* Posts by Dave 126

7494 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Apple's adoption of Qi signals the end of the wireless charging wars

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: for once...

> Personally, I'm not convinced that a company with only ~15% of the market is in a position to dictate standards

Market share isn't the only factor. 3rd party developer involvement also helps, and whilst developers are drawn to a big market share, they also appreciate commitment. And money. I haven't seen recent reports, but in the past we've seen articles about how more money is spent on iOS apps than on Android apps (people with pricey phones spend more money on software - shocker).

Of course, sometimes Apple doesn't dictate anything, but merely sees which ways the wind is blowing (see floppy discs, and later, optical discs).

Sometimes Apple gets it wrong - the Mac Pro was a bet on multiple GPUs, but then GPU devs favoured single, more powerful GPUs which broke the Mac Pros thermal design.

Your example - mass adoption of Lightning - was never going to happen because it is proprietary to Apple. However, many aspects of it were adopted in USB Type C.

6
1

Apple: Our stores are your 'town square' and a $1,000 iPhone is your 'future'

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Can't wait

> customising the hardware and software, not something you see in the Android world.

Yep, that marriage of software and silicon is an Apple trait that Google have noticed, and have hired silicon engineers too. Qualcomm too are offering AR / IR scanning support modules to OEMs too.

I suspect Apple will have the lead in attracting 3rd party AR developers initially, with Android systems catching up quickly.

3
2
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: The interesting bit...

Yeah, I was more interested in the new silicon too (because similar hardware efforts are in the pipeline from the likes of Qualcomm and probably Google too). These new phones are the first outing for Apple's in house GPU since they ended their relationship with Imagination Technologies. And their Image Signal Processor - let's not forget that the big stand out feature of Google's Pixel phone was cunning software treatment of the sensor data. There's some custom silicon for video motion tracking too. What makes this more interesting than the likes of Project Tango is that these iPhones will ship to interest developers.

6
0

Five ways Apple can fix the iPhone, but won't

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: 6 Ways All phone manufacturers can make a better phone

That'd be some version of a Sony Xperia Compact. I believe the current one is an XZ Compact.

Or just get an old size iPhone.

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: MPs->Cloud simplicity

You can do that on iOS through Google Play Music. If you must use your own server, there's an app for that.

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

They didn't kill it, they exiled it to the salt mines (LG TV user interface)

3
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: My wishlist

> (6) Return the old way of unlocking the phone so I don't have to do two actions or use my fingerprint to unlock it

That's a small annoyance with recent versions of Android - the requirement to swipe before entering a pattern unlock is just unnecessary. Android 4.X worked as one would expect.

4
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Ditch iTunes

Wht involve your phone? I just have a car stereo I can plug SD cards into. It's easier and safer than faffing with my phone when driving - real physical buttons. And yeah, I can just drag n drop oodles of music onto the cards.

6
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Headphone Jack Please

A wireless charging dock would answer the 'fall asleep whilst listening to headphones' use-case.

3
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Play back depth is a red herring...

...But these Sabre DACs sound very good.

The 24 and 32 bit DACs fitted to, amongst others, some LG, HTC and Sony phones sound very good indeed - but not because they can handle 24 bit audio per se. They sound good because care has been taken by ESS in their design and manufacture - and they are mated with a good amplifier that can drive a large variety of headphones. Having gone to that effort, they may as well be made to play back any file natively, so it's better to say they are 32 bit because they sound good, rather the other way round.

Still, it's a moot point if you are using headphones with their own DAC, or merely using the phone as a remote control for a device like a Chromecast or Sonos. Good headphones should last you over several generations of phone.

24
0

Boffins fear we might be running out of ideas

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: "They're all people who, in past times, would have been doing something more useful."

> Second, in past times, Thomas Edison is known for having electrocuted elephants in an effort to discredit Tesla and alternative current. I don't see that as being very productive either.

I'm not sure that it helps to be so reductionist about something as complicated as a human. Edison was incredibly driven to bring products to market, and that consisted of hard work, dubious morals and yes, marketing. Success was part of his motivation. I'm not sure that we can use a basic arithmetic such as Less Time Electrocuting Elephants = More Time Inventing.

