* Posts by HereIAmJH

67 posts • joined 24 Aug 2010

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Tesla launches electric truck it guarantees won't break for a million miles

HereIAmJH

Re: @Zog

There is no reliability problem with diesel engines. Most of the components on semi truck engines have a B50 rating of 750k miles or more. (B50 is a statistic on when 50% of the components would require a major repair, similar to MTBF on computer equipment) And diesels aren't that complex, until you start incorporating computer systems.

And you wouldn't drop a genset on an electric truck. That would be ridiculous. What you would create is a serial hybrid. It would have just enough battery to boost the available power for accelerating and steep grades. The diesel engine would produce enough power to drive the electric motors at highway cruise speeds. So the weight you gain with the diesel engine, generator, and fuel, you lose by leaving some of those heavy batteries behind. Diesel hybrids need to use some of the decades of experience of the train industry.

As far as safety is concerned, you'd have the worst of both worlds. BEVs are actually more dangerous that diesel fuel. Between battery charging, dangers from damaged batteries, and hazards to emergency service crews. Diesel, OTOH, is a known component and difficult (compared to gasoline) to ignite.

Some issues I see with the Tesla truck are that there appears to be no sleeper. So no team drive and the driver has to end their shift at some kind of facility. 60 mph cruise speed is too slow for the United States. 65 or 70 will be required, or you'll lose all your drivers. (drivers get paid by the mile) And it's going to need more than a 500 mile range. 10hrs x 70mph puts you at 700 miles minimum. I'm also curious how they are going to handle the un-sprung weight of having a motor at each wheel.

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CableLabs, Cisco working on LTE-over-DOCSIS

HereIAmJH

Re: So essentially...

I have been a Time Warner customer for over 20 years, and service hasn't improved since the merger with Charter. Although prices have gone up. Currently I'm having trouble with my modem receiving too many errors from the network and rebooting. I replaced the modem with an different brand and upgraded, and the problem persists. Too many errors and the modem reboots daily between 11am and noon. Which disconnects my VPN, breaks all my sessions, and drops me out of conference calls. OTOH, the last time I have lost cell service (other than leaving the service area) was over a decade ago when T-Mobile(Voicestream) lost power to one of their towers after a tornado. On top of that, I have to power the premise equipment for cable so if the power it out for more than 2 hours I'd have to hook up a generator to make a DOCSIS/LTE call. Where cable companies I have dealt with have always failed (Time Warner, Spectrum, Comcast) is their insistence that it is ALWAYS the customer's fault until you can prove otherwise. Google Fiber being the exception.

And yes, I'm very much aware that the LTE is a requirement for VoLTE. LTE isn't the problem, cable network reliability is. And last I checked, only cable providers used DOCSIS.

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HereIAmJH

Re: So essentially...

Charter has merged with Time Warner Cable. So size isn't the issue. The problem is quality of service. I haven't worked with a cable company yet that has the culture to provide carrier grade service. I have TWC and Google fiber, and I wouldn't trust either with phone service if I didn't have a cell phone. I don't trust the service to work in an emergency. And you want me to rely on LTE on DOCSIS when cell carriers are pushing VoLTE so they can retire the older protocols?

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Survey: Tech workers are terrified they will be sacked for being too old

HereIAmJH

Re: Us old fogeys

Hmm, I am doing IT work for the charity I support. It doesn't pay anything, and I'm providing all the hardware. Plus custom software and possibly a website redesign. Not sure how that is going to put food on the table if I lose my job. And I have decades of experience already. Even so, I do recommend helping out local charities.

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HereIAmJH

Re: Us old fogeys

And ironically today there is another article about the shortage of talented IT staff that is expected to get much worse. The company I work for is rumored to be talking merger, and many people I work with (including myself) are concerned that being in our 50s will make it difficult to find new IT jobs if we become redundant.

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Even more warship cuts floated for the Royal Navy

HereIAmJH
Joke

Re: No escorts = bye bye HMS QE

Might as well stay in port. It doesn't have any airplanes.

