* Posts by 45RPM

570 posts • joined 26 Oct 2010

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Xperia XZ1: Sony spies with its MotionEye something beginning...

45RPM
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Re: Sony design....

There seem to be two schools of Sony design. Simple, understated and tasteful (like this) and big, brash and shouty. Sony design, at its best, can take on the very best that other companies have to offer and show them what’s what. Sony design, at its worst, is all childish lumps, knobs, and flashing lights - which rather lets the side down.

Thankfully, in recent years, we’ve seen more of the ‘good’ Sony and less of the bad. And I know that people seem to have a downer on Sony TVs - but I have two, one is twenty years old and the other is ten. They still work perfectly - so you can be sure that, when it comes to replacement time, I’ll be getting another.

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Neglected Pure Connect speaker app silenced in iOS 11's war on 32-bit

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Re: Fault

@John Savard

Given the amount of extra work that would be required to support all that code whose only purpose is to run legacy code (and probably not very often at that), and the security nightmare that such a system would present, I am very grateful that support for this old software is being dropped.

Besides, if you're one of the few who really needs an old program (I count myself amongst that number, by the way, since I'm not prepared to drop several hundred quid on a new copy of one of my most useful development tools), I recommend either using an emulator or keeping an old computer hanging around for that purpose.

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@tiggity

I had one of those speakers. A Bose. It was the work of five minutes to upgrade it to Bluetooth and a modern dock connector. It still sounds great.

I take your point though - some people don’t have the ability to make the necessary changes.

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Re: Sale of Goods Act

@Keith Oborn

And that is my principle objection to EVs. They’re no longer tools, the way cars used to be, they’re mere gadgets. Toys. Expensive gadgets, but gadgets none the less - and their lifespan is at the whim of the manufacturer. At some point the manufacturer will stop supplying software updates - and some unforeseen bug will render them all inoperable. When that happens, it’s buy a new car time.

Yesterday, as I was blasting down the road in my early 1960s GT car, I saw a Jensen Interceptor - about 10 years newer than my car, but still knocking on the door of 50 years old. A very creditable age. It happened to be following a Tesla Model X. The Jensen looked amazing - a really droolworthy car, and I’d have been envious of it were it not for the fact that my car had rolled out of the same factory and matches it in the glamour stakes. The Tesla? Well, it’s not for me. It’s a toy. A frippery by comparison. It isn’t serious - and I doubt that any Model Xs will still be on the road in 50 years time. The Jensens on the other hand? Government will have to legislate them off the road - because they’re not going to stop running for any other reason.

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Re: they just need to...

@Lysenko It isn’t restricted like that - it’s still C, and can do everything that C can do, hence the name. But it depends on the source - have you allocated (and freed, natch) your memory manually? Are you hardcoding where you point on the basis of an assumption of 32bit size? Or have you been canny in writing your code (sizeof) or, better yet, used the Objective parts of Objective C to do it for you.

Flexibility is the watchword. In fact, I imagine that many ObjC developers don’t mess with pointers explicitly, and use ARC for memory management - these developers will have no issues at all. I use a mix of techniques, and use ARC where appropriate but not everywhere, and I haven’t seen any problems either.

Of course, it isn’t necessary to use ObjC to develop for iOS. Other languages, other APIs, other IDEs are available. I haven’t used them - but I imagine that updating to 64 bit in these cases might be more problematic.

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Re: they just need to...

@Lysenko

Certainly I’ve seen those issues in other development environments (it was particularly tiresome on VMS!), but I’ve yet to see an issue when using Apple’s APIs on Xcode. It really is as simple as changing a compiler flag on every project that I’ve updated to 64 bit so far (other than my own applications, this also includes the following supposedly 32 bit open source projects - Marathon, DOSBox, CrocoDS, ActiveGS…)

In my experience, Xcode really is a most remarkable IDE.

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Re: they just need to...

@AC

Excellent point. Thumbs up. But remember that we’re not talking about code changes - so extensive testing may not be required. Add half a day, depending on the complexity of the app.

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Re: Apple fragmentation

Yawn. I suppose I should feed the obvious troll. But the thing is that Android is an excellent OS. Sure, it has its faults, but doesn’t everything?

iOS is an excellent OS too. It has different faults. But upgrading to 64 bit only is not one of them. Apple isn’t to blame, at least not in this instance, if developers dump a load of shit onto their customers and run for the hills failing to support the poor bloody user.