Edison knew that both AC and DC can kill people. What he was doing was grappling with the fears of the wider public. Perhaps not in ways we approve of, but at least he knew that public acceptance was as essential to a product's success as more technical concerns.

0
0

Massive iPhone X leak trashes Apple's 10th anniversary circus

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: £1,000 for a phone

Re the price tag.

The Samsung Note 8 is enjoying record pre-orders, despite being nearly £900. Okay, there might be some pent up demand from would-be Note 7 owners, but suggests there are people willing to pay that much.

It is more likely that people used to paying £700 for a phone will pay £1,000 for a phone than it people will jump from a £300 phone to a £700 (with so many good solid handsets at around £300, those who buy flagship phones aren't desperately price conscious).

It is rumoured that Apple's suppliers are struggling to make the cut-out screen in sufficient quantities (and are passing the cost of the low yields on to Apple), and so initial supplies of the new phone will be constrained. As such, Apple wouldn't gain additional sales by reducing the price tag.

(Sent from my Nexus 5. No immediate plans to upgrade, but watching Qualcomm's / Apple's / Google's et al AR/3D scanning efforts with interest)

1
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Is "iPhone X" the actual name?

UNIX, NeXT, OSX, XDA Developers, X Window... Nothing wrong with X. To be futuristic with go-faster stripes, you need an X and a Z, as Clive Sinclair observed!

2
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Apple has redrawn the poo emoji

The graphic implementation of unicode emoji is up to vendors. Thankfully Google, in Oreo, has abandoned its weird 'smudged thumb print' style of emoji in favour of those that resemble every other vendor's (IRC, forums, WhatsApp, iOS to name but a few) since the days of acid house.

0
0

The new, new Psion is getting near production. Here's what it looks like

Dave 126
Silver badge

I reminded folk here a couple of days ago that the Gemini, featured on the Reg a few months back, is due to ship in December. However, for completeness, I felt I also had to mention another Indiegogo campaign, one for a snap-on physical keyboard for Moto Mod phones.

The Gemini looks lovely, but I can't help but think that keyboards - unlike other phone components such as screens, chips and cameras - won't go out of date as quickly. As such, one might be paying for a lovely feature that is married to hardware that may become outdated. The opposite might also be true - keyboards and keys are susceptible to failure - so being to remove a keyboard from a phone and send it off for repair (or swap for a new one) without the hassle of setting up a new phone strikes me as being desirable.

There's advantages to both approaches, and the Moto Mod keyboard campaign isn't as far developed as this fine Gemini effort.

3
0

Sci-Fi titan Jerry Pournelle passes,
aged 84

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: IT angle

Hehe, it seems a couple of you read 'IBM' as 'IBM PC'... Almost as if you had neglected to turn off your brains' auto-complete function! (I don't mean to have a go at you, just amused by the observation)

Sorry for being vague, I couldn't remember how to spell Selectric. Deighton leased the top of the range model with magnetic tape storage, apparently.

3
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

IT angle

Curiously, some other tech blogs are saying that he was the first author to write a novel on a computer - in the late seventies. However, Len Deighton wrote 'Bomber' on an IBM in 1968. It may be the case that both claims are correct, depending on how exactly the milestone is phrased. Deighton had an assistant, and would make some longhand corrections.

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/books/2013/03/len_deighton_s_bomber_the_first_book_ever_written_on_a_word_processor.html

https://www.theverge.com/2017/9/9/16279582/jerry-pournelle-science-fiction-author-writing-computers-obituary

4
0

Google to relieve HTC of its phones biz – report

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: My G1

The Psion-style Gemini Android / Linux (dual-boot) PDA phone thingy is due to ship in November. It's an Indiegogo product:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/gemini-pda-android-linux-keyboard-mobile-device-phone#/

There's also an Indiegogo campaign for a snap on Moto Mod keyboard, but it's not as far along:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/keyboard-mod-a-physical-keyboard-for-the-moto-z#/

6
1

We don't need another hero: Huawei overtakes Apple – even without a big-hitter

Dave 126
Silver badge

Andrew was on Radio 4 today, and he has a nice voice for radio. Radio 4 has also aired two documentaries hosted by Stephen Fry this week too (yesterday about Australian English, today Mental Health), so maybe one of the controllers has a sense of humour. ;)

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

People are expecting the iPhone to have a fancy screen with a cutout (a la Rubin's Essential Phone), and some fancy AR tricks. The latter will be more mainstream in Android phones next year, with active and passive 3D scanning DSPs and sensors from Qualcomm amongst others, plus software from Google ditto. Apple are likely to enjoy better developer support initially for these features, because their ARkit will roll out to a larger base of existing devices, even though they don't have specialised silicon inside.

