* Posts by Dave 126

7152 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Booze stats confirm boring Britain is drying

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: drunk posting again

Also: young people less likely to be in employment than older people, and beer has been taxed to the point of being of nearly unaffordable for them.

12
3
Dave 126
Silver badge

In the nineties, the word 'binge' was only used to describe a two day bender, aided by Columbian marching powder and, for full column-inches, the company of a underwear model. (I believe there are websites that help research the use of a word in newspapers and literature over time)

Three pints is a binge, now? Oh well.

16
0

Windows 10 S forces Bing, Edge on your kids. If you don't like it, get Win10 Pro – Microsoft

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: The Real money here? Proctor and Gamble etc

The port selection did raise an eyebrow. MS did have late-stage prototypes with two USB-C ports (which were used in the production of marketing materials) but have defended their final choice, saying that USB-A is still very common.

That is of course true, but why not both? My opinion is that the faster the transition from USB-A (and power input) to USB-C, the more convenient things will be for everyone.

4
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

They might be right, but this isn't the example that shows that. This isn't the version of Windows that users were coerced into migrating to from a previous version. If they didn't previously have features on a machine (because this version comes on new machines) they can't be said to have lost them.

There is a charge to upgrade to the professional version, but that was always the case. (Although this Pro version isn't as 'Pro' as previous versions - not being able to override system restarts to install updates, I'm looking at you)

4
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Does Win S-hit slurp like Chromebooks

Both the French and EU authorities are awaiting more information from MS about what data they collect from users, with a view to forcing them to make things clearer.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/2/21/14682256/microsoft-windows-10-eu-privacy-concerns

3
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

> Any company that can take the tactics it did to force Windows 10 down people's throats is a monopoly.

The version of Windows 10 that MS sneakily upgraded users' computers to is not Windows S. Windows S is unlikely to to become the dominant desktop OS. It's not my aim to defend MS, but just to point out that the situation now is so different to that of the Netscape days that the lawyers will have plenty to argue about, should it get that far.

1
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Meh, I give it a few months

> How that fits the EU ruling about IE in Windows? Or because they renamed it to Edge they believe it now doesn't apply?

MS could just say that Windows S doesn't have a dominant market position - which is true. It was only Windows' dominance at the time that opened them up to the EU ruling about IE. You can't be accused of abusing a monopoly if you don't actually have one.

14
1

Gamers red hot with fury over Intel Core i7-7700 temperature spikes

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: "opening a browser or an application or a program"

Indeed. Language is an ever-evolving thing, so I prefer to err on the side of clarity. For that reason, I use 'application' for a desktop program, and 'app' for a phone or tablet program. In time, the distinction will become less useful as more applications run on ARM, and more predominately ARM OSs play nice with mice and keyboards. Hey ho.

( I also use 'program' for computer software, and 'programme' for theatre and television shows.)

11
0

S is for Sandbox: The logic behind Microsoft's new lockdown Windows gambit

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: S is for Spyware

Idiots yes, but also anyone who requires some specific 3rd party applications not available on non-Windows platforms - so that includes a good many engineers at present. Not a hard concept to grasp.

And are you sure that 'idiots will flock to it'? I'd have thought these 'idiots' that concern you just use what comes installed on the machine they buy.

Windows S phones home just as Windows Pro does - as the article notes, there is little difference between the two other than a few settings.

(Curious observation - my stock Android keyboard just 'auto-corrected' Windows S to Windows Server)

3
6

Windows 10 S: Good, bad, and how this could get ugly for PC makers

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Oh dear

> 'do I click once or twice', hover to select problems? As ever with Microsoft, it's 2 steps forward, 1 step back.

My dad just hammers the left mouse button repeatedly over an icon then swears at the computer until a few instances of the document open up.

My educational computers have ranged from three mouse buttons (Acorn, something Unix-y) to one (Mac), my personal mice from two buttons to lots.

2
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: MS is daft.

I wouldn't say 'need', but a 4:3 screen is better suited to many school and college tasks than a 16:9 screen. I say that hoping that the classroom activities involve more than watching YouTube.

