* Posts by usbac

96 posts • joined 4 Oct 2010

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UK hospital meltdown after ransomware worm uses NSA vuln to raid IT

usbac

Re: Surprises?

@Blotto

When we converted to VOIP, we set up physical IP phones, and put them and the VOIP servers on their own network segment firewalled off from the corporate network. We're talking about a separate physical network, not VLANS! The VOIP trunks have their own path to the internet.

The firewall between networks only allows for an HTTPS connection originating from the corporate LAN to the VOIP servers for administration. And that's only allowed from two workstations.

All of the IP phones are POE, and the POE switches are powered by an enterprise class 17KVA UPS.

If our data network goes down, we still have phones!

4
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IP Freely? Mr IP Freely? VoIP-for-suits firm battens down hatches after PBX data breach

usbac

Re: Soo... I was the one that reported this.

Agreed!

We do business with Sangoma, and have nothing but high praise.

1
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WD unveils grown-up USB stick in My Passport slab form

usbac

Re: Sigh....

The first hard drive I ever installed was a Shugart 5MB MFM drive. I remember having to burn a custom EPROM to tell the controller card how control the drive. The controller had about 40 ICs on it.

This was installed in an IBM XT where we removed one floppy driver to install the HUGE 5MB drive!

That was around 1983/1984?

0
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WikiLeaks exposes CIA anti-forensics tool that makes Uncle Sam seem fluent in enemy tongues

usbac

Re: Obscure comments

As a developer myself, I wish I could up-vote you 100 times!

4
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FYI anyone who codes outside work: GitHub has a contract to stop bosses snatching it all

usbac

Re: 'Murica

Sharks won't work. They are not cannibals!

1
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usbac

Re: Interesting, but..

@ Flocke Kroes

I had a similar situation once. I worked for a small local IT consulting company. We got purchased by a larger company out of California. My boss (the former owner) came around with a stack of contracts for each of us to sign for the new company. One of the things included was a non-compete contract.

I told my manager I would not sign it. He responded "but, you have to". I told him "fire me, I'm not signing it". It turned out that he just told the new owners that I had signed everything.

About a year later we had a very unpleasant and adversarial parting of ways. There were several large customers that approached me and wanted to retain my services, so I started my own business. Cue the legal threats from the parent company. Fortunately for me, my grandfather was a lawyer. He sent them a letter demanding they produce the claimed non-compete agreement (knowing damn well that they didn't have it). Of course they couldn't.

Once they discovered that they didn't have the non-compete, they started making legal threats against my customers, claiming they had the non existing non-compete agreement. These customers were big enough that they weren't going to back down. Also, my grandfather threatened to sue them for making false claims and attempting to damage my business (along with slander, defamation, etc.).

My leaving the company was not out of malice (nor my idea). If they didn't treat their employees like shit, none of this would have happened. The former owner was a very nice guy and we worked together well for many years. We were even friends outside of work. The new owner was a complete dick. In the end, about a year later, they were out of business. I ended up taking on several more of their customers.

1
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Barrister fined after idiot husband slings unencrypted client data onto the internet

usbac

Re: Indeed

@ Pascal Monett

I used to do a lot of IT work for lawyers. It always amazed me that lawyers that charge clients $300-$500 per hour, were cheap SOB's when it comes to paying for IT support. The only clients I ever got stiffed by were lawyers. Good luck collecting from them!

They have the attitude that their time is worth X, and no one else's time it worth anything.

14
1

Fire brigade called to free man's bits from titanium ring's grip

usbac

Re: I keep seeing these

Yes, but (from the linked article):

"Your jeweler won’t be able to help you if you have stainless steel, cobalt chrome or titanium. These super hard metals are much harder than gold and platinum and that very hardness causes some to say they are a dangerous choice for rings."

So, an angle grinder is still about the only option.

3
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usbac

Re: Unusual

I wouldn't reconsider that choice.

I really wish I had chosen to be a fireman instead of working in IT. If I were a fireman, I would have been retired years ago (at 45) making about $20K a year more than I do now!

Running into a burning building, or fixing someone's virus infected Windows nightmare, a tough choice? I know a guy that's a fireman. He actually feels bad for IT people. He says he wouldn't trade jobs with me!