What you like isn’t necessarily what everyone else likes - which is fortunate, otherwise there’d be no competition, we’d all use the same devices and the same software, and the world would be a boring place.

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Re: they just need to...

@Byz

Wow. Is that how you bill your clients? ;-)

I’ve always found 10 or 20 minutes to be sufficient - and that includes the time to boot, change compiler settings, build, commit to repository, upload to Apple and shut down the computer again. But mums that word - best not to let on to the clients how easy the conversion process to 64 bit actually is.

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Re: Evidently never heard of escrow...

@Version 1.0

It depends. If you’re using Apple’s developer tools then the process for converting to 64 bit is pretty simple. You might have to update your code to replace any deprecated functions with supported ones, but I haven’t seen any situations where this is necessary (yet). So then it’s just a matter of telling the compiler to build a 64 bit version and job done. Simple as that.

You can even try it yourself. DOSBox and Marathon for iOS are 32 bit apps - but open source. Grab a copy of the source code, change the build settings, and you’ll be running these great apps on your 64 bit only iOS device in no time.

There really is no excuse for developers not to update their software. I’m pretty pissed off that I can’t run Civilization anymore - but I don’t hold Apple to blame for this. It’s not as if they capriciously dropped 32 bit support without warning everyone long in advance what was going to happen.

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Twitter: Why we silenced Rose McGowan after she slammed alleged sex pest Harvey Weinstein

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Re: I think Linehan has it right

@Anonymous Coward and Others

Scott Adams is quite smart. Just not the cartoonist Scott Adams who is not only a dick, but a dick who can’t draw very well - which is something of a handicap in a cartoonist.

The real Scott Adams, the guy who wrote adventure games in the late 1970s and 1980s, is quite smart though - although if he comes out in support of Trump I’ll revise my opinion pretty damn quickly (and call into question the intelligence of anyone named Scott Adams, regardless of the facts).

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Lenovo spits out retro ThinkPads for iconic laptop's 25th birthday

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@CrazyOldCatMan

I wasn’t. Actually, I found my old OS/2 2 install CD last month - but not the boot floppy disks which are also a prerequisite for install. Besides, if I recall correctly, you can’t install OS/2 2 on a system with more that a certain amount of memory (8MB?) or speed (33MHz?) - although it’ll run correctly once installed. Something like that anyway. I can’t remember the specifics.

I used to run it on my 25MHz Opus 386 PC. Happy days.

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Would you like a side order of OS/2 to go with that?

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Computers4Christians miraculously appears on Ubuntu wiki

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Of special interest to the clergy will be the hidden search engine for pictures of choirboys. There’s a real surplice of images there.

Oh, I’m soo damned for that joke.

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Ex-sperm-inate! Sam the sex-droid 'heavily soiled' in randy nerd rampage

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The number one pollutant in this world is people. Ideally the world population should be around 1bn - at this level our CO2 emissions would drop to sustainable levels, there’d be enough beef to go round, and our infrastructure wouldn’t be straining at the seams.

All of which is a long way of saying bring on the sexbots. Make them in male and female versions. Make them fat, thin, youthful, elderly, passive, aggressive, intelligent enough for a little conversation. Make them so desirable that most people won’t want the company of another human.

There’ll still be enough real shagging that we won’t die out. A few perverts like me will still desire the company of a genuine human partner. But a reduced population will also mean reduced pressure for a dwindling supply of jobs, and also reduced crime.

Oh dear. I seem to have built sexbots into a panacea for the human condition. And I’m sure that that’s one abuse they can’t take.

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My name is Bill Gates and I am an Android user

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Re: Thriller

@Tom 38

OTOH, what has Nadella done that is so amazing? He's screwed up less, but he's not attempting to achieve as much.

Okay. I’ll bite. Ballmer, through incompetence and a lack of love and understanding for technology (a pretty basic requirement in a computer business CEO), failed to anticipate where history was heading. He lacked vision and delivered one rubbishy or badly implemented product after another.

