* Posts by Dave 126

7500 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Don't fear PC-pocalypse, Chromebooks, two-in-ones 'will save us'

Dave 126
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Re: Personal Experience

>I like towers for the ease of being able to tinker around inside for upgrades but even good laptops are easier to get into now if they are not fruity.

Agreed, though I haven't had the need to upgrade the internals of my laptop (or even think about buying a new one). I'm not really a PC gamer, nor a heavy video editor, so my laptop that was upper-middle spec five years ago is still fit for the 3D CAD and Photoshop I throw at it occasionally today.

If I want to treat myself to some more RAM and an SSD one day, then yeah, it's nice that I can open the laptop up and fit some. In reality though, the need for upgrades is less pressing than once it was, back in the days when it seemed hardware struggled to run the software.

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Jeff Bezos to give forth at US space symposium

Dave 126
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Re: Don't mention SpaceX...

I've spent ten minutes on the internet trying to find a concise clarification of what Bezos is on about. No real joy. Some snippets, though:

- The BE-4 is about 3 times more powerful than the Merlin that SpaceX currently use.

- The BE-4 could be used in conjunction with existing NASA rocket stages

- SpaceX have been working on the Raptor, a motor of equivalent power to the BE-4. It is tied up with Musk's plans for Mars, such as possibly running on methane which could be sourced on the Red Planet.

-The BE-4 is further along the development path than the Raptor.

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Clive Sinclair Vega+ tin-rattle hits £300,000

Dave 126
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Re: Upon seeing the screenshot...

Found a list of controls for Sam Cruise here:

http://www.vincenzoscarpa.it/emulatori/spectrum/game-screenshot/manual.php?dir1=c&man=contactsamcruise_man

I get stuck on the above browser version when I answer the in-game telephone. Oh well!

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Dave 126
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Upon seeing the screenshot...

...I thought the game being played was How to be a Complete Bastard, and thought it fitting for the Reg.

Alas, on closer inspection it turned out not to be.

If your graphics department (hahaha) wants to do a quick Photoshop on it, you can find screen shots here:

http://www.mobygames.com/game/how-to-be-a-complete-bastard

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Californian tycoons stole my sharing economy, says Lily Cole

Dave 126
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There's a serious thought...

...bubbling up through my brain, but it isn't there yet. It the meantime, I'm just thinking:

'Cause I got a brand new combine harvester and I'll give you the key

Come on now, let's get together

In perfect harmony

I got 20 acres and you got 43

Now I got a brand new combine harvester and I'll give you the key.

That, and also Homer Simpson's garage, full of tools and lawnmowers marked 'Property of Ned Flanders'.

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Microsoft: Ditch your phone biz and do crazy hardware experiments

Dave 126
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When Cortana was introduced, MS made play of the fact that the privacy settings were under granular user control - in a bid to differentiate themselves from Android.

I don't know what the policy is now.

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Dave 126
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Re: while it looks for ways of getting people to write Universal apps.

Hehe, nice one! Have an upvote, Known Hero!

With Hololens, MS apps will run on all devices, even when they are turned off!

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Aye, AI: Cambridge's Dr Sean Holden talks to El Reg about our robot overlords

Dave 126
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Motivation, motivation...

As a meatbag, I have various motivations. These motivations are generally geared to preserving my life (food: yum. High fat and sugar food: yummier! High cliff: scary. Snakes: Avoid!) and passing on genes and caring for people who share those genes - in environments similar to those my ancestors lived in. Some of these motivations of mine are now not optimal for the selection pressure that lead to them (easy example: donating my sperm to a bank would be a low cost, low risk way of passing on my genes, but I haven't the instincts to do that in the same way I feel sexual attraction and the urge to find a mate).

So, what would 'Skynet's' motivation be? And what is the difference between a motivation and programming? An AI might be programmed to be self-preserving - that would make some sort of sense for a military command-and-control system which might be under attack. An AI footsoldier might be programmed so that it's own self-preservation is secondary to taking orders (or even it's own tactical reading of a situation, where it's own sacrifice buys an advantage for its allies).

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Fifth time's the charm as SpaceX pops satellite into orbit

Dave 126
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Re: "...refuse to be upset that the live video... ...didn't work..."

FFS!

The barge coms are fit for purpose: telemetry data is prioritised over the video.

Lots of lovely high-res video is then retrieved from the barge a day later, along with bits of returned rocket, to help engineers improve upon their efforts. Your enjoyment of these videos is merely a happy side effect. This is how they have always done it.

