* Posts by Dave 126

7034 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Tosh's new workhorse drive: Not too desktop, not too enterprise

Dave 126
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The Reg sub-headline writer has been losing it for a while. Oh well!

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Web-standards-allergic Apple unveils WebGPU, a web graphics standard

Dave 126
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Wasn't Apple actively using Metal a year or two before Vulkan was finalised? That would explain Apple's decision to use it.

https://forums.developer.apple.com/thread/38469

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Google gets smooth early Android releases. OEMs are struggling

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Re: Loss of battery life???

> So It's not Android, it's Samsung that is the issue here. Nice try thou.

Not just Samsung, it's sometimes others, as the article notes. I use Android and not iOS, and before upgrading the OS i wait a couple of weeks and lurk around forums to see if other users of my specific handset have experienced any issues.

Of course there are more handsets out there that use Snapdragon SoCs - including most Nexus phones - than use Samsung's Exonyss or whatever it's called.

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Re: Pixel is the reference phone, code works for Google, OEMs sort out the mess on their hardware

From what I've read online, it is difficult to lay your hands on a Pixel phone. Indeed, there have been some reports in the last few days that production is to end. I dont know if this limited supply is a deliberate decision by Google.

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Dave 126
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Re: Loss of battery life???

It's been a not uncommon issue with Android updates on non-Nexus hardware in the past... normally fixed a little while later.

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In China, Apple's gegenpress doesn't scare the locals

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Re: was supply constrained on the Pro

Well done Mage - you've got your cause and effect arse about tit, if we are to be so simplistic. Truth is more the opposite of what you state, though of course more inter-related.

I seem to recall we touched upon this the other week and you had your dates in a muddle then. C'mon, simple fact checking doesn't take long, and there's enough fucking noise in this world as it is.

Cheers

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Dave 126
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Re: Movie studio branding

Cable Chanel branding might be a better analogy - the term 'HBO-style drama' is an accepted shorthand. AMC and Netflix have caught up perhaps, and even channels such as USA, known for police procedural series, will take a punt on the likes of Mr Robot.

Back in the days of buying CD albums (and without being able to listen to it first on YouTube), one could to an extent go by what record label the album was on.

Still, AO's point stands; Apple's core strengths don't translate to creating original content.

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Dave 126
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Re: Movie studio branding

Pixar... formed from the stuff that was sold off to fund the making of Howard the Duck. Pretty sure there's an Apple connection here, too ;)

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Dave 126
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Re: April iPhone fatigue?

>This phone is sure to be able to do everything including wipe your backside after doing No 2's.

Since Japanese toilet vendors have recently agreed to standardise the symbols they use to mark the buttons for Bidet, Dry etc, they might even incorporate a Bluetooth or NFC-based API for controlling the crapper with a phone. Stranger things etc.

I don't know if the Koreans have similarly high tech bogs.

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Ubuntu Linux daddy Mark Shuttleworth: Carrots for Unity 8?

Dave 126
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>There's a very good reason why Apple have kept iOS and MacOS separate

Yes, Apple would like you to buy a Mac and an iPad. To that end, Apple has made it easier to use them in concert - ie, Continuity (open a document in your iPhone and it will be open on your Mac), OSX Photoshop can have tool palettes displayed on an iPad, Wireless MIDI baked into to all iDevices so they can just be a control surface.

Google too, as cloud providers, are geared towards the user having both a phone and a Chromebook - though of course they don't really care whose device you use as long as you use their services.

There is some scope for crafting applications that play nice between tablets and desktops (and of course 'convertibles'), but this idea of plugging a phone into a monitor is just daft, now that ARM SoCs are as cheap as (potato) chips.

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Microsoft's DRM can expose Windows-on-Tor users' IP address

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Re: Who in their right mind

>It's the wmv DRM implementation, so in theory at least would affect wmv players on Linux or Mac too

For sure, but as the article notes, Tails disables WMV key requests. If you were concerned about privacy enough to use TOR then you would use a Linux that was tailored for privacy.

If you choose to walk through a maze to make sure you're not being followed, you'd make sure you didn't wear the same jacket that you wear down your local pub.

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Dave 126
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Re: Tin Foil Hat alert?

Don't let thoughts of conspiracy blind you to the possibility of cock-up (or vice versa!). I suspect the latter.

