* Posts by Roo

1485 posts • joined 21 Sep 2010

Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

Roo
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Re: @ Voland's right hand

"Like it or not AutoCad and its brethren remain a resolutely Windows-Only affair so any ideas of migrating a whole city council to Linux for the time being are in the realm of science fiction. "

Little nitpick - AutoCAD users would (normally) form a very small proportion of the total number of City Council users, it would be silly to build your entire infrastructure around it IMO. Give the AutoCAD victims some boxes to RDP into and be done with it already...

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Qualcomm is shipping next chip it'll perhaps get sued for: ARM server processor Centriq 2400

Roo
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Re: A power draw of up to 120 watts

"What makes you think Qualcomm will be better than Intel with regards to buggy chips ?"

I think they have a better chance because the target ISA is so much simpler - better defined, peer-reviewed etc. Qualcomm could still screw it up of course, but the problem domain *should* be a lot smaller than verifying an x86-64 design - so they have a better chance of making a good fist of it.

I don't think it's actually possible to produce a formal model of the Intel ISA, and I feel safe throwing that out there because I very much doubt anyone will ever produce a complete formal model of it and prove me wrong. :)

"The Intel f00f bug was a bad one, as was the FDIV bug."

The current errata are somewhat worse in my view, but don't take my word for it, you should take a look yourself and make your own call - Intel do publish them.

"If Intel chips were so buggy there would be a lot of people complaining"

I'm complaining - but I clearly don't qualify as a lot of people. Few people look at the errata, when a box is a bit flakey folks tend to (naively) assume the CPU is OK, and look elsewhere at stuff like firmware, memory, PSUs, or OS bugs. They might even find problems in those areas too - but for whatever reason few people choose to look at the CPU errata - my guess is that many simply don't understand the language & concepts in the errata sheets and so ignore them outright.

I am no Qualcomm fanboy - I would rather someone else punted this gear. ;)

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Roo
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Re: A power draw of up to 120 watts

"Yes, nice technology, shame about how you licence IP."

Agreed. :(

"Icon, because I'm not sure why I'd want a 120W ARM CPU?"

I am hoping it's because it will pack more densely into racks, and deliver good enough aggregate throughput in production to allow you to squeeze more bang for buck out of your date centres. IMO Intel have dropped the ball on verifying and testing their designs - the errata sheets have been horrific for a few generations of Xeons now. There would be some advantage to having less buggy chips - firmware/hardware bugs & work-arounds get tiresome and very costly at scale... :)

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I tend not to read as much into geometry these days, although in this case it does look like it's made a difference in the sheer amount of cache on the chip - which is a good thing. It also shaves a cycle of latency here and there in comparison to the competition in terms of cache/memory latencies and branching. The instruction issues/cycle look well balanced and they've made an interesting choice in pipeline lengths as well - superficially it looks like they've put a lot of effort into minimizing latency. Can't wait to see some SPEC & SPEC_rate results - I'm not expecting top marks but I reckon the Centriq has a fair chance of achieving respectable SPEC / cubic metre (and watt) figures - which would be exciting. :)

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There really is no solid basis for comparison at first glance. The pin bandwidth seems to be in a different league and the "ring bus" does look quite different to what Intel were punting in Xeons, it looks a lot closer to a contemporary datacentre chip than Thunder-X & X-Gene.

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Don't worry about those 40 Linux USB security holes. That's not a typo

Roo
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Re: Physical access means you own the system

"Unless of course it runs say Secure Boot with Bitlocker."

Plenty of locally exploitable priv escalation vulns once the box is up though. ;)

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Paradise Papers reveal Apple moved bits of biz offshore

Roo
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"Cupertino also claims that it remains the world's biggest taxpayer,"

Dearest Timbo

I will gladly help Apple out - they can have my earnings and pay much less tax - and in return I'll have theirs. Everyone's a winner.

