* Posts by Dave 126

6751 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Bomb-disposal robot violently disposes of Dallas cop-killer gunman

Dave 126
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Re: I suppose it really doesn't matter what killed him

>So the Dallas Police are just another violent street gang, who take revenge, not a professional force charged with keeping the peace in society?

The Dallas Police are nothing more or less than a collection of human beings, some of whom in the circumstances would have been scared, nervous, angry etc, despite their collective training and experience. I don't know enough about the circumstances to make a judgement on their tactical decisions.

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Dave 126
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Re: @YetAnotherLocksmith ... It makes sense, but...

>Has no-one developed a weapon system where you can calibrate the range and hit someone in body armour hard enough to knock them down without killing them?

I've idly thought along the same lines in the wake of past school shootings - or rather, in the wake of some people calling for teachers to be armed. Is there some non-lethal system of taking a gunman down, or a system of containing them, or rendering their weapon unusable - like a massive electromagnet? I haven't thought of anything plausible, but then I'm not a weapons designer.

Sadly though, most research into non-lethal weapons have been focused on crowd control, gassess, nets, gloopy foams, noise, microwaves etc Curiously, tear-gas is used because it was originally developed as a tactical warfare weapon, but the Geneva Convention on chemical weapons banned it for that use. The manufactures therefore pitched it as a civilian crowd-control agent instead.

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New ISS crew will spend their time bombarding computers with radiation

Dave 126
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More info here:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/1873.html

They have already conducted tests on the ground.

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Dave 126
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>don't the ISS all use off-the-shelf laptops?

They do use off the shelf laptops running Linux, around seven of them, but they only act as terminals for the ISS's Command and Control computers.

Less critical work, stock control, email, note taking etc, is also done on standard laptops, but they are not connected to the critical C&C systems.

Judging by the photographs, the laptops are, at least in the American sections, ThinkPads.

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CloudFlare pros pen paranoid phone plan for pwn-free peregrination

Dave 126
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Re: You gotta be kidding

> no computer is safe when it comes to remote comms.

You can use an insecure phone to securely send short messages, if you have first, by hand, transcribed the padded plaintext through a one-time pad. If you wish to automate the use of the one-time pad using a discrete device, the processing required is so simple that the hardware and software required could be audited.

This would work fine, if only the content of the messages and not the meta-data is of use to your adversaries.

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New DNA 'hard drive' could keep files intact for millions of years

Dave 126
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Re: Unfortunately the discoverers of this old data won't have the key.

People have worked out various mechanisms for Time Release Encryption, but the issue is trusting the required 3rd party server.

Such a 3rd party server would have to be honest, and also in existence x years into the future.

If anyoine knows of work done to sidestep those issues, I'd love to hear them.

(The idea came to my attention when I thought of the uncaptured oral history available from people of a generation that don't blog. Whimsically, I thought of placing microphones in a pub, with everybody knowing that recordings couldn't be listened to for 100 years. )

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Dave 126
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Re: Still early in the morning?

The concept has been around for decades, so sci-fi authors have had plenty of time to use the idea! :) Indeed, Dawkins talks about the information half life in living bacteria in his book The Blind Watchmaker. Obviously this is a different situation, because he was taking into the account of the bacteria's error-correction mechanisms over millions of generations.

As for inactive DNA, studies conduction on bird bones at ambient temperatures (i.e not in a frozen vault) in New Zealand suggest that the inforamtion half-life as being around 500 years.

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/32799/title/Half-Life-of-DNA-Revealed/

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Dave 126
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Re: What could go wrong?

>The world, if not the entire Universe, is chock-a-block full of viruses. Apparently all created 'by accident'.

Hiya Jeff!

No, not 'by accident', but by a series of accidents interspersed by selection. Or rather, the natural selection of randomly occurring mutations.

If one were to merely transcribe a cat video into DNA, there would be no process of selection, no realisation of biological traits that could be tested against a selection pressure.

Of course, it is possible that transcribing an encrypted file into DNA would result in a virus, in the same way that it possible for a monkey at a typewriter to tap out the works of Vonnegut. Possible yes, but very unlikely. With 'very unlikely' being an extreme understatement.

Hehe, I made a comment which is text book Darwin, and I'm a creationist!

: )

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Dave 126
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Re: What could go wrong?

Not sure if serious.

You'd need the code for a real virus to start with, and some clue as to how to make it more dangerous.

If you think that a real, dangerous virus can be created by accident as a by-product of data storage, then you are not the person with that clue.

