* Posts by Pen-y-gors

2030 posts • joined 1 Oct 2010

Think you could deliver a Register lecture? Tell us why

Pen-y-gors
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Doesn't everyone?

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Pen-y-gors
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These are not the speakers you are looking for....

I have a selection of talks that go down very well with the local WIs - problem is they tend to be on 19th century Welsh history, so not much of an IT angle. Although the one on 19th century pubs of Cardiganshire may be of interest to our readers...

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An 'AI' that can diagnose schizophrenia from a brain scan – here's how it works (or doesn't)

Pen-y-gors
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Re: Seems pretty low res.

BTW all joking aside in most cases of schizophrenia the "split" is between the patients idea of reality and actual reality, often with the symptom of hearing voices.

So, we have 17,000,000 schizophrenics in the UK then - plus Trumpf and friends over the pond

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: Aren't all people a little schizophrenic ?

Harvey assures me that I'm perfectly normal and stable.

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Got some pom-poms handy? UK.gov seeks a geography cheerleader

Pen-y-gors
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Experts?

one of a network of experts across the civil service

I thought official government policy was to ignore experts and rely on unskilled, ignorant and bigoted amateurs?

Although I suppose there's nothing stopping them appointing a new expert and ignoring them in the same way they ignore all people who actually have empirical evidence for their recommendations.

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iRobot just banked a fat profit. And it knows how to make more: By selling maps of your homes

Pen-y-gors
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Ratner moment?

I don't know how effective these little beasties are at cleaning.

Could this be iRobot's Ratner moment - one careless comment which wipes out the company?

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FUKE NEWS: Robot snaps inside drowned Fukushima nuke plant

Pen-y-gors
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Time for some clever industrial design.

Obviously the challenges of getting anything to work in that sort of environment are horrific. But someone is going to have to think up the machines that can work there, otherwise how will they ever get it dismantled? I think we need some sort of international organisation that has lots of big and rugged machines that can cope with any environment, permanently at the ready to go to the rescue after some major emergency. Best locate it somewhere neutral, ideally near the equator. Nice tropical island somewhere?

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Brits must now register virtually all new drones and undergo safety tests

Pen-y-gors
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No to licensing!

Just make it legal to blast them out of the skies and run over anyone controlling one.

Had one hovering over my garden last night - in a village in mid-Wales FFS!

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Q. What's today's top language? A. Python... no, wait, Java... no, C

Pen-y-gors
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Re: In over 40 years of programming ...

Yeah, but serious geeks in late-middle-age still code everything in Fortran IV and then write a post-processor to translate it into COBOL, PL/1, Algol, Lisp or whatever the flavour of the month is.

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China censors drop the soap operas, sitcoms

Pen-y-gors
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Maybe a step too far in China. If you're going to keep the proles down-trodden, it's normally wise to allow them the bread and circuses. If you cut that down to half a stale floury bap and an ancient clown you may start to get trouble.

Sadly UK proles may turn out to be just as subservient as the Chinese ones. As long as they don't stop Love Island and that dating thing where people take their clothes off.

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'Coke dealer' called us after his stash was stolen – cops

Pen-y-gors
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Re: Florida Man

To be fair, dump criminals are preferable to clever ones

I think the residents of Finglas may disagree

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1836130/watch-the-moment-phantom-pooer-terrorising-an-irish-town-emptied-his-bowels-outside-a-shop-for-second-time-in-a-week/

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: Florida Man

@ Prst. V.Jeltz

I don't know about death for watching those programmes, but I suspect for making them.

Thankfully I don't think I've ever seen any of them, but I am vaguely aware of their existence from my occasional visits to that zenith of soft-prôn websites, Mail Online, which seems to feature their actors in various stages of undress.

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HMS Frigatey Mcfrigateface given her official name

Pen-y-gors
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Better value?

Not a bad price. And if they scrapped Trident they could buy about 80 of them - that would be a decent sized fleet again - and there would be two frigates per admiral! Bung some Tomahawks on board and they could threaten Johnny Foreigners all round the globe.

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Apple hurls out patches for dozens of security holes in iOS, macOS

Pen-y-gors
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Re: God operating Sytem

'naturally it has flaws'?

