* Posts by PatientOne

395 posts • joined 4 Nov 2010

Page:

Paxo trashes privacy, social media and fake news at Infosec 2017

PatientOne

Re: What is this?

Young people lack the experience to vote smartly. Old people have that experience.

Young people have better education, but does that mean they're smarter?

Old people do run the risks of dementia, but people diagnosed with such issues can be removed from the electoral roll.

The age of retirement is increasing meaning that people work longer, and there have been suggestings that people should work until 70, even later, and indeed there are some who continue working well past their 70th birthday. Perhaps you could argue that when you retire you lose the vote: That might seem reasonable save when people retire, they're at the mercy of those who can vote. Hate to be retired when someone decides to abandon the national pension payments and stop all payments - the young would probably agree as they've not paid in, but those who have...

So the argument is not so staight forwards. Perhaps adapting the old system of property owners being able to vote, but change it to tax paying workers... only that would exclude people who should have the vote (someone taking a career break to raise a family, for example).

Nope - not as simple as stating 'over 70's shouldn't vote'.

Naselus: You talk of old people voting 'stupid', but you do not qualify that with what you consider 'old', nor how you define their voting as 'stupid'. I do hope you didn't use the claims from the Brexit vote* as the claims that older people voted leave and younger voted stay is very misleading as it was at best a staw poll of a small number of people, most just around London, with a few stretching to a couple of other cities - there was no exit poll from which to draw meaningful statistics on the voting pattern.

As for the old being asset rich... are you surprised? They've been working for 50+ years and built said assets. Of cause they'll be asset rich. The state then seeks to strip those assets from them to pay for what those old people have already paid for while they were working (retirement, elderly care etc). The youth are lucky if they inherrit anything as a result, but they then get to build up their own assets. Or that's the theory.

*this is the only time I've heard claims that old people voted 'stupidly'. Mostly they're accused of voting as they've always voted, but by then they've learned that polticians lie, and if they bother to vote, they'll go with what they know, not what they're being told. Voting with self interest is the norm, and is not age dependent so that's a non-argument. Especially when you understand the importance of the women's vote over the years and how political parties courted that vote.

11
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Obama's intel chief says Russia totally tried to swing it for Trump

PatientOne

Okay, America (via the CIA) have sort to influence voting in other countries. Russia (via the KGB of old) has done the same. This is politics in action.

Most countries do this: They try and encourage a favourable outcome in an election in another country. There are lots of reasons to do this, from destablinising or winning favour, to gaining an element of control by having a sympathetic person run said country.

This is normal, so claims that the Russia sort to get Trump elected could well be true - he might well have been the more favourable candidate in Russia's eyes. Equally, any previous POTUS could have had help from the USSR, be it asked for or not. The reciprical is less likely, of cause, but look to non-communist countries and you'll see both US and USSR influences in elections, amongst others.

So... situation normal, really.

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Ex-MI5 boss: People ask, why didn't you follow all these people ... on your radar?

PatientOne

"At least with the IRA,... they were not anxious to kill a lot of people,"

Birmingham Pub Bombings, shootings and bombings in NI, targetted attacks against London and other cities... no, the IRA were not out to kill a lot of people. They were, however, unconcerned by how many they did kill: They wanted attention. If people died during those attacks: That was fine. So technically she might be correct, but that doesn't mean the IRA didn't kill a lot of people.

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'My PC needs to lose weight' says user with FAT filesystem

PatientOne

Re: Windows 98

Really?

The original computers were people (circa 1800's).

That would make you... almost as old as me :p

7
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No nudity please, we're killing ourselves: Advice to Facebook mods leaks

PatientOne

Re: So I can live stream my suicide

"Worse still, a woman can't show her own, even if nursing a baby."

Interstingly, there are claims that you can show breasts if you claim to be a man - pre or post op, or just identify as one. Of cause, first the images have to be taken down and you have to challenge why, but male breasts are, apparently, fine.

3
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Faking incontinence and other ways to scare off tech support scammers

PatientOne

"One rang me back immediately to complain that I was being very rude - and that his god would curse me."

