* Posts by Dave 126

7500 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

For God's sake, stop trying to make Microsoft Bob a thing. It's over

Dave 126
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Re: Destroy All Monsters

Yep, there is no technical reason (just developer time) why we can't use Post Comment to send a correction to the Reg Editorial team. There is obviously a mechanism for 'deleting' posts by a Reg moderator - could this system be automated so that any comment with REGCORRECTION in the title is 'moderated' instantly and thus isn't displayed in the thread, but is forwarded to the article author?

Help us to help you!

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Bluetooth 5.0 emerges, ready to chew on the internet of things

Dave 126
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Re: Is it still called an industry standard if

iOS has never supported the Bluetooth file transfer profile. I believe files can be transferred between devices with the use of a 3rd party app (such as 'Bump'), which is how I'm assuming how pocket-sized wireless dye-sub printers connect to iPhones.

Of all of my iPhone-owning mates, I've only heard one friend complain about this issue in ten years. Not surprising really - I've used the BT file transfer on my Android phone once, maybe twice in the same period. I'm not saying it isn't frustrating when you stumble upon the limitation, though! :)

- https://www.quora.com/Why-does-iPhone-not-pair-with-other-non-Apple-devices-via-Bluetooth-to-transfer-files with link to iOS list of supported profiles:

- https://support.apple.com/en-gb/HT204387

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Dave 126
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Re: Reliability?

Same here. I used to find Bluetooth a bit flaky, so it's a case of 'once bitten, twice shy'. These days though, depending upon the two devices, it can be pretty solid. However, Mr Rueger and myself can't be the only people who have some residual mistrust of BT's reliability.

For applications like smartwatches, where one needs to trust that notifications on a phone are passed on to a watch (or key fob, or headphones), reliability is crucial. 85%, to use your number, just isn't good enough.

My Huawei phone connects to my cheap Tesco BT speaker reliably, but my Sony phone refused to connect to a Ford Transit stereo on occasion. I've heard a lot of criticism of Smartwatches, but I haven't read of many complaints of patchy BT connection on the better known brands (i.e Samsung phone > Samsung watch, Apple > Apple, etc), so I get the impression that BT can be reliable these days if implemented properly.

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Huawei Nova: A pleasant surprise in a 5-inch phone

Dave 126
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Re: Is this a joke?

>There are more comparable mid-rangers to the iPhone 7 in size than this, but we can't have a phone review without the mention of an iPhone

The iPhone is a common object out there in wider society, so most people will know roughly how big they are without owning one. The are dozens of different Android models used by people I know, so most folk won't know a Galaxy A 3 Aqua Compact Plus if they saw one.

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China is building a full scale replica of the Titanic to repeatedly crash into iceberg

Dave 126
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Re: Life Imitates Art

For those who haven't seen it, Rick and Morty resembles what you would get if you put Hitchiker's Guide, Futurama, and Family Guy in a blender and poured it over Back to The Future - if Doc Brown was a barely functioning alcoholic. In other words, it is brilliant.

The Simpsons featured a Rick and Morty-themed couch gag, the longest they've ever done - it's effectively a 2.30 minute episode of Rick of Morty. Here it is:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ecYoSvGO60

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Apple Watch sales go over a cliff: Down 2.8 meellion per quarter in a year

Dave 126
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Re: Someone is lying!

>IPX7: Immersion in water of up to 1m for 30 minutes.

And that means it is water resistant, in that it resists water for a period of time.

Water Proof means that a watch is impervious to water. It isn't my distinction, and nor is it arbitrary; it's physics. Here's a handy chart of the activities that water resistant and waterproof watches are suitab;e for, courtesy of Casio:

http://mygshock.com/wiki/images/f/f1/Casio-Water-Resistance.jpg

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Dave 126
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Re: What iiiiis it gooood for? Absolutely nothing! (say it again)

>Hey tech companies - find a need and meet it, don't make a shiny widget and try to convince us we need to buy it.

I get where you're coming from, but what you say is easier said than done. How does a company identify a need or a desire amongst its potential customers? Let's look at some different approaches:

- Focus groups. Hmmm. As Henry Ford might have said: "If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have asked for a faster horse".

- The CEO wants it. Hmm, one assumes that the CEO became the CEO because he wasn't an idiot. However, his life style may be very different to that of his customers. This approach can work though - the Sony Walkman was born from a request by their CEO to his engineers, because he wanted some way of listening to music on trans-Pacific flights.

