* Posts by Roo

1426 posts • joined 21 Sep 2010

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Oracle crushed in defeat as Java world votes 'No' to modular overhaul

Roo
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Re: Java faster than C++

I think the downvotes are a bit harsh Plinker, but on re-reading your post the following caught my attention:

"In theory, adaptive optimizing compilers are faster than static compiling. Say you have Java code that runs a certain operation on a large list of a type of objects, the JVM will optimize for that type."

That appears to describe some form of "lazy vectorization", in the C/C++/FORTRAN world the penalty would be paid at compile time rather than runtime... Plus in the C/C++/FORTRAN world DLLs have also been leveraged (with varying degrees of success, natch) to accomplish the same goal at runtime.

C & C++ have virtual machine targets too - LLVM for example.

I am glad to have the choice to use all that good stuff plus we've got JVMs and anything else. It's 1's and 0's at the end of the day. :)

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Roo
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Re: Java faster than C++

""Java ... still doesn't play well with the OS leading to poor performance, unpredictable run-time behaviour"

Your Java skills are antique and outdated."

Quite likely in fairness, I too have worked with Java in low latency environments with fairly severe space constraints, albeit a while ago. I have also seen the JVMs improve too. IMO the *best* argument for Java is the tooling around it, YMMV. There are some interesting side-bits to Java such as tools that take Java code and compile it down an FPGA as well.

In practice I see the vast majority of Java code run on ancient JVMs which are significantly older than the Intel, GCC or LLVM alternatives on offer. So I'm not convinced by the argument that JVMs are intrinsically more up-to-date than anything else.

I am aware of "The secret to get Java low latency", but I have been doing the same thing at the same or lower cost with C/C++ for decades. I can do either, but I figure it's easier to use a hammer on a nail rather than a screwdriver. Still, if all you have is a screwdriver, fill yer boots with my blessing.

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Roo
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Re: Sun was always a little arrogant about Java

"What are you using Java for where that one bit is crucial?"

Strictly speaking not crucial, but it's harder and uglier than it needs to be to do a basic thing such as parsing binary input. For some folks latency is killer, pissing a few kiloCPU cycles up the wall to parse a few bytes of XML or JSON just doesn't cut it.

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Roo
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Re: Sun was always a little arrogant about Java

I'll bite. :)

"It spawned .net. If it did not exist we would still have to use archaic rubbish like C++ and PHP."

Sadly, despite all that prior archaic art to improve upon, Java still lacks first-class unsigned integer types, still doesn't play well with the OS leading to poor performance, unpredictable run-time behaviour and folks having to leverage third-party code to emulate/replace the functions that the host OS has already provided for decades.

Java isn't a "godsend", it's just a tool - and not a particularly elegant one at that. I say that having used Java on a regular basis since 1.1 (1.0 was missing too much to be valuable alternative to anything else at the time IMO).

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DeX Station: Samsung's Windows-killer is ready for prime time

Roo
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"We live in the age of low carbon so I have a wind turbine hat and solar cell jumper to keep it charged."

Bravo Sir !

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Comey was loathed by the left, reviled by the right – must have been doing something right

Roo
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Re: Comey was a coward for not throwing Hilldog under the bus

"She deserved prison"

No more than Donald or any of the other clowns in DC.

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Just so we're all clear on this: Russia hacked the French elections, US Republicans and Dems

Roo
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Re: Kettles and pots?

"if they do it they can't really complain about others doing it."

If only that were true. Instead we have lots of whining in order to deflect attention from their wrong doing just like a four year old child. It would be nice if they took jobs seriously now they are doing stuff like running a country.

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Roo
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Re: just getting started

Aww was that too soon after the AMT zero length password remotely exploitable vuln for you downvoters ?

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Roo
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Re: What next ?

Sigh... Didn't have to wait long for an answer, James Comey fired already. :)

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Roo
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What next ?

The Democrats and Republicans can now reasonably expect Russia to have some actionable blackmail material available, it'll be interesting to see whether they fight or co-operate to quash the investigations.

I suspect the latter because the establishment like to pretend that they have a "Mandate" whatever that actually may be. I haven't seen any Mandate Police or Mandates in the shops so far, so not entirely sure where they could come by such a thing as a result of an election won on the back of blackmail.

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Roo
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Re: just getting started

- don't use x86 hardware, especially in routers. :)

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Stop asking people for their passwords, rights warriors yell at US Homeland Security

Roo
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Re: What will REALLY fix this ..