Option one: Sing " My god's better than your god" (the lyrics are out there, trust me - just can't remember them off the top of my head)

Option two: Inform them that "My god's a Fun god, my god's the Sun god, Ra-ra-ra-ra-ra"

Option three: Ask them what their god does to sinners like them.

Option four: Reply with "from hell's heart i stab at thee for hate's sake i spit my last breath at thee"

Or laugh

Or hang up.

Depends on how much time you feel like wasting, and remember - if they call back they might forget to hide their number so you can pass it on to the ICO/Oftel etc. After all, they've just threatenned you over the phone, and as they made the call - that's illegal :)

7
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Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

PatientOne

"There's no evidence he did or did not "get away with it". He's avoided being questioned and any subsequent trial by his peers for an alleged crime."

The evidence would be the testimony of the women involved. That's the problem with cases like this: Unless reported immediately, it quickly devolves into one person's word against another's.

The Swedish haven't dropped the case, either: That runs out in 2020 and they've said if he turns up in Sweden before then, then they'll have that chat. It's only the EU arrest warrant they're dropping.

The bail jumping, of cause, is also a contempt of court, so I'd hope he does get a fine AND a year's stay in prison, just to add to his inverse tan.

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FBI boss James Comey was probing Trump's team for Russia links. You're fired, says Donald

PatientOne

Re: Comey was caught lying under oath. So Trump fired him. -- opportunely.

"Where there is smoke ..."

there could also be mirrors and it's all obfuscation. Or a smoke machine. There isn't always a fire.

Trump fired Comey, but read the BBC article about why: It wasn't Trump deciding to do so as much as agreeing to do so.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-39866170

Read down the article - it suggests Comey made repeated mistakes, including not accepting he made mistakes. Maybe Trump took advantage of this to get rid of Comey, maybe not. We don't know but there are going to be those who say he did, and those who say he didn't and those who will sit on the fence (I've got the cushions and some popcorn ready) and watching to see what comes from this.

Personally I wish I'd brought the marshmellows instead.

7
3

The rise of AI marks an end to CPU dominated computing

PatientOne
Joke

Re: Bloody AI's

With an AI here

and an AI there,

Here and AI

There and AI

Everywhere an AI...

There's a song in there, somewhere, I'm sure...

3
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Stop asking people for their passwords, rights warriors yell at US Homeland Security

PatientOne
Alien

Re: We desperately need a Trump icon.

There is one ->

You thought a human could look like Trump? That's a wig and a mask.

All hail our alien overlord!

4
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Who really gives a toss if it's agile or not?

PatientOne

Re: 'What's Real and What's for Sale'...

"Technically 'agile' just means you produce working versions frequently and iterate on that."

It's more to do with priorities: On time, on budget, to specification: Put these in the order of which you will surrender if the project hits problems.

Agile focuses on On time. What is delivered is hopefully to specification, and within budget, but one or both of those could be surrendered in order to get something out On time. It's just project management 101 with a catchy name, and in poorly managed 'agile' developments you find padding to fit the usual 60/30/10 rule. Then the management disgard the padding and insist the project can be completed in a reduced time as a result, thereby breaking the rules of 'agile' development (insisting it's on spec, under time and under budget, but it's still 'agile'...).

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An echo chamber full of fake news? Blame Google and Facebook, says Murdoch chief

PatientOne

So when is Murdock going to come out and claim copy write on fake news?

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Drone complaints to cops are up twelvefold in three years

PatientOne

Re: incidents dominate UK Airprox Board reports

Could be Madam Whiplash* has flexed her whip in that direction.

*AKA Lindi St Clair, head of the UK's Corrective Party, who stood for election to Parliament 11 times. She was a former prostitute and dominatrix who accused the Inland Revenue of living off illegal/immoral earnings as they taxed prostitutes income while prostitution was considered both illegal and immoral at the time.

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PatientOne

Re: Shotguns?