Even if you don’t like Windows 10, and many don’t (although personally I have no problem with it - perhaps because I don’t have to use it every day), I’d argue that Nadella has overseen:

The best version of MS Office in recent history

The opening of Microsoft to Linux technologies

The open sourcing of .NET, fulfilling the promise of C#

The cross-platformisation of Visual Studio

Some damn good software on Android and iOS

Some really fantastic computers - both desktop and tablet.

Microsoft now feels like a company that knows where it’s going. It’s great to see that it has vision and has stopped blindly bumping into walls and trying to shoot its own feet off.

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So. Should I upgrade to macOS High Sierra?

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No problems so far…

…well other than Webex integration in Outlook causing Outlook to crash, but Webex was never the best written bit of software. Other than that though, I’m very happy with High Sierra (especially since they didn’t observe the silly superstition of ignoring 13).

That said, your mileage may vary - and the advice not to install immediately (wait for 10.13.1) seems wise.

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Hotter than the Sun: JET – Earth’s biggest fusion reactor, in Culham

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Re: And Reaaction Engines is in the same science park

@Korev

Given that they benefit from EU funding too, and that we can't afford to do this on our own either, I imagine that what they're up to is:

a) cursing the idiocy of Nigel Farage, Boris Johnson, JRM, Theresa May, Jeremy Corbyn et al, and anyone who voted for Brexit and…

b) trying to find a way out. A friendly science park attached to, for example, Paris Sciences et Lettres? École Polytechnique? Technische Universität München? Universität Heidelberg? Or maybe my alma mater, Fachhochschule Wedel? ;-)

and c) carrying on regardless in the meantime.

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Re: Brexit pushes Fusion Power back another 10 years

Which is incredibly restrained of it, especially given that it pushes national attitudes to racism back 60 years, and the economy back 40 years. I’d say Fusion is getting off remarkably lightly.

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Re: Do not press

…must …not …step …away …from …European …Union. …Can’t …afford …to …do …this …on …our …own.

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Microsoft reveals details of flagship London store within spitting distance from Apple's

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@David 132

Walls? We’d be glad to have Walls. Without bricks or mortar. Or walls. I’m in the Arch flagship store. I haven’t worked out how to build the floor yet. It’s very…

…spacey here. As in lots of it. Free, that is. On my hard disk.

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Attention adults working in the real world: Do not upgrade to iOS 11 if you use Outlook, Exchange

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Re: Works fine here

Ditto. This article might have given me pause had I read it before upgrading - but luckily I upgraded before reading it. Loving the iOS 11 goodness, and everything works well.

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Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP

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The Registry, a monolithic store of settings, is very bad design. Good design would be discrete settings files for each application, including the operating system, which requires them. Critically, these settings files should be deletable individually or en masse, in case of corruption, in which case they will be automatically replaced by default settings files - and the computer will remain functional.

Before anyone objects, and claims that such a scheme would be unworkable, I’d like to point out that there are operating systems available today which use exactly this functionality, with great success.

Microsoft has done great things recently and, I hope, will continue to do so. I look forward to the abolishment of The Registry - except as a stub to support legacy applications.

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Boffin wins (Ig) Nobel prize asking if cats can be liquid

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Haven't the Will It Blend people covered this already? Pretty sure that they can liquidise anything…

You need a freezer to make it solid again.

And a lot more research into how to make it cat again.

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Massive iPhone X leak trashes Apple's 10th anniversary circus

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I can’t see how this hurts Apple…

The share price is jumping on the news and, whether you care or not, whether you’ll buy the new gewgaw or not, the world + wife will still tune in to the announcement. It’s a media circus for a reason - you already know what to expect in the big top, but you’ll still attend - just in case one of the acrobats falls off the high wire.

Sure, a little of the surprise might have gone, but the leak will have no material impact whatsoever.

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We don't need another hero: Huawei overtakes Apple – even without a big-hitter

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Re: Can't give an iPhone away

@marky_boi - the boss can't even give one away to convince us to change from Android to Apple for testing

Just noticed this gem. If this really is true (and this claim makes me doubt that it is), you’d be on a performance improvement plan, all of you, as quick as winking. If you’re employed in software development then you’re required to produced, good, well tested, software - regardless of whether you like the platform you’re developing for or not. It shouldn’t be the boss’s job to convince you to do yours - a good software developer should be responsible enough and take enough pride to do the job well.

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Re: Can't give an iPhone away

@AC - It would be rather boring if is was only Android or only iOS now wouldn't it.