It's too late for me now.

Bruce

5
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Microsoft wants you to plan a new generation of legacy systems

usbac

Re: @Duncan Macdonald Factory automation

@Arctic Fox

I understand completely. I just a few weeks ago loaded two new/referb PCs with Win XP for the wife. Both were for their HPLCs. Their software won't work on Windows 7 or above due to special hardware and drivers. Both HPLCs work totally fine, and would be over $80K each to replace.

Both are networked to be able to print to network printers and to offload data, but they were told not to browse the internet from these PCs. Not much of a problem since they only have IE6, and most of the internet in inaccessible anyway.

They also have several GC/MS's that are XP only. They are in the neighborhood of $120K each to replace. Many of these device live on for decades past the end of support for their Windows OS. It's too bad all of the instrument manufacturers don't make a Linux version of the software. It would be easier to support.

2
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College fires IT admin, loses access to Google email, successfully sues IT admin for $250,000

usbac

Re: "African American"

I used to work with a very intelligent young IT guy. He was about 20-21. He had just moved to the US from South Africa. He was about as pale-while as you can get.

When he started applying for financial aid to go to college, he noted his race on the financial aid form as "African-American"*. Later, when he was interviewed, they said "you are not African-American, you are white". They even went so far as to try to prosecute him for falsifying documents.

My lawyer grandfather got involved. He really hated all of this politically-correct bullshit, and told the school that he would love to try this case in court. He said he would like to see them prove that he isn't African-American. He wanted to get it into the local newspaper. Sadly, they just wanted to brush it under the rug.

* You see, in the US, if you belong to certain race groups, you get preferential treatment for financial aid for college. Apparently, racism and discrimination is okay as long as it goes along with the politically correct agenda.

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usbac

Re: Article Headline a bit misleading...

My grandfather was a lawyer, and he told me several times that default judgements are usually easy to get set aside. Any decent lawyer will do this. Especially if the case was tried out of the defendant's area.

In the US, plaintiffs usually have to file the case in the defendant's jurisdiction. In this case, there may have been a clause in the employment agreement between the admin and the school that allowed them to sue in the school's jurisdiction. These kinds of clauses can also be ruled invalid (state employment law may have rules that override this).

I've won default judgements, and never was able to collect. No one wants to enforce them. Try to get the police to enforce a default judgement.

1
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Mr Angry pays taxman with five wheelbarrows worth of loose change

usbac

I have to agree. My first thought was that the guy is a bit of an ass.

However, as anyone that has been on the receiving end of any kind of bureaucracy knows, it's easy to get very worked up when dealing government dickheads. Rational thought goes out the door when trying to deal with some of these people.

12
1

Don't pay up to decrypt – cure found for CryptXXX ransomware, again

usbac

A solution to the idiots that pay the ransom

Make it illegal to pay the ransom. Something along the lines of "accessory to a criminal act". Business should face imprisonment for paying.

If the money source dries up, the criminals will move on to something else.

7
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Europe trials air-traffic-control-over-IP-and-satellite

usbac

Re: Am I missing something here?

@ An0n C0w4rd

I agree completely. As a pilot and an IT person, I shutter to think about how many times I've clicked "next" through various "wizards" without even reading the dialog.

Now consider the same kind of situation in an aviation context. When operating in busy airspace, especially when IFR, maintaining your instrument scan, running checklists, and keeping aircraft control, the idea if just pressing the okay/acknowledge button would be easy to do without comprehending the instruction. Most non-pilots may not know that many ATC instructions require a full repeat of the instructions given by ATC. With a verbal read-back, you have to at least think about the instruction.

I also agree to the above comment about situational awareness. I have on two occasions been given instructions from controllers that put me on a collision path with another aircraft. Both times each of us realized it in time to change course, due to hearing the instruction to the other aircraft. This cross-check will be lost.

This sound like a disaster in the making.

1
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This is your captain speaking ... or is it?

usbac

I don't think even the worst terrorists are that truly cruel!

0
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Facebook's internet drone crash-landed after wing 'deformed' in flight

usbac

Re: Recurrent theme?

@AC

I was going to make a similar comment. The problem is bad autopilot code. Every pilot is trained from day one that you don't correct glideslope with pitch. Whoever wrote the autopilot code should have had at least a basic understanding of how to fly a plane!!