"good luck storing a 24 pounder in the mandated gun cabinet"

Good luck to the police in removing said cannon when they are directed to where it's stored (chained to the garage rafters, the back wall, the side wall and locked inside a brick outhouse as the one I helped crew was kept). Funnily, the officers who attended that call saw the funny side and just nodded and called it in as 'secure'. The ones who went to check one musket, however, were somewhat confused and then baffled as to why bother: The cabinet was bolted to the back wall of an Air Force Armoury, behind locks, armed guard and past the rather modern firearms that were not licensed through the police...

"Tony Martin"

To clarify: He was charged with murder (reduced to manslaughter) for shooting and killing a burglar with an illegal shotgun (A pump action shotgun of a type not allowed in the UK, even with a license) when he'd already lost his shotgun license (he lost his license in 1994, killed the burglar in 1999). The police claimed he was lying in wait for the burglars, and the man he killed, he'd shot in the back while the man fled the property.

"Hells, our terrorists aren't generally armed with more than a carving knife."

With which they can be quite effective, although they also use cars, bombs and other impliments. Just not generally guns.

"Suffice to say that blowing away drones with a shotgun is not likely to happen over this side of the pond."

Well, not firearms at least. Not sure how effective a Nerf gun would be, but a paint ball gun might do some damage. Flip side, there are always arrows (if you're any good with a bow), fishing line (as has been suggested) or other impliments, although this being the UK, good old fashioned weather (rain, gusty winds etc) makes drone flight somewhat of a gamble.

Rain... wonder if a super-soaker would hit a drone? That could be an alternative if it could fry the electronics... how do drones fare when soaked?

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Bloke whose drone was blasted out of sky by angry dad loses another court battle for compo

PatientOne

Re: What a colostomy bag...

"Sure, but I would also expect them to be arrested for assault and criminal damage and the court to order them to pay to fix said damage. They should have called to police to address the original issue..."

1) What assault? The previous comment was 'then OFFER to', which might be interpreted as a threat.

2) Original poster stated: 'come into someone's yard' to 'mount a camera on a pole': That's trespass, probably criminal trespass (damage to the property when mounting the camera, or erecting the pole) and so the land owner has the right to remove said item, and yes, that removal can include destruction of said items - they were abandonned on private property, and the person doing so may well be fined for the cost of removing said items.

As for the drone: It was over private property. American law does vary from state to state but I believe they do uphold the right of a landowner to protect their property against intrusion, so shooting the drone down would be within his right. The owner of said drone would have no right to compensation: Either the drone was under control and the trespass was deliberate or it was not and so the drone was a danger to people and property and needed bringing down for safety.

Calling the police is usually the best option, yes, but sometimes direct action is required. This is what the courts are for: To judge if the action taken was justified and they have twice now said 'yes'.

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Coppers 'persistently' breach data protection laws with police tech

PatientOne

Re: More accurately...

"Somewhere right now there's an officer in London wondering if he's about to be charged with murder for shooting the bloke who killed one of his colleagues and four other people"

Pedantic, I know, but... the bloke killed three people: One police officer, two civilians (as of last news update I read). So, unless there's been another death post mid-day news, it's 'the bloke who killed one of his colleagues and two other people'.

However, I think the above is justified by the title of 'More accurately'

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Airplane bomb fears spark America's laptop, tablet carry-on ban

PatientOne

Re: or stowed in the hold

"Why does a bomb disguised as a laptop be safer in the baggage hold than cabin?"

So it's not available to a terrorist as a threat. It's in the hold isn't anywhere near as threatening as it being in the terrorist's hands.

It also has to go through baggage handling... where it can be lost, dropped, kicked around, stolen, found, thrown around a bit more, put on plane to another country, left in some forgotten corner, and eventually, months later, returned to the owner in one or more pieces.

Well, that's what seems to happen to other forms of baggage at times...