The point was, the OP said he could get equivalent machines for less money... but that only holds true if one ignores the screen. How important aspect ratio is to you is a matter of personal preference, just as is the weight, the track pad quality, how noisy it is etc.

It would be nice if laptops with screens other than 16:9 were available from more vendors so that one could then shop around on other criteria, such as price.

15
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: MS is daft.

Does MS's competition offer a 4:3 screen? No, sadly.

2
3

Intel's Optane in PCs is as good as it will get for years, says analyst

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Only on new Intel processors?

What's new is the faster-than-SSD cheaper-than-DRAM non-volatile memory called Optane. How it might come to be used is the point under discussion in the article. Cheers!

0
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Why no figures...

It's all there in the source article:

https://www.gamespot.com/articles/intel-optane-memory-review/1100-6449530/#Benchmarking_Methodology

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Maybe I'm missing something

Have another coffee Steve! Yeah, you're right in that SSDs will be faster than a Optane + spinning rust setup. However, the point of the article was that a 1TB Optane + rust setup was no slouch, and yet still much cheaper than a pure SSD setup of the same capacity.

The second point of the article was that this isn't suitable for reinvigorating older PCs, because Optane requires newer Intel CPUs. Also, the spinning rust is more suited to desktops than it the laptops that many people use as their primary computer.

1
2

Spotify seeks hardware boffins

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Spotify - please create a device for audiophiles

Some variants of LG G and V series phones have an amp and DAC chip ('Sabre’) by ESS that is widely considered to be the dog's bollocks.

Alternatively, you can use an external DAC and amp over micro USB or Lightning. The B&O-branded audio module (actually ESS components) for that modular LG phone will work on a lot of Android phones with USB-audio.

Most of the reputable headphone makers will soon be shipping headphones with integrated amps and DACs, rendering the sound quality of the phone irrelevant (as long as it can output a digital stream quickly enough).

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: But Why?

You can listen to music on a dedicated player without being interrupted by phone notifications. That's a selling point!

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Volume knobs!

> Forgive me in advance. Your life must be so complete and empty of day to day worries that you complain about a button (and size of) being in the wrong place? I do wonder about western peoples whinges.

If a manufactured object is irritating to use, then the mean time to the user punching it, throwing it away or stowing it at the back of the garage is reduced. This results in more objects being manufactured. In short, it is a sustainability issue. It costs just as much to manufacture a poorly designed object as it does a pleasingly designed object, so it should be done right.

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Let's get Spotify to address a huge issue

There used to be an issue with number of tracks on that rare thing: an Archos 500GB (spinning rust) Android-powered Portable Media Device. I think Archos patched it in an update, but for a while it suffered from not being able to access the number of tracks that it's raw capacity would suggest it could. At first, Archos blamed the issue on Android itself - but I've never taken much notice of which file system Android uses, if indeed that was the issue.

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Hmmm, the current method of listening to Spotify - phone or tablet streaming to a Chromecast or similar - works well in all respects but one: it needs a nice big volume knob.

I can imagine a charging cradle for phones and tablets that would feature a USB jog dial or knob for volume control. Bang and Olufsen have made dedicated streaming-audio consoles that consist of a touchscreen plus knob. (And of course it was a B&O jog wheel on a telephone that inspired Apple's original iPod.)

0
0

Man nicked trying to 'save' beer from burning building

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Give the chap the benefit of the doubt

Foster's was unknown in the UK until the film The Adventures of Barry Mackenzie, in which a fire in a BBC studio is doused by a chain of Australian men drinking Foster's and lining up to piss on the fire - whilst singing the One-Eyed Trouser Snake Song.

Based upon Barrie Humphreys' cartoon in Private Eye, and featuring Peter Cook and Dame Edna. Produced by Philip Adams, whose brilliant radio show is available as a podcast - http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/

1
0

Huawei P10 Plus: The bigger brother is the real contender

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Small point

Large apertures also aid in portrait photography, since the background will be in softer focus.

3
0

IT error at Great Western Railway charging £10k for 63-mile journey ticket

Dave 126
Silver badge

As Jack Dee on I'm Sorry I haven't a Clue said: the Romans settled in Bath, and named it for its natural hot spring waters, and for its proximity to a toilet like Trowbridge.