I'm obviously naive - I thought TOR was just for buying drugs, or criticising the totalitarian regime you happen you live under - and I didn't realise WMV movies were still a thing.

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David Hockney creates new Sun masthead. Now for The Reg...

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Just trying to imagine....

... the Sun's masthead being an young man sunbathing naked by a Californian swimming pool, a la young Hockney. Hmm, can't see it appealing to the target market.

Now, a young woman sunbathing topless by a pool might work for the Sun, but even then the colour palette is mainly blue, and not the Currant Bun's usual red.

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Coming to the big screen: Sci-fi epic Dune – no wait, wait, wait, this one might be good

Dave 126
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Re: I loved the film but what an intro

Oh fank thuck - I thought you were going to link to the animated intro that some TV broadcasts of Dune had!

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Dave 126
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Re: Bah!

>Jodorowsky's version would also have been a confusing mish-mash of religeous piety and deus ex machina if the recent documentary is any indication.

And yet the talent he assembled was damned good. Foss, Giger, Bannon, Mobius, Pink Floyd, Dali...

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Dave 126
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Re: I'm only interested in seeing Jodorowsky's version

Also, his choice of actor for the role of Emperor is long dead.

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Dave 126
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Re: But what about..

I think the Caves of Steel would be more fun as film than the later Foundation series. The sequel to the Caves of Steel, The Naked Sun, featured a cover by Chris Foss that was more Arakis than Solaris. Of course, The Naked Sun wouldn't feature much more than a beautiful woman on a lovely planet... a challange for any cinematographer for sure.

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Dave 126
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Re: SciFi Channel version

Just to be clear - Jackson never wanted to make the Hobbit movie, but Guillermo del Toro pulled of directing during pre-production. The nature of the studio contract was that Jackson had to take on the reins, and couldn't put back the release date, forcing him to write the script as he filmed.

As for LotR, Jackson celebrated the landscape of NZ, just as Tolkien used a lot of words to describe Middle Earth.

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Dave 126
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Please, no more 'easter eggs' for geeks... Such things scratch at the forth wall.

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Dave 126
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Re: Chris Foss's artwork and a little known fact

Foss also did a book called Diaries of a Spacegirl, combining b&w line drawings of naked women on some pages, and his full colour airbrushed work (as seen on many an Asimov paperback) on others.

I believe he also paints steam trains. Last i checked, he's still alive. Some contempory conceptual artist copied a Foss painting wholesale but made it much bigger. Weird.

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Dave 126
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Re: No Giger

Well some of the Jodowosky Dune team - including Giger, Foss and Bannon - went on to make Alien with Scott. The French artist Mobius was also part of the Dune project, and he's to have his Valerian work brought properly to the silver screen by Luc Besson this summer - though he got a credit on Besson's 5th Element to settle an IP dispute.

Whilst Giger might have been a good match for Jodowsky's Dune, I never saw the biomech aesthetic in Herbert's Dune - but thats just my opinion!

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Dave 126
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Re: I thought Arrival was decent.

>yes, all that was evident in the movie. Still comes of as "bam, time travel, done"

IMO.

Most time travel movies have the plot: "Find or invent time machine. Travel in time. Mess with something. Discover bad unintended consequences. Try to fix it. Fix it. The End.*" Arrival was not like that.

*Of course we get themes and variations, where multiple time loops get invoked, or the bad stuff can't be undone. Perhaps the best of these is Primer.

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Dave 126
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Re: Lynch's Dune was good, lots of people agree

> Can you see them advertising a film with a protagonist called Mua'dib leading a group of fanatical warriors in an almost-accidental jihad against the entire rest of the human universe?

The film is called Lawrence of Arabia and it received huge critical acclaim.

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Dave 126
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Re: Lynch's Dune was good, lots of people agree

>is Decker a replicant? Well no coz he's in the new film and he's aged. Fuck you Hollywood.

So, someone turned off Decker's DRM - big deal.

Replicants were built with a finite lifespan as a form of security, that is to say that the finite lifespan was a human creation and not an inherent property of Replicants. Not only does it seem plausible that this limitation could be removed (either because someone found a backdoor or other security hole, or the company that built him had its own reason for removing it - or not actually implementing it in the first place), but it seems implausible that such a security measure could never be circumvented.

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Dave 126
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Re: Make something new

> There comes a point where you've seen all future films before they are made.

