* Posts by usbac

146 posts • joined 4 Oct 2010

Page:

Fix this faxing hell! NHS told to stop hanging onto archaic tech

usbac

Re: User story

How about option 4 - set things up properly so users can easily email scanned documents?

4. Place document on scanner, select your name on the touch-screen, press scan. Go back to your PC and find the reasonably named document under the folder "Scanner" in your "My Documents" folder, right-click, then send as attachment. Done.

With modern VOIP phone systems, supporting FAX machines is an absolute nightmare. Yeas, I know T.38 and all that, but just try to make it completely reliable. We tried for about a year, and about the fifth time some executive comes in on a rampage about their FAX not going through, you give up and order an analog line. We run a consumer call center on VOIP, and yet our one analog FAX line costs about 1/2 of our total monthly phone costs!

11
1

Insurers hurl sueball at Trustwave over 2008 Heartland megabreach

usbac

I don't think anyone in IT security has ever thought that being "PCI Compliant" means you are un-hackable. It just means that you maintain a certain baseline level of security.

No one is un-hackable, and if you think you are, you are delusional. It's really just a matter of how hard you are to hack, and is it worth the time of the hacker to break in? High value targets will always have a very hard time keeping systems secure.

I'm sure Heartland paid huge insurance premiums for years. The insurance companies (like someone above noted) are just trying to double-dip. It's sort of pathetic to bring the lawsuit after 10 years.

7
1

Security guard cost bank millions by hitting emergency Off button

usbac

Re: Exit the Cleaner

@ gnasher729

A similar thing happened here. We share a large industrial building with a ball bearing factory (I know, it sounds like a line form Hogan's Hero's!) A while back we had a sudden power outage. Our data center has good UPS backup power; enough for about two hours for all of the systems including cooling.

Senior management called the power company, and they said they would investigate, but that it would likely be the end of the day before they had an answer. So, management sent almost everyone home (almost, meaning I had to stay to shut down all of the production systems when we got close to UPS exhaustion).

So, I had just finished shutting everything down, when my boss and another VP came by and said "let's take a walk next door, and see if they know anything that we don't?" As we are walking around the side of the building, an electrician comes out of a side door. We stop him and ask him what he knows about any of this. He suddenly has a horrified look on his face. He then makes some half-assed excuse about having to check something, gets in his truck, and literally leaves long black skid-marks across the parking lot.

It turns out that the stupid jackass had turned power off to the whole building! There are four very large electrical boxes at the end of the building. Two are for us, and two for the neighbor. None of them are marked, of course. We turned them all back on, since if someone was actually working on something, they would be properly locked-out, right? Needless to say, our boxes are all padlocked now.

Our CEO sent the bill for all of the lost work to the company next door. He suggested they pass it on to the electrician's insurance company.

It took me the rest of the day to get all of our systems back up and running.

15
0

Sysadmin shut down server, it went ‘Clunk!’ but the app kept running

usbac

Re: DEC Engineer

@The First Dave

"This is _exactly_ why you MUST let the outside person do it. He might be more likely to make the mistake, (though is more likely to check things properly beforehand,) but when things go wrong, it's not _you_ that gets the bullet."

Back when I worked in consulting, I often thought that was the reason we were there. I though the in-house guys were more than capable of doing some of the projects we worked on. I think the reason they called us was to have someone to blame if things turned to shit!

8
0

IBM memo to staff: Our CEO Ginni is visiting so please 'act normally!'

usbac

Re: "Act normally! Ginni and the team are here to see what Austin is really like."

@IT Hack

Our CEO eats his self-packed lunch in the break room with the rest of the staff.

Everyone shares the same tables, from VP's to forklift drivers in the warehouse. None of this elitist bullshit here!

20
0

Trainee techie ran away and hid after screwing up a job, literally

usbac

Re: He started a new life

@Phil

"I've never understood what drives normal, non-psycopathic, people to take up dentistry anyway, even if they were competent with power tools. Yet they do. Funny old world, sometimes."

To me there is a long list of professions that I wouldn't want to do, but like dentistry, I'm very glad someone does! It gives me a lot of respect for those people.

