* Posts by Dave 126

7405 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Pains us to run an Apple article without the words 'fined', 'guilty' or 'on fire' in it, but here we are

Dave 126
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Re: Water to 30 meters, but what about SALT water??

To compare to a long established product line, inexpensive digital Casio Watches. Their manuals used to suggest the following:

Water Resistant. 30M Splash Resistant. Fine in shower, but don't place directly in water jet. Okay for swimming, but don't use the buttons.

Water Proof: 50M. Fine in swimming pool and shower.

The only Casio I had in my youth that died from too much water was the calculator model, which my dad placed under a tap to wash some mud off.

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Google plots cop detection for auto autos

Dave 126
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Re: Patent Algorithims

Emergency vehicles are often slowed by a queue of traffic waiting at traffic lights, and not every driver is checking their mirrors as they should.

It wouldn't be hard for the traffic lights themselves to signal to drivers to pull over when an emergency vehicle is due to come up behind them. This signal could take the form of a flashing blue arrow, perhaps. There are several ways the traffic lights could be alerted to an approaching ambulance.

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Hollywood offers Daniel Craig $150m to (slash wrists) play James Bond

Dave 126
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Re: I know who!

. Product Description. A gourmet energy drink with natural ingredients from ... Steven Seagal's Cherry Charge Lightning Bolt Energy Drink is the first energy drink to be made of 100-percent juice, and the first to contain ...

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l8aru1ard41qc30fq.jpg

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Dave 126
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Not after Destiny. Stephen Merchant in Portal 2 was much better.

(Or maybe Dinklage correctly saw that Destiny wasn't all it was cracked up to be?)

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Dave 126
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Dani Behr

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Dave 126
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Re: For some strange reason...

As Q: "Bond, have you tried turning her off and on again?"

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Dave 126
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Chiwetel Ejiofor looks pretty hard in Triple 9, albeit with a big dose of vulnerability.

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Dave 126
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Re: Mark Strong.

Mark Strong playing a Bond-esque British agent as a straight role opposite Sacha Baron Cohen:

Grimsby (trailer):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pjwDOVQQjo

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Dave 126
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Re: Mark Strong.

Ridley Scott on Mark Strong's performance in Body of Lies: "a marvel of exotic suavity and cool insinuation"

Roger Ebert on the same: " I particularly admired the work of Mark Strong as the suave Jordanian intelligence chief, who likes little cigars, shady nightclubs and pretty women, but is absolutely in command of his job."

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Dave 126
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Re: Other colours are available.

Sean Bean was a 00 agent though, albeit one gone wrong. [Goldeneye]

The 'working class Bond' concept was played with in 'Kingsman'. Really though, the whole point of Bond was escapism - fantasies of fine food and travel for readers in ration-book Britain, and the idea that 007 could hob-nob with rich evil elites without arousing suspicion. But hey, if you want an accent other than Received Pronunciation, may I suggest Timothy Spall?

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Dave 126
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Re: For some strange reason...

with Rich Fulcher as Felix Leiter.

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Dave 126
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Re: For some strange reason...

Damn you, I've just spent ten minutes trying to find Richard Ayoade as Dean Learner as Thornton Reed - with shotgun - on YouTube!

I would also love to watch classic Bond scenarios featuring Matt Berry as 007...

'Man to Man with Dean Learner' shows that Ayoade already has his own tuxedo... and damn you Channel 4 for blocking YouTube videos. Also damn you for requesting Comedy Central geoblock the UK even though you stopped showing the Daily Show. And damn you for replacing the excellent comedy you did in the nineties with Big Brother.

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Dave 126
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Re: Gina Carano

No problem with being a female (indeed, if you search the Reg forums for her name, you'll see the OP but yours that mentioned her was from me), but an American?

But hey, voice coaches do wonders these days, and any lingering trace of her native accent could be ascribed to her character having spent time studying in the US, or on secondment with the CIA or whatever.

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HDMI hooks up with USB-C in cables that reverse, one way

Dave 126
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Re: Only vaguely USB-C related rant incoming...

It's annoying that few TVs have a DP input, whilst few PCs - or modest graphics cards - have HDMI 2.0 outputs. Hopefully a Home Theatre PC graphics card (i.e small and silent for video and 4K desktop duties, but not gaming) will arrive in time.