And some people think that we humans only tell five or so basic stories.

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Dave 126
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Re: I am obviously alone in this.

There are some brilliant aspects to Lynch's Dune - especially set and costume design. The noble houses were well differentiated. I also liked some aspects of the special effects, such as the Navigator. However, the special effects in some of the exterior scenes let it down a bit. Imagine if it boasted David Lean's cinematography from Lawrence of Arabia....

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Dave 126
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Re: Terrorists

Dune does have a lot of what is now called Asymmetric Warfare, but then so does Lawrence of Arabia.

The list of contents from Dune's Wikpedia page make's a good summery of themes that are as relevant today as they ever have been:

4.1 Environmentalism and ecology

4.2 Declining empires

4.3 Middle Eastern references

4.4 Gender dynamics

4.5 Heroism

4.6 Zen

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Watch: MIT's terrifying invisible gel robo-eels snatch live fish

Dave 126
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Reg headline

The Reg headline invites us to watch something invisible.

Impressive!

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Apple weans itself off Intel with 'more ARM chips' for future Macs

Dave 126
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Just to clarify the article a little (by quoting from the source material, the bold emphasis is mine):

The current ARM-based chip for Macs is independent from the computer’s other components, focusing on the Touch Bar’s functionality itself. The new version in development would go further by connecting to other parts of a Mac’s system, including storage and wireless components, in order to take on the additional responsibilities. Given that a low-power mode already exists, Apple may choose to not highlight the advancement, much like it has not marketed the significance of its current Mac chip, one of the people said.

- https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-02-01/apple-developing-new-mac-chip-in-test-of-intel-independence

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LG's $1,300 5K monitor foiled by Wi-Fi: Screens go blank near hotspots

Dave 126
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Re: "LG's space-age monitors..."

"These are the days of miracle and wonder

This is a long distance call

The way the camera follows us in slo-mo

The way we look to a star

The way we look to a distant constellation

That's dying in a corner of the sky

These are the days of miracle and wonder

And don't cry baby, don't cry"

- From an album that begins with a description of an Improvised Explosive Device. It was a slow day...

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Dave 126
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"LG's space-age monitors..."

Isn't any post-CRT monitor 'space age'? Heck, even the Sony Trinitron CRT was only released in 1968, after man in had been in space and not long before man set foot on the moon.

So, let's have some suggestions for a phrase to replace 'space-age'. Please leave them below!

Mars age?

Reusable rocket age?

Twitbook age?

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Apple CEO: 'Best ever' numbers would be better if we'd not fscked up our iPhone supply

Dave 126
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Nah, he meant supply of iPhones.

It appears that the iPhone 6 is still available (including from such high street stores as John Lewis), so people have still had the option of buying a iPhone with headphone jack if they really want one. Apple's iPhone 7 sales resulats (as per article) suggest that many people haven't been that bothered about just leaving a Lightning dongle attached to their favourite headphones (or using the earbuds supplied with the iPhone 7).

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Boeing's 747 to fly off the production line for the foreseeable future

Dave 126
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Interesting:

https://www.flightradar24.com/blog/how-qantas-ferried-an-engine-on-the-wing-of-a-747/

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Baird is the word: Netflix's grandaddy gets bronze London landmark

Dave 126
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Re: Bandwidth?

>Uh, I wonder how he planned to transmit it? HDTV did not really become practical until sufficiently effective digital compression was available.

Curiously enough, Baird wasn't working with digital video! And even if he was, each pixel would require very few bits because of the narrow colour gamut the system used. Telechrome didn't render blues or greens very well, but produced acceptable pink skin tones.

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Dave 126
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microgravity film processing

>Film was never processed in space, just way to tricky to do that in zero gravity.

Film was developed in space, on the Luna 3 probe which provided humans with their first ever images of the moon's far side:

After photography was complete, the film was moved to an on-board processor where it was developed, fixed, and dried. Commands from the Earth were then given to move the film into a flying spot scanner where a spot produced by a cathode ray tube was projected through the film onto a photoelectric multiplier. The spot was scanned across the film and the photomultiplier converted the intensity of the light passing through the film into an electric signal which was transmitted to the Earth (via frequency-modulated analog video, similar to a facsimile).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luna_3#Lunar_photography

Interestingly, the temperature resistant and rad-hardened film used by the Soviets for this mission was salvaged from USA spy balloons.