12
0

Cops: Autonomous Uber driver may have been streaming The Voice before death crash

usbac

Re: Dick Heads

I really do like the concept of recording "parallel" data sets. I think where the concept breaks down is that it would only work if the human driver was a highly trained professional driver. Letting just any driver be the source of one data stream isn't going to be a big help. Look at how many terrible drivers are on the road. Would you want them to be the "control" data set with which to compare the computer's idea of how to drive?

4
1

Amazon staffers protest giant's 'support of the surveillance state'

usbac

Yeah, they think pressuring their CEO for doing what CEOs are supposed to (even required by law, in some cases) do for their companies, is going to help. The CEO is legally responsibility is to generate as much revenue for the company as possible.

These same people (who I happen to agree with), need to focus on voting out the oppressive, power hungry scumbag politicians that are buying these service from Amazon.

Even though I agree with what they are saying, if I was the CEO, I would tell them to go work elsewhere if they don't like the work they are doing. If they were my employees, they would do the work assigned to them, or they would be gone.

As people above have said, there is a consequence for standing up for one's beliefs. If you aren't willing to accept the consequences, then why should anyone listen to you? That's the problem today, people moan and wail about things, but aren't willing to sacrifice for their beliefs. Not many anyway. We've become a society of cowardly complainers.

6
3

US Supreme Court blocks internet's escape from state sales taxes

usbac

Re: Death and Taxes

We run several e-commerce websites. We already subscribe to a service that provides a web-API to calculate sales tax based on the full address of the customer. They handle the tax holidays, etc. They also deal with the other "ouch" here, remitting to each state (and having to fill out each states confusing sales tax form).

Remitting is actually the worst part of this mess.

3
0

Hold on. Here's an idea. Let's force AI bots to identify themselves as automatons, says Cali

usbac

Re: The bill is probably sponsored by telemarketers...

Does this mean I have to make "Lenny" play an announcement first? That will kill most of the fun...

1
0

Microsoft gives users options for Office data slurpage – Basic or Full

usbac

Re: Firewalls?

I actually put this question to our Firewall vendor. We are a corporate customer with a paid support agreement. I put in a feature request to be able to block "Telemetry" from the various software companies. I asked for telemetry to be a category in their web blocker module. They already have a long list of categories like adult, hate speech, advertising, etc. Each category has various sub-categories. I thought that having telemetry as a category, and each slurping asshole company be a subcategory would be perfect.

I knew they would never do it. The pressure from Microshaft, Adobe, etc. would be too much. I just wanted to see them squirm. At first their approach was to ignore the feature request. So when our sales rep called about a major upgrade and support agreement renewal, I told her that we are considering switching to PFSense, and oh, by the way, what about the feature request that wasn't ever answered?

After that little poke, I did actually get an answer from a manager in software development. Their explanation was actually fairly legitimate. They agreed with the need for it, and confirmed that I'm not the first customer to ask for it. They gave me several good reasons why it's not workable. The first was the wack-a-mole problem of many (hundreds of) IP addresses that change constantly. Then, they said that Microshaft has tied Windows Update into the same servers that receive the telemetry. So, blocking the telemetry at the firewall would break Windows Update. There is a similar problem with Adobe they said. If you run Adobe's rent-ware Creative Suite (which we do), it will stop working if you block their telemetry.

So, as long as we have to run the crap from Microshaft and Adobe, we are stuck. If I owned the company, we would be 100% open source. It's possible to run a company on open source, one just needs to have the balls to do it. For us, it's not even all that big of a stretch. Several of our major systems already run on Linux servers, and have both Windows and Linux clients. Others are web browser based, and the client doesn't matter. The killer apps for us are MS Outlook, and Adobe Creative Suite (which to be run on Macs - almost Linux). Man I wish there was an open source replacement for Outlook!

7
1

Sysadmin hailed as hero for deleting data from the wrong disk drive

usbac

"And OS/2 booted up instead of Windows"

So, it was an upgrade?

6
0
usbac

No need for physical drives

I do something very similar, but with a cool little tool called Drive Snapshot. I make an image of any PC I need to reload/refresh before blanking the hard drive. I put the images up on a NAS share that only I have access to.

Drive Snapshot allows you to mount an image as a local drive. So, when the inevitable "I know I told you about everything I needed backed up, but I forgot this one extremely important file/folder/etc." situation comes around I can mount the image and retrieve the file. It happens all the time. Here it's usually the damned Excel macros that people don't think about.