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AMD, Intel hate Nvidia so much they're building a laptop chip to spite it

Roo
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Intel's half of the memory architecture slides appear to have been drawn up by the Underpants Gnomes.

The slides assert that Intel has engineered a teleporting mechanism that magically delivers memory traffic direct to the cores. Poor old AMD not having any magic to fall back on. :)

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OK, we admit it. Under the hood, the iPhone X is a feat of engineering

Roo
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Re: "Why do you think Linux users do not spend money?"

@Hans1

I understand the sentiment of not funding scum, but in practice I have found buying an ScumTax free thin and light lappy pretty tricky. FWIW I build towers from bits or choose barebones boxes.

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Re: "it is easier to use, more reliable and has more features out of the box."

"Again the lack of understanding what most users needs is what dooms Linux to be on less than 5% of desktops, and why desktop commercial software stays away from Linux."

Desktop users are niche, most people use mobiles and don't run a desktop or even laptop at all.

However none of that is relevant to what suits my purposes. Your argument is pointless.

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Re: "it is easier to use, more reliable and has more features out of the box."

"Sorry, I forgot there's a third group, those who have been brainwashed (by the first group) to believe Linux is "the best" -"

Brainwashing at the scale required to keep an OS user community afloat requires the kind of resources that a big name like Microsoft, IBM, Oracle or Apple bring to bear.

There is however a significant group of FUD pedallers out there (including you in this case) who prefer to denigrate users (aka potential customers, peers and folks with enough marbles to make their own minds up) rather than accept that a different OS is actually a better solution. Folks spewing FUD is a key indicator that they feel threatened by the alternative and are unable to come up with a proper reason to use the product they favour.

I've used CP/M, MS-DOS (1.x -> 6.0), Windows 3.x -> ME, 3.51 -> Windows 10, VMS (3.x -> OpenVMS), SunOS, Solaris, Minix, FreeBSD, MacOS, OS/X, OpenBSD and Linux. I've tried a lot of stuff out - and at the end of the day OpenBSD & Linux still get my personal vote, but I don't feel the need to denigrate other folk's choices.

I am curious why would you care enough to want to piss on other people's parades, do you feel threatened by people making choices that don't fit with your world view ? You behave as if your career depends on you pissing on the Linux community - why is that ?

"Believe me, I'd really like a good alternative to macOS and Windows, but the "superiority complex" stemming from Stallman himself doesn't really help..."

I didn't like the noises coming from Olsen/Cutler/Gates/Jobs/Ballmer either, but I still had a crack at making the best of the stuff they punted. In this instance you are the problem, not te solution.

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Re: "Why do you think Linux users do not spend money?"

"There are two groups of people using Linux. For one, it's a political assertion in the name of Stallman and the GPL. The other is made of people who just find free stuff appealing, especially since Illegal copies of Windows and its software became harder to use (and running macOS on non Apple devices not so easy)."

There is at least one move group. That group paid for a vendor OS and then installed Linux anyway (like me, many times over) because quite frankly it is easier to use, more reliable and has more features out of the box. Certain vendor OSes out there don't ship basics such as a bourne shell, C compiler, standards compliant web browser, Python interpreter and a workable email client - you actually have to go out and install that stuff yourself from third parties...

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10/10 would patch again: Big Red plasters 'easily exploitable' backdoor in Oracle Identity Manager

Roo
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Re: I don't think anyone is shocked by this

"Thankfully, we've stopped allowing any new Oracle products onto our network. Those we still have must find a new non-Oracle solution prior to their refresh date."

Lucky you... Did that extend to Java by association too ? :)

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Oracle appear to have eliminated validation from their development process. They've mugged their customers with rank amateur wankware, they really should be litigated out of business.

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HMRC boss defends shift to AWS, says they got 50% knocked off

Roo
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Re: Of course not

"*Nix and you can't block root access to a file system like you can block admin access in Windows as *Nix doesn't have a very good ACL / security model in comparison) and the"

You fail at UNIX, OTOH you excel at talking smack and making stuff up. Just a few pointers for you:

1) root is not an "Admin Account", and it shouldn't be used as such - we've known better for several decades now.