Nah, you gets what you pays for - or should expect to.

At those prices I'd expect perfection!

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Why can't you install Windows 10 Creators Update on your old Atom netbook? Because Intel stopped loving you

Pen-y-gors
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Extended support

Manufacturers (or software and chips) seem to have decided that what they sell us is seriously life-limited. That may be okay for a consumable like cheese, but is not okay for something that could reasonably be expected to carry on doing its job for many years.

A simple netbook should be able to last for a decade or more, doing useful work.

What happens in 10, 15, 20 years when the hardware for the touchscreens in all these new cars needs upgrade or repair/replacement?

And it's not just Windows that has driver problems. A few years back I tried to install an Ubuntu upgrade on an old Shuttle PC. No chance - no drivers for the integrated graphics chip.

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: Microsoft murdered netbooks

Big problem is that not enough people actually need a netbook. Most people use their electronic gadgetry to consume - watch Youtube, view naughty pictures, listen to music, surf teh interwebs, send the odd tweet or short e-mail. They don't care if it runs windows, Linux, Android or iOS, so long as it works. What a netbook does, with its real keyboard, is allow the owner to create, and not just consume. No-one can type a 20,000 word report on a touchscreen, or write serious code. Sadly it's a limited market. My little old Linux AA1 was great. Cheap, tough as old boots, and a 10 hour battery life. Marvellous for sitting in the garden and writing the great novel. Power connector has got knackered sadly, otherwise I'd still be using it.

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Europe's 'one patent court to rule them all' vision may be destroyed by EPO shenanigans

Pen-y-gors
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Very strange

I know the workings of many European institutions are a bit strange, and influenced by many external factors, but WTF has anyone continued to support this dangerous clown? Has anyone any good suggestions why the Danish bod was so keep to support him?

We need a lot more transparency about the people involved.

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UK.gov watchdog didn't red flag any IT projects. And that alone should be a red flag to everyone

Pen-y-gors
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Amber is the new Red

(Or should that be Amber is the new Rudd?)

Anyway, another example of government dumbing down standards. Amber IT projects now mean 'pretty well doomed to fail', and Green is 'almost certain to be late and over budget, but may actually deliver something one day'. Don't need any other colours as those two categories pretty well cover all government projects (see el Reg articles for the last 319 years)

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Dow Jones index – of customers, not prices – leaks from AWS repo

Pen-y-gors
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less salubrious characters?

Any chance of a leak of the records of certain family members of D Cameron and T May? And probably a whole slew of other cabinet ministers, ex-ministers, dodgy friends etc.

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UK.gov snaps on rubber gloves, prepares for mandatory porn checks

Pen-y-gors
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But shirley...?

They want to use the ownership of a CC as a way to validate age. Okay.

But they want free sites to take CCs.

Using someone else's card with intent to defraud is a crime.

BUT if someone got a legit CC from overseas with zero credit limit, and used it on a free site, they could then pass the card details around thousands of people, who wouldn't be able to charge anything to the card anyway, even if they wanted to.

Can we get a card in the names of T May and A Rudd and pass the details around? No intent to defraud after all...

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Brit neural net pioneer just revolutionised speech recognition all over again

Pen-y-gors
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I bet he's sick of people saying "What a cunning plan my Lord" - but he does seem to have dreamt up some plans so cunning you could stick a tail on them etc.

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Physicists send supersonic shock waves rippling through a lab

Pen-y-gors
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Neighbours?

Can't be much fun working in the next lab to these bods - mini sonic booms all day. Hope they're not doing sleep research or similar.

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UK spookhaus GCHQ can crack end-to-end encryption, claims Australian A-G

Pen-y-gors
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Re: Obsfucted plaintext ?

Okay,meet you on the beach on the 6th.

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Pen-y-gors
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End-to-end - NOT

The term end-to-end encryption is a bit misleading. What it actually means it's encrypted from the point where it's encrypted until the point where it's decrypted - which is true of all encryption. Until they devise a way to encrypt your thoughts in your brain and decrypt them in your eyeballs at the other end, there's always going to be an opportunity to hack before it's encrypted or after it's decrypted, provided you have access to the device.

