out there than had previously been realized), or that Intel had claimed that the fixes wouldn't significantly affect performance for *anyone*.

Yet in the end the article does neither - it just adds some random field reports of what we essentially already knew, i.e. that there *is* a significant performance impact on syscall-dependent workloads.

That's not valueless, but it doesn't really pay off such a dramatic introduction, or justify the "airy little things of no value" line. That's what I was questioning.

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AdamWill
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Re: so, er...

Three thumbs down, yet no counterpoints. Interesting.

I'm not saying Intel's exactly being *up front*, here. But the story is more or less accusing them of *outright lying*, without backing it up. Intel says the impacts are "workload-dependent" and won't be significant to "the average computer user". Which, sure, is a very spin-ny way of saying they *will* be significant to workloads which *aren't* those of "the average computer user". But it's not actually a lie, and nothing the article presents as evidence actually contradicts it. In fact, the article agrees with it, explicitly, in the quote I pulled.

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AdamWill
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also weird

Also, this is clearly silly:

"Via Twitter, Francis Wolinski, a data scientist with Paris-based Blueprint Strategy, noted that Python slowed significantly (about 37 per cent) after applying the Meltdown patch for Windows 7."

Python is a *programming language*. (OK, it can also mean a particular interpreter for that language, but it makes no practical difference; the performance characteristics of the interpreter depend on the code it's interpreting). You can write something in it that does a lot of syscalls, or something that does very few syscalls. It makes no sense to suggest that "Python", as a single thing, can be slowed down by a single amount by these changes.

Also weird, the graph claimed to be "An example AWS CPU utilization spike after installing CPU flaw" - the change described as a 'spike' (which, uh, isn't a spike) appears to be on 2017-12-22, which is two weeks before all this stuff came out. I haven't seen any suggestion that Amazon was patching AWS in December. Also, the change doesn't look at all like something you'd expect to be caused by the Meltdown patch: it seems like the instance suddenly started "idling" at about 59% CPU usage for some reason, instead of idling close to 0%. I've no idea what'd cause that, but it doesn't seem to match the characteristics ascribed to the Meltdown fix at all.

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Who's that at Ring's door? Why, it's Skybell with a begging cup, er, patent rip-off lawsuit

AdamWill
Silver badge

Re: That patent office

note, patent abstracts are basically irrelevant; the part of the patent that actually matters when push comes to shove is the claim section. which is usually too long to make it more than 20% of the way through without bursting into laughter, tears or both.

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AdamWill
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good lord

First patent should be dismissed out of hand for the claim starting with this blurp of verbal diarrhea:

"A doorbell system comprising a doorbell, wherein the doorbell system comprises:"

...good grief.

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