2) chroot was available in UNIXland at least a decade before WinNT was even on the drawing board (Win 3.1, 3.11, 95, 98, ME et al didn't really have anything like that). Better and more comprehensive mechanisms have been implemented many times over since over the past *three* decades as well.

3) As for MS "redesigned their security so that remote access to local data requires local approval" - they have been doing that off and on since NT was released and quite frankly the CVE reports speak volumes for their fallibility when it comes to securing a machine running Windows.

Being cynical I doubt you'll be taking any of the above to heart given that you are probably just shilling or trolling - where the truth or rational arguments aren't actually relevant.

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"AWS took a large loss on this"

Apparently data is worth something, AWS getting HMRC's entire dataset would be pretty valuable as far as random datasets go. Even if Amazon don't want the data themselves, I'm sure lots of organisations of varying degree of shadyness would like to buy it. Win win for everyone but the tax payer.

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Oracle ZFS man calls for Big Red to let filesystem upstream into Linux

Roo
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"And the anecdote about being told "use that broken stuff, no you can't go back despite having myriad problems"? Way to run a business?"

That strategy is painfully familiar. The evidence suggests that it doesn't cause enough damage to cause any serious hindrance to multinationals that are 'too big to fail'... Outfits like Oracle can win contracts by simply selling at a loss in to remove the opposition, and/or get a nigh-on-free-cash to buy them out if they choose to. These outfits can't piss money up the wall fast enough to outpace the rate at which pension funds and customers/victims are throwing money at them.

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'Israel hacked Kaspersky and caught Russian spies using AV tool to harvest NSA exploits'

Roo
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Re: "I actually blame a Microsoft"

"Does anyone seriously think any o/s isn't vulnerable these days? I have a/v installed on my Mac, we have a/v on Linux at work"

Installing *more* software with *more* vulnerabilities does not necessarily make your system any less vulnerable. When that extra software systematically reports back to base and downloads payloads off the interwebs you have provided a *new* remote entry point that gives direct access to a process running with elevated privs. *If* the resulting system is *more* secure for that extra entry point it would be a very much against the run of play in the real world.

Keeping a physical separation between the interweb traffic, filtering everything coming in (and out) with a secure by default firewall (eg: pf), patching frequently and watching the logs is the best option I've found yet.

YMMV.

I think OS/es are vulnerable, so I try to cut down services and keep a physically removable network cable between my boxes and any off-site traffic.

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New coding language Fetlang's syntax designed to read like 'poorly written erotica'

Roo
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Re: Idiots in the IT field.. too many in the last few years...

${DEITY} bless those crazy people.

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Russian spies used Kaspersky AV to hack NSA staffer, swipe exploit code – new claim

Roo
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"Those who are quick to accuse US AV providers of being NSA tools"... Are wrong, because AV providers are in fact just tools.

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Oracle VP: 'We want the next decade to be Java first, Java always'

Roo
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Re: No worries

"JVM can turn on vector instructions if it discovers them in the cpu."

That presumes you've built a special JVM that targets the special instructions first. Your binary is only as portable as JVM(s) you have available to you. Someone somewhere will have to tweak those JVMs and release them to you in the first place.

"It is obvious that if you optimize continuously, it is better than optimizing once in the beginning, yes?"

It's not obvious at all. Optimisation is not free. Mechanical optimisation doesn't always make code faster, it's not perfect and it introduces risk as a consequence. Finally if you want stable behaviour from your code you would need to switch it off - jitter can be a huge problem in a distributed system, going to sleep for a millisecond can easily multiply to a penalty of a few seconds across multiple processes... :)

I am not dismissing runtime optimisation out of hand, but the downsides can be significant in practice.