I suspect that's what GCHQ spook meant about 'It's feasible'.

And in other news, Australian government repeals Boyle's law - volume of high pressure hot air generated by aussie politicians is now infinite.

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Slower US F-35A purchases piles $27bn onto total fighter jet bill

Pen-y-gors
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Russian subs?

No problem. Just put a small notice in the Times to the effect that the Navy will be doing live-firing exercises with depth charges in the area for the next few months. Enter at own risk...

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Brit military scolded for being too selfish with sexy high-end tech

Pen-y-gors
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Low tech?

Sometimes low tech can be rather more effective than high-tech, particularly if the low-tech is actually in stock and the high-tech will be ready in about 25 years.

I remember the US having problems in Vietnam with B52s being shot down, despite all sorts of clever anti missile technology. The Vietcong simply fired insane numbers of dumb missiles and shells into the path of the bombers - some were bound to hit.

And given the complexity of technology, has anyone thought of building a squadron or two of Gladiators for our lovely new white elephants? Probably so slow and odd that the smart tech on the target wouldn't recognise them as a threat!

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Viking storms storage monastery wielding 50TB SAS SSD

Pen-y-gors
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Re: @Bronek Kozicki, re: internet speeds.

@ac

Even worse would be over a 300Baud dial up acoustic coupler attached modem via a bad POTS line through a wonky international call.

Ah.Sir has experience of living in mid-Wales (and parts of Central London) then?

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: Nice

which means that a drive with a reasonable storage amount (6TB+, anything lower is a waste of money really)

I think that's a bit extreme. Spinning rust is fine for files that aren't heavily accessed - which I suspect is most of the data on most laptops/desktops. My new lappie has 256GB SSD for OS files, web server directories, DB etc, but then the general stuff sits happily on 1TB of rust. Works fine for me, but others no doubt have different requirements.

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: Yay!

@Wonko

Ta. But does that imply that individual bits/cells/sectors/whatever they are on SSD will start to fail after about 5x365 writes? Which would be okay for some sort of WORM type application, (log file archives) but not great for something that gets hammered.

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Pen-y-gors
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Yay!

Finally! All my pr0n in one place!

But seriously..."The endurance is one drive write per day for five years." - what exactly does that mean? Completely rewrite the drive every day for five years? Rewrite one bit a day for five years?

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Russia, China vow to kill off VPNs, Tor browser

Pen-y-gors
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Re: Simple explanation

@ArchTech

1. Georgia. The Georgians attacked two small disputed areas with mainly Russian populations.

1939: Germany attacks one small area (the Sudetenland) with mainly German populations.

2. Ukraine - no Russian troops in Ukraine. Yeah, right. Explain that to the families of the passengers on MH17, and the families of the Russian troops killed in Ukraine.

3. Oh please! Crimea was de-facto and de-jure part of the Ukraine. Forget what it had 'always' been. If countries have territorial disputes they negotiate, they don't invade. Should England invade Calais, Burgundy and Ireland because they had 'always' been English?

4. The Baltics. you omitted 'yet'.

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Pen-y-gors
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@me

Wow - 5 down votes (so far) - didn't realise we had so many Petrogradian Putin puppets on El Reg!

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Pen-y-gors
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Dunno about rare...Putin and his cronies are a pretty nasty bunch, prone to invading neighbouring countries and stuff like that.

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Pen-y-gors
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https?

Can the Chinese and Russian governments hack the detailed content of an HTTPS connection?

'Cos if not, then what stops people getting e.g. an AWS a/c in Ireland with a nice name like fluffykittens.cn and using it to run a remote desktop? And a nice little fake site for any public visitors, of course. The logs say you're spending a lot of time looking at fluffy kittens - what could be wrong with that?

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NASA flies plane through Earthly shadow of Kuiper Belt object

Pen-y-gors
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(Illustration not to scale)

You don't say!

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Trump tramples US Constitution by blocking Twitter critics – lawsuit

Pen-y-gors
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No-brainer

" legal action may bring hostility."

I don't see why - this whole case should be over in about 5 minutes, with judgement against Trump et al.

It's a government information channel - you can't block citizens from seeing it.