- Self-starting inventor or designer. This approach can work - at least you know at least one person wants the product. However, the designer might not realise how niche his requirements are, or he might get so caught up in the process of refining his design that he becomes blind to any larger market.

- Studying the target market. Unlike focus groups, this approach is more objective. At its simplest, it could be a time-and-motion study. It can be very labour intensive, and involve filming people complete day-to-day tasks, before spending lots of analysing said data.

- Samsung throw everything out there and see what sells. They made a range of smartphones of different sizes and lots of people bought the big ones. Lots of studies might have suggested that using a big phone with one thumb is a chore, but evidently users were willing to take a hit on that in exchange for being better able to show photos to their mates.

It isn't for me to say if any of these example approaches is superior - they have all at some point resulted in some popular products.

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Dave 126
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Re: Someone is lying!

The first Apple Watch what is generally referred to as Water Resistant - rain, splashes, perhaps a quick dunk in the sink are okay, but nothing more. If you wear it in the shower, don't subject it to the jet of water.

Water Proof means you can wear a watch whilst swimming - as Apple advertises their MK II models as being suitable for.

These are the long accepted terms in the watch industry. People can be confused by '30 Metres' or '50 M' waterproof, but the 'depth' is only a proxy for pressure.

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Dave 126
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Re: Casio

>It seems they did deliberately rip off the shape and size of the Casio calculator watches from the early 80s.

The size will have been a balancing act twixt battery life and bulk - and even now that compromise is unacceptable for some.

As for shape, once Apple had settled on a rectangular display there were only so many forms the watch could take.

Dolphins didn't 'rip off' the shape of sharks, but they appear similar because they are both subject to the same constraints. :)

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Dave 126
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Re: couldn't buy one

Indeed:

research firm IDC published a report estimating that Apple Watch sales last quarter were down 71 percent year on year. The figures weren’t surprising considering that Apple released the new Series 2 line right at the end of the July-September period, with supply constraints lasting well into the current quarter

- http://www.theverge.com/2016/12/6/13852560/apple-watch-sales-tim-cook

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Dave 126
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Re: Smart Watch needs a reboot.

>Aside from the security issues involved, the trouble is that all you're really saying is that a smartwatch would be useful if it was a smartphone.

That isn't what he saying. He wants a watch to function as a house key, a car key fob, or a bank card - if the security can be nailed down (a question of implementation, not concept).

What is notable about these applications is that they don't require a power-hungry display, or even a power-hungry continuous connection to his phone.

> Taking a phone out of a pocket is not difficult and takes only a second or two, so simply doing the same as a phone but on your wrist is not enough.

That is a second or two, repeated many times a day. And you might have muddy hands, or it might be raining out, you might have your hands full with shopping, or you might not want to bring your phone with you. I wear a conventional watch because I don't want to fumble into my pocket just to tell the time.

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Dave 126
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Do look around, there are a few takes on simply styled, analogue connected watches being released at the moment.

The appearance of Skagen watches might appeal to you, too. They're a touch too big for my tastes (44mm ish) but they are slim.

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Dave 126
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Re: Someone is lying!

Aye:

The timing of Cook’s essentially public comments is notable, coming the day after research firm IDC published a report estimating that Apple Watch sales last quarter were down 71 percent year on year. The figures weren’t surprising considering that Apple released the new Series 2 line right at the end of the July-September period, with supply constraints lasting well into the current quarter — basically, this summer was a bad time to buy an Apple Watch.

The new model is slightly more suitable for fitness-related use than the MK I, as it has waterproofing.

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Dave 126
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Re: Watches are still jewellery

The Mondian watches do have a nice uncluttered display, but I really like the Casio MQ 24 analogue watch, yours for around £7.00. Its just so simple and modestly competent that it is hard not to like it. A few quid more will get you a similarly-styled Timex with an 'Indiglo' backlight.

It might not take as many beatings as a steel-cased watch with a sapphire crystal, but you could buy a dozen of them for the same money.

That said, I often wear a small (38mm) wind-up watch from around 1968, again with a very readable display (white hands on dark grey face), beautiful without being affected. I don't wear it at work though, I wouldn't want to damage it. Last week I broke a Casio F-91 W 'Terrorist Watch' at work (£5.00), and I didn't care - it's almost a 'consumable', like the tyres on your car.

I don't like the current vogue for large (42mm+) analogue watches - they are garish and impractical.