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Didn't install a safety-critical driverless car patch? Bye, insurance!

HereIAmJH

Re: Safety-critical updates?

Since the cars are self driving, does that mean you can set parameters for when you don't need your car, and it could drive itself to the dealer for the update? For once the dealership would be able to work around my schedule. That would certainly cut down the delay on getting recalls fixed. Not sure when I'm going to have time to go to the dealer to get the seatbelt retractor recall fixed. Or get the bolts in the steering box replaced for another recall.

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FCC gives Google's broadband balloons 'experimental license' in Puerto Rico

HereIAmJH

Re: Power?

"Whilst the bloons themselves might be solar powered, the kit on the ground probably isn't and last I heard there were still major problems with that part of the infrastructure."

It's easier to deploy charging stations than it is to rebuild tower infrastructure. You can recharge a cell phone from a solar panel or generator. Wireless companies are getting their stores back open for charging locations as well as allowing free phone calls through whatever capabilities they have. But you have to get there.

To re-establish cell service they need to repair/rebuild towers and get power and possibly backhaul to them. They can fly in COWs and COLTs, but you need open roads to suitable sites to deploy them. Loon has the opportunity that they can fly to wherever they need to be and provide service for whatever infrastructure/device is there.

If this works, the US Govt and cell companies should put policies in place so that Loons can be deployed within a day or two of a major disaster.

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Linus Torvalds passed a kidney stone and then squeezed out Linux 4.13

HereIAmJH

Re: Is the sky falling? Or, ...

"As to the changed default re: cifs. Sounds good (belated)."

Silly me, I thought SMB and CIFS were part of Samba. And when Linus speaks of Linux, he's talking about the kernel. And while there were some security issues with Samba's SMBv1 that needed fixed recently, WannaCry affected Microsoft's implementation and not Samba's.

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Automobile Association under fire for car-crash handling of data breach

HereIAmJH

Re: Taking it seriously

While it's nice to jump on people for having a security breach and leaking customer data, note that April 22 was a Saturday. The article doesn't say what the server misconfiguration was or how long it took to identify it.

And I can't speak for the other info leaked, but masked card numbers (last 4 digits) is not considered Cardholder Data. Last 4 isn't even considered particularly sensitive, that is why it is printed on register receipts.

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How to avoid getting hoodwinked by a DevOps hustler

HereIAmJH

Re: DevOps!=Bullshit (at least some of the time)

My team develops, tests, builds, deploys, and provides 24x7 production support for our app. We don't do server maintenance or user acceptance testing. Our tiny team is required to be Agile and DevOps this year.

So far Agile simply means daily scrums so we can look at the hours remaining on each task and how it figures on the burn down chart. It also includes additional record keeping by importing tasks into the Agile tool and tracking remaining hours, in addition to our actual enhancement tracker that contains all the details of what needs developed. The only guidance we have received on DevOps is that we need a test suite to do automated testing. And we were helpfully provided with a test tool designed to test web applications, and ours is a multi-tier winforms desktop app.

As someone who has been down the route of fabulous methodology of the year (RAD, JAD, ISO9001, KANBAN, Lean, 6 Sigma), Agile and DevOps (at least how they are being implemented where I work) don't pass the smell test. If management cannot provide concrete examples of the problems being addressed and the discrete steps the new methodology provides, then it's all smoke and mirrors.

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What is dead may never die: a new version of OS/2 just arrived

HereIAmJH

Re: Obscurity

I think it was a missed opportunity that they didn't put a compatibility layer in there for Linux or BSD. Maybe something like built-in VM support and an integration layer with X for the desktop. One of the big problems with OS/2, and the reason for the solid support of Win16 apps, is the fact that there were so few native applications. I know I used it primarily for multitasking DOS applications that had performance problems with Desqview or Win95.

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HereIAmJH

Re: To quote a popular song ... 'Let it go !!!'