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Ransomware-slinging support scammers hire local cash mule in Oz

Pen-y-gors
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Re: What a silly bunt

That's a really double-plus unbright scammer - why waste time phoning someone back because they're pissed off when they could be phoning a load of technically-illiterate new suckers who might give them money?

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Trump to world: Forget moving to America to do a startup

Pen-y-gors
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Why on Gahd's Green Earth....

would any non-Merkin want to move to Trump's USA to try and start a business there? There's plenty of other friendlier countries to run a start-up in

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G20 calls for 'lawful and non-arbitrary access to available information' to fight terror

Pen-y-gors
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Not so bad....

They want access to 'available' information. If it's encrypted, without a backdoor, it ain't available. Discussion over.

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Pen-y-gors
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No point, no-one in government could be arsed to listen to someone who knows what they're talking about. Why should they? - blind prejudice, gut-feeling and unfounded belief is so much more reliable when making policy.

Interesting that a former head of GCHQ has just said it though. Bet they ignore him too. La-la-la-la, I can't hear you!

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Behind the scenes of Slovaks' fight to liberate their .sk domain

Pen-y-gors
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Re: You seem to have...

Not had one on El Reg, but Fasthosts (who I use for domain registration) have just started some idiotic 'click on the cars' captcha when trying to login. When I complain they say they can't remove it, but don't worry, it will 'learn' my IP address over time and reduce the number of clicks required. How does it learn my IP when I use multiple VPNs?

Fasthosts just said goodbye to about £1500/year in registration fees. A curious way of doing business. What happened to 'the customer is always right'? Can anyone recommend a good alternative?

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: Dulled innovation at the registry?

Good old days was very well, but I remember buying my first co.uk domain, probably around 1997, and I think I paid something like £75 for it, possibly for two years.

There is a strong case for national domains to require a clear connection to the country though. Why on earth do I shorten my URLs via Libya?

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Pen-y-gors
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Not the only ones

I entirely sympathise - the .cymru and .wales TLDs are managed by a foreign company (Nominet) based in - gasp - England! And we have to pay for them in English pounds, not a couple of pounds of leeks and a leg of nice spring lamb. Disgusting!

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Talk about a hit and run: AA finally comes clean on security breakdown

Pen-y-gors
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Re: Always simpler than you think

13GB/120000 accounts > 100K each

What other information do they keep about each customer?

My first thought as well. 100K is a small book.

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Semiconductor-laced bunny eyedrops appear to nuke infections

Pen-y-gors
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Control group?

But what happened to the control group - were they treated as well once the results were clear?

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Brit teen accused of running malware factory and helpdesk for crims

Pen-y-gors
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@Stollers

This is a serious problem like terrorism

No, not at all like terrorism. With terrorism people get killed and maimed. With this, people lose money and get very pissed off. Bad but definitely not in the same league.

And you misunderstand the whole point of El Reg comments - we take the piss out of everything, or to be more positive, we like to see the humorous possibilities of all aspects of life on this amazing little blue dot in the vastness of the universe. If we didn't our brains would probably dissolve.

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: @Doctor Syntax

@Doctor Syntax

For some reason I keep reading Shop-fitter as Shop-lifter.

I think my mind must be too highly-trained...

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Pen-y-gors
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Na, Stockport isn't in the West Midlands, it's in somewhere called County. Chap on the telly keeps saying things like

Stockport, County 1 Birmingham, City 2

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Boffins with frickin' laser beams chase universe's mysterious trihydrogen

Pen-y-gors
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Re: The point is H3+ is really unstable in anything like a normal environment.

@John Smith 19

am I talking cr@p?

Beats me! But even if you are talking poo you could probably still make a fortune speculating on the chat show circuit. No actual knowledge required.

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Civil rights warriors file US lawsuit: Let us see Five Eyes agreement

Pen-y-gors
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Fair point

No one disputes that FoI shouldn't be available to see what info the Security Services have on a potential 'subject of interest' or possibly, even where they got the info (at least until they're charged).

But it does seem extremely reasonable that, in a 'so-called' democracy, the principles and agreements that they operate under are open to public scrutiny. What harm could that possibly do?

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