* Posts by Dave 126

7494 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Earth's core is younger than its crust surface

Dave 126
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Re: Quite a large pachyderm in the room

>"I guess this is a problem specific to when physicists try to work out geology."

Not at all. The physicists in question did not use the word 'crust', they only mention the surface. The word crust was introduced by this Reg article in error.

That is all.

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Dave 126
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Re: Lack of critical thinking, methinks ...

>"I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."

The Reg made an error in its reporting, and introduced the word 'crust' when it wasn't present in the source material. Just like using Wikipedia, it's important to check the references yourself.

Welcome to the internet.

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Dave 126
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In partial defence of jake:

This Reg article has used the word 'crust' in error. The authors of the paper did not use the word 'crust', only 'surface'. Jake is correct - the crust took tens of millions of years to form in the first place, and has been recycled through tectonic activity many times since.

That said, jake should know better than to trust the Reg at face value - it's important to check the source material directly.

The purpose of the paper, as the authors intended it, was as a teaching aid for undergraduate students to challenge established views. Feynman would have approved.

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Dave 126
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Re: What is time

>In principle you can imagine a time difference for instance between your head and limbs

That's actually been shown experimentally! Seriously, physicists as NIST have observed difference in reading between two nuclear clocks, one 0.33 m higher than the other. The difference is as theory predicted, and it is equivilenet to 90 billionths of second over the course of a 79 year lifetime.

http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/releases/aluminum-atomic-clock_092310.cfm

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Boring SpaceX lobs another sat into orbit without anything blowing up ... zzzzz

Dave 126
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Re: Poor article

>What is the point of this article? If you think that this is now routine, then don't cover it.

You miss the point. We* have admiration that SpaceX is now making rocket launches and first-stage landings *boring*. Furthermore, we are all excited by the possibilities that *boring* and cheap access to orbit and beyond will bring. It is boring (and expensive) rocket launches of the past that have given us satellite communications, advanced weather forecasting and GPS. These things we take for granted today, but once would only have been seen in the pages of magazines like Amazing Stories!

*Boring* is meant as a compliment, as in 'reliable'. Take commercial air travel - you don't want it to be exciting, you just want to get from A to B. The same is true of any tool. I don't want my phone to imaginatively reboot itself mid-call. I don't want the knife I am using to excitingly turn into a snake. I don't want the bricks in my house to decide on a whim that they have had enough of this solid lark, and will have a go at being liquid.

* I'm summing up the general consensus of Reg Commentards as seen on previous SpaceX threads.

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Android might be on the way to the Raspberry Pi

Dave 126
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Re: Remix OS?

ChromiumOS has been made to boot on Pi 2 and Pi 3s, but is a little slow and the WiFi is unreliable, apparently. I only mention it here, because unlike Android, there are builds available right now.

It's interesting to think about what the upcoming inclusion of Android apps on ChromeOS means for Remix OS... will RemixOS remain as compelling an option for many people?

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Dave 126
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Re: Another slice of pi

Hmm, tricky - it either has to work with a TV or monitor you already have, or you have to source a dedicated screen (by which time the cost will probably have defeated the object)

Maybe it can share a monitor, mouse and keyboard with your desktop PC, by means of a KVM switch? It could be used for when you don't want to use your main PC (because of noise, or power usage concerns, perhaps) or when you can't (your main PC is busy doing something).

I can't immediately think of any compelling use for a headless Android device - but if you do, this app called 'AutoStart - No root' does what it says on the tin, going by the reviews.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.autostart&hl=en

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ISS 'nauts to inflate pump-up space podule

Dave 126
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I want to know too. I want to know enough that I've perused the Bigelow website, but not so much that I've loaded up Photoshop and taken a measure tool to the cutaway illustration that I've found.

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Thai bloke battles jumbo python in toilet todger thriller

Dave 126
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Re: Is it just me, or...

Well, have an upvote for hanging around and taking the resulting sarcasm with good grace.

Welcome to the Register, Mr Renault!

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Hooves in spaaace: Goat Simulator goes galactic

Dave 126
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>Stellaris or Total War Warhammer or Doom or the upcoming Hearts of Iron 4

The above have received barely a mention on the webs this week compared to another game, from some outfit called Bizzard or something.

I'm glad the Reg at least has separated from goat from the sheep!

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Citrix bakes up Raspberry Pi client boxes

Dave 126
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If you really want to complain about mark-ups on Raspberry Pies...

... just get your self down to Maplins.