I could even recover the entire bootable drive if I really had to. I haven't had to go that far yet.

2
0
usbac

Placebo effect

I would guess that most of us here have at one time or another, told a user that we made a change that will speed things up/fix a problem/etc?

My experience is that it works more than half of the time. I will frequently try it first (based on who the users is, and past history). If the first "fix" doesn't do the job, I will go on from there...

4
0

Zookeepers charged after Kodiak bear rides shotgun to Dairy Queen

usbac

Re: Sense of humor

This was a very young bear raised by humans at a zoo. It was about as dangerous as the neighbor's German Shepherd.

These people were trained zookeepers with extensive knowledge of animal behavior. I would trust their opinion much more than local law enforcement. We all know what geniuses most local law enforcement officers are!

35
30
usbac

Sense of humor

Wow, here I am thinking that having a sense of humor was being outlawed here in the US. Now I find out that Canada is following along with us! Poor bastards!

29
14

You have GNU sense of humor! Glibc abortion 'joke' diff tiff leaves Richard Stallman miffed

usbac

Re: concern about the potential offensiveness of the words

@ handleoclast

I wish I could up-vote you 100 times. That's about the best explanation of the current political situation I have ever read.

As an American, I think our founding fathers would be disgusted by the far ends of either party. If you look at very early American history (early for us anyway, a mere few hundred years), the political parties associated with by our founding fathers don't look anything like our current political parties.

2
1

Skype for Business has nasty habit of closing down… for business

usbac

Re: Why are people still on 32-bit windows

Because some of us have business critical software that won't run on 64-bit Windows. Some of it due to driver issues.

I'm typing this on an i7 Quad Core PC with Windows 7 32-bit installed! It's too much grief to constantly launch VMs for daily tasks.

13
0

Fatal driverless crash: Radar-maker says Uber disabled safety systems

usbac

Re: The Shape of Things to Come...

You talk like any tech company has ever stood behind their product. For the last 20 years or so the tech industry has been rushing buggy insecure products out the door to beta testers (paying customers). None of them have ever cared if their products actually work, why do you think autonomous vehicles would be any different?

It's an industry mentality now...

16
0

The e-waste warrior, 28,000 copied Windows restore discs, and a fight to stay out of jail

usbac

@jabuzz

The new Dell PCs coming in with Windows 7 installed (but are actually licensed for Windows 10, yuck!), don't have COA stickers anymore. They do have the Windows 7 key in the BIOS so if you use a Dell Windows 7 CD, it will install and auto-activate. But, there is no sticker anymore.

3
0

Aching bad: 'Kingpin Granny' nicked in huge prescription drugs bust

usbac

This is the US. It seems that a "Resisting Arrest" charge is automatically added to each arrest. Kind of like VAT.

I think if you told the cops "I give up" and actually put the handcuffs on yourself, you would still be charged with resisting arrest.

Since the purpose of the court system is for plea bargaining, this gives them a little more leverage. It's like having cash in hand when bargaining for a new car. It's that little "extra".

21
0

Uber and Waymo sitting in a tree, S-E-T-T-L-I-N-G

usbac

Re: Aw

This is like watching a really good movie, that ends too soon without a satisfying ending.

3
0

Fella faked Cisco, Microsoft gear death – then sold replacement kit for millions, say Feds

usbac

"I once tried to convince a small firm that it would be much cheaper to buy their networking kit off the grey-market and buy double what they needed. That way they can have a fully configured device on standby should one of the primaries fail. This would be a)much cheaper and b)much quicker."

We actually do that here. When we buy some major new piece of network gear, we usually get at least a year of warranty with it. By the time we purchase it, it's usually been out for a year or more. So, by the time the warranty is out, I can find a used one on ebay for less than the cost of an extended service contract. When the used one gets here, I load the current config image for the device it's meant to replace. Then, I have a drop-in replacement! Much easier than having to overnight a new unit with systems down.

I have found that even with supposed same day support contracts, the techs usually have to overnight in a part anyway. So much for same day support. If you question it, they point out that the contract only promises that a tech will be on site the same day.