It would be worse than boring - it would be dangerous. Think back to the 1990s / early 2000s when Microsoft had a de facto monopoly on just about everything OS related. Linux was in its infancy and Apple was busy dying. You had precisely one choice - Windows - and it wasn't a happy one. You bought Windows, and you got something which was insecure and which rode roughshod through established standards (or tried to).

Android is a great OS, although it might not be the great OS for you. iOS is a great OS, although again it might not work for you. Even Windows for phones was a great OS - before Microsoft deep sixed it. Competition is great - without competition you'll get shit.

@Hans 1 - How is Apple less evil than Google?

Well perhaps Evil is in the eye of the beholder too. But Apple makes its money by selling hardware. Google makes its money by selling advertising. Because of these very different business models, Apple doesn't need to grep the contents of iCloud for any scavengable data which it can sell or use - which, from a privacy perspective, suits me fine. Google, on the other hand, needs to and does scavenge whatever it can from the data you store on its servers (which may suit you fine - it's a valid option).

This means, of course, that some of Google's facilities (OK Google, for example) are more advanced that the Apple counterparts - Apple spends time focussing on security, for example, and sandboxing processes (even Siri) so that your data doesn't leak out. Because Google's business model is predicated on not doing this, it can allow its services to communicate much more naturally and freely, providing an apparently more flexible and advanced service - provided of course that you don't have any secrets that you'd like to keep, well, secret.

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Re: Can't give an iPhone away

@marky_boi - I know this tune, you’re a bot aren’t you? Either that or you’re just a wee bit clueless and you enjoy talking out of your hat (which I’m sure is very funky, and worn backwards as you hoon around in your bewinged Corsa).

The truth is that, as far as your data is concerned, Apple’s garden isn’t so much walled as fenced - with one of those cute little picquet fences for flower borders that can be stepped over ever so easily. You can sync your appointments, contacts, email with Google (or any other service you care to mention), and export any documents you create in Apple’s own Office suite in more portable formats - or just use tools from third parties in the first place.

Even software isn’t very walled. Sure, most people will have to use Apple’s various stores for buying software - but given that Apple curates its garden (not hugely well, given the amount of crap on there - but still) to ensure that Malware doesn’t sneak in, and the relative incidence of Malware on Android to Malware on iOS, I’d say that that’s a bloody good thing. And if, as any good geek would, you want software from off the AppStore then you can either install PastryKit framework apps (no need for the AppStore, no curation), or install OpenSource apps that you build yourself using Xcode (which is free) and of which there are a multitude. Jailbreaking isn’t required in either case.

SO yes, I totally get that there are excellent reasons for choosing Android - but you can cite those without having to make up a load of fake bullcrap. Assuming that you’re knowledgable enough, and actually have some good reasons…

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Their phones might be very nice, and very good, but I have my doubts that they’re very secure - even without including the mandatory Google snoopage. So far, Microsoft and Apple have proven themselves concerned with privacy when it comes to looking after your data - Google notsomuch (which isn’t actually a criticism of Google - the OS is free, so they have to make their money some how). Chinese designed kit, if it takes off in the west, is a golden opportunity for data mining which could go far beyond anything done today. That’s okay too - you pays your money and you makes your choice.

My point is just that quality, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder - and sales volume is no indication of quality (or, indeed, of profit).

BMW, Audi, Mercedes, Volvo, Jaguar et al don’t outsell Ford or Chevrolet. But which would you rather have? (again, that isn’t to say that Ford don’t make some decent cars).

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Dude who claimed he invented email is told by judge: It's safe to say you didn't invent email

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I invented the letterbox. And peas. But I’m a bit older than he is.

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It's official: Users navigate flat UI designs 22 per cent slower

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I think that there are 'flat' interfaces and undifferentiated interfaces. TWM, Windows 1, Windows 2, System 7 (in fact, all pre-MacOS 8 MacOS) are all Flat - but perfectly differentiated (and, to my eyes at least, very clear and elegant)

Windows 3 - Windows 7, macOS 8 - macOS 10.9, iOS 1 - iOS 6 are all differentiated and 3D (to my eyes they're very clear, but also a bit gaudy)

Anything recent, as far as I can tell, other than some special Android / Windows skins or Linux variants, are flat (which is elegant) and undifferentiated (which is sadly unclear).