It was a difference in design philosophy. A lot of problems that were blamed on OS/2 were actually hardware that wasn't performing to spec. Stodgy OS/2 said "I'm not going to stand for substandard hardware." Windows said "if I didn't see it, it didn't happen". The odds ended up in Windows favor and the underlying issues went unnoticed. But they had their share of blue screens too.

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Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

HereIAmJH

Re: Ecuador.

And I have a friend who was raped in the parking lot of a bar by a stranger and suffered debilitating trauma for years afterwards. And another who was raped by an ex in front of her infant son when he dropped by for a 'visit'. Two sides of every coin.

Julian should just stop being a douche and go stand up for himself in Swedish court. Everything he has done since makes him appear guilty. And considering the hurdles women face in reporting sex crimes, I'm inclined to believe the reason he doesn't is because he knows he did something wrong.

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HereIAmJH

Re: Actions == consequences

"At that point it wouldn't suprise me if Trump (after a quick win, and smarting about the release of Chelsea Manning) decides to put in an extradition request."

Ironically, Obama didn't want him. Trump now has an empty cell to fill, and a need to look tough. But the clock is ticking, maybe he just has to stick around a little longer and Pence won't want to bother with him. Leaving him free to enjoy his incarceration for jumping bail.

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74 countries hit by NSA-powered WannaCrypt ransomware backdoor: Emergency fixes emitted by Microsoft for WinXP+

HereIAmJH

Re: "the SMB server bug is the result of a buffer overflow in Microsoft's code. "

"Yes, and patched automatically in all supported versions before this happened. "

I would be surprised if MS is actually fixing bugs in SMBv1. Windows 7+ and Windows 2008+ support SMBv1, but default to SMBv2. So they don't use the protocol unless the remote forces them to downgrade. The 'fix' that has been around for a while is registry setting to turn off the SMBv1 protocol. Just like we did for SSLv3 (and now the lower TLS versions). Anyone who has done PCI scans has seen this working through the system for a while.

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HereIAmJH

Re: Risk Management

"Say what you will about newer versions of Windows automatically installing updates, but it's functionality that exists for a reason."

Which would all be well and good, if the damn morons in charge of making corporate policy didn't hijack the security update process with marketing. I don't allow automatic updates because I don't want to deal with upgrade nag-ware or compatibility scanners digging through every file on my system for an 'upgrade' I haven't determined I even want. Automatic updates have to come from a TRUSTED source.

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Hackers emit 9GB of stolen Macron 'emails' two days before French presidential election

HereIAmJH

swaying elections

Before you say the margins are too wide in polls for this to sway the election, remember that going into election day Clinton was expected to beat Trump by a landslide. This is definitely an attempt to influence voters. A hack that apparently took place several weeks ago dumped just as the candidates go into a quiet period where they cannot respond. You have to wonder if this is the new weapon in the assault on democracies. Hack the candidates and then selectively release information when it can do the most damage and sway opinion to the party that will support the most favourable policies.

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Head of US military kit-testing slams F-35, says it's scarcely fit to fly

HereIAmJH

Re: Phew, bullet dodged.

You should just change them to launch drones, that will put you ahead of the curve. Everyone else will be there in 10 years. Of course, about that time an aircraft carrier might be about as sustainable as a battleship.

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BOFH: The Boss, the floppy and the work 'experience'

HereIAmJH
Facepalm

Oh, for the days of Cowboy mode

Decimating cowboy mode has been great for employment. I must be supporting a dozen guys whose sole purpose is to stop me from getting anything accomplished. I spend more time in meetings than I do coding. And let's not even talk about server auditing, which wouldn't be so bad if it was actually accomplishing anything. Seriously, monitoring for file changes but excluding the whole OS? And now we're going DevOps and Agile, with a bunch of people who don't know the difference between a scrum and a sprint. Not sure how we're going to do it, we have more gates than the stock yards. But hey, it gives them an opportunity to buy Jira, which they might be able to get installed, eventually. Got to have a meeting on it....