The best part is that I usually get to take home the ebay purchased item once it's determined that we don't need a spare anymore.

3
0

You want wires with that? Burger King backs, er, net neutrality

usbac

We can at least hope this presents the issue in a way that the typically apathetic Joe Public can understand. I frankly don't care if Burger King gets a little extra publicity out of it, if it helps to get the issue in the minds of people that wouldn't care otherwise.

At my workplace, most of the people I talk to have no idea what Net Neutrality is, or why it's so important. When I explain it to them, they get it. I just don't have time to go around and explain it to the other 330,000,000 people that need to understand it.

26
0

The Reg visits London Met Police's digital and electronics forensics labs

usbac

Re: At leas the article demonsrates a point I have been making for a while

Especially using fingerprints. What good is a "password" that you leave lying around at least 1000 places every day!

7
0

Hot chips crashed servers, but were still delicious

usbac

Re: My keyboard stupidity.

"(caps lock is the worst thing ever to be put on a keyboard)."

Agreed! At our company I have a number of users that do everything in all-caps. I sit at their computer and try to log in, only to find their Caps-Lock on! When I comment, the answer is always "x system requires everything to be in capitals". My answer is always "there is not a single system in our company that requires all capitals". Doesn't change anything.

I swear, one evening I'm going to take a screwdriver and break all of the Caps-Lock keys off of every keyboard in the company. I wonder if anyone makes a keyboard without Caps-Lock? I could be a product idea?

4
0

Funnily enough, no, IT admins who trash biz machines can't claim they had permission

usbac

Re: I've, umm... done most of that stuff

Same here!

This brings up a really big question. I've done all of these things. I think, even forwarding the boss's email somewhere else. All done legitimately, as part of doing my job.

Where does the line exist? Do I need to get written permission every time I delete a backup. Format a server? Change contact info with one of our cloud provides? Since I haven't been expressly given permission to do these things, am I breaking the law each time? It sort of opens a can of worms, doesn't it?

11
6

Oregon will let engineer refer to himself as an 'engineer'

usbac

Re: Oregon is a nanny state

I agree. I used to think the "can't pump your own gas" was a control freak thing. We live in a neighboring state, and our gas prices are higher than they are in Oregon, and I have to freeze my ass in the winter and fry my ass in the summer to pump my own gas. Suddenly the idea doesn't sound too bad!

24
5

Looking through walls, now easier than ever

usbac

We're getting ready to build a new house (owner builder), and I'm really considering wrapping the whole thing in foil that's properly grounded.

It would kill cell phone usage. However, maybe our guests would actually want to talk instead of just sitting with their face stuck to their goddam phones. My long time best friend from out of state visited with his wife a while back, and I don't think he had his iCrap out of his hand for more than 10 minutes the whole weekend!

2
0

Spy-on-your-home Y-Cam cameras removes free cloud storage bit

usbac

Re: Stuff like this is why I went with a host it yourself camera system

I did something similar. Being generally frugal with tech stuff, and always wanting control of my gear, I built my camera system myself.

I bought a bunch of the cheap (<$30) HD IP cameras off of Ebay. They work great by the way. I then installed Blue Iris ($59) on an old PC running Windows 7 (yes, I know, Windows yuck!), and it works very well. I have all of this on it's own network heavily fire-walled from the internet. This way the cameras can't phone home with god knows what in their firmware, nor are they accessible from the internet.

The best part of all of this is, no cloud bullshit. The whole system will work without any internet connection at all. And, I have about 30 days worth of storage.

7
0

Amazon Key door-entry flaw: No easy fix to stop rogue couriers burgling your place unseen

usbac

"What I would suggest to Amazon is to incorporate local storage to cache video, and log lock activity, until the [Wi-Fi] signal is restored. It's not a perfect fix – a bad guy can just continue DoS'ing until the storage fills up or cycles through – but it would increase the complexity to exploitation significantly."

Why wouldn't the thief just take the obvious looking camera with them? I mean if you are set up the jam the wireless, you would be expecting to see a camera mounted somewhere pointing at the door, right?

These "security researchers" make a suggestion like this, but really didn't think it through, did they. I hope they aren't going to be doing our next security audit!!!