So don't have a downer on flat UIs. Have a downer on undifferentiated UIs instead!

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Fewer than half GCSE computing students got a B or higher this year

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Re: Teaching IT doesn't have enough money

"This is very much the problem with business, they want it all for free"

How do you work that out? What I want, what business wants, is for schools and universities to build a solid foundation on which I can add business specific skills and training. And given how much I pay, both as a taxpayer and in direct contribution and funding to my kids education, and how much students pay in tuition fees, I'd say that that's the very least I can expect.

A graduate with a degree in computing should have a solid understanding of how computers and networks work, C programming (and not some trendy, mainly educational frippery like Haskell), and a solid grounding in mathematics. SQL would be nice, Linux is essential and everything else is a bonus.

With that foundation they can pick up pretty much everything else on the job.

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Re: Teaching IT doesn't have enough money

…and, sad to say, university level IT / computing isn’t well taught these days either. The first thing that I have to do when employing graduates is teach them C - and, once they have C under their belts, then they can begin to become adept in the other languages that I may need them to use.

Other (basic) things that they don’t know / understand include:

modulo arithmetic

matrix transforms

how a computer actually works (to most it’s just a magic box for running software)

algorithmic efficiency (big O and so forth)

Fortunately, they’re all bloody clever - so they pick it up quickly - but that doesn’t alter the fact that, as an employer, I shouldn’t have to be the one who teaches them this stuff.

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Ten spacecraft – from Venus Express to Voyager 2 – all tracked same solar flare

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Re: CME's? we've heard of them ...

My guess is that another Carrington event would brick just about everything. I even doubt the ability of my 1964 GT car to survive it unscathed owing to induced currents in its primitive wiring. That said, I'm damn sure that my old car would be easier to get up and running again than my modern one…

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Ubuntu sends trash to its desktop's desktop

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Re: memory failure

@davidp231

32bit cleanliness is not required for VM. 32bit cleanliness is required to use more than 10MB RAM. To use virtual memory you need a 68030 cpu or a 68020 cpu with an MMU fitted to your computer. In practice this means that all non-68000 Macs can use virtual memory, 32 bit clean or not, with the exception of the LC which, despite being 32bit clean, had no MMU - and a multiplexer which was limited to 10MB RAM. Making the original LC a bit of a shit computer.

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Re: Wot! Someone copying Apple?

@wayward4now

I think that it's fair to say that Woz was the genius behind the design, but a good design isn't enough to succeed in this world. You need business acumen as well - and without the business acumen of Steve Jobs there wouldn't be an Apple (or a Pixar) today. You may not like him, but Apple would have gone the way of Osbourne and Sinclair without him.

And Woz wozn't (sic) the only hardware / software genius at Apple. Let's not forget the likes of Burrell Smith, Bill Atkinson, Andy Hertzfeld…

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Re: Wot! Someone copying Apple?

@Nuno trancoso

Stanford's NLS (by Doug Engelbart) can reasonably claim to be the first ever GUI. Xerox's Alto (http://toastytech.com/guis/salto.html) followed up on this groundbreaking work - but had no icons, or drop down menus, at all. Nevertheless, it was a huge step forward, but nothing like a GUI that you'd recognise today.

Star, also by Xerox, improved on Alto with icons and resizable, overlapping, windows - but, in the case of Star, a huge amount of CPU power was required because the entire screen had to be redrawn whenever a window was moved. Oh, and it didn't have trash either, at least, not in its earliest incarnation, and by the time it did get a trash Lisa and Macintosh had launched. Nor did it have drop down menus - all its menus were in a ribbon like bar at the top of the app, plainly on view at all times.

So yes, I think that Apple can reasonably claim to have innovated the first recognisably modern GUI. More importantly, I think that Apple (Bill Atkinson, to be more accurate) can reasonably claim to have invented the crazily complex maths required to do Quickdraw Regions - that clever functionality whereby only the parts of the screen which have changed get redrawn. Xerox were astonished by the regions functionality - they hadn't thought it possible - and it permitted Apple to run a full GUI on a 5MHz 68000 CPU (Lisa).