They won't sell you a Pi for £25, but will bundle it will some so-so accessories for £70 or whatever.

I don't care how much Citrix sell their solutions for - their customers will make their choice after doing the sums. But Maplins could have sold the Pi for cheaper - hopefully to young, budding tinkerers - and thus grown the market for all the sensors, LEDs, Arduinos, daughter boards and other gubbins they sell at a mark-up.

Yeah, I know we should buy this stuff online, but sometimes you want something right now! Oh well, I've known Maplins to sell an external HDD enclosure for more than they sell and external HDD.

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Gillian Anderson: The next James Jane Bond?

Dave 126
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>I prefer Jason Statham.

I really enjoyed Statham's self-paraody in Spy (2015)!

Rick Ford: You really think you're ready for the field? I once used defibrillators on myself. I put shards of glass in my fuckin' eye. I've jumped from a high-rise building using only a raincoat as a parachute and broke both legs upon landing; I still had to pretend I was in a fucking Cirque du Soleil show! I've swallowed enough microchips and shit them back out again to make a computer. This arm has been ripped off completely and re-attached with *this* fuckin' arm.

Susan Cooper: I don't know that that's possible... I mean medically...

Rick Ford: During the threat of an assassination attempt, I appeared convincingly in front of congress as Barack Obama.

Susan Cooper: In black-face? That's not appropriate.

Rick Ford: I watched the woman I love get tossed from a plane and hit by another plane mid-air. I drove a car off a freeway on top of a train while it was on fire. Not the car, *I* was on fire.

Susan Cooper: Jesus, you're intense.

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Dave 126
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Re: Tom Hidlestone?

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy with Alec Guinness is still my favourite Le Carre adaptation... though I like Philip Seymour Hoffman and Gary Oldman in two recent films, the plots need a bit more space to breathe than a feature-length film can provide.

Being a comparatively recent novel, A Most Delicate Truth could make a good TV series, though perhaps not one for cosy Sunday night viewing - it needs to keep its anger.

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Dave 126
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Re: May I offer as an example...

I feel Gina Carano would make a better J Bond than Ms Andrerson. Carano, who was a mixed martial artist before her film career, has a presence and muscular power.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gina_Carano#Television_and_film_career

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haywire_(film)#Critical_response

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Dave 126
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Re: James Bond/007 Isn't a Person

>But, I draw a line at there being a "black" James Bond or a "female" James/Jane Bond.

During the cold war, a black James Bond wouldn't make too much sense- he wouldn't be that covert an operative in a Eastern European casino, for example. With the state of the world as it is today, it is easier to imagine places a fictional MI6 could use a black operative. Indeed, Bond's CIA counterpart, Felix, has been black for the last few films.

Heck, a James Bond of Chinese descent could be dead handy for some missions today! (though of course film producers today keep more than an eye on the Chinese cinema market).

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Dave 126
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Re: Tom Hidlestone?

>What is all this 'Night Manager' rubbish?

Ah, but it was such shiny, good looking rubbish! It wasn't nearly as deep, dark or subtle as a Le Carre novel, but at least it had Tom Hollander in it, reprising his role as 'The Fucker' from The Thick of It.

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Dave 126
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In support of Idris, this clip from the film Pacific Rim. Idris wears a psuedo-RAF uniform at times. The director asked Idris to use his natural voice for the film (though English, it was his role as a Baltimore gangster in the Wire that really made his name) though in this clip he's generic transatlantic:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTV7eZIINs4

He's also driven a Bentley really fast. Though Aston Martin (or a Citreon 2CV) is often asscociated with 007, Fleming had him in Bentley:

http://www.bentleymotors.com/en/world-of-bentley/our-story/news/2015/idris-elba-breaks-historic-flying-mile-speed-record-.html

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Dave 126
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Re: One film

The Woody Allen James Bond:

"My doctor says I can't have lead enter my body under any circumstances!"

The same film also featured an Ursula Andreas James Bond, and David Niven as the original James Bond, bemoaning the damage to his good name from his masters appointing sex maniacs as his successors.

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Dave 126
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Re: Bond.

I've recently been watching Elementary, with a Dr Jane Watson - played by Lucy Liu... you get used to it!

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Dave 126
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>Firstly, Bond has to be English and posh.

Sean Connery was less English than Idris Elba. Even the version of Bond played by Daniel Craig was Scottish (orphaned, raised in an English boarding school)

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Google to kill passwords on Android, replace 'em with 'trust scores'

Dave 126
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Re: Lost in a foreign country....