0
0

Secure microkernel in a KVM switch offers spy-grade app virtualization

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Proof of correctness proves what, exactly?

SeL4 formally verified some time ago, and since tested:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/L4_microkernel_family

https://www.quantamagazine.org/formal-verification-creates-hacker-proof-code-20160920/

4
0

Dear rioters: Hiding your face with scarves, hats can't fool this AI system

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Self contradicts itself in the first line

The Reg sublimes aren't generally written by the article's author. Instead they are outsourced to someone with kangaroos loose in their top paddock.

9
0

Sub plot subplot thickens: Madsen claims hatch fumble killed Swede journo Kim Wall

Dave 126
Silver badge

Interesting but not directly linked

"The case has prompted investigators to reopen unsolved killings in Denmark, including the 1986 find of the dismembered remains of a 22-year-old Japanese tourist whose corpse was found in several plastic bags in Copenhagen harbor. Moeller Jensen stressed that it was standard procedure to look at so-called cold cases and there is no immediate link to Wall's killing."

-

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/danish-submarine-owner-faces-charge-womans-death-49412497

Madsen was fifteen years old when the Japanese tourist died.

8
0

Stealth, lightweight Android breaks cover

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Apps are more of a problem

If you *need* to message people through Facebook but refuse to install the official messenger app, you can install an app called Disa.

1
0

Paris Hilton inflates crypto bubble some more, backs Initial Coin Offering

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Lydian tokens are intended to allow people to buy advertising campaigns.

You could read their whitepaper (link below), but I'm not sure you'll make much more sense of it than I did.

The section titled "Why use Lydian tokens to purchase services available to purchase with fiat currency" doesn't offer any clues.

There were some words about using the blockchain to ensure that people paying to advertise weren't defrauded... and something about a browser that lets end users exchange Lydian tokens for an ad-free browsing experienced. However, the latter isn't directly related to this offering.

https://www.slideshare.net/mobile/gurbakshchahal/lydian-whitepaper-81517-draft

0
0

It's happening! Official retro Thinkpad lappy spotted in the wild

Dave 126
Silver badge

My first Linux install was on an old Thinkpad, but it took some effort to get the audio to work. Something to do with a non-standard IBM hardware, so the thingamajiggy had to be started before the ASIO doowhatsit. Rewarding, but a bugger largely because my friend and I were learning this SUDO malarkey on the fly.

2
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Since 16:9 became ubiquitous on laptops, tablet adoption had risen. Perhaps now that many people use a tablet to watch movies away from home (which are usually more comfortable to view anyway, especially on trains or in hotel beds), laptops can revert to 16:10 or 4:3?

Also, Apple and Microsoft can source screens of the aspect ratio they want, so surely Lenovo can too?

10
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Screw 16:10

It's horses for courses, but generally 16:10 or 3:2 is well suited to productivity applications and for reading documents and webpages. The reason? Title bars, menu bars and ribbons will soon eat into the height of the the screen, so what starts as a 16:9 letterbox becomes a slit. Reading an article then requires lots of scrolling. Urgh. Also, a taller screen means that the user's gaze is at a higher, more comfortable position for longer.

Of course, I've seen very wide spreadsheets spread across several monitors, and DTP workstations with monitors in Portrait, so there is no once aspect ratio fits all. However, it would be nice to have some choice in the market. At present, damned near every laptop has a 16:9 screen except for Apple (16:10) and Microsoft (3:2).

12
0

Don’t buy that Surface, plead Surface cloners

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: "Clone"

> Remember MS only entered the market to ape Apple and thus effectively create a clone of the MacBook Air

That's a bit of an over-generalisation, maybe? MS have had problems for years with how to bring hardware-dependant features to their OS when laptop vendors aren't interested. So yeah, they must have envied Apple's integration of software and hardware, but MS have borrowed from Apple's methods and not just blindly copied (aped) the results.