So jabuzz, never say never! :)

EDIT: a good link here: https://www.damninteresting.com/faxes-from-the-far-side/

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Apple eats itself as iPhone fatigue spreads

Dave 126
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Re: Adapters

>No. All it does is increase cost for the headphone.

If your headphones outlive your phone (which they should) that's not an issue. I don't know if you've noticed, but the cost of silicon gets cheaper over time.

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Dave 126
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Re: Well....

Whilst Apple makes most of its money from phones, it has a history of making money by stealing the lunch of of others, including Sony (iPod), HMV (iTunes), Nokia (iPhone) etc. The idea that a smartphone is so good that the user has no need to upgrade was foreseen by Apple years ago. Apple knows what its history is. And it has a shitload of money to spend on acquisitions and R&D.

The above does not guarantee them success if they choose to break into new sectors. However, it does give them the benefit if the doubt before writing them off.

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Dave 126
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Re: Innovation?

>What about... ... five SEPARATE connectors for charge, HDMI, data master, data slave and analogue audio/ear/mic.

Or you could just use a headless computer, ARM, x86 or otherwise, to achieve the tasks you need. Shit, Raspberry Pis and the like cost next to faff-all, so why not have one in addition to your phone? That way, you can work at your tiny computer AND answer a call or pop down the shop without having to unplug the half dozen cables you've just outlined.

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Dave 126
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Thank you for playing! :)

>For innovation there's companies sticking heat cameras and molecular scanners in handsets.

Good on 'em. Those features (which really are using the base phone for it's screen and CPU/GPUasCPU power) might be better as add-on modules, no? Even if your day job is an insulation technician, do you really want o carry the extra bulk when you're in the pub?

>We could do with some decent optical zoom

That will usually add to the bulk of the camera. You could envisage snap-on lenses, or else there is the Nokia 1020 approach which assumes most zoom photography is in the day time and most low light photography is social and wide angle. Apple's approach is reasonable - just add a second camera with a zoom lens. Then there is that project on Kickstarter which uses about a dozen sensors and lenses, and does cunning stuff in software (one gets the idea their end-game is to sell to phone vendors). Then of course is the zoom approach used by Panasonic et al in their 'rugged' cameras: a mirror at 45º is used to increase the distance from lens to sensor. Oh, I nearly forgot - the Samsung cameras with real 10x optical zoom that also happen to be Android phones. Oh oh oh, one more - Sony took their brilliant RX100 camera and pared it down to just the lens and sensor and called it the QX 100, to be paired with Android phones. Dang, neglected those DSLRs with phone controls. So: You have options. (Phones aside, even on dedicated cameras low light performance is usually traded against zoom range)

>and quality audio.

Has been done plenty already. The Sabre DACs from ESS are considered the dogs bollocks, and are in in phones from LG (G2, V10, V20) as well as from one of the recent Chinese upstarts. In time, the DAC could be supplied by Sennheiser et al in their headphones, by Google in their Chromecast Audio, or by Sonos in their speakers, or by Yamaha in their AV receivers etc etc. Some version of the Galaxy S III had Wolfson DACs.

>Project Tango might be a thing.

Maybe, but not for everybody yet - there is no 'killer app' yet for Joe public to justify the RAM requirements and cost of extra sensors, though of course in time those costs will fall to negligible. There might be scope for using Project Tango to sell clothes online ('scan' your body, and let M&S online show you what their shirt looks like on you). Possibly a candidate as a modular 'add-on'

>I'm a fan of any upcoming device that may offer a degree of ruggedness married to some decent specs (not achieved by sticking an iPhone in a rubber sleeve).

But easily achieved by sticking an iPhone in an Otter case. Next!

>Maybe we could do with a different shape that's not so razor-thin that if gives me cramp after holding for a while.

Again, stick it in a case of your choosing. Otter for the building site, fine leather for the ambassador's party. The point is, the slimness of the phone allows you a choice of 3rd party cases.

>Or build in one of those ring things on the back that are trending (yet ridiculous).

You've lost me. Genuinely, I don't know to what you are referring to. The fault is probably mine because I'm not down with the kids.

>What would be truly innovative would be some crazy new battery technology.