Just as it would work for people who have an elastoplast on the thumb they use for their fingerprint scanner - they enter their passphrase instead.

There is even precedent - it is not unknown for a card issuer to telephone a card holder if the card is used in unusual circumstances, to request further authentication beyond the card and PIN themselves.

(Though of course you should not give any information in those circumstances, but instead ring off, ring a trusted party such as a friend, ring off and then ring the number on your card or bank statement. The idea of ringing a friend is to make sure than any would-be spoofer hasn't kept your line busy - this has been known to happen on UK landlines, I don't know if it applies to mobile phones )

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Ego and CEO are 66 per cent the same

Dave 126
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Re: news?

Dead tree newspapers have had television reviews and previews for decades. Ditto radio, theatre and art exhibitions.

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Want a better password? Pretend you eat kale. We won't tell anyone

Dave 126
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arse... hic! feck... hic! DRINK! hic... girls... that would be an ecumenical matter!

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Dave 126
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Re: How crackable are alien languages?

You could try passwords derived from the Clangers, but I'm not sure how you would enter them.... Whaaawoooowah

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Dave 126
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Re: Trust No One?

You could always use two password wallets, made by different teams, and combine their output:

passwordpart1passwordpart2

Of course this approach isn't as convenient as using just one password wallet.

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Dave 126
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Substitution can have a place, as long as it not a common type. e > 3, 1 > l, o > 0 etc are no good.

batteryhorse > cbuudszipstd

'batteryhorse' is easy to remember, and 'advance each letter by one' is easy to remember. cbuudszipstd is slightly less vulnerable to a dictionary attack (though I note that zip is a word, and std is a standard (std!) abbreviation). If we started at batteryhorsestaplepurpleetc, there would be less chance of the output being mainly composed of dictionary words and fragments.

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Dave 126
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>So brute-forcing it is going to take that much longer.

It really depends upon how the brute-force program is written. It isn't going to start at

aaaaaaa

aaaaaab

aaaaaac... ...zzzzzzz

but will start with commonly used words and combinations - adam, angryant... ...zebra34.

There is no reason the brute-force program isn't using common substations - l0ve, Lov£, l0v3 - if the author of the program has decided (based on analysis of leaked databases of real-world users' passwords) that such an approach will be faster.

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Toyota not shybot about whybot it will trybot the iBot

Dave 126
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Re: 5 Stars

The investment that many companies are now putting into 3D depth sensing and autonomous car movement (nVidia, Google, MS, Intel, Tesla, Volvo and others) could be a good match for electric wheelchairs, especially for users with limited use of their hands.

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Dave 126
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Re: Big Thumbs Up!

>yet most trials are for military guys in the field to substitute for a fork lift. How sad.

That application is a better fit for the technology as it is now - fit operators, colleagues on hand to help don the suit, noise, power supply requirements etc. When it is refined, then yeah, it will be suitable for helping people who can't use their limbs.

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India launches hypersonic space shuttle precursor

Dave 126
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Re: Descent...

Well, if I was in it, it wouldn't make much odds to me if it hit the ground at hypersonic or at merely supersonic speed!

I guess it depends upon how good the view is out of the window, and whether my state of mind would allow me to spend my last minutes/seconds admiring it. Most likely I'd be "oh shit of shit oh shit oh shit" or even inventing a new swear word, but you never know!

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Dave 126
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Re: sounding rocket?

The term was new to me until today - when I read it in another Reg article.

According to Wikipedia, it means the same as 'research rocket', and 'sound' means to probe...

Hence the 'Lambda Sond' (Lambda sensor) grill badge on some older Volvos.

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World goes SIM-free, leaving Sony and HTC trailing behind

Dave 126
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Re: Any advice?

Thank you for your suggestions and feedback guys!

I'll see how well he adapts to a landscape keyboard first - then try a swpye keyboard. Then a new phone.

Some people have enjoyed using 'swype' keyboards using the Galaxy Note's stylus, according to one forum thread I've just read.

Despite having a number of compact cameras, his phone has become his main photographic device, so there is a case for him to get another phone anyway. A Galaxy Note 4 seems to have a well-regarded camera, big screen - and who knows, maybe he'll find the stylus handy.

Samsung's strange swapping of Android's [Back] and [Menu] keys will be fun for him!

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Dave 126
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Any advice?