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BOFH: Don't back up in anger

PatientOne
Black Helicopters

Re: Great episode

You accidentally secure erase a file by right clicking and selecting 'erase' rather than 'delete' from the menu, then clicking 'yes' when prompted because you've been secure deleting files for a while and got into the habit. Yes, you need secure erasure software installed to do this, but who doesn't these days? o:)

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PatientOne

ISO 9001: We've got policies and people might be following them.

ISO 9002: We actually check that people are using these policies.

ISO 9003: We do something if people aren't.

Okay, it's been a while, but that was how it was described back then. Somehow I doubt it's really changed much.

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Two-thirds of TV Licensing prosecutions at one London court targeted women

PatientOne
Joke

Re: How..

42...

where have I heard that number before... something significant about that...

(Yes, just coincidence, but... live, the universe and all that...)

5
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PatientOne

Re: TV

I would have expected it to be the primary resident that would be summoned, not the person who answers the door.

If this is the case then we need different data points to understand what is happening. Is this a case of women not thinking of getting a license when men do? Or that men are more likely to pay up if confronted over the lack of license? Or that more women are more likely to be the owner or primary tenant than men?

The 16yr old could be the primary tenant at that property, possibly bought for her by rich parents - we don't know. Equally, it could be a shared house and she has a TV in her lockable room - which requires a separate license (Some thing common amongst students sharing a house). All we've been told is a 16yr old living in a £400,000 house didn't have a TV license.

Yes, Crapita's approach is typical of their business model (maximise income v minimal effort and charge for everything, including all inbound phone calls, and I bet they'd try charging for any calls they make to you, too, if they could). Yes, they are bullies. No, this doesn't mean they're targetting one particular demographic. Doesn't mean they're not but we don't have the right information to support such a conclusion.

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Mysterious Gmail account lockouts prompt hack fears

PatientOne

Re: Weird.

Latest version of Andriod here - but had just been notified that GoogleMail app had updated so, having checked it was legit, I logged back in and it was all fine, believing it was just down to the app updating.

It was a little worrying, though - but Google seem to take security seriously and I normally get separate notifications if there are any changes to the account (the message simply said that due to a change, I'd been logged out for security reasons and needed to log back in).

0
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You're Donald Trump's sysadmin. You've got data leaks coming out the *ss. What to do

PatientOne
Joke

Re: @frank ly - Take the battery out?

Wait... Samsung phones... That's why they burst into flame: They were trying to go for the 'disconnected battery' option but it must have been an early prototype and sparked instead...

Apple must be doing the same thing considering their battery woes...

Wow: Mobile Phone manufacturers are secretly helping the People...

Oh... my pills. Well, yes, I had forgotten them. Freshly dried frogs, too, how nice.

5
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Scottish court issues damages to couple over distress caused by neighbour's use of CCTV

PatientOne

Re: 5 days

'A purpose of "so we can see who it was that parked and blocked our car in", would not be regarded as a legitimate purpose under the DPA'

Are you sure about this? I've not checked what would be allowed by the DPA, but blocking someone's drive is an offence (civil rather than criminal) especially if it blocks a car's access to the highway. If it's a frequent problem then I would have thought this would be an effort to gather evidence of harassment if it's the same driver/car each time which would be permitted.

Obviously I'd hope anyone doing this would check with the police/lawyer first.

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Openreach reshuffles top brass, brings in BT bods to make biz more independent of BT

PatientOne

BT and other infrastructure *was* national. However, thanks to @10 years of union strikes, successive weak governments and withdrawl of investment, the country was left almost bankrupt. In stepped Mrs Thatcher who had to turn all that around and she opted to sell what she could, such as rail, BT, gas and electricity. She did, however, retain a majority share in these companies that successive governments then sold until the companies are, essentially, private.

People can decide for themselves if the move was right or wrong.

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Revealed: Malware that skulks in memory, invisibly collecting sysadmins' passwords

PatientOne

Re: Cybercriminals and open source exploit code

So the person infecting the system has to have access to the system to execute the code... or are they sending the code in via infected e-mail (suchg as a binary) or drive-by from a web page (such as a javascript exploit?).