Apple sell laptops to make money on the hardware, whilst MS mainly want to strengthen the image of Windows laptops as a whole. These days you can buy Windows laptops from a range of vendors with a excellent high resolution (and colour accurate) screens and trackpads that are actually usable! The strategy seems to be working.

There are also Surface features such as stylus input that traditionally Apple left to partners like Wacom, or else implemented in a different way (through the iPad Pro range).

Features such as a removable keyboard with a discrete GPU are very non-Apple, though macOS is beginning to play nice with external GPUs over Thunderbolt.

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: "Clone"

The Acer mentioned on the article has a 3:2 display, same as the Surface range. MacBooks have a 16:10 display, whereas the vast majority of other laptops have the wretched 16:9 aspect ratio.

I'm not aware of any laptops with a 19:10 display, though it wouldn't surprise me if some weird specialised gaming laptop had one.

2
0

Google's Hollywood 'interventions' made on-screen coders cooler

Dave 126
Silver badge

> For all we know, Mrs Columbo is his schizophrenic alter ego who goes out and commits the murders then Columbo finds someone else as a fall guy/girl.

Have you pitched that to a TV Network yet Dan? :D

3
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

> I think there are better things to make cool. Like being generally nicer to people in everyday life.

How are you supposed to solve crimes if you have a happy home life and no drinking problem??!

Actually, Columbo is the exception that proves the rule: he's nice, he's cool, he has a wife and dog.

5
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Halt and Catch Fire

If I want technically accurate, I'll read a manual ;D

Silicon Valley is very good, especially from the second season. What it isn't is a historical account.

Similarly, Silicon Valley. If you can just go with their McGuffin of an impossibly good compression algorithm, the door is opened to satirising the odder aspects of start-up and VC culture.

1
0

15 'could it be aliens?' fast radio bursts observed in one night

Dave 126
Silver badge

There's a difference between liking an idea and believing it. I like the idea that there will be a roast duck in my oven when I return home... it doesn't mean that I believe it.

Using 'Aliens' as a placeholder is healthy, because it doesn't colour any working theory (which currently is a weird neutron star with a massive magnetic field). It also has form: Pulsars were once known as LGMs (Little Green Men), until a better explanation was arrived at.

15
1

P≠NP proof fails, Bonn boffin admits

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: sha256 hash

No, because to win the prize you can't merely demonstrate that you can't do it; you must prove that nobody can do it ever.

8
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Let them eat Clay!

> Now, if you could prove the opposite, that would be something else entirely.

Yep, that would be the premise of the film Sneakers, starring Robert Redford as a pen tester, and James Earl Jones as head of a three-letter agency. Supporting cast includes Ben Kingsley, River Pheonix, Mary McDonnell, Dan Akroyd and Sidney Poitier.

2
0

Samsung keeps the smartwatch alive. Just

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: But... Who buys this stuff?

Indeed. When mobile phones were the size of bricks, only people who could really justify the cost and inconvenience would have one. A decade or so later, with advancements in batteries, silicon and infrastructure, most people would have one.

0
0

LG teases us with svelte V30 but refuses to say if it's coming to Blighty

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Dual SIM ? Memory expansion ?

Dual SIM V20s are available for around £300 according to Google, though I can't personally vouch for the retailers. The V20 isn't waterproof but does have a swappable battery.

1
0

Sony remembers it once made a great little phone

Dave 126
Silver badge

I loved my Z3 Compact, but the official Sony case left one edge of the screen unprotected, allowing it to be shattered when I dropped it on a sharp edge. I should have bought a 3rd party silicone case for a fiver.

I could reach about 85% of the screen with my thumb without readjusting my grip - on the Nexus 5 I'm using now that's about 65%. At the time I had an active job away from my vehicle, so a compact, pocket friendly model was most welcome. That said, this Nexus 5 is easier in the pocket than I expected it to be.

I'm in no hurry to upgrade, so will wait for Qualcomm's/Google's/Apple's AR / 3D-scanning efforts to mature next year before getting a new handset.

1
0

Google ARCore brings augmented reality to relatively small audience

Dave 126
Silver badge

Qualcomm

http://uk.pcmag.com/news/90725/qualcomm-hopes-to-recapture-ar-for-android

Qualcomm have announced ISPs as part of their new Snapdragon platform for two and three camera AR capabilities, including a low-power active Infra Red part for real-time point clouds.