Furthermore, Apple built on the NLS work of Doug Engelbart (1968) and ENQUIRE by Tim Berners Lee to develop HyperCard - the first mixed text and media hypertext system. HyperCard in turn influenced Tim Berners Lee (very recursive) and Robert Cailliau to develop a what we now call a web browser. Which is a very useful innovation.

But really, has anyone ever done anything that was genuinely 'New'? We're all just standing on the shoulders of giants. It's giants - all the way down.

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Re: memory failure

@albaleo

More or less. Dragging a file to the wastebasket (as it was known on U.K. Macs back then) didn't result in the immediate deletion of the file. The file could be removed from the trash until Finder quit. On System 6 or earlier this meant that the file(s) would be deleted whenever you launched a program (in single tasking mode) or at shutdown (if multifinder was running for cooperative multitasking)

System 7 (1991, for the Mac Plus and above) fixed this so that deleting files worked more or less as it still does today, from a user perspective at least.

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Re: Wot! Someone copying Apple?

I’m pretty sure (and someone is bound to correct me if I’m wrong) that Apple hasn’t invented anything per se. What it has done is innovated (a lot) - and many of those innovations have since been copied by other computer manufacturers.

The beige plastic case. It might seem stupid, but this did a lot to make computers acceptable for home use. Before Apple? Heavy, pressed steel case full of bodged wires and unfriendliness. After Apple? Streamlined plastic, and finished circuit boards.

The floppy drive. Apple didn’t invent the floppy drive - but, before Apple, disk drives cost more than the computer - and contained their own CPUs, RAM and so forth to drive the, er, drive. After Apple, the computer’s own CPU drove the drive using software run on the computer itself. Thanks to Woz the price of disk drives dropped dramatically.

Colour graphics. Before Apple if your computer could even drive a display it was driven like a teletype. No moving graphics. Just text - and strictly black and white. Using some clever kludges based on the inadequacies of NTSC Apple gave us colour graphics.

Drop down menus. The GUI existed before Apple, but it was very menu driven. No one thought of hiding the menus aways so that they weren’t visible until clicked. In fact, I think that the icon representation of files and folders might be an Apple innovation too (Xerox used lists of filenames).

Regions. This is the cunning method by which only the parts of the screen which have changed get redrawn, rather than the entire visible area. It’s how Apple got away with using comparatively weedy CPUs and limited memory compared with the beast that was the Xerox Star.

ADB. Imagine a desktop bus through which you could daisy chain, keyboards, mice, joysticks - even slow handheld scanners. Sounds like USB? Actually, it’s ADB - and the year is 1986.

Desktop spanning multiple monitors. Apple may have been the first - but even if it wasn’t it was the first affordable (relatively) implementation. Yours since 1986 (with an addon board and monitor which clipped to the CPU of the Mac Plus).

CD-ROM. Again, Apple wasn’t the first - but it was the first to ship an optical drive as an integral part of the computer (Mac IIvi / IIvx).

No floppy drive (or CD-ROM). How everyone laughed. And then copied this usefully cost saving idea.

The Dockable Computer. If only they hadn’t abandoned this useful idea. I which modern Macs had a dock connector - but that doesn’t alter the fact that the Duo did it first, and (even today) did it peerlessly well.

I could go on. The postscript laser printer, the swipeable touch screen smartphone, the ‘intelligent’ PDA, the modern tablet computer and many more besides. None of these products was, strictly speaking, the first - all had ancestors - but all did it in a way that made them significantly more useful than anything that went before.

Ultimately, you might not want to use an Apple product (whether for good reasons (there’s another system which fits your use-case better) or stupid ones (I hate Apple and I’ll never buy an Apple product)), but if you use a computer then you have no choice but to use Apple’s innovations.

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Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

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Have you every considered citing yourself - just to see if anyone notices?

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Foot-long £1 sausage roll arrives

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@Pen-y-gors

I submit to no-one in my love for the Scotch Egg - with a dab of tomato sauce. But this isn't a Scotch Egg - it's a Dragon's Egg, which is something different and wonderful. I have a place in my heart for both, just as I enjoy stews and curries, hot dogs and sausage rolls.

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They all pale into in significance when compared to the mighty Dragons Egg by Monty Pieman. Sadly, they haven’t made it in a while - but it’s a Scotch Egg with the egg replaced with a delicious mash of chillies. I don’t know exactly which varieties they use - but I’m a bit of a chilli-head and, when I first had one (last year), it definitely gave me a bit of the chilli-sweats. Superb effort. I’ve had quite a few since - and now I miss them because they haven’t made them in a while. I doubt that this footlong will make an acceptable substitute.