I'd guess it's someone getting into the system and executing the code from their computer, or they remove the executionable once the code is in memory, so the problem is still with the initial intrusion. Doesn't make it any better, of cause, but understanding the process is important in developing a counter - and to be honest, what AV / Malware protection doesn't periodically scan the memory anyway? Or is it simply that the scripts don't show as malicious so go unreported?

Would be interesting to see what emerges from the investigation - if anything.

0
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UK cops spot webcam 'sextortion' plots: How vics can hit stop

PatientOne

Re: Why

@ Evil Auditor

<pedant>

By strict definition and use, it is still incorrect to say half (50%) will be blow median as median indicates the point where there is equal chance of being above or below that point: Not a 50% chance. As I said: There will be people ON the median point who are therefor neither above nor below it therefor less than 50% will be either above or below.

</pedant>

IQ is the most commonly used means of determining relative intelligence of subjects meaning it's simply a convenient, easily understood concept for purpose of illustration.

@ Naselus

True, I did imply he was very intelligent, and I cannot support that as a claim, other than to point out he started poor and built his career through hard work, a little luck and a lot of showmanship and that does take intelligence. So perhaps settle at 'not stupid' and certainly above the median?

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PatientOne

Re: Why

1. Half the population is of below median intelligence.

Nope. I know you're referring to the median rather than average, but as IQ is an arbitary rating (100 is the average score, but what we rate as an IQ of 100 isn't the same as it was 100 years ago). It's a whole number, so there will be a quantity of people who will have that median score.

Hence less than half will be below, and of those, most will be close enough as to make little noticable difference.

You also assume that those falling for such a scam are below the median intelligence: Again not true. Very intelligent people can be fooled into doing something stupid. Paul Daniels, who you may or may not remember, was fooled into voicing support for elephants that get their trunks stuck where the sun don't shine. He most certainly wasn't below median intelligence, and his whole career was built on misdirection, but that didn't protect him from being tricked. Now consider people are more relaxed when they feel they're in private...

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AI is all trendy and fun – but it's still a long way from true intelligence, Facebook boffins admit

PatientOne

Re: Pulling open the curtain

'Basically this isn't AI at all, but no different to 1980s "Expert Systems"'

Pretty much what I was going to say.

Expert Systems (ES) work by following set rules, or a model. It parses input and calculated the probable result, and is consistent in this approach. That model, however, is created for the ES: It does not build the model itself. Advanced ES can adjust the model within parameters if results show the predictions made are inaccurate, but they still have to fit within the bounds of the supplied model and rules.

For Artificial intelligence (AI) that model would be adjusted as the AI learns: It would process the data as per the model, then compare the predicted result with the acutal result and start shifting weightings in the probabilities. In medical terms, this would be the process of taking symptoms and calculating the cause. The more cases presented, the better the model will be, but the AI could scrap the model entirely and build a new one from the raw data if needed: Something an ES can't do.

For humans: We cheat. We are as likely to miss details and skip steps in processing information. This is both a strength and a weakness in the human brain and why we fail to realise things at first glance but rather it can take several moments to realise (There is a bicycle approaching; That is a man in a dress; That car isn't going to stop; That is someone I know). As a result, we can react quickly to the unusual, but we can miss things along the way. It's wired into us thanks to evolution: If you can't react quickly to a potential danger, you don't survive, but if it's safe then take all the time you need to check and double check and realise you were wrong in your initial assumption and that root vegetable really doesn't look like someone's face.

So there has been a choice: To develop AI to be consistent in accuracy or to mimic the human brain and accept it will make mistakes. The last I heard, the aim was to remain accurate: We've enough natural stupidity without introducing more artificially.

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Helping autonomous vehicles and humans share the road

PatientOne

"Cyclists have to follow the highway code, or face fines, but there's no "Bicycle Test"."

Yes there is (in the UK at least): The cycling proficiency test. It's just not compulsary.

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PatientOne

Re: Price hikes on the way.

"A black box could help with such things."