It's a problem that plagues the whole software industry. I've worked in IT for about 25 years now, and lost count of how many times I've wondered if the people that wrote a piece of software have any knowledge of what the people that use the software actually do.

It's funny, I'm a software developer and a pilot. I'm also not current, for the exact same reason, too poor!

4
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Bluetooth-enabled safe lock popped after attackers win PINs

usbac

@d3vy

I agree to all of the above. Especially the remote start.

With remote start, I don't have to tromp through a foot of snow to get to the car, start it, turn on all of the defrost settings, and then leave the car running in the driveway with the keys in it. I also don't track all of that snow back into the house on my return. On my SUV the remote start is smart enough to read the outside temperature, and then decide to turn on max AC or max heat/defrost.

At first I thought remote start was just a gimmick, but now I love it!

2
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Trend Micro AV nukes innocent Sharepoint code, admins despair

usbac

Re: Killed SharePoint?

It shows their anti-virus works. It detected the "SharePoint" virus, and cleaned it!

Problem solved.

8
1

Sysadmin figures out dating agency worker lied in his profile

usbac

Re: Well...

Using TAB is fine and great until you get to a web form like my banks. Somehow, some idiot web designer laid out the form such that you have to press TAB FIVE f**ing times to get from the username to the password box!!

I somehow think their web designer is the reach for the mouse type.

16
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Imagine every mistake you can make with a new software rollout...

usbac

Re: SO VERY TRUE!

It really can be done right.

Several years ago, we needed to replace our primary system (ERP/Accounting/etc.). We researched vendors extensively. Once the top three vendors were chosen, we involved each department lead in the demos.

Once the vendor was chosen, we had the software company send technical people, not sales people, for a week of training/gap analysis. During these sessions, EVERY SINGLE employee that would ever need to use the system attended the meetings and ere allowed to ask any questions they wanted. The software company wasn't terribly thrilled about all of this, but if they wanted to make a six-figure deal on software, they didn't have a choice.

The result of all of this was that three days after deployment, almost all of our staff was working productively. The up front costs of doing things this way paid off big in the end. The senior management of our company is very supportive of the IT department, and their support helped make for such a successful project. Ti's really too bad management at other companies just doesn't get it.

We run our company with about 50% of the staff that other similar companies in the same industry would have. We do this through very good systems and good management of these systems. Fortunately for us, ownership of the company knows this. That's why they support IT so much. They see the value, not just the cost.

7
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Veeam kicks Symantec's ass over unpatentable patents

usbac

Patentable?

If all of these patents were shot down by the USPTO, why in the hell were they issued in the first place?

It looks like they approve anything applied for, and then wait for the courts to sort them out?

10
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Hell Desk's 800 number was perfect for horrible heavy-breathing harassment calls

usbac

Slightly off topic, but...

Many years ago I worked the graveyard shift at one of our local network affiliate TV stations. I was there to record programming that came down from the satellites late at night for airing the next day.

It was a very boring job, so me being the very curious sort, started exploring the station. I decided to check out the news set. I thought it would be cool to see what it would be like to be a news anchor on the set.

Sitting at the desk, I noticed there was a phone just below the top of the desk. Now, this being the era of Centrex phone systems, all extensions actually had outside numbers attached. Someone had the forethought to turn the ringer off on this phone. Being the helpful sort that I am, I decided that someone might want to call them sometime, and that they wouldn't know about it, so I should be helpful and turn the ringer back on. I also jotted down the phone number for that extension.

Several nights later (and, remember I was very young at the time) I'm at home eating dinner and watching the 6:00 news, and decided this was the time! I grabbed the phone and dialed the number. It was hysterical!!! Both news anchors were sitting there and all of a sudden, ring, ring, ring... They both looked at each other with this horrified look of what do we do? Finally one of them sheepishly answered the phone. I started "I would like to order a large pepperoni pizza with..."

You should have seen the look! I so wished that I had the VCR running. Thank god no caller ID in those days. I think some people suspected it was me, but no one was sure.

The stupid stuff we do in our youth.

19
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The new FCC privacy rules are here, and nobody is happy

usbac

Re: Partisan lines?