SpaceX deliver payloads to space for money: they are not an entertainment company. If they were, and you JeffyPoooh had paid for a pay-per-view event, then yes you would have grounds to carp. But you are not, so please leave it alone.

When courting paying customers, SpaceX have numbers on their side. Whilst I'm sure that the employees of SpaceX like having a generally positive public image, it is not their core business.

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Dave 126
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Re: Its managing public perception

>I believe they do have footage, but it runs on a delay loop, because they only want to show success.

Believe what you want.

Meanwhile, SpaceX have provided footage of their past failed landings.

On their last attempt, that resulted in an explosion, Musk tweeted that it won't be their last RUD. (Rapid Unplanned Disassembly). On this attempt to land, Musk said they were not expecting a successful landing (because of the amount of fuel required to get the satellite to its orbit).

>Pictures of detonating rockets is bad for business,

The customers need to get satellites into orbit. They only have a few suppliers to choose from. They do due process, weighing up a lot of factors, and bash out contracts with insurance clauses. i.e it is not an emotional decision that would be influenced by a picture.

SpaceX have had one rocket explode on the way up (destroying its customer's patyload), but all their landing attempts have been done after doingthe job they were paid to do.

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How exactly do you rein in a wildly powerful AI before it enslaves us all?

Dave 126
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Re: Let's just hope AI's will be smarter than these researchers

>When researchers say intelligence what exactly do they mean?

Presumably, the ability to make actions that are in its tactical and strategic advantage. To a human, 'advantage' would mean a continued, happy existence, but what 'advantage' would mean to an AI is harder to define.

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Dave 126
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Re: Let's just hope AI's will be smarter than these researchers

>Human intelligence doesn't reside in individual brains, it resides in external memory

That's knowledge, not intelligence. For sure, intelligence was used to assemble said knowledge, but actual intelligence it isn't. In familiar situations though, we sometimes use one instead if the other.

>have blown the doors off the old evolutionary limitations of a single brain with no external storage

We can't compose a single 'intelligence' from multiple humans brains that can react in real time. The 'bus speed' (language verbal and written) between 'processing nodes' (human minds) is incredibly slow. >taking part in a public debate about something potentially dangerous that doesn't exist yet

Prevention is better than cure

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LOHAN sponsor knocks up nifty iMac fish tank

Dave 126
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Hmmm...

I have an old G3 Mac Pro (the grey plastic one, before they went 'Cheesegrater Aluminium) that could be similarly re-worked as an aquarium. Or vivarium, if lizards are your thing.

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Converged PC and smartphone is the future, says Canonical's Mark Shuttleworth

Dave 126
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Re: I agree about the convergence - just not the Ubuntu bit

Or Google, or Apple. In very different ways. It depends on what you want.

Google sell you low-priced hardware to sell you video content. Could be used with phone and TV (beta) for office-like tasks with keyboard and mouse

Apple, the above but pricier.

Google: use services (email, document creation / sharing) across platforms: PC, Mac, *nix... Android, iOS.

Apple: Doesn't matter, above applies (for GMail users). Or: Continuity, their iOS/OSX integration.

The Ubuntu/MS concepts just seem to be based around re-purposing a phone's CPU. But why? Just buy another CPU in a stick, they are not that pricey.

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Dave 126
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Re: Another one 'swallows the coolaid'

Hi bombastic bob!

Thankyou for making a reasoned argument (though capitals are hard to parse!). You mentioned Apple as having not followed the same path as MS and Ubuntu... they would rather sell you additional hardware. As such, they have provided a software solution that (in concept at least, I haven't used it myself) is sensible: open documents on your iPhone are open when you turn on your Mac. Straightforward enough, I reckon.

A small point: Canonical have been advocating Desktop/Mobile OS on a phone for longer than MS have (although in reality, both organisations would have been exploring the concept long before any public announcement).

Without Apple, my experience of Android+Chromecast (i.e, the same as iOs/Android + Chromecast/Playstation/Whatever) informs my opinion here.... attempts to reuse a phone's CPU are more effort than they are worth.

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Dave 126
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It seems that the main advantage of Ubuntu's idea is seamless access to work-in-progress documents, but that could be done through software. You don't want your data on just one device anyway (loss, damage, failure), and the same mechanisms that make backing-up easier can also make data accessible to multiple devices.