16
0

Filer startup Qumulo chosen to help tame the DreamWorks dragon

Dave 126
Silver badge

This was a good article, especially in juxtaposition to the last Reg case study of a VFX house who rolled their own storage.

2
0

Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: How times change..

"What's that Photoshoppy thing, called, the one I can use to edit pictures?"

The GIMP.

"Come again?”

The GIMP, The GNU Image Manipulation Program

"What's GNU mean?"

It stands for GNU's Not Unix.

"Eh? But what..."

It's a recursive name, see. The GNU in GNU'S Not Unix stands for GNU in...

"You know what, don't bother. I'll just print it out, cut it out with scissors and scan it back in."

* * *

If the menu item just says GIMP, then no, it doesn't say what it is. InkScape isn't the best name, but at least gives a clue (the convention for more than thirty years across platforms is that pens and ink metaphors are for vector graphics, and brushes and paints are for bitmap graphics)

I do take your point that in a community where projects are forked and improved upon and there is no 'default' text editor, so each text editor needs its own name. It's just not ideal for all users though.

14
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: How times change..

Unity didn't work. However he had a point in general about usability and UI design - these things are important if one wants to attract the uninitiated. It is hard to get right, time consuming and expensive too if you want to test a UI amongst a large range of users. That said, it can also be about some simple things, such as giving applications names that reflect their function. Windows' Text Edit, Paint and Explorer might be shit, but at least a novice might guess what they do. This is important - if they are learning, why fill their heads with arbitrary names? Imagine learning to drive if the instructor insisted the steering wheel was called Antelope and the accelerator ColdDerek - it would just be useless aribitary stuff to remember, on top of the actual important stuff such as speed limits and clutch control.

InkScape is a reasonable name; The GIMP is not a useful name.

29
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: My thoughts on this ... @badger31

It's the concept of plugging your phone into a monitor, mouse and keyboard that has fallen by the wayside. Why? Because a discrete (and discreet!) HDMI ARM or X86 computer of equivalent power to a phone can be very inexpensive and be about the size of a cigarette lighter. So, why faff around plugging your phone into stuff when you can use it in parallel with with a separate device?

These days I don't plug my phone into an amp or speaker dock to stream music - that's what the Chromecast Audio is for. Being able to control the music from anywhere in room, or take a phonecall outside without unplugging cables or interrupting the music offer clear user advantages over the 'one device does all' approach.

Notably, Apple never went down the Unity / Metro route (though there was an argument for Unity in poorer countries where a user could only afford one device but might share a HDMI tv). Of course, Apple would rather you buy an iPhone *and* a Mac, but I can't help but think their 'Continuity' approach (share open documents and files seamlessly between phone and desktop) has more merit for most users than faffing about plugging phones into monitors.

6
1

Not the droids you're looking for – worst handsets to resell

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: How 'real' are Sim-only RRPs

I haven't looked for a while, but I remember the well-recieved Xperia Z3 Compact had an RRP of around £550 at launch, even though it could be bought brand new for around £400 online. My figures are rough, but still within margin to support your point.

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Why Does This Matter?

> Fingers crossed the next device will be a Gemini (assuming they get the thing out the door). A proper, useful keyboard on a phone would be a wonderful thing to have; and I'll probably hang on to that until the heat death of the Sun.

Since you are looking at crowdfunded solutions (and you are an adult who knows the risks), you might also consider a Moto Mod keyboard - five row sliding and tilting keyboard for compatible Moto phones: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/keyboard-mod-a-physical-keyboard-for-the-moto-z#/

You give the impression that you're waiting for real products to ship and be reviewed before laying out your cash, so may the best keyboard win!

My feeling is that the detachable keyboard will be the better solution - should a key fail, you can detach the keyboard from your phone and send it off for repair, without having to faff around digging up a spare phone. Should your phone fail, your investment in the keyboard can be carried over to a new phone. Ditto if you ever wish to upgrade your phone.

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Why Does This Matter?

> m not really sure I understand why this is important. Who sells their phone after only one month?

Hi Rosie! Some people sell on a new phone they get with their network operator contract. It's a bit daft, because they would probably save money if they bought the phone outright ( or on credit card) and then negotiated a SIM-only tariff.