Or maybe this will be the better solution:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/9867/club3d-releases-dp12-to-hdmi-20-adapter

I don't know, I haven't tested it. (The three buyers who left reviews on Scan.co.uk suggest it does what it says on the tin)

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YouTube breaks Sony Bravias

Dave 126
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Re: Nothing new here.

http://iplayerhelp.external.bbc.co.uk/tv/v2_closure

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Dave 126
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Every new TV should include a small IR blaster - the size of a coin - with just one button: On/Off. This blaster will have an adhesive back so that it can be affixed to one's PVR/Satellite/Cable Box remote controller.

OR:

TVs have a 'wake on HDMI signal'.

The TV remote does little more than turn it on and off - the rest is done through the Humax PVR remote. The PVR remote can double as the TV remote, but the step of pushing [TV] [On] [PVR] [On] confuses and infuriates my dad.

[Off Topic: My mum is merely confused when watching the TV and it suddenly says 'Spotify' - a result of my dad in the next room selecting the wrong device from his phone ( I named the Chromecast Audio dongle in the kitchen 'Kitchen'... I don't know what else I can do). ]

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Dave 126
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>If I want to search for/look at a YouTube video when seated at the TV, I'd rather do it on the TV than go fire up some other device. So I'm rather annoyed at this development.

It sucks that something that did work now works no more. However, a Chromecast dongle - using as it does a phone, tablet or computer for text input - makes searching for Youtube videos so much easier than using a standard IR remote that I don't begrudge the extra power consumption. It also more than makes up for the time it takes for the Chromecast to boot up.

That said, our new Samsung TV presents itself as a Chromecast device, making Google's dongle redundant for the time being. The PlayStation 3 offers similar functionality from the Youtube app on an Android or iOS device.

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Latest Intel, AMD chips will only run Windows 10 ... and Linux, BSD, OS X

Dave 126
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Re: Microsoft continues to destroy the PC

> [Microsoft] is solely responsible for the decline of PC sales,

MS has caused me as much exasperation and frustration as the next user, but I have to suggest that at least part of the decline in PC sales is that older PCs are still fit for purpose.

My five year old Core 2 Duo w/ 4GB RAM is still happy to do 3D CAD work, as well as office and video tasks... for sure, a newer and faster machine will complete ray trace renders quicker, but that itself isn't reason for me to go out and drop £1,000 on a new PC.

MS have clearly made some infuriating and bewildering decisions over the decades, so you don't need to exaggerate!

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Dave 126
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Re: Another option (if you really want to stick with Windows)...

Hmm... it appears you can use Win7 in a VM without contravening the licence. What isn't allowed is using the same Win 7 licence for both the host OS and guest VM.

- http://superuser.com/questions/25678/how-does-windows-7-licensing-work-for-running-the-os-as-virtual-machines

- http://blog.superuser.com/2011/04/06/microsoft-licencing-transferring-windows-to-another-computer/

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Dave 126
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Re: Another option (if you really want to stick with Windows)...

>But the license doesn't allow that...

Does it not? Genuine question.

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Astronauts sequence DNA in space for the first time

Dave 126
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>a phage isn't a bacterium, it's a virus.

Quite right. Maybe the writer got confused by phage being an abbreviation bacteriophage - a virus that 'eats' bacteria?

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John Ellenby, British inventor of the first laptop, powers off

Dave 126
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Re: The Grid still looks modern

>The Grid still looks modern and can be used in future Sci-Fi movies.They just need to put in a UHD colour screen and a new motherboard with a modern CPU.

Or they could just leave the GRiD in its original state and insert a new display in post-production! :)

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Dave 126
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Re: Aliens

>Never understood why they removed the robot sentries (and Ripley's search for her daughter) from the original film.

Commonly cited reasons given for films in general are:

- Potential cinema audiences can be put off by films over a certain length

- Theatres want shorter films to allow more showings per day

- The pacing and rhythm of a film

These days, many DVD releases are longer than the Theatrical Cut without even advertising the fact - people are more comfortable on their own sofas with a Pause button for toilet breaks.

Pacing is more an art than a science - the 3 3/4 hour long Apocalypse Now Redux 'flows' better than the original, whilst Cameroon was right to remove a scene of a cocooned Burke from the third act of Aliens - just as Scott omitted a cocooned Dallas scene towards the end of Alien - because it just broke the momentum.