It's really simple:

BOTH parties are power crazed, bought-and-paid-for sleezebags that don't give a flying fuck about ANY of the people that elected them!

The republicans would sell us all out to big business, and watch cheerfully while we are being anally-raped by the mega-corps, all the while sending our jobs overseas.

And, the democrats would take most (or better yet, all) of our income and hand it out to people that don't want to work. After all, someone has to pay for the free housing, free groceries, free health care, free internet, free cell phone, etc.

Neither party has the best interests of working middle class people in mind. We desperately need a viable third party. But, the one thing both the republican party, and democratic party can agree on, is that they can't allow a third party to get established. And, they both work very hard to keep it that way. Notice that none of the other parties were allowed into the debates!

0
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Casino cops are coming if we can't move all this cash in a hurry

usbac

Unfortunately I don't think so. Having worked IT for a very large casino myself, I can tell you that they pay shit, treat you like something worse than shit, and expect you to live there 24/7. If you have the "nerve" to go home to sleep a few hours every few days, "you are not a team player".

After 26 years in IT, that was the very worst job I have ever had. To see the pallets of cash coming in every day, then to get paid crap and treated like property, you want to get out of this hell on about your second day there!.

2
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WTF ... makes mobile phone batteries explode?

usbac

Re: Dense energy storage can be dangerous...

Just remember what happens when a phaser overloads!! Very bad news.

10
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You shrunk the database into a .gz and the app won't work? Sigh

usbac

Re: Replace tape

@ Zippy's Sausage Factory

This is a little bit off-topic, but still relates to tapes...

Way back in the mid 80's I was in school in Los Angeles to be a recording engineer. Our school had a very high end recording studio. Some of us that had earned the trust of our professor were allowed access to the studio on off hours. We had friends with bands that wanted to record demos to send in to record companies (those were the days).

The problem was that reels of 2-inch tape were very expensive for us poor students. A reel of good quality tape could be as much as $200-300. Our professor told us where to get really good tape for cheap. He explained that the high-end recording studios sell reels of "used" tape for really cheap. The reason is that when well known bands come in to record an album, they run many takes of the same song. Since they are paying thousands of dollars per hour to use the studio, they just keep grabbing new reels of tape. When the project is over, the studio bulk erases the tape, and sells them off cheap.

A friend and fellow student had some friends of his that wanted to record a few demos. So, he went and bought a few reels of this used tape. We arrange to use the studio ofter class one afternoon. His friends aren't quite there yet, so we start getting things ready in the control room. I take one of the reels and start loading it up on our 24-track deck. I notice that a bunch of the VU meters twitch as I'm winding the tape onto the take-up reel. We both look at each other, and realize this tape wasn't erased. So, we quickly re-patch the console for playback instead of recording.

We start listening to the tracks, and make a rough mix. As we are listening we're thinking we've never heard this song before, and are trying to figure out who is the band. About this time Richard's friends show up. They come into the control room and say "Cool.. The Bangles... where did you get this?" It turns out we had an un-released song.

There was one mostly usable take on the tape. We quickly unloaded the tape and put it away. I don't know what Richard ever did with the tape. These days, we could have done a decent mix-down, and posted it on the net. We were both too honest do anything unscrupulous with the tape. It would be quite an artifact to have these days, however.

10
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Ad-blocking ‘plateaus’, claims hopeful ad industry

usbac

Is it really smart doing these surveys?

I'm just wondering what the effect is of polling thousands of users (especially no-techie users) and asking them if they use an ad blocker? How many of these people think "Hmm, what is an ad blocker? (a quick Google search later) ...hey, this is cool, no more annoying ads... (ad blocker installed)"

I would think these polls would be very risky to ad companies.

5
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'I found the intern curled up on the data centre floor moaning'

usbac

Re: Laura's Tale

Many years ago I had a phone number that was very close to the office number for one of our local District Court judges. I would get phone calls all the time from lawyers. I had great fun with that.

A lot of the calls would be asking if a hearing or trial could be postponed. I would reply "so what date works for you?". Then, whatever the date, I would pause and rustle some papers, and answer "Okay, that date will work fine for his honor..." With all of the "failure to appear" rules, I wonder how it worked for them? God I hate lawyers!!