3
0

Essex drone snapper dealt with by police for steamy train photos

usbac

"Only our team of highly trained authorised pilots and specialist-approved contractors are permitted to fly drones near the railway. It's just too dangerous for anyone else to fly a drone near the railway and you could face a penalty of up to £2,500."

So, in other words: We need to protect our cushy revenue sharing agreement we have with the ''approved contractors''.

I get it!

72
21

Support team discovers 'official' vendor paper doesn't rob you blind

usbac

Re: The story is ...

@ Mike Dimmick

"They decided to encode the product price in the reduction barcode as well as the product code."

Not a good idea for another reason. It would have taken me about 30 seconds to figure out how to get big discounts on stuff from that store. Print my own bar-code labels!

I write code for printing bar-codes as part of my job. I can actually read several symbologies just by looking at them (sad isn't it).

7
0

Beach, please... Billionaire VC finally opens way to waves

usbac

Have an upvote.

I think that's where the "up to $20 million" part of the article comes from. It mentions that the fine would be $4.1M per year.

10
0

Vibrating walls shafted servers at a time the SUN couldn't shine

usbac

Re: Wind!!!

@ JamesPond

Being the military, I would think they have ways of dealing with an "inconvenient building"!

6
0

IT fraudster facing four years' bird time for $10k blackmail

usbac

Re: Why did he do it though? Pure dicketry?

A similar situation, but in reverse, happened to me recently.

The company I work for purchased another smaller company that was having financial difficulties, and about to go bankrupt. Apparently, this deal was in the works for months. The first I hear about it is when the executives come to me and ask me to get the domain moved over to us, and to get the phone numbers ported.

About this time I find out that they just received their second disconnect notice for their phones. Here in the US, once a number is disconnected, you lose the phone number forever, and it can't be ported. They knew about this deal for months, but didn't tell me about any of it until way late. Fortunately, our VOIP provider was able to get the porting request through in less than 24 hours, and we were able to keep the numbers.

The domain was a bigger problem. This company didn't have any in house IT staff, and relied on a small IT service firm that was local to them. When they had this firm register the domain for them, the owner of the IT service firm registered it to himself. Not the best way to handle things, but not a big problem. At least that was what I thought. It turns out that while the company was having financial problems, they failed to pay the IT firm. About $13K to be exact.

At this point I figure there is going to be lawyers and lawsuits involved to get the domain name back. And, I would kind of understand the IT contractor wanting to get paid before handing over the domain name. So I decide to take a shot at resolving this myself. I called the owner of this IT firm (Jay), and presented it as IT guy to IT guy just trying to solve the problem. It turns out that Jay is a very professional and honest guy. His response was "no problem, how can I help?" He was very helpful getting the domain registered to us. Frankly, even though I consider myself a very ethical person, I'm not sure I would have been so cooperative when someone owed me $13K! I, many years ago ran my own IT contracting company, and people stiffing me was one of the reasons I don't anymore.

After getting everything worked out, I go to our CEO to update him on where everything is. He was very worried earlier when I told him the domain was registered to the IT contractor that was owed a lot of money. When I explained that Jay was very cooperative, our CEO was surprised. He made a comment about not many people that honest around anymore. He told me to give Jay his email address and have Jay send him the outstanding invoices. He said he would tell accounting to pay Jay what he is owed.

Our CEO is a very good guy. That's why I still work here. I could make a lot more money elsewhere, but one needs to look at the big picture. When you work for someone that respects you, and trusts you, it makes a big difference. This is the same guy that took a sizable personal pay cut to avoid having to layoff anyone during the recession.

This whole story is a good example of why doing the right thing should always the way to go.

28
0

Connect at mine free Wi-Fi! I would knew what I is do! I is cafe boss!

usbac

Re: Just another attempt

I agree, I don't understand the fuss. When you send any data out onto "The Internet", it is by definition insecure. I don't see why using public Wi-Fi, secured or not, is less secure than using the internet from home.

Once the packet leaves your house, it can be intercepted. Period. Whether you send that packet from your own router/access point doesn't really matter.

If you are connecting to a server or share on your own private network with your own Wi-Fi, then of course you want the Wi-Fi to be secured. Otherwise, outside of your network, it really doesn't matter if the Wi-Fi is encrypted. As others have pointed out the hotel owner could be packet sniffing.