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Dave 126
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Aliens

The GRiD was in Aliens, but only in the Special Edition edit of the film that was released some years after the theatrical release. Should you be be scratching your heads and thinking "What drone guns?" it is likely you've only seen the TV broadcast version! :)

The director James Cameroon featured another strange portable computer, the Atari Portfolio, in his film Terminator 2 - a device developed in Surry, UK, and licensed to Atari. John Connor uses it to hack an ATM, and later a vault in the Cyberdyne lab.

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Deep inside Nantero's non-volatile carbon nanotube RAM tech

Dave 126
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Re: "only moving carbon nanotubes a few angstrom"

>Are we into mass production (tonne lots) [of Carbon Nano-Tubes] yet?

Yes*

*It depends upon how sir would like his CNTs. How long d'ya want them? How consistent, how pure? What's your application? Do you want them for their electrical properties, or for their mechanical or electrical properties? What's sir's taste in substrate, if any? We regret to inform sir that we currently have no mile-long tubes available for extreme engineering projects...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synthesis_of_carbon_nanotubes

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Dave 126
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Re: Bunch of CNTs

>So why are they aiming at a couple of minor niche markets when they could seemingly take over the entire world's memory and storage markets?

Because some of the advantages of non-volatile RAM would be currently wasted in mass-market devices such as desktops and phones. One these devices are designed to take advantage of it, the market will grow and prices will drop - a virtuous circle. There's always been games of chicken and egg in IT! :)

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Dave 126
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>Speed increases will, doubtlessly, be noticeable but does this then move the bottleneck to the system bus and or HDD/SDD and how many years before the price makes this technology practical for us home users?

Good questions, for which clues to some answers can be found in the history of the tech we use today. Already you can buy mass storage that sits on your PCIe bus instead of your SATA.

Some advantages, such as an 'instantly wake from a non-power consuming sleep state' might require a tweak to the computers power management system and CPU. The lower power consumption is of greater benefit to embedded and mobile applications than to desktops, though.

In the mid term, a technology that is as fast as RAM and as non-volatile and capacious as a HDD will change how a desktop computer is designed fundamentally. That is, why have separate RAM and mass storage?

Whilst you might not consider yourself an expert, you know better than others where the bottlenecks already are in your system, in relation to the tasks you put it to.

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Behold: Huawei evokes always-wise God Cloud – with Terminator users

Dave 126
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Phoenix/MVS is remembered for the responses that it gave to its HELP command. One such was the response to the command HELP GOD, to which Phoenix/MVS would reply "Deities must be invoked directly and not via Phoenix MVS."

- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_(computer)

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Epic Games forums breached, salted passwords nabbed

Dave 126
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>confused about the above comment , i'd think they'd love people to use weaker password words

Strategically, the UK Gov might want more data, but doesn't want its citizen's (and corporate organisation's) data to be snaffled by some other nation states.

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Dave 126
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Re: Given the commentary about weak/strong passwords at the end

RightStallionCellClip it is then! :)

Alt text:

or NotwrongMarePileFastener

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Microsoft's HoloLens secret sauce: A 28nm customized 24-core DSP engine built by TSMC

Dave 126
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Re: What about heat dissipation?

The DSP will be doing more work when its 'view' changes - i.e when the wearer moves or rotates their head. When the wearer moves or rotates their head, there will be more airflow.

I'm assuming that Hololens production won't ramp up until MK II or III or whatever - so there's some scope to fab at process sizes smaller than 28nm.

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Dave 126
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re: ARM?

> Maybe they should have just gone for an ARM-based SOC instead of a custom thing with an Atom on the side, Windows 10 is supposed to be cross-platform after all.

Quite a few of the software partners are used to developing for x86:

http://www.winbeta.org/news/microsoft-announces-long-list-hololens-partners-new-use-case-scenarios

Not sure why you suggest an ARM-based chip in place of this custom DSP - even phones use GPUs that aren't ARM-based.

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Sex ban IT man loses appeal – but judge labels order 'unpoliceable'

Dave 126
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Re: Shame on the GP

The law was changed in the UK, ohh, about ten years or more ago. It was in the news and everything.

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Dave 126
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Re: They might be painful to remember they exist

The recent Karl Urban one was very good, but we only saw a bit of MegaCity One - and other than him passing Anderson's probation, it was presented as being just another day for Dredd. A great shame that no sequels are planned, though Karl Urban is keen - even suggesting that he could do one in a decade or two, portraying different parts of Dredd's career.

The Stallone film, whilst blaspheming, is worth watching for the production design and more ambitious scope - we go to Cursed Earth, even if its poorly realised. Stallone has since apologised for not making the film as it should have been.