My old man is getting frustrated with his Nexus 5 (5" screen) because his sausage fingers make typing difficult, so wants my advice in getting a new phone. Has anyone here with sausage fingers found that a 6" phone makes typing easier?

Thanks in advance!

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Dave 126
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I just bought a £45 phone...

...and it ain't bad at all! Seriously, it hasn't annoyed me once yet!

I needed a phone that day (having punched my painfully slow £25 (unlocked, from Sainsbury's) Alcatel Pixi 3 in the screen for refusing to read an SD card properly the day before) and went to an EE shop. I didn't want to spend much because I have a fancy phone in need of expensive repair. The price tag said £90 for a Huawei Y560, but the manager had a ring-binder and said I could have it for £45.

I'm really happy with it. Within 5 minutes of opening the box - it shipped with the battery at 50% charge - I'd popped in my EE contract SIM, restored my contacts from Google and had a fully functional phone. It's snappy and doesn't pause or lag for normal tasks (the Snapdragon 210 gets warm during modest strategy games, no matter), it's 4G, Android Lollipop, has a camera flash, GPS, 1GB RAM... I really can't find any major shortcomings with it. SD card slot, replaceable battery, it's all there. At its list price it has some competition, but at £45 it is amazingly good value.

If you do buy a budget phone, the important thing isn't the internal storage (most have SD card slots) but the RAM - shockingly, some Android phones are still sold with less than 1GB of RAM which is just asking for frustration.

(Meanwhile, the quoted repair cost for my Sony Z3 Compact remains £85. It's like when my mate's Hitachi disc cutter died and rather than pay £80 to fix it he bought one from Lidl or £50 with a 3-year guarantee)

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Dave 126
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Re: "SIM free" ?

Also, if you buy the phone outright you are covered by the Sales of Goods Act ("This phone has failed, please give me my money back now!") as opposed to having the use of a phone that remains property of EE/O2 until the end of your contract period ("What do you mean I have to wait a fortnight for you to send it off to be repaired?!").

In addition, you can ring your network operator at any time and say "You competitors are offering me the same tariff for less. Please knock a few quid off my monthly bill or I'll leave you for them!"

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Dave 126
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Re: IPhone fatigue?

Sadly, the trashbat.co.ck website seems to be down... but I have found one image of the Wasp T12 Speechtool, though alas it doesn't show the T12's fold-out twin jogdials for one-the-go MP3 mixing, or its integrated business card printer.

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8641/16615827980_f8ca763638.jpg

https://musicfashionperv.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/nathan.jpg

Now, that's a phone!

I'm hoping that George Lucas decides to make Special Edition of Nathan Barley, by using CGI to add hipster beards and sailor tattoos to the characters.

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Would we want to regenerate brains of patients who are clinically dead?

Dave 126
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Re: That icon ?

>The trick is knowing what icons, and the names thereof, that are still lurking on the server.

Have you found the angel/demon Jobs/Gates icons?

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Dave 126
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Re: Braiiinssss

>It seem to be more probable to me that this is a treatment for people who were just over the brink after a slightly late resusication than doing a frankenstien.

There are cases of brain damage occurring in a clinical environment - for example brain swelling some hours after admission to hospital. There are even cases of pregnant patients whose brains are dead whose bodies are kept alive for months until the baby they are carrying can be delivered by Ceasarian section.

The article's discussion of people surviving after spending time without breathing was to illustrate the point that 'death' isn't as easy to define as once it was - indeed, last month's National Geographic had an article on this very subject.

You raise a good point about the importance of CPR training. Ideally, the first responder will shout for someone else to call the emergency services whilst they administer CPR immediately. Hollywood and TV gives the impression that five minutes of passionate CPR might revive the patient, but that isn't the case - it's usually done continuously until paramedics arrive, and then only improves the patients chances.

Can anyone provide input about the 999 services being able to pinpoint a mobile phone - in the scenario that the first responder is alone with a patient?

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New solar cell breaks efficiency records, turns 34% of light into 'leccy

Dave 126
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Re: Barking in the wrong forest.

>Until someone thinks up a way to spray pv on its not a good enough solution for most available locations.

Installation costs... not sure that spraying would save that much time. I imagine most of the installation labour costs are those associated with working at heights - erecting scaffolding, basically. This cost could be shared if it is combined with other maintenance work - or the installation of external insulation on the walls of the house (popular in Germany, I'm told, though I've seen it done in England).

Hmmm... I could imagine a cherry-picker hoisting a rolled-up array of solar panels above the apex of the house, and it could then be unfurled downwards.