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Toshiba's nuclear power plant business runs out of steam

HereIAmJH

Re: Hmmm

The coal industry isn't coming back for electrical generation in the US as long as natural gas is so much cheaper. And unless some regulation (it won't come from this administration) forces some of the damage caused by fracking on the industry, it's unlikely coal will ever be cheaper than natural gas. And as more and more new construction includes solar PV, the market for coal (base load) plants will continue to shrink. Of course, the same can be said about nuclear. Why take on the long term costs for nuclear when the base load need continues to drop for a number of reasons (more efficient appliances, alternative energy, more efficient housing). The only bright spot are electric vehicles, and those owners tend to be anti-nuclear.

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HereIAmJH

Every design is unique

Mixed design fleet doesn't make sense. Sure, if all your reactors are the same and a flaw is discovered, you have to fix them all. But statistically all designs are going to have some kind of flaw. Either by design, manufacturing, or installation. If every one is unique it's possible you will have to find each one individually, rather than find once fix everywhere. And dividing your expertise into multiple designs increases your risks. Not to mention increasing design, manufacturing, and install costs. I thought we learned that lesson a couple centuries ago.

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Why are creepy SS7 cellphone spying flaws still unfixed after years, ask Congresscritters

HereIAmJH

Re: Why do we still have the traditional cell infrastructure anyway?

Many of the radios have already been replaced during the LTE rollout. And it doesn't free up any spectrum because the growth of data means all the spectrum gets refarmed as quickly as possible to support LTE.

As far as making the cellular networks dumb pipes, there are a number of problems. First is phone companies make money selling services. A dumb pipe doesn't let them sell anything but connectivity, removing a large percentage of their revenue stream. And everyone thinks they should have unlimited data so they can stream videos. The next problem is phone company culture. They know how to provision and sell phone services. They understand switched networks and have carried that model over to IP networks. And finally, governments don't want them to change because they will lose almost all of their ability to do surveillance.

As a consumer, you might want to consider one of the disadvantages of VOIP, the lack of caller ID. It has always been possible to set your own caller ID info, but in the past it required hardware like a PBX. With VOIP, anyone with some coding experience can appear to be anyone they like. Many less than honest telemarketers are already using it to get past Do Not Call registries, and it is only going to get worse.

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Firefox 52 kills plugins – except Flash – and runs up a red flag for HTTP

HereIAmJH

I'm still using v5.4.11 of Ghostery, prior to all the v6 nastiness. Turn off auto updates, fix the version compatibility if necessary. I have uBlock Origin on one of my machines, and it's much more difficult to work with. For example, say you want to stream a TV show from one of the networks. It's a lot easier to figure out which trackers need to be enabled with the old Ghostery. I'm sure someday Firefox will break the old Ghostery and I'll need to find a new blocker. But it's working fine with v52.

BTW, GMail and Craigslist should be congratulated for using 0 trackers.

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Google yanks workers from ISP outfit, it's THE FIBER COUNTDOWN

HereIAmJH

Re: Really?

Better, I don't know. Faster, quite likely. At least in areas surrounding the Google Cities. Time Warner, now Spectrum, increased it's speed significantly in areas where Google was rolling out. Comcast also started pushing faster plans.

As far as what data they collect, I suspect everything they can. I was surprised the first time I logged into my google.com/fiber page and saw info on all the machines on my internal network. Since they provide the router they can snoop on all your LAN traffic too if they want.

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Prez Obama expels 35 Russian spies over election meddling

HereIAmJH

Putin the empire builder

They won't bother. They'll be too busy infiltrating former Eastern Bloc countries as they work to rebuild the Russian (USSR) Empire. And NATO will be too disorganized by all of Trump's antics to do anything about it.

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Stupid law of the week: South Carolina wants anti-porno chips in PCs that cost $20 to disable

HereIAmJH

Re: It's a Wanker Tax

"Most folks (in NC) who want porn won't figure out how to disable it, live too far from a state line, or simply don't feel it's worth $20 to drive six hours to buy an unlocked computer. They will pay the $20 to keep their access going."