In my line of work the size of working set is often a key determinant of performance - simply because cache miss penalties are so big... JVM based apps tend to be at a disadvantage in this regard because they usually chew up *more* memory than a native binary - with a JVM you bring the kitchen sink with you regardless. This may not be a big deal when you are running a couple instances on your desktop PC - but it is a big deal when you are trying to maximise the throughput of a box running tens, hundreds or even thousands of instances in parallel. It's not uncommon for the Java apps we watch over to run into the OOM Killer - and that literally kills throughput stone dead.

Memory efficient code does have a legitimate role to play, it's not just a fetish. :)

Generally speaking I find that optimising the code at the source level actually gives the biggest benefits of all - a bad design will always perform badly. :)

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If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face — forever

Welcome to my Orwellian Nightmare ! :)

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Home Sec Amber Rudd: Yeah, I don't understand encryption. So what?

Roo
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"I don't need to understand how encryption works to understand how it's helping – end-to-end encryption – the criminals. I will engage with the security services to find the best way to combat that."

I wish she would understand how end-to-end encryption helps law abiding citizens too.

She comes across as a self-pitying self-righteous bully who invents hurts and grievances to excuse the premeditated and malicious policies that she is intending to foist upon millions of tax-payers who do nothing but make her richer and who have never harmed a hair on her head.

Malicious leeches have no place in civil society. She should take the medicine and do her --ing job or piss off back to whatever swamp she slithered out of.

FWIW I suspect the same will be true of the next Home Sec. and the one after that too. :)

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HPE coughed up source code for Pentagon's IT defenses to ... Russia

Roo
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Re: Did I understand this right?

These days "closed source" often includes a pile of "open source" libraries anyway, so you get the same vulns as open source, plus an extra delay as the vendor incorporates the updates and redistributes their software. FWIW there is a metric crap-ton of *very out of date* vulnerable Open Source software incorporated into every single vendor product I've looked at as part of my day job so far. It's a royal ballache. :(

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Roo
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Re: Did I understand this right?

"They should just Open source it shouldn't they?"

Probably - the security by obscurity model has been blown. ;)

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Researchers promise demo of 'God-mode' pwnage of Intel mobos

Roo
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Re: Actually, it is standing on a turtle

"I assume you've seen Talos II? That machine does all of this but it's not x86..."

That's news to me, but as fun as POWER boxes are ... I just want vendors to wind back the clock to the 70s and give us machines that don't have a billion lines of crapware baked into the bootstrap. :)

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Re: Actually, it is standing on a turtle

"Well, technically it is on a replaceable Flash device, the problem is that the CPU / PCH requires the firmware stored on that Flash device to carry a valid Intel cryptographic signature"

That rather misses the point, the point is to reduce the complexity and return full control of what boots back to the customer. It's about having a choice - and not having to put blind faith in a very complex setup that is known to be vulnerable until the day you decide to re-purpose that box as a boat anchor.

Ideally all the bootstrap would do is load a few bytes off the flash and execute them. The customer, if they chose, could then put some signature verification code in for bootstrapping the main CPU.

There is nothing stopping Intel et al from providing a flash drive with their current crapware installed gratis. That would give the folks who give a toss a chance to fix the hardware - and of course for Intel it gives them an easy out should they ship broken by design bootstraps in the future.

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Re: Actually, it is standing on a turtle

"This is where it goes seriously pear-shaped. They are treating the ME like yet another general purpose computer, running a general-purpose OS, with general-purpose bugs..."

The 'console' being a fully fledged machine running it's own OS has been a thing for many decades now (common on big iron), sometimes it was a very handy thing to have. IMO it went pair shaped when that 'console' widget got hooked up to cables carrying random traffic.

It would be nice if Intel had all the bootstrap for that console widget on a physically replaceable flash device - so customers could actually have control over their own machines for a change. :)

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Java security plagued by crappy docs, complex APIs, bad advice

Roo
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Re: @Gene Cash RTFM

"Oh well the lack of proper real Multiple Inheritance support in Java is a programming headache .. you need to use the Java Interfaces to mimic it .. and that is not good at all."