Still, we'll always have RoboCop (emotionless lawman in a satirised world), and Dirty Harry (Clint being an influence on Dredd)

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Four in five Android devices inherit Linux snooping flaw

Dave 126
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Re: Well as i run

You didn't spot the tongue in a cheek, kryptylomese? :)

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Microsoft’s Continuum: Game changer or novelty?

Dave 126
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Re: "Samuel Johnson had for women preachers"

>Of course all I know about this historic literary figure is what was in that episode of Blackadder III, so I'm no more refined than the next lout.

Just to add to your knowledge of the man, Johnson was fond of insulting the Scottish and Scotland. I've yet to learn why.

http://www.samueljohnson.com/scotland.html

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Dave 126
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Re: "Samuel Johnson had for women preachers"

>Just out of curiosity why didn't you use Muslims have for Women Imams instead of "Samuel Johnson had for women preachers", given there are Women Preachers and there's zero Female Muslim Imams.

Your curiosity didn't extend to clicking the link? The alternate analogy you provide wouldn't express the nuance of the author's views.

Johnson: "Sir, a woman's preaching is like a dog's walking on his hind legs. It is not done well; but you are surprised to find it done at all."

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Uber and Volvo take on Ford in race to launch self-driving vehicles

Dave 126
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Re: Got fed up of being flashed.

>Will it insist on putting the side lights on even when it's sunny? Easy to bypass with a switch on the dash!

Why would you want to turn them off? Daytime Running Lights have been shown in studies to improve safety for years*. Even your own observations as a driver should tell you they substantially increase a car's visibility in most driving conditions. Even on bright sunny days, when a road moves through areas of shade, DRLs really help other drivers a, spot you, and b, better judge your speed. If you haven't observed this, then I hope driverless cars arrive sooner rather later.

The number of people (usually in grey or silver cars) who don't turn on their lights in dusky, misty or rain-spray conditions is incredible. It's almost as if they want to be invisible on the motorway.

*The first study of DSLs I read of in New Scientist, about fifteen years ago, was conducted in Australia. I'm assuming you have a rough idea of the difference in visibility conditions between New South Wales and, for example, South Wales...

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Snowden says Russia ‘probably responsible’ for NSA hack

Dave 126
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Indeed he is, and you can sense his anger. Rather than a retelling of a Le Carre novel, this shenanigans could be from the pages of one of his recent books, such as 'A Most Delicate Truth'

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Google's brand new OS could replace Android

Dave 126
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>I don't see why this would change anything wrt the pushback from equipment manufacturers and network operators that is slowing the rate of updates to a crawl.

Because with a different OS architecture, you could update more parts without waiting for an SoC vendor to release a binary blob to an ODM.

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Dave 126
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Re: Because most of the planet

>I can't tell whether you're joking. QNX as a mobile OS died with Blackberry's smartphone

And QNX lives on as it has for decades, battle tested, real time - and a tenth the size of Linux. Google are happy of there are devices around that inform them about their users, but those devices don't have to be phones.

Still, it'll probably save them headaches if they roll their own OS.

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Dave 126
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Re: How does using the Linux kernel prevent Google from distributing Android updates?

>The real reason they can't distribute updates quickly is because they let the OEMs customize it, thus they depend on the OEMs to port their changes onto new versions before they can be released.

Doug, you're forgetting a few stages, such as the chip set vendors creating binary blobs that are them passed onto the ODMs.

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'Daddy, what's a Blu-ray disc?'

Dave 126
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Re: quality..

>Worse still I can find no evidence it [http://www.pwbelectronics.co.uk/product/cream/cream.html] is a spoof Someone has reinvented snake oil sales for the 21st century.

No proof of a spoof, but all evidence points that way:

Free sound improving techniques:

Plain piece of paper under one of four feet.

Pinning back one corner of a curtain.

Plain piece of Blue paper under any vase of flowers or any pot plant in the listening room.

Tying a Reef knot.

Freezing using a domestic deep freezer.

Pieces of quarter round wooden doweling in all right angles.

Aligning the slots in screw heads.

- http://www.pwbelectronics.co.uk/free-sound-improving-techniques

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Dave 126
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Re: Are we sinking into a kB/Kib-like mess?

>So when you buy a TV, you have to peer at the specs to find out if they are kilopixels or kibipixels? Stuff that.

Don't bother, just look for the UHD tag - that'll mean that it is 3,840 x 2,160 and that's all that most available content will take advantage of.