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Likewise, LG have made some odd design choices (G3 had stupid high resolution screen that sapped battery, another had a weird modular set up, their 'sane' V10 / V20 alternative high end offerings weren't sold in Europe) and then they had an endless boot cycle issues on some handsets, leading to bad press.

Shane, cos LG seem able to make a great flagship phone, but stumble at the last hurdle. Their latest G-series phone has a similar 2:1 screen to the latest Galaxy S, but reviews suggest Samsung's offering will be just that little bit better around the board.

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

That is a near-term future I would like to see. We don't have just one knife in our kitchen, so why just use one phone/tablet/touchscreen media streamer? It would be nice if an old phone's screen could be easily mated to a Raspberry Pi. Etc etc

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: James May

> benefit from significant tax subsidies... ...Pity the idiots that are trying to keep up with them out of their own pockets.

I was under the impression that the tax subsidies have been tweaked to steer fleets towards lower emission vehicles - more hatchbacks and fewer BMW sedans.

0
0

Will the MOAB (Mother Of all AdBlockers) finally kill advertising?

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Sponsored people

Not just athletes, but people on forums too. And I used to know a bloke on campus who was a paid 'brand ambassador' for shoes with wheels in them.

The answer is to go to the pub more, and use word-of-mouth when it is delivered face-to-face. Or subscribe (pay real money) to an organisation such as the Consumer Association who buy every product they then test in controlled circumstances.

But hey, I like my Logitech mouse, my Victorinox knife, Scarpa boots, my local Lidl, my Panasonic compact camera (but I hear Sony RX100 is the mutt's nuts)... I get on well with Ryobi drills, but my mates swear by Makita - and they have a better site radio.

1
1

Apple's zippy silicon leaves Android rivals choking on dust

Dave 126
Silver badge

Neutral sites that have a reputation for benchmarks have usually placed iPhones highly. If you still suspect bias, you can read through their testing methodology.

22
2
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: It's just a shame

Hehe, I remember asking a 'first adopter' the same question when he upgraded from his Galaxy II to a III some years ago - what does a phone need all that power for?

What has happened in the mean time is that people use their phones for more intensive tasks. For example, the early days of smartphones, the cameras were no match for a dedicated cameras - now they are good enough for many situations, so the PC is taken out of the workflow. It's all on the phone.

Whilst I'm on record here for being happy enough to slum it with a £45 Huawai (I loved the way it bounced on tarmac!), using a Nexus 5 is a breath of fresh air in comparison (yeah, I know it's a years-old model).

10
2

Microsoft and Rambus will get schwifty in quantum-cum-cryogenic computation collab

Dave 126
Silver badge

And for anyone who clicked on this article for the headline, the first episode of Rick and Morty Season 3 was broadcast on the first of April. Rest of the season to follow later this summer.

For those slow on the take up, imagine a cross between Doc Brown and Futurama's Professor - but alcoholic and misanthropic - careering around a HHGTTG universe. Yeah, it's great.

7
0

Apple nabs permit to experiment with self-driving iCars in Cali

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Not The Only One

I read that it was Lexus SUVs that Apple are using as test beds. Despite a couple of hiccups a few years back, I believe Lexus still have a reputation for being reliable, and fairly anonymous-looking in the States (they're a bit scarcer in the UK)

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Not The Only One

> Why should you prefer Apple's self driving software over Google's or Bosch's or Ford's? ... Now maybe the Apple's UI is nicer, but they wouldn't need a permit to test self driving cars if they only intended to put a pretty UI over someone else's self driving software.

The UI won't stop with the car. Indeed, an iPhone (with access to messages and calender appointments) would have a fair idea of where the user wants to go before they even get in the car. The UI would have provision for organising travel for different family members (if we're on the assumption that the private car ownership model will still hold). The UI would be linked to related functions, such as the iPhone waking the user with an alarm.

0
0

Back to the future: Honda's new electric car can go an incredible 80 miles!

Dave 126
Silver badge

Well, it will always be up to the user to choose the right vehicle for the job. My longest car journeys tend to be of several hours drive down to the coast... But at those times I'd rather use a van I can sleep in, and not my daily run-around.