I can't say that I missed MI in Java that much - but in fairness I do tend to use an "interface" style of coding in C++ - simply because it reduces the chances of Mr & Mrs Cockup paying a visit.

My top Java headaches are the lack of unsigned int & the total disregard that Java has for the host OS - I see thousands of lines of code to replicate OS calls and JNI bollocks for basic stuff like setting an env var on a daily basis. I get that Java was intentionally ignorant of the OS - but that really is a massive handicap when you are running grown up apps that really do need to talk to the OS to get their work done.

If I had to choose between proper integration with the host OS or MI, I think I'd choose the former every time. YMMV :)

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CES 2017 roundup: The good, the bad, and the frankly bonkers

Roo
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Re: Nothing from Intel on this list?

The 'Compute Card' is different in that it has an expensive (Intel) single source CPU built around a legacy ISA. Much like the Raspberry Pi alternatives that Intel punted and abandoned.

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Deputy AG Rosenstein calls for law to require encryption backdoors

Roo
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Re: Laws of Math vs Laws of Men

"but you do have to wonder why politicians, political appointees and even moderately smart guys like the late not-much-lamented Comey simply *will not* understand that the backdoors idea cannot work, will have no effect on the Black Hats it's supposed to be targeting and will render everyone less safe"

The answer is very simple: They don't actually care about security and locking up bad guys, they just want access to all your data 24x7. Given that the motivation is clearly not security, and the folks talking this shite are pole climbers by definition, I believe we can safely conclude that they want this stuff because it will give them a massive edge over the proles in terms of insider trading, blackmail, extortion and evading justice. I am not even sure why they are trying to justify this crap to the television cameras, it's not as if the voters have a choice in the matter.

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"TLAs will gain access to mountains of "where you at" messages, pictures of food, and other useless data."

Google, Whatsapp, Facebook et al all leverage that 'useless' data to generate cash. Presumably the TLAs & gov can and will do exactly the same - much like our allegedly confidential NHS records here in the UK.

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Linux-loving lecturer 'lost' email, was actually confused by Outlook

Roo
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Re: You canna change the laws of physics captain....

"The ones that REALLY annoy me are the ones who can't understand simple physics."

Ah yes, I worked at a place where the chief was a Salesperson. Said Chief had a number of cracks at changing the laws of physics with their considerable physical presence. Two events stand out in my memory. The first was a heated argument between said Chief and a usually quiet spoken very intelligent academic.

The Chief had decided that the product said academic had produced would be far better if it used an IR camera, the Academic disagreed because the whole point was to pick out dark colored particles in a light background. The academic did try to point out that an IR camera would simply measure temperature and therefore be no use in the application, and the discussion ended with much shouting from the Chief and the Academic quietly resigning.

The second stand out moment (there were a lot of memorable FUBARs in that brief 18 month stint) was when the Chief returned beaming from his latest sales trip, having flogged something that would be physically impossible to build, and on the off chance that we did make some magic happen it would be physically impossible to operate. Apparently the customer agreed with this assessment, but the Chef decided it was possible, and came back to base with a signed contract featuring a termination/non-delivery penalty clause. The Chief checked in on the engineering team who timidly and gently told him it wasn't possible... Some point later in the afternoon I had the unhappy experience of watching a very large and angry Chief trash an office, punching a few holes through the partition wall after a phone call with said customer.

It was an unhappy occasion because he came out of the office and bellowed lots of unpleasant things about engineers after cooling off a little.

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Re: I am fairly sure

"I have navigated trees with a + and - to collapse structures even in Linux apps. This is not "new", he had clearly got past the real changes i.e. having to start double clicking etc."

You could have read the article and realised that he was using the UNIX 'mail' application on a VT (aka dumb terminal) - likely a text only one... Some apps *did* run on VTs and offer the +/- idiom (ISTR trn did that) 'mail' most definitely did not.