I remain unconvinced (but I actively welcome reasoned persuasion by you guys!) by the idea of having a Desktop OS put in a phone and the phone connected to a screen, especially when the cost of an SoC to run a Desktop OS on a TV is low (compared to a generic Snapdragon 8xx 2GB RAM 5" Android phone). A 'PC on a Stick' isn't going to take up much space in a kit bag, especially when compared to a keyboard or wireless mouse.

I have usability concerns, too (i.e plugging a phone into a TV, then unplugging it when someone rings or you want to leave the room for ten minutes).

Also, redundancy concerns: If you lose your phone, you can still use the 'PC on Stick' to contact friends and colleagues. Vice versa if your 'PC on a Stick' goes 'poooft!', or a crumb gets in your keyboard and stops the spacebarfromworking.

So: Convince me, guys! :)

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Dave 126
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>a desktop and a couple of laptops, all of which have their own storage, and setting them up to talk seamlessly to each other isn't trivial.

Hi AndyS. I thought I'd ask you, since you actually live this scenario. Is there any way you could envisage the above inconvenience being fixed by software? Your wording suggests that is is *possible*, but a bit of pain in the neck to configure/maintain.

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Ad-blockers are a Mafia-style 'protection racket' – UK's Minister of Fun

Dave 126
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Re: Takes one to know one

Yep, two Reg articles about different subjects, but based on the same speech by the Culture Secretary. This little sub thread belongs under the *other* Reg article, the one about the BBC, not this one which is about ad-blockers.

Ah well, it is nearly Friday!

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Google risks everything if it doesn’t grab Android round the throat

Dave 126
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Re: Bring it on ...

[Note to non-Uk readers: the network 'Orange' changed it's name to EE a little while back, after a merger with 'O2']

I had a similar issue the other day. Normal phone broken, so wanted to put my EE SIM into a Samsung 'feature phone' that had been on the same Orange contract - even the telephone number was the same!

Orange waived the (less than £10) network unlock fee without argument, since it was clearly ridiculous that a phone acquired on the same contract wouldn't for merely rebranded SIM. It is possible that the quoted fee was less for me than JimmyPage, since the unlocking could be done with a code on this Samsung.

However, I was told it would take around five days for the code to be sent to me, so I went out and bought a bargain basement (£25 from Sainsburys) Android phone unlocked to any network. As a phone for voicecalls, text email etc, it works pretty well.

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Dave 126
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Re: Update route?

>(2) Manufacturer (e.g. Samsung) spanners it onto their hardware

That is actually several steps. If you will allow me, just for clarity, to change your example from Samsung to an ODM who doesn't make their own chips:

Google distributes the new version to an ODM, lets say HTC. Google also distributes source code to chip makers like Qualcomm (and yes, Samsung). They decide if they can be bothered to support the chip in question. If they do, they send a Board Support Package to the ODM in question, HTC, Sony, Samsung etc. Then there is lots of testing. Then it is sent to:

(3) The carriers, for approval. Then sent back to ODM for changes to be implemented. (Repeat)

(4)Then it is sent to the relevant regulatory authorities for approval. (Repeat)

(5)Then it is distributed to end users.

Note that there is plenty of scope for foot-dragging by various parties.

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Dave 126
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Re: HTC did good

For a short while the HTC ONE M8 was actually sold by Google as a Play Edition phone. Since Google can't release their promised updates on a Play Edition phone until the hardware vendor has supplied them with some binary blobs, HTC had to get do the work quickly.

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Dave 126
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Re: The fragmentation story again? Really?

>It has been coming up quite frequently since before Android even launched. And it hasn't prevented Android from taking over the world.

@Mikel He didn't say it would damage adoption of Android. He said that Google will make efforts (as they have in the past, including the Nexus range, the Silver Edition programme, APIs being moved into Google Play Services etc) to make the situation more to their liking. A less fragmented Android would suit Google - whose revenue does not come from Android adoption in itself, but through services with ads - more than the multi-version Android world we have now.

From other sources, it is reported that Google may be thinking of designing their own chips and SoCs.

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Dave 126
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That's a good idea Marcelo. And Google have already done it - On ChromeOS.

The reason it isn't done already on Android is because it currently wouldn't work.

Hence the interest in the possibly merged future of ChromeOS/Android.

http://arstechnica.co.uk/gadgets/2015/11/what-android-could-stand-to-learn-from-chrome-os/

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NASA compiles Scott Kelly space photo album

Dave 126
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Professional gear - the cost of getting 1Kg of cheap camera lens into orbit is the same as 1Kg of professional gear! The retail cost difference is a rounding error.