Or a modular array of smaller PV panels, each lifted into place by a few robotic quad-copters, such as these: https://www.ted.com/talks/vijay_kumar_robots_that_fly_and_cooperate?language=en

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Chaps make working 6502 CPU by hand. Because why not?

Dave 126
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Re: Stupid masochists.

I think you may be right, EddieD. My confusion may stem from Mr Ploppy featuring in the episode 'Head', in which other body parts were lopped off.

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Dave 126
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Re: Stupid masochists.

Oooh, you don't want to have a good idea. My grandfather had a good idea once and his toes fell off.

?

Yeah, he thought it would be a good idea to trim his toenails with a scythe.

- Mr Ploppy, Blackadder II

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Got $130,000 down the back of the sofa? Great. Grab an HP 3D printer

Dave 126
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The use of 'a' or 'an' depends upon the pronunciation, not the spelling of the following noun. Because the correct pronunciation of 'h' is 'aitch', then 'an' should be used before 'HP' , as in "An HP engineer explained to us..."

We do the same with 'm' ('em'), as in "A Minister of Parliament was caught in an hotel room with..." versus "An MP was caught in..."

'Hotel' may be pronounced without the 'h' being stressed, so both 'a hotel' and 'an hotel' are commonly used. 'Heirloom' is always 'an', 'Hangman' is always 'a'.

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Dave 126
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Re: Over-hyped stupidity

>Over-hyped stupidity

>Neat and useful technology yes.

Er, so whcih one is it? Make your mind up!

>People have actually claimed "3D Printed Car"

So, you managed to find the words of some idiots on the internet... well done Jeff, that must have been hard! :) Meanwhile, the people who actually make cars, Ford, BMW et al, are interested in this - as they always have been in CAD and prototyping tech.

For sure, 3D printing has been over-hyped in the past - by idiots - but this HP process has my attention. It's worth noting that they bided their time - they bought Stratasys (fused material deposition) quite a few years back before letting them go without any HP product being released.

It ain't going to change the face of manufacturing, but it will be a consistent way of bringing products with short production runs (up to 10,000, say) to market.

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Dave 126
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Re: 10 bob

Many parts of HP's printer are 3D-printed. HP aren't making tens of thousands of these things, so 3D printing is a suitable manufacturing process.

In any case, the plastic bits of the printer aren't likely to be those that wear out and need replacing.

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Dave 126
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Re: "The market is forecast to rise from $4.1bn in 2015 to $16.2bn by 2020"

>upwards of £30,000 per seat for CAD, and that didn't include the workstation.

>>Don't they still pay at least that much for CAD?

Actually, yeah, they do - but since I only introduced it to make the point that in some industries any advantage is worth a lot of money, I didn't see the need to stretch the credulity of the general Reg readership. Bless them.

Rhino 3D, 3D Studio Max are in the £ hundreds

SolidWorks, Alias, Siemens NX, etc are £ thousands

Catia etc £ tens of thousands

The pricing in part came about from a time when the hardware to run the software cost £ millions. It started to change in the mid nineties when desktop-class hardware, most famously by Solidworks, the start-up capital for which was raised by card-counting in Las Vegas casinos - the founder was one of *those* MIT blackjack students they made a film about.

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Dave 126
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Re: This article lacks technical detail.

More info here:

http://www.computerworld.com/article/3071035/emerging-technology/hp-begins-selling-its-jet-fusion-3d-printer-says-its-50-cheaper-10x-faster-than-others.html

Fused powder bed

Nylon

Colours and conductive parts

Bed size 16-in. x 12-in. x 16-in.

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Dave 126
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Re: Oh, I'm quite interested in what this might be...

RepRap and Makerbot cost £500 are aimed at hobbyists that might not even know what they want them for.

If you are just about to spend £120,000 on something, your job depends upon reading the data sheets and justifying to your finance department why it is a good investment - who will not accept "I liked the name" as a good enough reason.

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Politician claims porn tabs a malware experiment, then finds God

Dave 126
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Re: Ivone

Or a Yahooing, in the case of this politician!

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Dave 126
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They had some great articles. Its hard to think of a significant American author who hasn't written for Playboy.

These days, the writers have passed away, and Playboy doesn't do nudity. Oh well.

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Dave 126
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Re: Wrong shaming

>Shouldn't the real shaming be that he's using Yahoo! in the year 2016?

I came here to say that! Well done, well done.

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