99℅ I don't need to move a sofa from A to B, though it's handy that I have access to a vehicle that can do so on occasion.

The joy of a ICE vehicle with a large tank is that one doesn't have to drive to a fuel station every day. This is different to EVs which can be 'filled up' at home (if you live in an appropriate home)

2
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: One of the factors I'd be interested in

> You'd be a bit annoyed to get into your car and find it grind to a halt a few yards down the street because you'd just been using its battery to cook your breakfast.

As I said, it's a question of implementation. Say there were peak demands on domestic power a couple of hours after you have arrived home from work: there would be scope for reducing the peak loads on the grid by using your car battery. There would still be plenty of time to top up your car between midnight and seven am. Also, I suspect most people will have an EV with a range well in excess of their daily commute.

The idea is to reduce the spikes in demand on the grid. And the spikes really are 'spikey'!

4
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

I guess I don't have to rely upon my memory to know what fraction of my journeys are less than 80 miles... My phone - or rather Google - knows. Of course I would have to filter the data (I,E, ignore journeys that I make Mon-Fri 9-5 in my works goods vehicle).

My point is, someone could create an app that would give prospective EV owners a very good idea of the sort of range they need. It could even take into account factors such as hills and temperature.

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: One of the factors I'd be interested in

> One issue with EVs is the load they will put on the electric grid and is the grid resilient enough to handle it.

Electric vehicles - when parked at home - can conversely help to smooth the demand upon the grid, by using their batteries as local storage. It's a question of implementation. The mass manufacturing of Li-Ion cells for cars also brings down the cost of batteries for domestic or local power banks.

I'm not saying you're wrong, but only that this is complex.

3
0

Apple wets its pants over Swatch ad tagline

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Daft thing is ...

Every time jake makes the assertion that 'nobody wears a watch these days', he gets the same response. Yet he keeps making it. Why?!

6
0

Apple’s premium TV plans – the hobby doomed to stay that way

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Isn't it inspiring

The article wasn't written by Reg staff - it was written by 'Faultline'. There's a description of that group at the bottom of the article.

1
0

Take that! FCC will hand net neut to FTC – reports

Dave 126
Silver badge

Is there a style book that suggests that abbreviations such as 'FTC' are spelled out for the benefit of readers?

I know what the FCC is - Eric Idle write a song about them.

0
0

Microsoft's new hardware: eight x86 cores, 40 GPU cores

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Microsoft cheque in the post?

> Wow, for a cynical snarky website, I have never seen such a shill article. The whole thing is written like the next xbox is such an amazing hardware and performance marvel.

The power of the machine isn't up for debate, nor it is subjective - it isn't shilling to state the facts. The article did not offer any opinion on the end user experience, which is more subjective and thus would be more open to accusations of shilling.

Raw power doesn't in itself make for a great gaming experience, and it won't sway the purchasing decisions of gamers that much - they care about what games are available, which of their mates use which system for online play, their subjective preference for either a PS4 or XBOX controller, etc. Whilst they do care too about the pretty graphics - Sony's latest offering is no slouch, either.

6
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Now all it needs is some games ...

Games on Steam tend to be cheaper than for XBOX, and I imagine MS take a bigger cut of XBOX software sales, too. Don't forget MS's subscription fees for XBOX live, too.

4
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Now all it needs is some games ...

Martin is correct - this generation of consoles sees Sony with most of the exclusives. There isn't a great case for owning an XBOX one and a gaming PC, but there's a good case for having a PlayStation and a PC if you're a keen gamer - and enjoy the genres of games each platform excellent at.

4
2
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Multiprocessing

The PS3 was a strange beast, using Cell CPUs, which IBM and Toshiba had a view to using for other applications. The Cell cores were designed to scale from the get go, hence the interest in using farms of PS3s for making supercomputers.

Game developers though found it a bit tricky to use it to its full potential.

As a result, the PS4 (and XBOX One) are x86 based, both with AMD graphics.

You can't compare x86 cores with Cell cores or nVidia cores. Nor can you compare to mobile chips with many cores - the idea there is to use a big core for intensive applications and a little core for when the phone is idling... the aim is to save battery power, not to use all cores at once.

1
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017