Yes, but the market for those (and thus the investment in their development) is not exclusively mobile phones. Maybe LG will develop such a battery, maybe Panasonic, maybe some unheard of university spin-off. We haven't got such wonder batteries yet, but rest assured it is not for want of throwing money at the problem. You can't blame mobile phone vendors for not speccing a technology that doesn't exist yet - it's like saying Toyota isn't being innovative because their cars don't fly and aren't fuelled by banana skins, and whilst they can reach 88Mph they don't travel in time.

>Heck, even stick a solar panel in the back so those of us in sunnier climes can charge up on the windowsill sans cable.

Again, probably best suited to a modular add-on. I mean, if the solar panel was useful for 6 months a year, why would you want to carry the bulk of the device around with you in winter? Efficiency aside, wouldn't you rather the solar panel charge a battery pack, so it can continue to accumulate solar rays when you're actually using the phone? And if you're not using the phone that much, why the hell are you needing to charge it so much? Also, you'd want your solar panel to be bigger than your phone. Because physics.

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Dave 126
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Re: Dunno, Man

If you had a blank slate - i.e there were no existing 3.5mm devices on the market - would you use the same format today?

I've had MiniDisc players that have developed faults with the 3.5mm jack (fortunately they had a second audio-out 3.5mm port at line level). I've had an early-ish Creative Labs MP3 jukebox fail for the same reason, because the port was soldered directly onto the main PCB. I've broken lots of headphone cables by snagging them on things - the failure occurs by the plug. I've had a Sony Xperiaphone where the Tip Ring Ring Collar was not sufficient for them ('cos you only get mono in) so a TRRRC 3.5mm port was used in order to support stereo in (for noise-cancelling headphones that used the phone's silicon, and for stereo microphones).

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Dave 126
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Re: Adapters

I tend to lose or break ear buds. Most of the breaks come from the cable being yanked, and the failure occurs near the 3.5mm plug - so a MagSafe style breakaway adaptor would be preferable for me.

My headphones can break, again near the 3.5mm plug. I have even looked into buying or making a short 3.5m Male to Female adaptor, with the male bit being L shaped. This would reduce the mechanical load in the cable. So yeah, I wanted a dongle even before a dongle is necessary! Sometimes I have been known to apply some Sugru or SikaFlex to the cables of new earphones if their cable gland doesn't look up to the job. Some Sennheisers had replaceable cables, but the replacements weren't cheap, and the current models seem to have abandoned this.

In time, this fuss will die down. Adaptors for older headphones will be dirt cheap (and in the process protect the cables of the headphones from mechanical strain). The advantages of having the DAC chosen and tuned for specific headphones will improve sound quality (or make the same sound quality cheaper to achieve), and noise cancelling headphones will be cheaper and easier to use (because they won't contain a battery that needs charging).

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Dave 126
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>If that's true, then why are more and more Android phones also dropping the headphone jack?

Because you have a huge choice of Android phones available to you. Those people who have already found wireless headphones to their liking (joggers and gym bunnies?) won't mind a phone without a 3.5mm port.

In any case, I haven't heard of any of the big names dropping the 3.5mm socket wholesale.

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Dave 126
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Re: I got my first ever iPhone in 2016

>It was the iPhone SE, I begrudgingly have to say I like it a lot

Indeed, my mate is still on the iPhone 4S, after replacing its battery himself. It's just a really well designed little thing, slips in his pocket easily, looks sturdy.

I had the Sony Xperia Z3 Compact, which was a cracking little phone, but the official Sony case was rubbish as it left one edge exposed. Sod's law dictated that it was this unprotected edge that fell against a sharp ridge and shattered the screen. Had the Xperia had an aluminium bezel like the iPhone 4 instead of it's ABS bezel, the drop would have left its screen unscathed.

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Dave 126
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Re: (users needed to use a phone one-handed, Apple argued)

It amused me to observe that 4" iPhones are roughly the size of playing cards - objects that evolved over decades to be helf easily in one hand, and sonvey a small amount of information very clearly.

In contrast, 5-6" phones are roughly the size of postcards, objects that have for decades been used to display nice pictures.

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Dave 126
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Re: Apple shouldn't have continued with the Lightning connector

>Personally I don't think Apple will ever adopt USB-C on the iPhone. In a few years when inexpensive but reliable wireless earphones can be made, they'll add wireless charging and drop Lightning.