Only if it's connected to a dashboard camera so you can see what the driver was facing else you'll not have the context of the situation. Hard breaking could be due to someone cutting you up (unsignalled lane change) on the approach to traffic lights rather than you not paying attention to the lights changing, for example.

At which point you can add a few more to the list:

- not using your indicator to warn traffic of your intention

- changing lanes when it isn't safe to do so (causing a road user to swerve or slow down as a result).

- ignoring red lights at junctions and pedestrian crossings (can also add ignorning pedestrians on pelican crossings)

- ignoring traffic priority as marked or as per the highway code

- (or generally) ignoring road instructions (particularly temporary ones).

4
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Kotkin: Why Trump won

PatientOne

Re: Labels, labels, labels . .

"I'm sorry, since when are minorities an elite?"

Oligarchies.

4
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US citizens crash Canadian immigration site after Trump victory

PatientOne

Re: How can any decent voter

"even our current Prime Minister was elected by the Tory party rather than the electorate"

And Blair/Brown were elected by the Labour party. We, the people, don't actually vote for who will be Prime Minister: We vote for our representative with a mind of their declared political party (if they have one) and who might become Prime Minister if they form the goverment. This is why we don't get a new election if a current Prime Minister steps down: We still have our elected representative.

I do agree strongly with the issues you mention regarding first-past-the-post (I've only once been represented by an MP I voted for (independent)) so a proportional system is long overdue.

10
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Add it to the tab: ICO fines another spammer as unpaid bills mount

PatientOne

While I like your idea of the fines, all that the companies will do is cycle through faked CLI's to avoid triggering the fine. This is made worse by it not being possible to trace all faked or temporary CLI's. Yes, you'd get to the company that provides the CLI number used, but they would argue they are not responsible for their users use of the system resulting in quite an interesting court case (which I think is needed anyway).

Basically, it comes down to this: Someone making nuicanse calls v someone making an anonymous call. Considering why someone might be doing the latter: There's a case for protecting the caller from being identified, even if most users are abusing the system to avoid a fine.

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PatientOne

Re: The ICO is toothless

"I changed my phone number and less than two weeks later they were back using my name on the new number."

Obvious questions: Did you have your new number unlisted? If not - they used the phone book.

If the number is unlisted, have you phoned a company from that number without withholding it? Or has anyone else? If so, they know who you are and could have retained the number.

If you haven't, have you registered the number anywhere against your name? This includes banks. If so, then someone traded your number.

When you answer the phone (or anyone at that address for that matter including a telephone answering machine message) do you announce who you are? If so, they could be random number dialing and recorded the name given when you, someone else, or the answering machine gave it. They might even have asked (possibly in response to a demand to remove your number from their system).

The moment one company has your name and number, they'll share/sell it on and then you'll get more calls, all claiming they're allowed to call.

If you've done none of the above then they shouldn't have your name againt that number at which point I'd refer it to your Tel-Co to explain. But be absolutely certain you've not fallen foul or slipped up even once with the above as your Tel-co will insist you must have.

However, if it was the Tel-co who gave out your details, it could have been under the pretense that the company was running a poll on behalf of the government and so was allowed even unlisted numbers. This is the excuse I had from one company who got my unlisted number. They were lying, of cause: I followed up with enquries of my own (aka a FoI to the relivant department on telephone polls they had commissioned in the last few years - their reply was they hadn't and wouldn't run such a poll). Cue one more complaint to OfTel.

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PatientOne

Re: The law is there for a reason, it’s to stop companies inundating people with unwanted messages

@Esme

You can with the right phone system (it's what I did in the end). It is also possible at the switch, but the tel-co's make money by connecting calls and they won't get paid if they block the call, hence they only do so under court order, and they don't admit to it if they can plausibly deny they can do so.

0
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Topless in-car selfie attempt climaxes with rear-end bonking

PatientOne

Re: re: Photos

Easy: A pair of legs in the car seat, a cop figure standing next to it.

Well, it says 'topless'...