3
0

US government: We can jail you indefinitely for not decrypting your data

usbac

Does the govnernment even read their own briefs?

It points out that in other cases, people have been held for contempt of court for nearly seven years, and cites the appeals court verdict that "no temporal limitation on the amount of time that a contemnor can be confined for civil contempt when it is undisputed that the contemnor has the ability to comply with the underlying order."

How is it "undisputed" if he says he can't remember the password? How can the authorities prove that he could remember the password if he wanted to, and thus claim that his ability is "undisputed"?

Also, how can they have hashes for encrypted files? If the files are encrypted, the hashes would also be garbage. This sounds like law enforcement using buzzwords to bullshit a judge. Somehow I don't think the supreme court justices are going to fall for that.

This case could set some very dangerous precedents. This is getting into the though crimes idea.

106
1

Private sub captain changes story, now says reporter died, was 'buried at sea' – torso found

usbac

Re: Personally

I've been in several private submarines. Atlantis Submarines operate tours in several tropical areas. Granted they are corporate owned, but they are not "publicly", as in government owned.

I highly recommend taking a tour in one. I can't dive due to some medical reasons, so it makes for a very fun way to see the underwater world.

2
0

DJI's Spark drones to be bricked by September 1 unless firmware updated

usbac

It's a shame

The technology in DJI's drones is very impressive. I was considering the purchase of an Inspire for aerial photography, but wouldn't touch anything from DJI after this.

I have this strange, possibly old fashioned idea that if I pay money for something, it's mine. Disabling a product after purchase is on very shaky legal ground. I will have to ask my lawyer about this the next time I see him.

I'm sure here in the US this would be grounds for a class action lawsuit. Even if the EULA grants them the authority to do this, I don't think a court will side with them. It would be hard to get 12 regular people off of the street to agree that a corporation (especially a foreign one) can disable an expensive toy without refunding the purchase price.

I would love to see the FTC demand that DJI buy back every bricked drone at the retail price.

10
1

Sputtering bit-blasters! IBM's just claimed densest tape ever record

usbac

Re: Long live tape !

@Lee D

I really don't understand all of the down-votes. They must all be from Millennials that have never tried to recover a server from a tape!

I've been working in IT for about 25 years now. I can count the number of times I have SUCCESSFULLY restored data from a tape on two hands with fingers left over! The number of times I've tried to recover data from a tape probably numbers in the hundreds (I used to work for an IT consulting company).

On one occasion, we had three backups of a server. Each one ran a successful verify pass. Not one of the three would run a complete restore. Not one! The WORN concept is so very true.

People that are relying on tape are fooling themselves. At my current employer, we don't use tape at all. We have other solutions for offline storage (removable hard drives in a fireproof safe, along with offsite backups that are also offline).

I've been burned way too many times by tape failures to ever rely on it again. It seems like as the density increases, an already unreliable medium is only getting worse.

0
11

User filed fake trouble tickets to take helpful sysadmin to lunches

usbac

Re: Has a customer ever apologised to you?

@phuzz,

Years ago I worked in IT for one of the larger hotel/casinos here. Because of the design of the place, the shortcut to the other side of the casino was through the kitchen complex.

People might be surprised to know that large hotels and casinos try to make most food items in house. We had a large bakery within the kitchen complex. Our bakery manager had an old PC that was a total piece of crap. She had been trying to get a new PC for over a year. I was fairly new at my job there, and was just trying to take good care of our users. I've always looked at the job of IT being a kind of internal customer service. So, I went to the director of food and beverage, who for some reason I seemed to get along with very well*, and asked for a new PC for the bakery manager. He approved the purchase, and I ordered her a nice new PC.

The hallways of the kitchen complex there were usually lined with bakery carts (about 5 feet tall with a dozen or more shelves) each loaded with pastries. After getting her new PC, the bakery manager told me to help myself to what's on the bakery carts any time I happen to be taking the short cut through the kitchens. I must have gained 20 pounds while working there!

* I always took very good care of the food and beverage department. Mostly because the director was a really nice guy and always appreciated what the IT department did for him. He started with the company as a line cook, and worked his way up to be the director. He knew what it was like to work hard. He would also comp dinners for my wife and myself at the high end restaurants regularly too,

18
0

SQL Server 2017's first rc lands and – yes! – it runs on Linux

usbac

I see this as a good thing, and actually have a use for it.