5
2

How to make the move from ISDN to SIP

usbac

I agree completely. If you do SIP, you have to do it right. We run a retail call center. We moved from a PRI to SIP a year and a half ago. We have an actual fiber Internet connection running QoS with about 15% of our bandwidth reserved for VoIP. We have very few problems with call quality. As a matter of fact, I think when we do have poor call quality, it's on the other end.

The point about getting sales calls for VoIP that have very poor call quality is so true. Before the move to SIP, our at the time phone provider was trying to sell us their SIP service. We had a conference call scheduled with one of their sales guys, and one of their tech people. The problem was that that we couldn't hear either person because they were breaking up so badly! We told them to get lost right then and there.

That experience made us stay away from SIP for several years. If a major telco can't even make a sales conference call without call quality issues, what should we expect from SIP service?

We are with a provider that has good tech support, and has had fairly good service, at a great price. We are saving about $1500-$2000 per month in usage compared to the PRI we once had.

Add to that the savings of not making our $1100 per month lease payment on our phone system. We went with FreePBX/Asterisk, and bought our phones outright. We used an older Dell server we had as a spare (you don't need much server - you can run 10 phones on a Raspberry PI). In all we spent about $6000 for the new system (36 phones + 48-port POE switch). Full ROI in less than three months.

If done right, SIP can be great.

0
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Flytenow's other wing clipped: second appeal fails

usbac

Re: Hypocrisy

Way back when I got my PPL, the regulations just said it was legal to "share expenses" with no definition of how much of a "share" the passenger paid. It was technically legal for me to pay $1, and the passenger to pay the rest.

My dad was an insurance claims adjuster. In our state there are a lot of small towns separated by hundreds of miles. I would take my dad on rounds by plane where we would visit several cities in one day, and be back by the early afternoon. The insurance companies paid him a mileage rate based on the road distance between these towns. Usually that would pay for almost all of the plane rental (which included the fuel). I basically got to fly for free.

A few years ago, the regulations got "clarified" by the FAA with the whole ratio calculation thing. Now the sharing of expenses needs to be calculated correctly. Back 20 years ago, this whole Flytenow thing might have worked. Not now for sure.

Bruce

0
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Quad-core coffee table trumped by dual-Mac garden furniture

usbac

Re: re O'Reilly etc

I have an original Apple ][ manual from 1977 in good shape!

Complete with schematics and an assembler listing of the OS. Man, those were the days....

4
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The case for ethical ad-blocking

usbac

I have no ethical problem with ad-blocking

Our security subscription allows us to ad-block at our corporate firewall. I just had to enable the category "Advertisements".

It's funny, we have had a content filter available on our firewall for years, but never enabled it. Management has always been fairly liberal with filtering/tracking here at the company. They have always had the opinion that if they thought they had to nanny employees that much, they shouldn't be working here. In fact, they did terminate an employee a while back for abusing (and I mean really abusing) Farcebook.

It was finally the annoying ads that made us enable the content filter. So far, the only content we block is ads! It took a while for me to get the okay. There were some discussion about the ethics of ad-blocking, since we are a business that needs advertising. But, the recent stories of malware spreading via the ad networks finally sold it. It's the lack of policing their content that led to the blocking of ads at our company.

Everyone that works here is finally seeing how the web really should be!! People are coming to me to see how to get an ad blocker for their home PC.

7
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FBI's Tor pedo torpedoes torpedoed by United States judge

usbac

Re: A legal work around?

@ Bob Wheeler

Most modern network drivers allow you to change the MAC address within your OS. No need to change hardware.

This all happened when network hardware vendors started recycling MAC addresses. All of a sudden, it was theoretically it's possible to have duplicate MAC addresses on a network. Very, very unlikely, but because of this, the ability to change mac addresses was added to drivers.

4
0

The future of Firefox is … Chrome

usbac

Re: Choice

I agree completely. I use Palemoon because I simply hate the new Firefox UI. Chrome is out of the question because of the UI.

It's really a shame most of the web these days won't work if your browser is more than a few hours old!

31
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We bet your firm doesn't stick to half of these 10 top IT admin tips

usbac

Re: Irredentism

@ Naselus

I work for a mid size company. Actually, I kind of like doing the stupid little stuff. I really don't mind changing a wall thermostat, installing the new dishwasher in the break room, or changing batteries in emergency lights. The kind of stuff that somehow seems to fall under "IT".