4
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Self-driving cars doomed to be bullied by pedestrians

PatientOne

"How many cases of carjacking do you think will happen before crims realise that they may as well just walk into the Old Bailey and take a dump in the foyer?"

How many cases do you think will involve an unknown person due to baggy clothes, hoodie and scalf or mask?

Thieves have long ago figured out how to avoid detection and identification via the MkI eyeball, and will quickly figure out it's the same for car sensors. As for where they came from/went to? Across the road of cause. CCTV will track figures only so far, but a criminal learns to find the blind spots or where they can operate that has a slow response time, possibly because the roads are all blocked up by stationary self-drive cars waiting for the pedestrians to finish bimbling across the road.

The latter is my main concern: That self-drive cars will cause road congestion to the point that emergency response vehicles can't get through. Even with careful programming, unless the self-drive car knows to get out of the way of the ambulance/fire appliance as a priority and sod the pedestrian who has stopped infront of the car to see what's going on, the car will just sit there and obstruct the road while the pedestrian obstructs it's path.

There is a reason why we need drivers to be able to overrule the self-drive option: It's because rule may need breaking in event of emergency.

6
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EU ruling restricts rights to resell back-up copies of software where originals are damaged, destroyed or lost

PatientOne

Re: Um?

You buy a license to use the software.

This seems to get missed all too often: It's a license you buy, not the software itself. So no, you can't sell or pass on the backup of the software, but you can sell or pass on your license to use it.

All this is saying is that backups of the software are for personal use only and cannot be passed on. Certainly you can't sell it (as you can only sell the license).

This also means that you can't buy the software, make a backup and sell the software while retaining the backup: Only the person with the license can use the software legally.

3
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‘Alan Turing law’ to give posthumous pardons to 59,000 men for 'gross indecency'

PatientOne

Re: Warning - Full Rant mode...

Erm...

Witches were protected under crown law and you couldn't kill them by burning - you had to drown and behead them, then you could burn the body. I believe that witch burning was more an american thing.

Witch trials during the English Civil wars were an anomyly, encouraged by Parliament against royalist supporters and so were political. Those killed as a result were pardonned by the King (Charles II) when he ascended to the throne (Post Cromwell). Not that it did them any good.

2
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Virgin Media boss warns Brexit could hamstring broadband investment

PatientOne

Re: Start investing and laying some fibre, then we'll listen...

You do know that when cable was introduced you had a lot of different companies laying their networks, most of which was fibre (as that's what was required), and that NTL, then VM, bought those companies and inherited the existing fibre network?

So VM hasn't had to lay much fibre - only what they need to expand their network.

Now I can't say how they've been doing on that latter issue: I've not worked for cable since the initial build period (Late 90's) but I know they have been doing some and keep promising cable to areas that they've still not extended into so it's a bit of a mixed bag, there.

As to the price hike: Some companies take every opportunity to do so, others try to keep it to a minimum. VM seem to be amongst the former, but again, never worked for them (was with one of the early companies) so don't know what they're like.

1
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British jobs for British people: UK tech rejects PM May’s nativist hiring agenda

PatientOne

Re: @qwertyuiop

"And we are having hard brexit ignoring the wishes of almost 50% of the electorate."

"And we are facing a brexit in response to the expressed wishes of over 50% of the electorate who bothered to vote."

FTFY.

As ever, I might not agree with the outcome (or specifically with how the referendum was run) but as over half of those who decided to vote said 'out' then that's the majority vote. Would you have them ignored instead? Have you considered that Nicola Sturgen might be right: That the reason for so many wanting out of the EU is they've become disenfranchised over it? That they can no longer see the point of it? That they see just more beaurocracy and foreign rule and our own politicians, our MEP's, have been inadequate in addressing that?

"Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting for dinner and the sheep not being dinner"

No, it's a herd of sheep voting over who gets eaten by a wolf: The wolf wins regardless.

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PatientOne

They should have come to the Public *WITH* the options already formulated *BEFORE* the referendum.