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CMD.EXE gets first makeover in 20 years in new Windows 10 build

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Re: auberginey

You wouldn't like the VT220 if you had to use one today. I had to use one yesterday - and it gave me a cracking headache. Up til then I'd forgotten all about the CRT induced headache, engendered by CRTs with low refresh rates - and the ghosting.

My first monitor was a natty amber job. I can't remember the manufacturer - I always think of it as an Elephant, despite the fact that Elephant Memory Systems made disks not Monitors, because I stuck an elephant sticker on the casing - the sticker came free in a box of disks. Happy days.

But, to answer your question, it's a kind of very dark aubergine purple with white text - the current Ubuntu terminal colour scheme. I can't remember a mud or turd coloured version.

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Re: Fucking Heresy

I know - I’m still pissed off at the changes made to the bios font when IBM released VGA. CGA for the win - who needs more than 16 shades in text mode? Or more than 640*200 resolution, black and white, in ‘high resolution’ graphics mode?

Grumble grumble, I remember when this was all fields. Kids today. When I were a lad, I had to walk 50 miles to school in cardboard shoes with a laptop abacus. And we were grateful.

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Alternatively, and this works on older versions of Windows too, just install ‘Console’ (https://sourceforge.net/projects/console/) and get this benefit and many more besides. And if Console isn’t your cup of tea, there are plenty of other alternatives available just a quick Google away.

My preferred colour scheme is Ubuntu’s auberginey palette (and typeface, for that matter). Using Console (and the settings for Terminal on my Mac), I’ve given all my computers a little Ubuntu makeover!

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How can you kill that which will not die? Windows XP is back (sorta... OK, not really)

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It seems like a rather anachronistic way of measuring Operating System market share - especially now that most internet use is on mobile devices (tablets and smartphones). I'll bet if the analysis included the likes of Android and iOS you'd see that Android has by far the largest market share. I'd further guess that Windows and iOS have roughly the same share of the market.

So, do you have these (I suspect more representative) figures el Reg?

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The ultimate full English breakfast – have your SAY

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It's not difficult. Just add everything.

Fried egg, runny yolk x2

Fried slice

Baked beans

Fried tomatoes

Fried mushrooms

Fried potatoes

Bacon x2

Black pudding x2

Sausages x2

Chilli sauce

And all washed down with strong black coffee.

And don't get religious about the sauce either - save the prejudice for whether to eat veggie or pork sausages.

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Southern awarded yet another 'most moaned about rail firm' gong

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Greater Anglia used to piss me off every day until I got so fed up that I moved house to Chilterm Railway's patch. The service is now excellent, but I concede that my solution was rather extreme and not remotely practical for most.

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Microsoft hits new low: Threatens to axe classic Paint from Windows 10

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Re: Now just notepad, and we can write off builtin apps completely. @me

@Sandtitz

Here. Have an upvote from me. I wouldn't worry about all the down votes though (look at the reaction to my comments on this thread - very negative, and I can't understand why either (although, since there's no explanation either, I don't care too much))

I can think of some very good reasons to abandon Paint (and any other software extraneous to the OS), not least for reasons of security and developer time required to maintain the software. But I suspect that many of the commentards downvoting you are newbies or have only a passing familiarity with IT (although, doubtless, they'd claim great expertise). The Register used to attract Programmers, Sand Benders, Ops and Sys Admins. Now there also seem to be noobs and gamerz here for the lulz (whatever that means).

Like Viz, the Register just isn't as good as it used to be! Won't stop you coming though, will it? Me neither.

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Re: Now just notepad, and we can write off builtin apps completely.

@Adam 52

I'm not saying that they always behave well, or do the right thing (although, in my experience, they can generally be trusted) - just that they aren't a monopoly any more.

As you say, you had a choice - and you made it. While it lasted, at least, I hope that it was the right one for you. Of course, you could have stuck with Windows 7 - and, presumably, a still working copy of Photoshop.

You could also have chosen to buy a Mac (with Photoshop) or Linux (with something else). So badly behaved, perhaps, but not a monopoly.

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