Yeah, and they are really going to be pissed when they find out they wasted their $20 because the lawmakers in question are in SOUTH Carolina.

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Jimbo Welshes on pledge to stop fundraising

HereIAmJH

WMF Financials

"I don't understand why they haven't yet succeeded in collecting enough cash to just being able to live on the interest?"

It's not hard to figure out what they have and where their income comes from. In the US, 501(c)(3) organizations are required to file public financials. A Form 990. There is some lag on filing though.

For FY 2014, WMF had $78m income ($77.4 in contributions). $26m in salaries, and $77.8m in net assets on 6/30/15. Operating costs where $52.5m.

Their 2015 990 isn't available yet, but a June 2016 audit from KPMG is. Income increased to $81.8m. Salaries to $31.7m. And assets increased to $91.7m. Expenses increased to $65.9m.

So based on that number, assuming an average of 3% over all their assets they would have income of about a 1/2 month of expenses.

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Plastic fiver: 28 years' work, saves acres of cotton... may have killed less than ONE cow*

HereIAmJH

Please don't use palm oil. It's leading to deforestation and driving the tiger to extinction. Unless, of course, you want to start feeding Vegans (and Politicians) to tigers. Human encroachment on habitats will soon mean the only living large carnivores will be in zoos.

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Drubbed Grubhub bub scrubs anti-Donald-dubbed snub sub-hubbub

HereIAmJH

such poor reading comprehension

No where in his email does he say that he expects people who voted for Trump to resign.

"While demeaning, insulting and ridiculing minorities, immigrants and the physically/mentally disabled worked for Mr. Trump, I want to be clear that this behavior – and these views, have no place at Grubhub."

...

"Further I absolutely reject the nationalist, anti-immigrant and hateful politics of Donald Trump and will work to shield our community from this movement as best as I can."

...

"I want to repeat what Hillary said this morning, that the new administration deserves our open minds and a chance to lead, but never stop believing that the fight for what’s right is worth it."

I suppose if you believe all Trump supporters are inclined to 'demean, insult and ridicule minorities, immigrants and the physically/mentally disabled', then maybe he is asking for Trump supporters to resign. But don't be confused and think he is asking for a resignation because they voted in a particular way. He just doesn't feel the need to allow anti-social behavior in his workplace.

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Fleeing Aussie burglar shot in arse with bow and arrow

HereIAmJH

Re: It will be a shame if the Archer gets charged

Bull. Neither is going to come 'take our guns'. The worst we would see is losing the ability to purchase new assault rifles and background checks on all non-private gun purchases. A bigger problem for gun owners is sites like Craigslist won't take gun ads making private sales a little more difficult.

As far as this article is concerned, where he screwed up is he waited too long. He should have shot him while he was in the house stealing the money and keys. At least then you can claim defense of a person over defense of property.

* BTW, assault rifle is defined as scary looking rifle with a large magazine, not based on it's actual ability to cause harm.

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Swedish appeals court upholds arrest warrant for Julian Assange

HereIAmJH

Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

"Uh-huh, USGov is perfectly happy to let someone accused of leaking so many secrets wander around scot-free and have no intention of having a quiet word in his ear."

Except that Assange didn't leak anything. He published documents that were leaked by Manning. And Manning is spending the next 35 years in Leavenworth Prison. He/She has currently just ended a hunger strike to force the Gov't to pay for sex reassignment surgery.

Personally, I think extradition would be tough. Assange not a US citizen. He didn't hack any US servers. Proving jurisdiction on a crime seems to be a stretch. And rendition of a public figure would lead to too many questions about black ops.

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Larry Page snuffs out ‘too expensive’ Google Fiber project

HereIAmJH

Re: Who in their right mind ...