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

You're making the mistake of judging a nascent platform by the applications currently available for it.

There are countless applications for an environment-aware device beyond games and social media gimmicks, in areas ranging from engineering to music.

Qualcomm and Apple will be releasing specialist AR silicon soon.

1
0

How does Apple chief Tim Cook's package look now? Like $89m

Dave 126
Silver badge

> I suppose the unfortunate thing is that Cook is trousering almost $100m for being very ordinary. I'm not a Steve Jobs enthusiast, but he did stuff that kept Apple out in front within its niches, whereas Cook has presided over, not quite mediocrity, but a lack of genuine innovation

Okay, I need to pick you up on this. You're rating innovators over good managers, regardless of the dollar value they bring. You're judging Cook against a subjective definition of 'innovation', and though you may well be right, it is not directly linked to the profits the company makes and thus the pot from which to pay him.

Also, you've neglected to include a sample group - are any other companies innovating in the way you mean, or are they all hedging their bets and investing in the 'next big thing' (cars? IoT? AR? Healthcare?) just as Apple are? Exactly.

Oh, you might want to look at Apple's R and D spending over the last decade.. it's grown hugely.

What seems clear about Apple under Jobs' return is that they had their shit together, thanks in no small part to their COO Tim Cook. A company is a team effort - the clue is the word 'company'. A fantastic bit of industrial design, product design or UI design is visible to you, but how are you judging Cooks supply chain management skills? Their bottom line suggests he's more than a bit damned good at what he does.

tl; dr Have some courtesy for the professionals whose work you can't grok.

1
1

Forget trigonometry, 'cos Babylonians did it better 3,700 years ago – by counting in base 60!

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: So much for digital

I don't know... Something to do with Napoleon possibly?

Whilst I work (measure and cut) in mm, I estimate in feet and inches. However I may be missing a trick because of the way that 12 can be easily divided by 3 and by 4 (and obviously 2 and 6). For centuries, carpenters have been able to make beautiful pieces without a unit of measurement by means of dividers - it is only important that they can express a length as a rational of another.

31
1

Calm down, internet. Elon's Musk-see SpaceX spacesuit is a bit generic

Dave 126
Silver badge

They can spell consistently. The idea of removing u from colour and vapour was an attempt to remove French influences. English English is a mongrel. A mongrel that engenders fondness.

7
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Double vacuum

You may well be right but I'm tired and drunk so can't do the working.

4
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: "Not a movie prop, honest"

I always liked the spacesuits in Alien, the way they looked like cricket pads!

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Double vacuum

2 atmospheres in the suit, zero outside, or more easily, 4 inside and one outside.

8
1

Kraut coppers seize 5,000 Donald Trump-shaped dance biscuits

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: A little off-theme

He was desperate to be seen at the most fashionable nightclubs amongst the cultural movers and shakers back in the eighties, but he was known for not drinking or taking drugs.

2
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Pill Colour

> And now that the US economy is entering the Trump Recovery with gusto

It's a straight line graph from several years back into the Obama administration you fucking innumerate gobshite.

25
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Pill Colour

> I wonder if those people actually taking these drugs view Trump in the same light as most commentards on this thread. I'd guess not

Ravers are Trump supporters? Are you off your tits?! The young men on speed dancing to Happy Hardcore tape pack topless outside a burger van at Glastonbury might be equivalent to Trump's core base, but not the users of a drug that gives a feeling of love and goodwill to all people

Most Ecstasy users I know have a good sense of humour, usually veering towards the ironic, daft or dark. Many of them are doctors, chartered engineers or other professionals. All empirical evidence is that taking some once in a blue moon with good people is good for your mental and physical health. And it is actually scandalous that its original purpose - the treatment of PTSD - hasn't been explored further due to political stigma. We'd rather our servicemen suffer high rates of divorce, prison and suicide instead.

Any more than one death in a few million users (compare to alcohol, or going jogging) isn't due to MDMA but to impurities and substitutes, the result of a Daily Mail-appeasing political political policies. Remember David Nutt was fired as New Labour's Scientific Advisor because he didn't give the 'scientific advice' that agreed with the party line.

For more information, see that infamous hippie rag The Economist.

18
2

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017