Onboard the ISS, US use Nikon D4, Russia D3 dSLRs. Sony, Panasonic and Canon cover video duties.

For handheld photography outside the ISS, a modified Nikon D2X is used.

You can often see an arsenal of dSLRs and big lenses fixed (velcro?) to the the walls in interior photographs of the ISS. ThinkPads are also easy to spot.

There was a documentary made with IMAX film onboard the ISS over a decade ago. Because IMAX is chemical film and not a digital format, the film had to be returned to Earth fairly promptly, so that it wouldn't record too many cosmic rays.

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Bill Gates can’t give it away... Still crazy rich after all these years

Dave 126
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>Humanitarian worth 16.6 Donald Drumpfs

FTFY

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Microsoft's Hololens is up for pre-order, here's hoping you can expense it

Dave 126
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>I guess a good parallel is the Kinect - it sold by the shitload when it was priced and packaged for consumers and had a ton of great software being sold so they could use it, but started off with expensive developer previews so it could get to the point where it was a consumer product.

Even the original Kinect was sold at a loss - with an idea to recoup the money by selling games (a bit like printers and ink cartrisges... again, profit is hard to calculate).

Within 48 hours of its release, a MIT student had got a PC to talk to the Kinect, opening the door for people to use the subsidised hardware for their own applications. A little while later, MS released a PC-only version of the Kinect which was more expensive, along with drivers and APIs.

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Dave 126
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>our highly profitable hardware. If it sells.

How can you even judge the profit on something that hasn't been sold yet? You have to share your R&D and tooling costs amongst your customers. After that, you add up your bill of materials and assembly costs per unit. Add the two together and add a margin. This will be roughly what you sell it for.

For the moment, we don't know how many customers there will be. So we can't calculate a profit.

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Microsoft releases Windows 10 preview for Raspberry Pi 3

Dave 126
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Re: No, thank you.

>Tablets, then, didn't really exist. The EEE PC came out in 2007.

2007? We were discussing what killed netbooks, not what what aborted them!

Whatever, a small letter-box of a screen just wasn't much fun. I saw a fair few netbooks (Linux and XP) in the wild for a few years after their arrival - until tablets and 'thin n light' laptops came on the scene - so I stand by my comment about their small screen being their Achilles' heel.

I don't care how good an OS is, if it is on akward hardware then the whole experience will be lacklustre. At the time we were forgiving of netbooks' shortcomings because of their price - the Reg termed them 'SCCs', Small Cheap Computers. I'm sure some of you can remember a sunny photograph demonstrating this!

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Dave 126
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Re: No, thank you.

>Yep, it's the netbook scenario making a comeback, and look what that did to a very clever idea.

I don't think it was MS that killed the netbook. They weren't great for writing lots of text due to their small keyboards, and their letter-box shaped screens made even browsing web pages tiring work - too much scrolling! These points remain true regardless of what OS they were running.

Netbooks could get you out of a jam, but you wouldn't want to use one for extended periods. For purely consuming content (web pages, video), tablets simply had a better form-factor.

For creating content, you'd want at minimum a bigger keyboard (novelist). Coders and artists would also want a bigger screen and more grunt.

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Brit uni rattles tin for ultra-low latency audio board

Dave 126
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Re: What's

Can't help you - there's no clearer image of it in the video.

For all I know, it could have been an old drill-bit case that this guy has re-purposed as a chassis for a home-built mixer.

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Dave 126
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Re: Ultra Low Latency

> I don't know if it works on Android yet, but last I heard latency was still a problem.

http://www.androidpolice.com/2015/11/13/android-audio-latency-in-depth-its-getting-better-especially-with-the-nexus-5x-and-6p/

URL alone gives the idea.

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Raspberry Pi celebrates fourth birthday with fruity version 3

Dave 126
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Depends on the browser?

Anecdotal evidence, possibly not relevant to Linux, please feel free to correct me:

Using some old Windows XP desktops with around 1GB of RAM, I found Chrome too memeory hungry, so I installed Opera. My reasoning at the time was that each Chrome tab was a sandboxed instance, so using resources. Whether I was right or wrong, Opera worked better than Chrome on these underpowered machines.

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Crowd-funded OpenShot 2.0 delivers graphic Linux package

Dave 126
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Very interesting

It is the crowd funding aspect of this project that has caught my attention. I keep abreast of the popular technology sites, but I haven't heard much of crowd-funded open source projects.