As others have mentioned, it depends on your options. I had a choice between AT&T and Comcast. I was leaning toward AT&T and getting basic connectivity. (I don't have a great deal of traffic) I had the full speed Google fiber active for a year at $70/month. During that time I had 4 outages that always seemed to happen when I was out of town, meaning my systems were off line for close to a week each time. I had one poorly installed cable (service call to change the fiber connector), one fiber jack failure (likely was the issue for the first call), and at least two outages where Google was tinkering with configurations and reset my router to 'default' settings. Since I had ports forwarded and didn't use 192.168.0.x, it required me to reconfigure each time. Which required a call to tech support because resetting the router caused it to stop recognizing the Google supplied password. This of course means the front line support can't fix it and have to pass it to the back office team that only works M-F 8-5. After a year I gave up and downgraded my service to the free option. And I've had no problems in the year since.

It took about 6 months from sign up to connect for me. My mom signed up about a month after I did and it was over a year before they contacted her to install. In the mean time Time Warner gave her a much better deal to upgrade with them. So there are two subs that Google lost through mismanagement.

I suspect they would have had a much higher uptake if it didn't take so long between sign up and install. Considering many had already been waiting for quite a while from announcement to sign-up.

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Nuclear fallout shelter becomes cloud storage bunker

HereIAmJH

Re: "Don't forget the naturally low ambient temperature of being in a cave..."

It simplifies thermal management planning in that you have a static base line to work against. You'll still have to remove any heat that you generate. You just don't have to worry about outside temperatures altering your cooling requirements.

I used to work for a company located in caves and we definitely needed air conditioning for the computer room. We also had to use vent fans in the warehouse to remove heat from electric forklifts and machinery. Just think of a room with a huge amount of insulation.

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And now we go live to Nashville for the latest on Google Fiber v AT&T and, yup, it's a mess

HereIAmJH

Re: A cynical part of me wonders if...

I don't have any love for AT&T, but Google uses independent utility locating services to mark lines. The lines are painted on the ground so it's unlikely anyone is moving them. The gas incident most likely falls under shit happens. If the worst that happened is they had to shut down an intersection, they did OK. A contractor for Time Warner Cable locally hit a gas line, blew up a restaurant and killed someone.

My experience with Google crews is filling in holes where they pushed their cable under my driveway and cleaning up their trash. Service wise, once they got about a year of experience they have been pretty reliable.

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PHP flaws allowed God mode access to top smut site

HereIAmJH

Re: Yes, I'm a weretroll and it's that time of the lunar cycle for me.

Garbage collectors help to avoid memory leaks from objects not being freed after use. Bounds checking is for buffer overruns. And it's ridiculous that it's not the default setting on modern compilers.

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US work visas for international tech talent? 'If Donald Trump is elected all bets are off'

HereIAmJH

Re: We are already there

It's hard to believe, but before British colonialism a century ago, those countries used to be rather peaceful and free.

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Ad-blocker blocking websites face legal peril at hands of privacy bods

HereIAmJH

Adverstisers consistently prove their unworthyness

Flashing ads, then pop-ups, then pop-unders, interstitials, auto playing videos and user trackers. I have sympathy with good web sites trying to generate ad revenue, but the techniques that have been used over the years to stuff unwanted ads down our throats means that with very few exceptions, if I can't use an ad-blocker I'm not going to visit. If they would stop being such assholes, I suspect many would stop using ad blockers. I know I get tired of the drama of maintaining a good ad blocker. (the bastardization of Ghostery recently is a good example)

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A typo stopped hackers siphoning nearly $1bn out of Bangladesh

HereIAmJH

Re: Bah

A bigger problem than QE in the US is the overnight lending rate being at or close to 0. Basically this is for banks borrowing money from the Federal Reserve Bank at extremely low rates to cover short term shortfalls due to latency in the banking system. Since money transfers now are merely data transactions, there is nothing to stop them paying tonight's loan with a new one tomorrow. So the money that the bank loans you on your Visa card at 10-20% they can borrow at about 1% from the Fed. The stated goal is to keep interest rates low to encourage borrowing (mortgages, business equipment, etc) to spur the economy. But the effect of low interest rates means that you can't earn anything on your savings, thus forcing retirement accounts into more risky stocks. The banks have been gradually increasing their interest rates while getting a taxpayer subsidy.