It gives me a nice mental break from trying the figure out why Microshit's latest server OS is doing something strange. Or trying to figure out why the shipping software I wrote four years ago screws up only when shipping a 3 pound package to Kurblackistan and the recipient has two K's in their last name!

3
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Call the Cable Guy: Wireless just won't cut it

usbac

57 Drops in my home

Our home builder let me come in on the weekend and wire my house. He just said "don't hurt yourself on my job site". It was very nice of him to do that.

57 drops might seem excessive, but the walls will only be open once (I hope). At that time Cat-5e was really cheap. It took five 1000 foot boxes, but Cat-5e was only $31 a box then.

5
0

Let’s re-invent small phones! Small screens! And rubber buttons!

usbac

Re: Even Windows 7 has sometimes weird UI behaviour

This reminds me of a good story.

At my former workplace, we get a support call from the director of corporate finance (a total uptight b***h - I mean she probably goes home and tortures kittens for fun). Since I really hated the place, and had already given my two-weeks notice, I didn't take things too seriously. It turns out this woman had accidentally hit the hot key sequence to flip the video upside down. So, with two of my co-workers from IT, in tow, I walk into her office and without saying a word pick up her 21" CRT monitor and flip it upside down on her desk, and walk out.

My co-workers were laughing their asses off. No one would dare cross this b***h before this. I think my co-workers were actually following me around just to see what strange shit I would do. I would never do anything malicious or unacceptable in the work place, but I did have a bit of harmless fun.

9
0

Behold, Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – and a firm screw-you to Oracle

usbac

Re: More spyware ?

By Microsoft's own admission, you can't turn off ALL of the spying. Any spying that can't be turned off completely is unacceptable in a corporate environment.

Windows 10 will NEVER be seen on any desktop within our enterprise! Senior management here agrees that any spying is totally unacceptable. Even with the enterprise version of Windows 10, you can't completely disable all "telemetry". Not going to happen here!

Even with all of the "telemetry" settings turned off, Windows 10 phones home over 2000 times per day. This isn't a bunch of FUD, this is reality. The world may look different from your cubicle in Redmond, but in the real world, we aren't the product!

16
6

Romanian ATM hacker exploits vulnerability in FENCE, escapes jail

usbac

Re: I dont care what he did

Yeah, me too...

It must be a "stick'in it to the man" thing!

0
0

'Dodgy Type-C USB cable fried my laptop!'

usbac

Re: Who the hell...

Someone that works for a company that can afford to burn bundles of $100 bills to heat the building?

0
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Remember Windows 1.0? It's been 30 years (and you're officially old)

usbac

@ jelabarre59

Same here. We used one in high school to connect to the local university's CDC Cyber 730.

I think I still have a few Basic programs on paper tape in a drawer somewhere. The youngsters have it so easy now!

1
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Rap for wrap chaps in crap email trap: Chipotle HR used domain it had no control over

usbac

Not exactly the same problem, but similar

I work for a mid sized e-commerce company (that will remain nameless). A few years ago I received a phone call from the manager of a small company asking if I know why they are getting flooded with calls asking for our company. Customers were calling thinking they were getting our customer service department. After a few days of head scratching, we still couldn't figure out why our customers were calling them?

At this point, I called the manager back, and asked them to ask one of the callers where they got the phone number. The customer answered that it was printed in a big numbers on their pick-ticket (invoice) that was in the box. It turns out that someone here just used 1-800-(company name) on the pre-printed forms. The problem was, that wasn't the correct toll free number. We had sent out tens of thousands of orders with this printed on the pick-ticket.

Nobody ever admitted to being responsible for this. Fortunately for us, the owners of the poor company that kept getting slammed with calls was very understanding. We gave them and their staff codes for some huge discounts on our products, and everyone just laughed it off. Being the US, I was really surprised we didn't get sued! It says a lot for the owners of that company.

3
0

Apple 1 goes on sale, expected to fetch £300,000 to £500,000

usbac

Re: That much $$$: fool, money...

Yeah, but try to find a modern board-house that can make a PCB that looks that poorly made!