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Local TV presenter shouted 'f*cking hell' to open news bulletin

Dave 126
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Re: Erm

>You'll be telling me next HIGNFY is scripted. "9:10, Paul, you can start saying "twat" now. But no fucks till 9:20"

Not quite, but you will occasionally hear the continuity announcer say:

"And now our drama, which contains strong language from the outset"

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Dave 126
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Re: Real News

"You don't know about Ron Burgundy? He'll read anything you put on the autocue"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HNJ93HCxUA

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Apple again late to another market others pioneered. Or is it?

Dave 126
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Re: Revisionism

>Nonsense really. Apple came late to every product sector after other companies proved there was a market.

Creative didn't prove there was a big market for a big MP3 jukebox that wouldn't fit in your jeans' pocket. In fact, they demonstrated that there wasn't a big market for them. But yes, Sony had already proven there was a mass market for audio players that fit in your pocket with the Walkman and later MiniDisc, and in addition, Sony had shown there was a smaller but lucrative market for very expensive pocket-sized audio players (again, with some models of the cassette Walkman).

I don't consider Apple to be geniuses, but I am often surprised at how often their competitors have dropped the ball. But hey, it makes it interesting to read and to learn why, for example, it wasn't the Sony iPod or Nokia iPhone.

Or heck, why it wasn't the Nintendo PlayStation. Seriously, the Sony employee who fought for and designed the PlayStation (in a market everyone assumed was sewn-up between Sega and Nintendo) was a self-professed admirer of Esslinger's work for Apple, and with the kudos he received for the games console he went on to develop the VAIO range of laptops and desktops - the later aimed at Audio Visual editing. When Jobs killed the MacOS clone scheme, he wanted to make an exception for VAIO gear - in fact, the first x86 builds of OSX were tested on VAIO laptops. Was it genius of Jobs to keep NeXTStep's descendant easily portable between architectures and thus keep his CPU options open? No, it was just common sense.

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Dave 126
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Re: Revisionism

>The main thrust of his point is still correct. Apple improve rather than invent. It's still innovation to some extent, but they don't invent new products or markets.

His main thrust to was to call 'nonsense' on the article's claim that Apple achieved mass market uptake of certain product types, then he concluded by talking about hardware specs (which are only meaningful with regards to user experience) and things being 'overpriced' (By what criteria? Certainly not overpriced with regards to market acceptance, as is proven by Apple's bottom line. Overpriced in terms of Bill of Materials? Er, no company sells products at a price equal to the BoM, unless they are getting a return on their investment in a different way, such as selling services on top).

It is a shame that his language distracted from some pertinent points. Nokia could indeed have brought an iPhone-like device to market first - but they tripped over themselves. Sony had all the engineering, manufacturing and UI talent to make an iPod-like device first, but they tripped over themselves.

Yes, Apple's approach to negotiating with the likes of record companies (iPod) and mobile network operators (iPhone) saw them in good stead (and is perhaps pertinent to this article), but it wasn't a one way street as Mage suggests - having a physical product that people actually wanted to buy helped Apple in their negotiations.

Mage suggested the article was being revisionist, but he used factually incorrect examples to make his point.

For the record, I've never owned any Apple kit, but I studied Product Design from '98-2001, during which time the iMac and iPod were released, and CAD solid modelling came down from the mainframe to land on the Windows desktop). I've had Sony Walkmen, CD Walkmen, Sharp MiniDisc player (with scrollwheel), an LG MP3 player with 32MB storage, a Creative Zen Jukebox (the iPod sized one, not the CD player-sized Nomad model), a Neuros, an Archos GMini, iRiver H320 (which I repaired by cannibalising the HDD from a dead iPod, and installed Rockbox on it), and many more. The iPod is damned fine piece of product and UI design, and the only reason I've never bought one is Apple's restricted file management and codec support - which is their prerogative. Just as it is my prerogative not to buy one if I don't want to.

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Dave 126
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Re: Revisionism

>The iPod outstripped other MP3 players (Creative, Digital River) because of the Record label deals with iTunes and ability to buy tracks rather than buy entire CD and rip it.

That's just incorrect Mage - it's actually you that is being revisionist. The iPod did well because it was better than the devices that came before it in some important aspects. The Creative player was too big to fit into most pockets - it was the size of a chunky portable CD player, whereas the iPod was the size of a chunky cassette walkman. The iRiver H120 (which is what I can only assume you mean by 'Digital River') was a good machine, but it came out (2003) two years after the first iPod.