I have been critical (in a supportive, not mocking way I hope) of some open source productivity applications (just as I am of commercial applications). I do this because as a user of software, I want the best and sanest solution for everybody. 'Everybody' means people who are rightly wary of proprietary software, just as it also includes people who are less confident with computers.

I love the ethos of open source. I love the idea that if someone needs a little bit of software, they can write it and make it available for others. And in those cases, I wouldn't knock them for not polishing the user interface. To create larger applications, a team might be required - skilled people giving their time. But usability testing and refinement is time consuming. If crowd-funded open source software is more suitable for 'everybody', that can only be a good thing.

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Raspberry Pi 3 to sport Wi-Fi, Bluetooth LE – first photos emerge

Dave 126
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One assumes that such chips are descended from those developed for mobile phones, and thus work similarly.

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Dave 126
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Re: Arduino 101

@Zsn

Just out of curiosity, what sort of things do you do with your Arduino?

I've only brushed with them - An Arduino Duet sits on the PCB of my RepRap 3D printer. I'm not a coder, but I got the impression during the course of commissioning the printer that it would only take a week or two to bend an Arduino to my will.

Very tempted to drop £50 on Banggood.com's cheap n cheerful stepper motor kits, sensors and some Arduinos, and make something (don't know what, but like Lego Technic, that's the point).

Perhaps Arduinos don't get much coverage on the Reg because they are headless systems? Unlike the Pi, they aren't designed to run a GUI OS. If the Reg reviewed Arduinos, it would have to start reviewing soldering irons, Dremmel-like tools, glues and hot wires. Fun stuff for sure, but creeping away from the Reg's core competencies.

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Standing desks have no effect on productivity, boffins find

Dave 126
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Re: It seems a bit early to pass judgement

There are plenty of such studies that have examined longer term health benefits. However, an employer would want to know if any change they make will affect productivity in the short term. That was the purpose of this study.

Fortunately, their finding suggest that standing desks don't negatively affect productivity.

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Dave 126
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Re: Personal experience

The study was limited in scope, as all studies are. It was designed only to study productivity in a time-and-motion style.

It was only over a 19 week period, so would not have been able to pick up on any medium to long term health benefits.

There is plenty of existing evidence, obtained by different methodologies, to support the idea that sitting down continuously for long periods is bad for one's health. This study just provides some evidence that standing desks don't negatively impact productivity, thus reassuring any employer that is considering installing them.

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Brit brewer opensources entire recipe archive

Dave 126
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Re: Founder gave entertaining talk at LSE recently

That needs topping up, surely?

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Surprise! British phone wins Best Product at Mobile World Congress

Dave 126
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Re: The Mind Boggles

What Darryl said.

Heck, for people with an older house a FLIR camera could quickly pay for itself.

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Dave 126
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Re: Um...

AO supports British industry when he can. In the past he has made the valid point that the dollar value of British manufacturing is higher than ever - it is just that it employs fewer people, because of automation.

However, he seems to be a bit under the weather at the moment, and has recently written articles on one subject and then slung in a final paragraph about another.

It has been the case that manufacturing has been done in Asia for decades, but that design was done closer to the end market; Clearly, designers in [Country] have a better understanding of consumers in [Country]. However, as living standards around the world improve, a designer in China can design a device that may past muster in the UK. Really though, if you make enough devices, then the cost of the designer per unit becomes close to zero, so you don't really save money by having your designers in low paid countries. As it is, the most famous product designers are English, German, French, Japanese and Italian and American. As perception plays a role in valuing product design (*not* Industrial Design... akin to Alaister Cooke's observation that "the national dish of America is menus"), I enjoy mulling the manufacturing history of those countries.

Put another way, if you make enough units of a single model you can throw a lot of money at the design process. Same goes for tooling costs.

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Dave 126
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Re: I almost got optimistic then

Regrettably, DAB radio is a thing in the UK.

Most people I know listen to 'radio' either at home or in their cars. At home, damn-near everybody has WiFi, and a Chromecast (roughly the same price as a low end DAB radio) will allow a choice of thousands of 'radio' stations to be listened to on any existing audio equipment with an aux-in, plus podcasts, Spotify, YouTube, whatever.

In my car, Radio 6 Music is the only DAB station worth listening to. However, the DAB signal isn't strong everywhere, and my data allowance (I don't watch YouTube videos in the pub on my phone) means I could listen to 6 Music over 3/4G with about as much reliability as DAB.