Then look at your viewing habits and environment - do you watch TV in a well lit room, or is it in a darkened cave for cinema-style film viewing? This has a bearing on which display technology will be most suitable.

After that, just make a decision about whether you want to spend extra for UHD Premium and/or Dolby Vision - these refer to the colour and dynamic range. Do note that the UHD term alone means that a TV will likely offer superior colours and dynamism than your older TV anyways.

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Dave 126
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Re: Dearth of content

The BBC are making Planet Earth II (narrated by David Attenborough) in UHD. It's due to be broadcast later this year, hopefully with a UHD BluRay to follow.

I know it's not David Lean, but like Lawrence it should have some spectacular scenery in it! :)

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Dave 126
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Re: Dave 126.

> Googling "IPS glow" should give you some pretty extreme illustrations.

I don't need to Google it, I've seen it! :D Very noticeable when watching 'letter-boxed' content (i.e a movie whose aspect ratio is different to that of my old LCD/LED screen. The 'black bars' at the top and bottom of my screen are not black, and can be easily seen against the background if the room's lights are turned off.

My friend's OLED TV is a different matter. You just cannot discern any letterboxing at all in a dark room - which is what you would expect. It really does make for a better film viewing experience, especially during darker scenes. He knew his viewing habits, weighed up the benefits against the cost and made decision.

However, read up on it - if you use your TV for watching football on a Saturday afternoon for example, you might be better served by the greater maximum brightness of a modern LED set.

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Dave 126
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Re: Dave 126.

>But how does it offer "greater dynamic range"? It is a TV with pre-recorded content, OLED and black is black, white is white. How can they "increase" that via the source data or by changing from 8bit to 10bit colour? They can't. ;)

How? Because UltraHD includes the Rec 2020 colour space specification, at either 10 bit or 12 bit per pixel. The specs cover the content, not just the final display output.

'White' is not the brightest. For a demonstration of a file having more information that the display device, just download a *.EXR or *.HDR image file, view them in PhotoShop (Gimp users need a fork called CinePaint) and play with the slider in the bottom left hand corner - it is akin to adjusting the exposure of a camera. Such files are used as environment maps in 3D raytracing, because light sources depicted in the images have their brightness defined by the extra bits per pixel - thus the rendered object will have highlights and shadows. To a lesser extent, many RAW files will also contain more information than most monitors can display.

If you reread my original post, you'll see that I said that UltraHD TVs have greater dynamic range, not '4K' TVs per se. That was very deliberate distinction, though of course most '4K' sets will soon conform to UHD (the first 4K sets were sold before the standards were finalised).

>The UHD/4K provides better resolution.

UHD is a set of standards that include resolution *and* colour space, including a greater dynamic range.

>The OLED provides better dynamic range. (Black has always been black, white has always been white, everything else is false advertising)

OLED does allow for proper black (each pixel is its own light source), but there are techniques that increase the dynamic range of LED sets (effectively 'local dimming'). LED sets still won't have the absolute black of OLED, but they have greater absolute brightness. This is accounted for by UHD standards.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultra-high-definition_television#Color_space.2C_dynamic_range.2C_and_frame_rate

>TL:DR, the advertisers and marketers are very good at using the wrong words to describe real changes, and you seem to have fallen for it.

I'm not clear what you think I've fallen for. Your post suggests that you think UHD only covers resolution. The idea that 'black is black and white is white' applies to printed images but not necessarily to display devices (or for that matter, stained glass windows).

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Dave 126
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Re: quality..

>... not to mention the fact that the analogue vinyl recording format makes no provision for DRM

Well, vinyl wouldn't provide Digital Rights Management, hehe! The idea of 'vinyl Analogue RM' may have been around, but it never worked in practice - if it was ever implemented at all:

Copy-protection for vinyl in the 1970s

http://www.currybet.net/cbet_blog/2008/01/copy-protection-for-vinyl-in-t.php

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Dave 126
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Re: quality..

CDR? Get back to your cave, Mr Flintstone! :D

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MoD flings £800m at Dragons' Den miltech startup wheeze as post-Brexit costs bite

Dave 126
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Details here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/innovation-initiative-to-bring-future-tech-and-ideas-to-the-armed-forces

The 'VR Helmet' mentioned in the article is actually an AR (augmented reality) helmet for training exercises - infantry in a real field can see - and respond to - simulated tanks and aircaft etc.

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