"Errm. Cancelled accounts?"

The information they have already collected has plenty of value to folks like recruitment agencies, or intrusive HR teams for example. The current world political agenda appears to be very firmly weighted in favour of corporations over people at the moment so I would expect the market for that kind of data to expand rapidly over the next few years.

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Roo
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Re: What will REALLY fix this ..

".. would be the Silicon Vally lot realising that people are actively cancelling asocial media accounts if they have to cross the US border.

I reckon that amount of screeching *would* be heard in Washington."

Not sure there would be much point in the screeching as Silicon Valley will have already collected all the info they need to spamvertise the users and their online acquaintances. :(

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Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

Roo
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Re: Windows 10 Creators Update CU (NT) system.

"You pretty much have to be a sociopath to get into politics, after all, and without politics, things don't get done, like it or not."

Not everyone needs a sociopath to tell them what to do, and quite frankly politicians are rarely needed for doing useful stuff like changing tires or wiring up a house. :)

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Head of US military kit-testing slams F-35, says it's scarcely fit to fly

Roo
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Re: Oh wonderful

"Nope - we have a position of strength - they need us more than we need them."

Doubtful. The EU loses just one trading partner with a paltry 60m customers, we lose access to the entire common market (which includes the member states plus all the folks paying to play like Norway for example).

"And all the free trade deals we will do will increase non EU trade."

Free trade deals aren't free beer, they cost real money. As a country of 60 million folks there is *less* benefit for the trading partner in negotiating with us simply because we are a smaller market than Europe as a whole. Consequently you *should* expect the cost of trade with those countries to *increase* rather than decrease. Increasing costs tend to hinder trade.

Most of the folks on telly telling us Brexit is great seem to be very rich, have multiple passports, and keep most of their money outside of the UK. In your case I can't work out if you are ignorant, stupid or simply shilling for Brexit to happen for some other nefarious purpose that you dare not share in public.

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Roo
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Re: Oh wonderful

"So greater foreign investment then. Another benefit..."

Greater foreign investment erodes it further because the folks with the gold make the rules. Less sovereignty is what you are getting - perhaps you could write to your local MP about it.

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Roo
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Re: Oh wonderful

"So far TheVogon's comment has attracted 26 downvotes - and no rebuttals. Hmmm."

Plenty of rebuttals, just a lack of folks on the Brexit side willing to take part in rational discussion or point out a silver lining that isn't a figment of their good intentions.

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Roo
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Re: Oh wonderful

"Everyone said the economy would crash as soon as we voted for Brexit - it hasn't - record highs in the FTSE, outstanding economic growth"

When a currency falls shares become cheaper and more attractive to foreigners. TL;DR: Britons own less of their companies, and what they own is worth less anyway.

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Roo
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Re: Oh wonderful

"Brexit will save us billions every year. It has hardly any cost so far....Our economy is growing 2nd fastest in the G20..."

1) Our currency has plummeted in value, so a net loss overall.

2) We haven't left the EU yet, so you can't honestly comment on the true cost yet.

3) The likely outcome is that trade overheads will increase because we still have to renegotiate all those agreements from a position of weakness.

The reality of the situation is that Britain is a much weaker trading partner than the EU as a whole, so we are unlikely to get any favours from partners over and above what Europe gets.

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Microsoft taking CodePlex behind the shed and shooting it by Christmas

Roo
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Re: @Mage

"Not necessarily without ticking off the vendor and/or breaking contracts..."

That probably wouldn't matter to a company living on the "razors edge" as it was put. Besides if there were decent sums involved the chances are a savvy outfit could negotiate a licensing deal with the vendor (or current rights holder). Some income is better than none from the vendor's PoV.

It still doesn't change the fact that they were mugs to buy a bit of plant that would outlast it's irreplaceable control system by several decades...

I note that the usual trio of are downvoting a suggestion to do a bit of reverse-engineering or leverage Open Source when the vendor solution amounts to FOAD. I would hate to be one of their customers. :)

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Roo
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Re: @Mage

"Which is EXACTLY the problem."

Nah, it's a normal part of evolution...

"Think of the lathe that is controlled by an ISA card which means the computer that controls it MUST run Windows XP (because Vista dropped support for the ISA bus). It had been bought just a few years back and is designed to run for decades (thus it's being amortized for that long)."