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Apple hasn't announced the new iPhone 5SE and pundits already hate it

Dave 126
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Re: The problem with Analyists

>They are all a bunch of overpaid, useless Berks.

I can imagine that there are some very competent ones, but employed by [Apple and whoever] and so have no motive to shoot their mouths off.

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Dave 126
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Re: Shall I be an analyst for the day?

Yeah, I can imagine some people would be happy with a small iPhone 4 sized phone in their pocket, in conjunction with an iPad Mini in their glovebox, bag or briefcase. So Apple's decision to not offer a smaller, up-to-date iPhone did seem a bit odd.

That said, they have access to far better market research than I do, and their earnings appear to vindicate them.

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Dave 126
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Re: Cook said...

Absolutely. However, Apple are in position to think medium term (their back aren't against the wall, financially), so if faced with a choice between making shedloads of money on the medium term or a bit of money short term, will likely choose the former.

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Dave 126
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Re: The 5C was different

I'm making no comment on Apple or Android here, and I'm mentioning my 4.7" Sony Xperia Z3 Compact purely in relation to the ergonomics of screen and phone size. The vendor and OS are irrelevant for this post. Okay:

I choose it because I didn't want a 5"+ phone. My job can be active, so a large flat slab in my pocket is uncomfortable (and probably not good for a larger phone, bending moments being what they are).

Holding the phone in my right hand hand, my thumb can reach 80% of the screen easily, and 100% at a slight stretch. Reaching the top left corner of a larger phone strains my hand, and compromises my grip of the handset.

Now, if my lifestyle was different (perhaps if I spent more time on public transport, or if I decided that bum bags or utility belts became me) or my hands were bigger, or my fingers fatter, or my eyesight poorer, I might consider a 5" phone. They are better for looking at images, definitely.

Summery: Choice is good.

Observation: Playing cards are a size that is easy to hold in the hand. Postcards are of a size that is easy to look at.

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Dave 126
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Re: Those who can't, analyse....

>Those who can't, analyse... In developing markets, people don't normally have the kind of cash needed to buy the latest and greatest, but still have a desire to own apple devices.

They have no cash, so why would Apple court them? Especially when it comes at the cost of cannibalising sales from their high-end, high margin models.

I agree with you in general though - analysts have a worse track record of predicting Apple's future than Apple do. Probably because Apple employ some expensive analysts themselves, and feed them with expensive-to-acquire data.

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Android users installed 2 BILLION data-stealing, backdooring apps

Dave 126
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Re: Agree about Samsung

It sounds like a Sony Xperia will tick moist of your boxes. They are pretty good at updates as well - not the quickest, but I've had one Xperia that's updated across three Android versions. (Not that I jump on the update as soon as it drops - I prefer to hold back a month or two and see on forums how other users fair with it first)

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Dave 126
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Pies, damned pies, and...

>The statistics are surprising since iOS is generally more secure than Android on account of its restricted application installation controls.

What statistics? All the previous paragraph meant was that "about 40 percent of large enterprises [which being large presumably a fair few iPhones] sampled by Proofpoint" had at least one iPhone running at least one malicious app.

There is no way of extrapolating from that statement what percentage of iPhones have malicious apps installed, beyond "more than zero", so I can't be surprised or otherwise.

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Meet Barra's baby: Xiaomi arrives with a splash

Dave 126
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Re: With all the "spying"

Hehe, I think the same when I see the fifth instalment of the Mission Impossible film franchise.

There was a Xiaomi Mi4, so I'm assuming quadraphobia was just a Japanese thing (companies like Panasonic would often have a MK3 product followed immediately by a MK5 successor. )

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Dave 126
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Re: on the up?

Performance-wise, one assumes that this will be as quick as any other Snapdragon 820-based phone, though I note the slides refer to two different clock speeds, 1.8 and 2.1 GHz. The 4GB RAM can't hurt, either - that's all my laptop has, and in five years I've only wanted for more on a couple of occasions.

**

Apps aren't the only investment people make in iPhones - there are also bits of hardware, either from 3rd parties such as headphones or from Apple like the Apple TV, that don't work as well with Android devices. However, many of my iPhone/iPad using mates use them in conjunction with Chromecasts and Playstations rather than Apple TVs or whatever. So, it's hard to call. The price difference between a Chinese Android phone and an iPhone buys a lot of apps and peripherals.

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