The first-gen iPod wasn't designed to sell massively, as it was Mac-only. It used FireWire to both charge and transfer music, because USB 2.0 hadn't yet been widely adopted. It did nail the UI and form-factor, though.

The other pre-iPod MP3 players were flash-based, which was then too expensive to store much more than an album of music, and they started to appear at a time when MiniDisc players were just becomming popular in the West. Richer Sounds would sell you a blank MD (74 or 80 minutes of music, roughly 100MB) for £1, so their size, cost and cost/album were acceptable.

There was nothing to stop Creative adding a scroll wheel to their player - even my 1999 Sharp 722 MiniDisc recorder had one (though its main function was for titling tracks and scrubbing within tracks - as it would be on a Sony AV-editing rig. Apple's implementation of the scroll wheel came from a Bang & Olufsen telephone.

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LeEco Le Pro 3: Low-cost, high-spec Droid takes on the big boys with a big fat batt

Dave 126
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Re: Headphone volume warning...

>The headphone volume nag is an EU requirement, I'm afraid, and is now built-in to Android.

Ah yeah now you mention it, I remember flashing Korean firmware onto MP3 players (or else just selecting a non-EU country) back in the day when MP3 players were still discrete gadgets.

>Now, this obviously takes no account of how efficiently your headphones convert 'leccy into noise, nor if they are powered 'phones.

Or if I'm feeding it into another device, such as a car stereo or home amplifier, that has its own effing volume control. Actually, the issue here is my much loved £50 car stereo from Lidl - it's evidently been designed to take AUX input at headphone level, and not at line-level (and even then, it outputs the audio at a lower level than it would if playing off SD card or USB stick). Back in the day, CD Walkmans, MD players and early MP3 players all had two 3.5mm outputs, one of which was line level - but my Lidl stereo was designed about a decade after that ceased to be the norm.

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Dave 126
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Re: Battery Life

Turing off 'Mobile Data' when in areas of very low signal makes a massive difference to how long the battery lasts.

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Dave 126
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Headphone volume warning...

... is bloomin' irritating. I'm safely parked up, and select a podcast to listen to through my car's 3.5mm input. Podcast starts playing through the car speakers, I drive off. Suddenly, the audio drops in volume. Grr. I have to then find a safe spot to pull in, unlock my phone, dismiss the 'Listening to music at high volume for extended periods can damage your hearing' dialogue, turn the volume up again and set off on my journey again.

Thankfully it hasn't happened for a while. Perhaps the phone is programmed to only issue the warning a few times?

EDIT: I'm encountered this on Sony and Huawei handsets, so it certainly isn't unique to this LeEco phone.

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Dave 126
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Re: re -90 to 100%

>Getting from 90 per cent charged to 100 per cent took an hour

Don't charge to 100%. It's not good for the lifespan of the Li-ion battery. My source is 1, a Reg article a few years back about how to care for your Li-ion battery*, and 2, Sony phones used to have an option to stop the phone charging once it had reached 90%. MacBooks and some other laptops also manage their power so that they don't sit at 100% when plugged in.

*Other bits of advice to extend lifespan of the battery: don't regularly run the battery all the way down, don't let it get too hot, ideally just use it in the 85%-60% range, if not using the battery for some time, make sure that there is at least 40% charge in it.

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Plastic fiver: 28 years' work, saves acres of cotton... may have killed less than ONE cow*

Dave 126
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Re: And yet...

>A petition calling for an end to the Badger Cull, something surely of equal interest to Vegans et al is languishing with barely a fraction of the votes this time waster has garnered.

There hasn't been a widespread badger cull, only a trial of one. A smart badger-hugger will do nothing to oppose the trial because:

- 1, The trial was found to be not very good at killing badgers

- 2, killing badgers only results in a badger vacuum, quickly filled by more badgers moving into the now-vacant territory. If badgers are eventually found to be vectors for bovine TB, having lots of badgers moving across the country would only result in more cattle with TB.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not much of a chemist then?

>>I too wonder how long it takes for those loony eco-warriers to work out

>You sound like a Daily Mail reader from, let's say, the 1980s

Look, I was brought up to have respect for the environment (and none at all for the Daily Heil), but I have a rational outlook and a fair grounding in science. There are lunatics who profess to be environmentalists, just as there are lunatics who are climate change deniers. Indeed, one can feel that it is lunatic greenies who do more harm to the good fight than right-wingers, because they make it easier for Joe public to dismiss very real concerns as hysteria.