Also note this guy was 'placid' - therefore it is extremely unlikely that he used a Windows box very often. Windows has a habit of making people permanently angry - compare and contrast Steve Ballmer with Dennis Ritchie for example.

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Looks like she got free fault diagnosis on her own kit at the Charity's expense. Nice.

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Re: Client support, we've heard about it

"The funny thing was he was a Comp Sci professor, and was doing cutting edge research in parallel programming. He just didn't want to be bothered to learn anything new outside his interests."

I have some sympathy for that position. If you are really busy there are few things more irritating than having your working environment turned upside down because someone else has decided it needs to change for their benefit rather than yours. This is a regular occurrence at my current workplace - the tools are changing faster than anyone can learn to use and apply them (entire teams have this issue, it's not just me). :)

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The future of Python: Concurrency devoured, Node.js next on menu

Roo
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Re: Multithreaded programming is easy, Multithreaded coding is not.

"In fact, while async programming is super-simple, it has many caveats which can be far more complicated to resolve than multithreaded code."

The problem I most often see is that folks haven't grasped the underlying theory of the parallel programming methods they employ - so they don't have sufficient information to 1) select the best option and 2) use it.

Case in point I'm seeing a bit of Futures creeping into common usage in Java, which combines pros and cons of Threading with the pros and cons of async... You thought 'goto spaghetti' was bad ? Try futures spaghetti not only is it tough to follow but it's also adds unpredictability to the mix. It gets really fun when some code throws an unexpected uncaught exception a couple of weeks after the guy wrote it - when said dude says "This is too complicated". :)

I think futures have their place - a dark corner under a dusty blanket with a "Bio-hazard" sticker on it :)

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Re: There's a reason Unix has this idea of "one program per job" and "pipes" to link them.

"Yes, it was a model designed when very few 'programs' could fit into RAM so you needed to chain them while I/O was stored in the pipes while one program unloaded and the next one was loaded into RAM."

That wasn't the sole reason. One of the reasons is that they wanted something that was easy to understand and use on datasets that vastly exceed the capacity of a single address space & processor. The fact that the vast majority of HPC boxes out there run something akin to that model should tell you that a lot of people still find that model very valuable.

"It's an utterly outdated model,"

Well no, because HPC - and all the other stuff that doesn't fit into a single address space or a single machine. For example the microservices model is built on the same principle - lots of little bits of code talking to each other over some kind of pipe.

" especially because error handling is a nightmare, and there's very little checks about the parameters (that's why they are easy attack targets)."

That really depends on how you do it, but I do concede that handling errors across multiple threads (or processes) is generally a lot harder than working on a single thread/process.

"But keep on thinking what was necessary to cope with 48K of RAM is sound design still today..."

I'll let you think that as my place of work crunches through multi-petabyte datasets with their wimpy 256Gbyte/32 core boxes.

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Re: Bah!

The solution was to create the abstraction of "your program owns the entire machine and there is only one thread in your program".

I think the microservices folks have rediscovered that one. :)

The following documentary "UNIX: Making Computers Easier To Use -- AT&T Archives film from 1982" shows the reasoning behind UNIX guys pushing that exact same approach (pre-threads !).

https://youtu.be/XvDZLjaCJuw

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Re: Switch Case

"And while I'm here, Duff's device is known to be a performance handicap"

I think a lot of people neglected to pay attention to what Tom Duff was trying to achieve: specifically "loop unrolling" with a compiler that didn't do it - with a minimum of code.

He was also counting cycles on some fairly exotic big iron - which had a very different set of strengths & weaknesses in comparison to *most* that followed it (eg: memory that keeps up with the core clock, small to zero caches and maybe a couple of cycles max for a memory fetch).

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Re: Trivial ?

"Switch/Case is a code smell"

In this case: He who smelt it dealt it.