Yeah I get that plant lives for a long time...

However, I think it's fair to say there is very little evidence to support the idea that piece of PC hardware & software will survive *and* be vendor supported for more than a decade... So why would you install some plant with a multi-decade lifespan with Wintel control system that you can't reasonably expect to be supported (or replaced) for several decades ?

At the end of the day ISA cards are not rocket science, neither are the drivers that run them. A moderately clued up EE grad could port the control HW & SW across to something more contemporary, or you could track down middle aged PC geeks fed up of playing guess the required heap size today with JVMs...

"Yes, it's living on the razor's edge, but that's just how some people are forced to live."

Open Source has been catering for those folks for a very long time in lieu of helpful/existing vendors.

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Roo
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Re: @Mage

"and many business-critical applications ONLY run on Windows."

In my experience the vast majority of businesses don't need Windows only "business-critical" apps.

Case in point I know of one site that invested *lots* of money into writing and maintaining what was essentially a revision control system using Oracle to store the content and Windows front end to go with it. RCS, CVS, SVN, Mercurial and GIT (to name a few) would all have done the same job a lot better for $0 and would have run on a Windows box just the same, but they weren't even considered because the folks in question never looked beyond Oracle & Microsoft...

At another site they had a huge cross-platform library - that they traditionally built under Windows and Linux (to support both platforms), but having had Visual Studio fall over repeatedly trying to build an urgent bug-fix release on a Windows box they ended up moving the Windows build to run under WINE on Linux which has now become the default mode of building simply because it's quicker and more reliable. Not saying that WINE is good for everyone - but it works well for those guys...

Windows isn't special anymore, it's just another piece of legacy software.

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Kremlin-linked hacker crew's tactics exposed

Roo
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Re: "We still don't know it actually occurred"?

"That "17 intelligence agencies" nonsense is a complete myth and exposes YOU as the hack."

Blimey someone rattled your cage pretty hard to drive you to make your second ever post to El Reg a personal attack and left-wing conspiracy theory job. Stick to the day job, leave the shilling to the pros.

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USA can afford golf for Trump. Can't afford .com for FBI infosec service

Roo
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Re: Tomatoe or Tomato that is the question Ketchup or Red Sauce? ;-)

"If you look at what he's done in the first 65 days since being in office, he's done a lot all the while he's been harassed by the Dems and the Press"

The press seems to be pretty much irrelevant judging by how much effect that accusations of sexual assaults had on his campaign. The Democrats are also irrelevant because the Republicans party enjoys a majority in both the Senate and Congress. The only thing standing in Trump's way is his own adopted party, the GOP, which has been a constant throughout Obama's terms as well.

The Whitehouse lacks leadership right now, that's Donald's can to carry.

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UK Home Sec: Give us a snoop-around for WhatApp encryption. Don't worry, we won't go into the cloud

Roo
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Re: IIRC

"You know, I'm fairly certain that when this mass-monitoring gig first hit the broader news, we were assured by all sorts of gov and TLA types that they only wanted the meta-data and weren't interested, or authorised, to access the actualy *content* of our communications."

I wouldn't be surprised if that was still the case broadly speaking.

"Whatever happened to that undertaking?"

The apparatchiks worked out that unlimited access to people's private communications would allow them to nip challenges to their power in the bud, and make lots of money in the process.

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Roo
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Re: It'll all be fine

"Now that the Brexit is coming, those pesky laws of mathematics imposed upon the UK by a tyrannical EU will be repelled."

The other thing being "repelled" is the finance industry, which is exactly what the EU & US have been trying to achieve for the 200 years or so. Presumably Team Brexit are planning on emigrating to the US or perhaps the Virgin Islands to enjoy their retirement.

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Roo
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Re: This wont stop terrorist acts

"so unless they are monitoring EVERYONE ALL THE TIME then they would not be able to stop this or other acts of criminality where the accused was not being actively investigated beforehand."

They need a lot of man power to make that actually work, the Stasi achieved that by recruiting pretty much the entire population. I'm sure Daily Mail readers will be happy to volunteer, so it's not all bad news for the treasonous control freaks in HMG hell-bent on wrecking this country's ability to trade and feed itself.

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Roo
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Re: AC: "Some saddo.."

"Yeah, of course, argument with his girlfriend and his first thought was "rampage at HoC and stab a copper!"

Raoul Moat.