My long term goal is to get Windows completely out of our enterprise. Getting all of our desktops on Linux isn't completely viable yet. We are getting close, but I can't quite make it happen. Windows 10 Spyware Edition has accelerated this move, however.

Where we can get rid of Windows is in the data center. We've been able to get most of our servers over to Linux. We do however have some legacy systems that require SQL Server for their back end. With SQL Server available for Linux, we can get almost all of our Windows servers migrated.

2
3

The curious case of a Tesla smash, Autopilot blamed, and the driver's next-day U-turn

usbac

@wolfetone

In every airplane I have ever flown, applying a certain amount pressure (it varies a little by aircraft) to flight controls, disengages the autopilot. You can make course/altitude/climb rate/decent rate/etc changes without disengaging the autopilot, but you have to use either the autopilot controls, or in same cases (course changes) you can do it from the Nav gear.

0
0

Security robot falls into pond after failing to spot stairs or water

usbac

My Roomba can't detect our stairs. We had to put one of the little beacon thingies at the top of the stairs. It's a very normal set of stairs, but Roomba took a tumble down the stairs twice before we installed the beacon. So much for AI.

It looks like this thing was about as good at it as my Roomba...

1
0

Stop this crazy crusade! Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon scold FCC over net neutrality

usbac

The fix is already in

Everyone is just wasting a bunch of time and money trying to stop this. It's obvious to anyone that Pai is in the pocket of the large telcos. He's not going to go against the wishes of his corporate masters. They paid a lot of money to get his "support", he can't disappoint them...

Since when has any elected official (and especially appointed ones) done anything good for consumers, and acted against their corporate masters?

15
0

Blunder down under: self-driving Aussie cars still being thwarted by kangaroos

usbac

Re: Obvious solution

@schmerg

"There used to be stories of roos travelling at high speed "crossing the road" and happening to land on top of a car and caving in the roof. A modern car roof should be able to withstand that I'd guess, but I'm guessing a collision with the windscreen would still be serious enough."

You just don't want to be driving a convertible! Especially true with the top down.

4
0

Florida Man to be fined $1.25 per robocall... all 96 million of them

usbac

Notice that the complaints weren't investigated by the FCC until it started to effect companies with deep pockets (or perhaps, expensive lobbyists).

Our complaints never get addressed! Our government only exits to serve their corporate masters now.

33
0

Bankrupt school ITT pleads 'don't let Microsoft wipe our cloud data!'

usbac

Re: Other media options are available.

@stephanh

This reminds me of something that happened years ago (late 80's I think, I was about 14 at the time). My mother worked for an organization that was an offshoot of our county government. They were starting a large project to build a geographic information system (GIS) of all of the land parcels in the county. The project was quite a thing in the 80's, as they needed to purchase a mainframe, and some very high-end graphic workstations.

They contacted the government of the largest city in the county $BigCity and offered to share the database if they would contribute money or manpower to the project. They declined, not very politely.

About two years go by, and after finding their own funding, the project was finished. Along comes lawyers for $BigCity using a law that since tax payers money was used to create the database, they claimed they were entitled to a copy of the database. Lots of legal wrangling ensued, and it ended up with the lawyers for my mom's organization saying that in fact they did need to give them a copy of the database.

About that time, mom's boss and his wife were over for dinner, and they are complaining about losing the issue. Me, being kind of a smart-ass teenage geek, I suggest they hex dump the database on many boxes of green bar paper, using the worst old printer ribbon they could find. This would meet the legal requirement that they give them the database, I argued?

It turns out that is what they did! Mom's boss invited me over to watch box after box print. We all stood around laughing our asses off as it printed. They even grabbed an old ribbon out of the trash. I was there when John called the city to tell them their copy of the database was ready, just come and pick it up...

9
0

DJI: Register your drones or no more cool flying vids for you

usbac

Re: Disposable email address

I'm a law abiding citizen, and a licensed pilot. I would still use a fake email and address. The reason: IT"S NONE OF DJI'S FUCKING BUSINESS!!!

Simple as that!

4
2

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018