It would be best if dreadlocked crusties shut the hell up, and left the airwaves clear for people like David Attenborough and scientists to make clear, well-argued points.

Instead, we've had Greenpeace activists set fire to a GM research nursery in Australia (thus spreading GM plant matter far afield, the opposite of their intent), and the moratorium on nuclear power in Germany.

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Hackers waste Xbox One, PS4, MacBook, Pixel, with USB zapper

Dave 126
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Re: Ridiculous

MIDI is optically isolated, and its cousin DMX, which is used in a similar manner but for lighting and other stage effects. Your point stands, though - I haven't seen it built into a PC since the Atari ST. The common approach on PCs was to have a MIDI break-out box attached to the game port.

For that matter, IrDA is optically isolated, but again, it's been almost entirely supplanted by BlueTooth, and hasn't been common since the old Nokia days - when people only ever seemed to use it for playing two-player Snake.

Thunderbolt started off as 'LightPeak', with the intention of using fibre optic interconnects. However, a copper cable solution was cheaper, and also perhaps the thinking was that consumers would find power delivery more useful than long fibre optic lengths.

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Banks' bid to board iPhones' NFC chips rebuffed

Dave 126
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Re: NFC tech

A compromise compared to what now, Mage?

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Dave 126
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Re: They ain't dumb Apple you know

Banks wanted a much larger percentage of each transaction than Apple charges. Apple was happy enough with a tiny percentage because their motive was to differentiate iPhones from Android et al.

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RIP HPE's The Machine product, 2014-2016: We hardly knew ye

Dave 126
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Re: Did Samaritan Win Out After All?

If you skip back to The Reg's previous article about the machine, you'll see me recommending that excellent television series. It really gets going (and then some!) half way through the third season. The first season, whilst having a gentle overarching plot, is largely a 'monster of the week' police procedural.

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Dave 126
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Just for fun:

Here's HP's Star Trek tie-in teaser trailer for The machine:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3sHh6CsN7c

[To be read in your best movie-trailer voice:]

At the beginning of the 21st century, the earth needed to find a way to keep up with the data from over 30 billion connected devices, which changed the basic architecture of computing. This year, Hewlett Packard Enterprise will preview [dum dum dum!] The Machine

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A Rowhammer ban-hammer for all, and it's all in software

Dave 126
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Re: Still does my head in

>I can visualise how buggering up memory can cause other programs to mis-behave but still struggle to visualise how you can force such a specific mis-behaviour that you can take over control of the machine.

The Google Project Zero the article refers to is outlined here. It should answer your question better than I can!

https://googleprojectzero.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/exploiting-dram-rowhammer-bug-to-gain.html

I think the rough idea is that by hammering the memory bits you have permission to access, you can flip a bit in adjacent memory that otherwise would be off limits to you. Part of the exploit method is to deliberately fragment the machine's memory before the hammering, so that there is a greater chance of accessible memory being adjacent to memory reserved for the kernel.

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Google's Chromecast Audio busted BT home routers – now it has a fix

Dave 126
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Not related to article:

My Chromecast Audio works with my Huawei phone, but not with my housemate's Nexus 5. Weird, but just writing the last sentence has jogged my brain onto a possible cause - I use Google Play Music, my housemate uses Spotify, so it might be an issue with the client app and not the phone itself. Hmm, a line of enquiry to be confirmed or eliminated later - I'll just try something from iPlayer Radio on the Nexus.

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Half-ton handbuilt CPU heads to Centre for Computing History

Dave 126
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Go big or go home!

Oh, it appears this chap has already got the memo! :)

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The future often starts as a toy, so don't shun toy VR this Christmas

Dave 126
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Re: I'd save some money back...

>I wish I'd had the money to do all that.

It's more to do with where you live, and not how much money you have per se - though obviously money and employment have a huge bearing on where you call home. Trees, streams and beaches cost nothing - travelling to them might do.

To someone brought up in a small town or village, raising a child in a city just looks cruel.

Another link - my 'techno hippy' friend in North Devon built himself a rotating observatory, and in the mid nineties constructed a CCD imaging system for it. Digital imaging was no match for film for everyday applications then, but for for stargazing CCDs offer some advantages such as compositing images to compensate for partial cloud cover. I remember him telling me he used some laser-pointers down the telescope to find the correct location to mount the sensor. Now in his sixties, he plays with racing drones - indeed, he's hosted regional championships, including one in which a world champion has qualified. Really though, it has more in common with the 1980's outdoor activity of RC car racing than it does video games.