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The 'data driven enterprise' is actually just the enterprise

Roo
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"I think you can append +xxxxxx to your gmail address, too, if you're into the Google thing."

Alternatively (if you can stand the scorn of knowitall cloud evangelists, commentards and ISPs who hate people having static IPs) you can run your own mail server and configure it appropriately to use + or whatever you fancy.

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UK digital minister Matt Hancock praises 'crucial role' of encryption

Roo
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Re: I think they genuinely don't see the problem.

I think that they don't actually give a toss about the problem. They've been told repeatedly by domain experts (security, policing et al) about the pitfalls, yet they still wilfully pursue agendas that facilitate an authoritarian regime. The logical conclusion is that they want absolute power without any kind of reasonable check or balance. There is no hard evidence that they actually give a toss about preventing crime.

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Pence v Clinton: Both used private email for work, one hacked, one accused of hypocrisy

Roo
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Pint

Drink the f up.

You guys must be paid to argue with yourselves on a beer night. For shame.

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81's 99 in 17: Still a lotta love for the TI‑99/4A – TI's forgotten classic

Roo
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Re: The TI9900

"Also it used blocks of main memory as the register set which allowed for rapid context switching."

The INMOS T2/4/8s took a similar approach - and they were also *very* quick at context switching.

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You're doing Hadoop and Spark wrong and they will probably fail

Roo
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Re: Cloud has several inherent disadvantages for parallel workloads...

"I don't know about other providers, but AWS generally charges for download but not upload."

Fair point Dan, but you pay for your network connection, and that kind of bandwidth can cost serious $$$. :)

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Roo
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Cloud has several inherent disadvantages for parallel workloads...

I am not convinced that running Hadoop/Spark in the cloud makes a great deal of sense in the general case, particularly when you are running on shared infrastructure.

1) Non-trivial parallel workloads are much more sensitive to latency, and in particular latency spikes which is one area where Clouds running over shared infrastructure are at a significant disadvantage.

2) A lot of Hadoop/Spark apps operate on huge datasets (most apps I've worked with in recent years are process multiple TB of data in a run), which you have to first transfer into the cloud... In some cases a run will generate a lot of data too (again multiple TB) - and you as a customer have to pay to transfer that data to and from the Cloud datacenters, which also adds latency and cost over and above on-prem.

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In colossal shock, Uber alleged to be wretched hive of sexism, craven managerial ass-covering

Roo
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Re: Just look at Uber's CEO

Ah look, a Fake Rebuttal to go with all that Fake News that is going around.

""She got a proposal for sex over the company's chat."

No she didn't. Try reading what she said."

I suggest you RTFA first.

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Probe President Trump and his crappy Samsung Twitter-o-phone, demand angry congressfolk

Roo
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"I'm sick and tired.... err, I mean I'm sick and tired of everything associated with Trump being labelled as something new and nasty. "

Fair point it's not new, as we all know after hearing Trump bleating about Hillary running official emails through unofficial systems, but doing the exact same thing after winning an election on the point is nasty.

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Next Superdome CPU chips amble into HPE

Roo
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Re: Put that right for you

"They did not have a choice."

Indeed, second sourcing requirements were not unusual back in the day - particularly for "Defense" projects.

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Roo
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Re: The fact that Itanium relied on a smart compiler

There are other drawbacks to EPIC in addition to recompilation (other architectures suffered from this at various points in their life too). Here's a couple.

* Dynamic scheduling in hardware has more information available to it - and it can of course it can be tuned to fit the hardware to a much larger degree (instruction grouping, uOps etc).

* EPIC pushes you towards massive register files and huge buses in the core, which means longer slower wires, more transistors switching state on a cycle, which all means much slower clock rates in comparison to RISC designs on any given process at a given level of power consumption.

Digital Equipment Corp (amongst others) explored VLIW long before EPIC when silicon was even more expensive and decided to go the RISC route with Alpha. The evidence shows that fabrication was not given enough respect by the guys who came up with the EPIC ISA (that was clear very early on in EPIC's life).

It's an interesting beast though and it wasn't a total disaster, so fair play to the folks who made it work.

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Talk of tech innovation is bullsh*t. Shut up and get the work done – says Linus Torvalds

Roo
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Re: Or, in the vernacular ...

Sadly that usage of "Trump" is obsolete. Besides I imagine is trademarked up to the hilt, there is no profit in upsetting the big cheese with the small personality any more than you need to.