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One-third of all HTTPS websites open to DROWN attack

HereIAmJH

1/3 didn't patch for POODLE?

I would have thought anyone who cared about their security would have already addressed SSLv2 when they turned off SSLv3 for POODLE.

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FBI says it helped mess up that iPhone – the one it wants Apple to crack

HereIAmJH

Re: County owned phone?

The county paid for a popular phone. Doubtful anything county related was super secret and requires a high level of encryption. This is being played out as privacy rights, but I doubt the employee actually has any right to privacy on this phone from his employer. Even if he hadn't gone on a shooting spree of his co-workers. I know that my employer has the ability to read my corporate emails, log my corporate IM, logs/proxies all my Internet activity, and can access anything on the encrypted drive of my laptop. Some businesses record phone calls on the company PBX. This is more about property rights. The county owns the equipment, not the employee.

I personally think Apple sees this as a 'slippery slope' concern. They don't want to be deluged with subpoenas from a bunch of different LEAs with varying technical capabilities. This time they are being asked to turn off a couple security items, next time it could be 'decrypt this for us'. Some have mentioned that Apple is concerned about their 'unbreakable' image and the affect on sales. I doubt that there are many mainstream people out there that are going to be worried that law enforcement can get a subpoena and unlock their phone. There are no protests over CALEA, and it has been in place since 1994.

Regardless of what eventually happens, I still think gov't/corporations who purchase corporate assets should require that the vendors provide them with a method of accessing those assets regardless of what the employee does. Those assets are owned by taxpayers and shareholders. Suppose an employee changed the locks on a company car. Should the automaker/dealer refuse to register a new key for the owner? (this is similar now that keys have RFIDs and software that control whether the actual key functions)

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HereIAmJH

County owned phone?

"It's a county-owned phone. Farook didn't own it nor pay the account."

Wait, so they are asking Apple to unlock a phone that they legally own? County purchased the phone and paid for the service? And Apple refuses? Sounds like Gov't agencies and businesses should be considering removing Apple from their approved vendor list until they provide a master key for their devices that the owners (not the employee users) can use to recover the device and data.

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The Nano-NAS market is now a femto-flop being eaten by the cloud

HereIAmJH

odd way to break down devices

I would have thought USB were storage expansions, and network attached (the NA in NAS) would be NAS. I've never seen a 1 disk NAS, but 1 to 4 drives would be nano or entry level NAS systems. Over the last couple years I have personally purchased a 2 drive NAS and a 4 drive NAS. I have also purchased about 7 USB storage expansions. Several of which I simply stripped of drives to expand my NAS.

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Government hails superfast broadband deal for new homes

HereIAmJH

Re: slightly OT ,,

"has anyone any experience as to whether broadband (or lack thereof) has ever played a part in house pricing ?"

I suspect it's going to be like telephone service and public utilities. Some people wouldn't buy a house on a septic system or well water. Not too long ago a land line would have been a firm requirement on a home. Would you buy a house that didn't have cell service? I'm sure cable TV and Internet is a determining factor in some home purchases. Particularly new houses. I installed Google Fiber at my 70yo house (that is currently vacant) just because I knew it could be a selling point at a later date.

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Obama: What will solve America's gun problem? What could it be? *snaps fingers* Technology!

HereIAmJH

Re: Huh?

>How often do people have this problem in America where an assailant

>is attacking them in such a way that lethal force is necessary?

If lethal force isn't needed, then they shouldn't be pulling a gun. Don't point a gun unless you plan to shoot. Don't shoot unless you plan to kill. But if a gun IS necessary, it needs to work every time. How often do you need your fire extinguisher? Would it be useful if it had electronic locks to determine if it was going to work? People just need to take some personal responsibility and properly store and handle a dangerous tool.

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Security industry too busy improving security to do security right

HereIAmJH

maybe not too hard, but no necessarily easy either

If only it was just about POS devices. We started with scans of servers that processed CC transactions. Then it was every server of an app that processed transactions. Then it was every server on the vlan with an application that processed transactions. Now if feels like every server for every app that is used by a user that has thought about processing a CC transactions.