Instead we had the terror clown (tm) circus of FUD (you can fill in your own options as to which clown fits to which politician)

5
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Queen Lizzie awarded good behaviour medal

PatientOne

Re: Ah yes. More confirmed kills than anyone else

You might want to check out what she did during WWII.

"After months of begging her father to let his heir pitch in, Elizabeth—then an 18-year-old princess—joined the Women’s Auxiliary Territorial Service during World War II. Known as Second Subaltern Elizabeth Windsor, she donned a pair of coveralls and trained in London as a mechanic and military truck driver. The queen remains the only female member of the royal family to have entered the armed forces and is the only living head of state who served in World War II."

So she wasn't really a rookie by the time the Korian conflict came around. But she clearly had you fooled :p

16
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'Geek gene' denied: If you find computer science hard, it's your fault (or your teacher's)

PatientOne

Re: lack of genes or lack of trying?

I'd say you need a degree of aptitude simply to get started, but success is more dependent on interest.

After all, if you're not interested you won't apply yourself to a subject even if you've got the aptitude.

Where as if you're interested, you can't succeed, no matter how hard you try, if you've no aptitude (don't believe me: Listen to me try and play the Saxaphone. Or don't: It'll save your ears).

So the limit is a combination: Interest, in order to want to pursue a subject, and aptitude, to see just how far you can get with it. Study can compensate for aptitude to a degree, but you'd still need the greater aptitude to progress far.

As for where aptitude comes from: Well, part is nature, part is nurture. How our brains wire up gives us the base line tools we then need to learn how to use. It's quite a study, particularly if you're interested in cognitive psychology and Artificial Intelligence.

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Silicon Valley’s top exorcist rushed off his feet as Demons infest California

PatientOne

So they use Latin because it's the language that demons hate the most?

Why? I would have thought Hebrew would have been a better choice...

5
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Judge makes minor tweaks to sex ban IT man's order

PatientOne

Re: Bill of Rights, etc.

"This is basically going against the constitution that we don't have"

"This is basically going against our unwritten constitution."

FTFY

"Unlike most modern states, Britain does not have a codified constitution but an unwritten one formed of Acts of Parliament, court judgments and conventions."

From https://www.bl.uk/magna-carta/articles/britains-unwritten-constitution

But google it: There are a fair number of sites explaining it.

3
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Windows 10 backlash: Which? demands compo for forced upgrades

PatientOne

Re: It it just me

Yes and no: As M$ are pushing out updates without notification (depending on which version you have) and as these updates can brick or otherwise damage your computer, then it's relevant now, too.

For example: A few day ago my Win10 PC started rebooting shortly after I'd turned it on. didn't matter what I was doing, it just rebooted. I checked the logs and found this was happening just after an update had been downloaded. Not the same update - any update. Further digging showed this was due to a 'corruption' in the update system - which Windows 'fixed' while detecting the fault... but the fault was caused by Windows trying to download and install a new (aniversary) edition to Windows... and to get past that, I had to download and install that manually for the PC to start behaving again...

So no, not too late, just late.

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I want to remotely disable Londoners' cars, says Met's top cop

PatientOne

Re: Because Criminals will follow the rules?

If you want to shield the ECU from an external EMF, then the best solution is a Faraday cage, surely. The best would be one made from solid metal sheets. This would cause attenuation of signal from most EM sources (it's not so good against slowly modulating sources), so would be a good start. Failing that, a mesh or grid would work, too, but not as effectively.

So, all you have to do is wrap a car engine compartment with metal panels and/or mesh and you've protection.

Can you see where this is going yet?

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You should install smart meters even if they're dumb, says flack

PatientOne

I got a letter saying I needed to arrange for the meter to be fitted as they were required to install them.

I didn't bother responding.

A friend, however, did, and took a day out to await for the meter to be fitted. They never turned up.

So one more reason to refuse: Even if you do want the meter, you may wind up wasting your time waiting for them to turn up.

Strangely, I was asked, not too long ago, if I'd consider swapping to a rival supplier, who informed me they *don't* do smart meters. Which is good to know if my current supplier pushes for me to have one.

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