This whole "code smell" thing has become utter bollocks. It is too often used to promote personal prejudice over and above sound engineering backed by objective reasoning, it's become a short cut for "I know better than you".

As it happens the 'switch' statement is a way of representing a common assembler idiom of a 'jump table', which happens to be fairly efficient - and it rather handily tends to keep all the code local which means it'll fit inside a cache line or two if you are lucky/clever. Not using a switch statement where one would fit nicely would be a code stench in my view - and that's my personal prejudice, but at least I can back it up with some objective reasons why it can fit some scenarios better than the alternatives...

If you want some code smells to work on I suggest you start with the JVM, then the Java libraries and work your way up to Spring. In the case of the JVM you start with a massive --ing runtime that takes an age (in machine terms) to start and consumes vastly more memory that it actually requires to operate - and it does this because it's the only way it can approach the speed of a compiled language.

I'm hoping that would keep you busy enough to lay off on the switch statement. :)

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WannaCry-killer Marcus Hutchins denies Feds' malware claims

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Re: I'm confused

"Wrote code in the UK, (allegedly) sold code in the UK, to Russians. Arrested in the USA.

How does that work?"

The UK was flogged to the US by Churchill, voting is mainly there to grant legitimacy to polices that have no rational basis.

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Re: Oh dear... maybe

"Interesting logic there; it's OK to share code that can be used for criminal purposes because it can be used for legitimate purposes as well."

Ordinary people have to live with the fact there are plenty of everyday things can be used legitimately but are also fairly frequently used for criminal purposes. Here's a few examples to help illustrate that 'interesting logic' for you:

- knives, guns, explosives, cars, trucks, aeroplanes, diesel, battery acid, microbes etc...

Sharing code seems fairly tame compared to folks speeding through a school crossing - which seems to happen fairly regularly around the world.

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There could be a silver lining... If the Feds will carry this to it's logical conclusion and prosecute everyone involved in writing Windows while they are at it, after all their code has also been used in the attacks as well.

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Linus Torvalds slams 'pure garbage' from 'clowns' at grsecurity

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Re: Grumble

"I notice you didn't answer my question about how much commercial linux support costs..."

I'm giving you the benefit of doubt here by assuming that you are asking the question out of ignorance rather than out of hope of someone dropping a shilling into your palm:

1) There are lots of vendors offering commercial Linux support, they all have different 'list' prices for different levels of support...

2) Typically customers don't pay list price, so only the vendor and the customer know how much the support costs...

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Re: Grumble

"You might be able to download an Ubuntu ISO for free, but in a production environment Linux has costs just like Windows or OS X "

Sure it does. The costs are just a lot smaller in a lot of cases. Why do you think all vast majority of HPC shops run Linux rather than Windows ? Quite a lot of those clusters are run by outfits that previously *only* ran Windows. They actually had to spend extra $$$ to hire Linux expertise, force the vendors to sell them boxes sans Windows Tax *and* fight the bean counters and the PHBs to get Linux in there in the first place.

The reason why they succeeded is because HPC shops are particularly cost sensitive, and Linux really does beat Windows hands down in the HPC space for TCO.

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Re: Ego Overload

"During this whole period, grsec has basically been the only way to let untrusted code run on a Linux box without guaranteeing eventual compromise."

That is a very bold claim when there are millions of x86 boxes out there can be owned from userland regardless of what kernel is running.

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Roo
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Windows

Re: Ego Overload

"Linus, and the other kernel maintainers, have been essentially ignoring security for years."

I have seen plenty of evidence to the contrary over the past 23 years, so I can't help but wonder if you have been wearing your backside as a hat for the past couple of decades.

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Roo
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Windows

Re: Ego Overload

"When dealing with other members of the human race you'll often find that if you treat people with respect, they return the respect."

You could always have a crack at that respect thing yourself you know.

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Our day with Larry Page: Embedded with one of the world's richest men

Roo
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It seems that Larry Page doesn't do anything or know anything, he has found his perfect role in life.

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