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Dave 126
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Re: I'd save some money back...

I did all those outdoor activities too when I was a child, and I'm very glad I did. However, I still have fond memories of waiting for Sinclair computers loading, playing two-player games on an Atari ST, and later playing networked Doom - as well as using these computers as paint brushes and musical instruments.

These groups of activities aren't mutually exclusive. For sure, young people today are offered more polished, more immersive games, but at the same time there is potential for greater links between the virtual and physical spaces. Examples of these links might include: Making your own toys with sensors, motors and Arduinos, Augmented Reality (as a toy, but also as a tool in the workshop), and Machine Vision. As an adult, the 'toys' that appeal most to me now are on the border of the virtual and physical - such as CNC routers.

Finding a good balance is in part a matter of parental guidance, and it sound that despite your grumpiness, your children are lucky to have you as a father.

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Drops the mic... Hang on, hackers could be listening through my headphones?

Dave 126
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Re: Odd

>Also, I guess I'm getting old, we used to use speakers as microphones when I was a kid because we didn't have all the stuff kids have nowadays.

Same here. First, I discovered that microphone worked as a speaker, when I was about 7 year old. Later, I used some earbuds to record sound onto a Mac LCIII at school. Certainly not hi-fi quality, but speech was comprehensible.

Also, the port remapping isn't unheard of - many XP-era desktops would present a dialogue asking what kind of device had just been plugged in. Of course, this facility in hardware doesn't translate to helping me right here and now remap my unused mic jack as an audio out.

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Dave 126
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Re: Odd

A lot of PCs have retaskable audio jacks at the hardware level - but the firmware and drivers differ between models. Some PCs would bring up a port selection dialogue when a 3.5mm plug was inserted.

I have spent a few minutes seeing if can do the same - my headphone jack is damaged, so it would suit me to reassign the microphone port. However, it would probably be quicker for me to open the machine and re-solder the port than it would to faff around with software and drivers. As far as I can make out, the IDT drivers allowed port remapping in XP, but don't in Win 7. Screwdriver time...

Oh, just to clarify, Class D amplifiers are not 'digital', though people often refer to them as such.

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Hey techbros, make an airplane mode but for driving for your apps – US traffic watchdog

Dave 126
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Re: So what you do is

On a more sensible note, more vehicles are coming with external cameras, either to cover the driver's ass in the case of a collision (typically on delivery vehicles who were the targets of insurance scammers), or as part of assisted driving systems. Dash-cams are popular in countries where people don't trust the police.

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Dave 126
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Re: That's why ..

Sony sold NFC tags for their phones - tap the phone on the tag to enable a certain profile, for example. Daftly, there wasn't a 'toggle mode'. This meant that you couldn't tap a tag to enable a silent profile and then tap the same tag again to turn the ringer back on.

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Dave 126
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Re: If Fines Can't Stop It, Can Technology Really Provide An Answer?

>How does it differentiate driver from passenger? Genuine question.

The report glossed over that, merely saying that 'until driver/passenger distinction systems mature, Driver mode must be activated manually'. Oh well.

It seems most of the thrust is towards the systems already being developed by Google, Apple et al. When you connect your phone to your car, the car takes control of the UI, giving simplified controls for calls, sat-nav and audio.

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How to confuse a Euro-cop: Survey reveals the crypto they love to hate

Dave 126
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>Sorry, but it's working exactly as designed.

Actually, it isn't. As the head of the NSA pointed out, they like encryption. Because Joe Public doesn't bother with it much, the people who use encryption stand out like a sore thumb, providing the NSA with metadata that to them is just as useful as any message content.

Encryption will only work as intended until everybody is using it all the time. Whilst professionals like doctors and lawyers will need to take due diligence against criminal data thieves to comply with data protection legislation, most people's choice of messaging app will be determined by what their friends use and its convenience.

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A closer look at HPE's 'The Machine'

Dave 126
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Re: Welcome to the machine

Hehe, I've just finished watching the techno-thriller series 'Person of Interest', in which an all-seeing AI is dubbed 'The Machine'. The soundtrack includes Portishead and DJ Shadow amongst others, but it refrains from using Pink Floyd's Welcome to the Machine until the end of its 4th season, and to great effect.