0
0

Windows Server 2003 and the industry refresh that never was

usbac

Re: None of the above?

In our case, none of the above!

We are moving our Windows servers to FreeNAS. We will still run a couple of Windows servers where we absolutely HAVE to. But, we have a few existing Win 2008 server licenses for servers that are running Win 2003 now. Those servers (only three) will be upgraded to Win 2008, and will be the only remaining Windows servers. They will be moved off of Windows by the time support for Win 2008 ends.

Our current ERP system (accounting, inventory, invoicing, etc) already runs on Red Hat. Serving files can be done with FreeNAS. We are currently working on moving any in-house developed apps to MySQL/MariaDB. We have the source for all of them, so moving off of SQL server is not insurmountable.

There are no plans for ever seeing a Windows 2012 server in our data center.

3
0

How much of ONE YEAR's Californian energy use would WIPE OUT the DROUGHT?

usbac

Not going to happen

The problem is that the environmental impact studies would take decades.

Then you would have dozens of environmental wacko groups suing the municipalities that are trying to build the plants. The lawsuits would take many more decades to get through the courts.

You have to remember this is California we are talking about here! It's the highest concentration of environmental activists (wackos) on the planet.

35
19

Did you almost prang a 737 jet with a drone over Dallas? The FAA would like a word

usbac

Funny, x 7 just proved my point. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KhZwsYtNDE)

If you believe Naughtyhorse, that plane should have fallen out of the sky and exploded! Strange how it just kept climbing. Almost like the aircraft designers planned it that way?

A bird strike to a cessna windscreen is a very bad thing. I've seen it first hand. When you fly light aircraft, you are very aware of this fact. Fortunately, with single engine aircraft, the prop usually gets the bird before it comes through the windscreen. Not so with twins.

Large jet aircraft have much stronger windscreens than light aircraft. They will usually take a bird strike without complete failure of the windscreen (maybe a little cracking).

Way back when I was learning to fly, we hit a Red-Tail Hawk on short final. Luckily for us, the bird hit the wing at about it's midpoint. The impact actually caused the plane to yaw hard to the right. It caused some damage to the plane, but it was still flyable. If it had hit the windscreen, I wouldn't be writing this.

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usbac

Re: Could a drone hurt a 737?

From someone that IS a pilot.

First of all, the Airbus that went into the Hudson had multiple bird ingestions into each engine. Unless the 737 flew into a "flock" of drones, it would only take out one engine. Even on short final, a 737 is quite capable if performing a go-around on a single engine. There is adequate rudder authority to counter the asymmetrical thrust.

As to damaging a control surface, that's very unlikely. On short final, with full (or nearly full) flaps and leading edge slats extended, the airflow would likely push the drone away from most of the control surfaces. A bird strike to control surfaces rarely makes an aircraft "uncontrollable".

Hydraulics are inside the wings and fuselage, and are generally routed through well protected areas when possible. Aircraft designers are not idiots. Again it's extremely rare for a bird to make it deep enough into the wing or fuselage to get to hydraulic lines.

And lastly, if hitting a light plastic drone can damage a landing gear strut (or tire), I wouldn't try to land 45,000 Lbs of aircraft traveling at 130+ knots on it. The loads on a landing gear at touchdown are massive!

As for the other items "Or even if it wasn't landing, it could damage the nav or weather radar. Or break the pitots which detect airspeed (giving you no idea how fast you are flying)", if the aircraft isn't landing, what the hell is it doing below 400 feet?

As a pilot, I'm not defending what this drone operator is doing. There a plenty of things that can kill us pilots, we don't need idiots trying to kill us with their drones!!

I just thought I should shed a little light on reality, not what someone who plays a little flight sim on their computer thinks...

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iTunes snafu: DNS fail borked Apple's app & iTunes stores for 10 HOURS

usbac

Remember, when you are in the Reality Distortion Field, time passes a different rate than for us on the outside...

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Netadmin wanted for 'terrible, terrible, awful job nobody wants'

usbac

Re: Microwave

Yeah, somehow installing our new dishwasher came under "IT support".

Not a big deal, though. Something like this sure beats trying to fix fucked up Windows. Make a nice break from dealing with users complaints (Except every time there is some issue with the dishwasher, it's "call IT")!

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