Turning off SSLv3 and TLS1.0 seems easy, after all it's just a couple registry settings and a reboot on Windows, right? Except if you're a .NET web service then you need to be 4.5+ as well as all of your clients. .NET 4.0 only supports up to SSLv3 and TLS1.0. And if your newly secure TLS1.2 server needs to talk to an older server running Win2003, then you're going to have to back off on your server's client settings because it also only supports SSLv3/TLS1.0. And it's not until you start rolling out enterprise wide that you realize you have a critical piece of infrastructure that hasn't been upgraded, for some reason. (hint: the guy that built the server is no longer around, and everyone is afraid to touch it because it's mission critical. Scary, huh?)

And then of course there is the gov't. I managed to knock two very important gov't agencies off of our app when I installed POODLE fixes. One it still using .NET 4.0 and the other is using a Java library that they have only been able to get to talk to our SOAP at TLS1.0. I have no idea why the transport protocol affects the message protocol, but it's their code and I don't have the details.

I might be able to get SSLv3 turned off 1Q16, but two painful outages while trying to get two outdated protocols turned off means that we have a lot of management visibility and will be looking at extended testing before attempting again. We're not even considering turning off TLS1.0 any time soon, simply because we can't dictate what our external clients use.

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Radio wave gun zaps drones out of the sky – and it's perfectly legal*

HereIAmJH

Re: if it can't regain a GPS signa

The article said it was jamming ISM bands (WiFi). GPS is not in an ISM band and would likely not be affected. They also said they were working hard to stay legal (only offering to law enforcement). No one is going to allow them to sell a GPS jammer, unless it was direct to military.

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Internet Architecture Board defends users' rights to mod Wi-Fi kit

HereIAmJH

Re: FCC regulating unlicensed bands

I absolutely DO understand the problem. Example, 802.11b has 12 available channels, but only 11 can be used in the US. The radios in even the earliest equipment supported the 12th channel and it was turned off in the config. Changing the config could potentially turn on a frequency that is illegal in the jurisdiction where the equipment is operating. Of course, you could also import equipment configured for another jurisdiction and have the same problem. I installed my first WiFi network to replace some 900Mhz industrial equipment 17 years ago. Going back further, ham equipment is infinitely adjustable and can be operated illegally. Yet rather than locking down the hardware they actually lessened regulations by implementing the no-code test for amateur radio licenses. The Citizen Band craze of the 70s brought lots of illegal amplifiers. It was common for truck drivers to boost their signal to get more range. Yes, if caught you could be fined and get your equipment confiscated, but unless you were really abusing it (and mostly stationary) you weren't a big enough concern for the FCC to bother. Mostly those blasting out so much power that they were bleeding in on TV broadcasts. And yet the world hasn't come to an end.

My point was that the FCC commissioner this week stated that he didn't think it was their place to regulate LTE-U because it is in an unlicensed band and that the stakeholders (carriers and WiFi) should work out the details since the standards for using the bands are in place. This is a complete contradiction to wanting to lock down WiFi hardware that would be operating in the same unregulated band.

BTW, locking down the hardware won't even solve the problem of illegal transmissions. You can add external amplifiers. And just changing the type of antenna alters the transmission pattern, possibly making you illegal. Omni vs sectors vs yagis, etc.

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HereIAmJH

FCC regulating unlicensed bands

Ironic that FCC wants to regulate the hardware from WiFi vendors, but has just stated that they have no authority to regulate LTE-U. (LTE on unlicensed WiFi bands)

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Drunk driver live-streams her slow journey home

HereIAmJH

Thoughtful criminals

I applaud this new trend of thoughtful criminals in Florida. First it's the guy that left his court documents (1st stolen car) in the 2nd stolen car. Now it's drunks recording videos of their attempt to drive home. Both should be a slam dunk conviction and will lighten the load of overworked police officers.

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