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Remote unauthenticated OS re-install is a feature, not a bug, says Cisco

Roo
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Re: Must be the end of world....

You can't blame the customers for this. Cisco could ship their kit secure by default - and let the pros and wannabes break security as they wish. If they really can't manage that they should probably stop selling stuff they don't understand and can't build properly.

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SQL Server on Linux? HELL YES! Linux on Windows 10? Meh

Roo
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Re: POSIX subsystem

"Can't recall anything ever wrong with it? It outperformed Linux as an NFS Server last time I tested it!"

Quite the reverse in my experience - a 486DX2-66 with an IDE drive running a 1.2.x kernel spanked the NT 3.51 and NT 4.0 installs on a Pentium Pro with 8x the memory, 4x the clock speed and 4 way striped UltraSCSI drives (Adaptec 3940UW). NT had some serious flaws with respect to file system performance back then.

In fairness I can accept that your mileage varied, we had some fairly extreme use cases - zillions of little files and lots of massive (for the time) files, nothing "average". :)

The POSIX subsystem was a huge disappointment, mainly because the performance conform to a typical POSIX/UNIX coder's experience. Processes were slow to start, context switching was very slow in NT, UNIX apps tend to presume the opposite, Paging & Memory mapped I/O was cripplingly expensive too.

MS have moved NT along over time - but it's been rare that NT has been the quickest or most efficient option. YMMV

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Coming to the big screen: Sci-fi epic Dune – no wait, wait, wait, this one might be good

Roo
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Re: Make something new

"what's wrong with Doc Smith?"

Not much IMO, but I suspect the pipe-smoking, somewhat outmoded portrayal of women and genocide may not sit well with current audiences. :)

"I'd pay to see a decent Lensman film."

Have an upvote. Loved the books, I'd like to see a Skylark film too. :)

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Judge allows plan for Intel to reanimate McAfee. The brand, we mean

Roo
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More money than sense.

If Intel had any sense they would let the brand name die and invest all that lawyer money in something more productive than preserving a toxic brand name associated with a shit product.

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Trump's FBI boss, Attorney General picks reckon your encryption's getting backdoored

Roo
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"The problem is not their age, it is that they are wilfully thick, stupid politicians(*) pandering to the lowest electoral denominator."

There is no evidence to indicate that the lowest electoral denominator gives a flying fig about encryption. There is more evidence to indicate these clowns just want a competitive advantage over the proles baked into law.

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Roo
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Re: Back to MD5, et. al.

"At some point politicians will understand that encryption is just maths at work and trying to restrict it is self defeating"

That is wishful thinking. :)

These folks have never at any point in their lives had to understand encryption to get what they want. Why would they start learning now when barking orders has worked so very well for them all their entitled lives ?

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Seven pet h8s: Verity is sorely vexed

Roo
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Re: Concurrency

"Distributed concurrency is fairly new and not solved as much as people expect it to be."

Depends on your definition of "new", folks were working on this problem before ARPAnet first started punting bytes around the place. Leslie Lamport et al wrote the "The Byzantine Generals Problem" paper ~1980, and it was not a new problem for them to solve even at that time...

From my point of view, academically, distributed computing/parallel processing is fairly mature, there are plenty of robust models and papers out there, the problem is that folks invest their time in looking for silver bullet frameworks rather than reading papers and applying grey matter.

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Roo
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Re: Stuck-in-time Overflow

"Upvotes should disappear after a year and eventually old answers will sink and bright shiny new code will appear to take its place."

That's not a bad suggestion, but I'd like the option of specifying a time range. There is some perfectly good old code out there that needs love too. ;)

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Roo
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Rejection Criteria

Dear Verity

I fear that if I were to enforce the third rejection criteria ("probably cleverer than us.") pretty much everything would be rejected. Would 2 out of 3 suffice, or is that too little hitlerism ?

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Oh, the things Vim could teach Silicon Valley's code slingers

Roo
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Re: As a long-time Vim user (since 2005 or so)

"I much prefered EDT and TPU, personally."

I did enjoy using TPU, but the joy was derived from the sense of achievement I got from mastering something awkward. Once I got stuck into Emacs/vi/sed/awk I never looked back. :)

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Fired Ofcom Remainer bod sues UK gov for withholding his payoff

Roo
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Re: Almost right

I think Trump is more likely to pan out as America's Yeltsin.

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