I can't see that happening until all airlines allow Bluetooth (or similar) to be used in flight. I have no idea as to how feasible that is.

Also, wireless charging is inefficient - no biggie if you're at home, but it is unsuitable for external battery packs and cases.

Personally, I don't think the 3.5mm headphone socket is perfect - because I have an active job, the cable can catch on things so I'd rather a MagSafe-style connector.

As for Apple abandoning the 3.5mm socket, it really depends upon how quickly you get through headphones, earbuds and phones. For me, I lose and break earbuds regularly, my quality headphones usually outlive my phones, and some of my phones have had better quality sound output than others. If my current Sennheissers had a DAC built in, it wouldn't matter which phone, tablet or laptop I used them with.

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Dave 126
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@DougS

Hehe, we've just posted much the same comment! However, I did note that James wasn't singling Apple out here!

There are things I would like from a phone that aren't currently provided - but hey, I'm a fussy bugger and a product designer! Hell, I'm the sort of weirdo who might get some genuine use out of a Project Tango (real-time 3D environment mapping) phone. The point about being a product designer is that you have to consider how people who are not like yourself will use something. The fun thing about product design is that it sits across disciplines, such as the science of materials (which can be tested, stretched, squashed, simulated) and people (who are surprising, and strangely resistant to being stretched and squashed)

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>It is isn't happening now it is going to happen sooner or later. Here's hoping the phone and IT industry in general can focus on genuine innovation now rather than 'ohh it's 0.1mm thinner than last year with even roundier corners!'.

Yet nobody who has commented about the industry's lack of innovation in the last few years has said what their idea of an innovative smartphone would look like. I suspect that this is because current smartphones already do what people want them to do.

For nearly a decade, most of my mates had 'candybar' mobile phones, primarily for texts and calls, and even the later models with colour screens didn't really add much functionality. The style of phone everybody uses these days - oblong slabs composed mostly of a touchscreen roughly 5" in the diagonal - could not have arrived earlier, no matter how 'innovative' LG or Apple had been - because chips weren't quite efficient enough. As it was, the first iPhone was pushing at the limits of what people would bear in terms of price and battery life.

In the future, we might expect silicon to be yet more power efficient, and batteries to store more energy- that's when you can expect more obvious innovation. There is plenty of time and money being spent on achieving just that. Or when LG make OLED screens that can be rolled up. But hey, obvious innovation is overrated. There is a lot to be said for refinement. For around a century, bicycles have been three triangles made of welded metal tubes attached to a couple of pneumatic tyres. The design is a good un!

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I'm deadly serious about megatunnels, vows Elon Musk

Dave 126
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Re: All related to Mars

Hydroponic technologies are advancing quite nicely - Japan already boasts indoor multistorey lettuce farms. Not only can they grow more lettuces per square foot, but the plants are raised so that (the ageing workforce of Japan) don't have to stoop down to harvest them. Labour on Mars will be expensive, and your humans puny - so make food production as easy for them as possible.

Then there is the legalisation of marijuana in several US states, which means that the development of some hydroponic kit is more in the open, developing LED lighting sources that emit different frequencies at different times (some wavelengths work for photosynthesis*, other wavelengths influence the plant's budding cycles).

* There are different types photosynthesis pathways found in nature, some pathways being more efficient, some more tolerant of temperatures, some require a leaf to have particular structures. This is why we currently have botanists and geneticists working in this area to improve crop yields, and develop crops for the climatic conditions that might be expected in a few years time.

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WTF? Francis Ford Coppola crowdsources Apocalypse Now game

Dave 126
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Re: Tom Clancy Games @ Dave 126

Del Toro was working with Kojima on game that Konami cancelled, which is why he tweeted "Fuck Konami" as a Christmas message. Seems Kojima might have some sympathy for Coppola's attitude towards big film studios.

There is spoof photo of a Powerpoint slide doing the rounds on the internet, purported to have been revealed by the infamous Sony leak:

KONAMI - INTERNAL USE ONLY

2015 STRATEGY AND PLANNING

- Fuck Hideo Kojima

- Fuck Metal Gear

- Fuck Silent Hill

- Fuck It

- Fuck You

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Dave 126
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Re: Tom Clancy Games

On the subject of Metal Gear and its creator:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/38737220/hideo-kojima-says-games-and-films-will-merge-together

His latest game will feature the director Guillermo del Toro.

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