If you only want to watch it for the techno stuff, there's a case to be made for jumping in at the beginning of the 3rd season, in which it breaks from it's police-procedural format and then some. It was created by Johnathan Nolan (Momento, The Prestige, Inception, Dark Knight, Intersteller, Westworld) and addresses many of the themes he's known for.

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CompSci Prof raises ballot hacking fears over strange pro-Trump voting patterns

Dave 126
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Re: Vote Fraud? Are you CRAAAZY?

>So, up until a couple of weeks ago, the Democrat party line was "Vote fraud? Don't be ridiculous! Never happens!"

They didn't say it never happened, they said it hadn't happened when Trump said it had. It was just another example of people doing some fact-checking, and this fact-checking being wilfully misinterpreted as anti-Trump bias.

There was a case of a woman whose submitted a postal vote on behalf of her husband, who later died before polling day. The Trump camp interpreted this as pro-Clinton fraud.

Anyway, your duty now is get out of your bubble, and that goes for the Democrats too. Remember you have to live amongst each other, and you have more in common than your polarised media suggests.

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Reg man 0: Japanese electronic toilet 1

Dave 126
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Future Toilet?

Really Mr Corfield, you don't know how to use the three seashells? What are you, a caveman? :)

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Dave 126
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You got away lightly: A friend of mine was due to give a speech of thanks to her Japanese hosts after a stint of teaching English when she made a trip to the bog. She pushed the wrong button, and the toilet retracted into the wall and a shower head soaked her to the skin. She had to give her speech with her silk blouse stuck to her skin.

Technology aside, the product designers Seymour and Powell revealed in the late nineties series 'Designs on your [toilet]' that the Japanese test the flushing system toilet in a more rigorous and sensible way than we do. UK toilets are tested with standard speheres, whereas the Japanese test the flush with hand-rolled foodstuffs to better simulate what the toilet will have to deal with in the real world.

It was also toilet design that led to Jony Ive leaving the UK for California:

'Tangerine had a consultancy contract with the bathroom-fittings company to design a toilet. I was there when Jony made an excellent presentation to this guy who was wearing a red nose because it was Comic Relief day. This clown then decided to throw his weight around and pulled apart Jony’s design. It was ridiculous. Britain lost Jony Ive then and there.’ - Clive Grinyer

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Emulating x86: Microsoft builds granny flat into Windows 10

Dave 126
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>nevermind binary compatibility, they won't work on a phone because they weren't designed for phones.

That is very true, but MS are pursuing the idea of letting people plug their phone into a monitor, mouse and keyboard. Ubuntu were making similar noises, but Apple have taken a different approach (documents and draught emails on your phone are handed over to your Mac, presumably through iCloud or somesuch).

I'm not sure why - SoCs are so cheap these days you might as well just have a second PC instead of a dumb dock.

The only advantage to MS's approach I can think is security - you'd be using your own personal device instead of running your software on an untrusted PC. You'd still have to have trust that the keyboard wasn't logging keystrokes and the monitor wasn't grabbing screen shots, though this wouldn't leave you as wide open as running your software on an untrusted PC.

Still, if working away from an office is your thing, just use a laptop.

I can't understand why more tablet makers don't let them be used as second monitors. You could have an ARM tablet that acts as a screen for a headless x86 box for when you need it. Shit, we could have the x86 box built into the keyboard, a form-factor I've not seen since the Amiga :)

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Dave 126
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Re: However on Linux..

That doesn't help the people whose business are running on legacy software. If they could have switched by now, they would have done.

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Apple unplugs its home LAN biz, allegedly

Dave 126
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Re: Oh - I quite liked the Airport range

There's more to choose from today than ever before. Apple haven't been chasing anyone's custom for Airports for a while, since they haven't had a price drop for years.

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Dave 126
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There's lots of other ways of playing music from an Apple device these days. iDevices play nicely with Google Chromecast /Audio devices, as well as Sonos and others.

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Dave 126
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Re: Worth watching, regarding the iFixit teardown / Recyclability (shockingly bad).

Any chance of a transcription?

For a tooled-up recycling facility, glue is easier to dismantle than screws because end-of-life products can processed in an oven. This is less labour intensive than using a person with a screw driver.

The trick to bringing costs down, as in manufacture, is the (dis)assembly line.

Apple have a vested interest, for sure. But then so do iFixit.

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