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The Great Brain Scan Scandal: It isn’t just boffins who should be ashamed

Dave 126
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Re: Other fads

>no sneaking round the back and adding more libraries.

It was the AlphaGo computer which created its own libraries. That was kind of the point.

Nobody was claiming it was Skynet, but it was an advance on what went before.

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Dave 126
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Re: Quantum of Rubbish

No, no more than using X-rays to study anatomy is part of any physicist's 'campaign' to prove that life is based on high energy EMR.

And in any case, Jim Al-Khalili's position isn't as strident as you suggest. See this review of one of his books here on New Scientist:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22429950-700-are-we-ready-for-quantum-biology/

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Dave 126
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Yep, there will always be froth bat the edge of the rising tide of knowledge and the dry land of the unknown.

It was curious that the article made no mention of the way that researchers are financed, and the pressure on them to chase grants and get their names on as many paper as possible. Oh well.

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Dave 126
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Re: There's a flaw with this article

Same here - I've kept abreast of pop science for the last couple of decades and this 'fad' against which the author is railing is largely new to me.

I found it a little unfocused, as well. There was talk of 'luvvies' (a word coined by Stephen Fry to describe thespians, and used in that sense by Private Eye) in the article, but not of actors. Still, if you want both actors and neuroscience being talked about by someone with insight and humanity, Oliver Sacks talks, amongst other things, what he learnt from the actor Robin Williams: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/celebrating-oliver-sacks/6741096

(to avoid confusion, note that the interviewer is called Robyn Williams, a science journalist).

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Dave 126
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Re: I would suspect...

Botanical illustrations at the time were akin to diagrams - each plant represented in a similar way for ease of comparison. It can be hard, even with to day's cameras, to arrange a botanical subject in a consistent way.

And that is before we think about the issue of colour reproduction.

http://blogs.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/theconveyor/2015/05/27/colouring-by-numbers-botanical-art-techniques-investigated/

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Dave 126
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We've lost a couple of good 'uns in the last year, Oliver Sacks and Umberto Ecco.

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/celebrating-oliver-sacks/6741096 (MP3 and transcript)

What both have in common are sharp minds and human compassion, Sacks a celebrated physician and professor of neurology, and Ecco a philosopher, historian and novelist.

Are there any hard numbers to show that mysticism has risen in recent years? I see inherent issues with attempting to quantify it - if you are relying on people self-reporting, then could it be that it is their vocabulary and not their behaviour that has changed.

As for mindfulness - some of the most active, effectual people I know practice mindfulness with discipline. I also know a fair few people who both a bit New-Agey and a bit useless.

Also, no justification was given for the assumption that people's behaviour is a reaction to how they perceive their relation to the organs of power, when it could be that it is their immediate environment that more strongly influences them. I find it plausible that people's perception of power does influence them, but it is also plausible that for many people it is intertwined with other issues, such as what their future job prospects might be. The idea that mysticism is a response to fighting in vain to change The System is also put forward by Adam Curtis in The Century of the Self. (Has anyone here heard anything of him lately? There's been nothing about him on the internet since the release of Bitter Lake, save for an appearance at a film festival. )

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Chilcot's IT spend: Tighter wallet than most public sector bods

Dave 126
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>With the publication of the report Private Eye will have to look for a new joke.

I'm holding the latest issue in my hand, fresh through the letterbox today: it would seem the Conservative and Labour parties are doing the best to keep the Eye supplied with material.

Cartoon: A man reading two headlines, Brexit Chaos, and Chilcot Published: "The whole thing was based on deliberate inaccuracies with no thought whatsoever for the aftermath"

Also, a Lookalike Special: Emperor Palpatine / Theresa May, Penfold / Micheal Gove, Angela Eagle / Brienne of Tarth

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Paper wasps that lie to their mates get a right kicking, research finds

Dave 126
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Re: The cost of cheating

>Insects have opiates, ie they feel pain.

And we only know that because people have experimented on wasps.

To all those deploring the researcher as a sadist, it was her research in 2002 that showed that wasps are capable of recognising individual wasps from their facial markings. Heck, she's probably harmed fewer wasps than many a rural boy with a petrol can and a free afternoon, and she's done so to expand our understanding of social insects, and understanding we can put to the benefit of wasps should we choose to.

Comparing her to a character from Iain Banks' first novel isn't helpful.

Wasps in the UK are generally useful for pest control, and not usually aggressive (if one takes an interest in your cider, waft it away instead of swatting at it).

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Dave 126
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Re: The cost of cheating

>Poor method, poor control = Totally invalid experiment.

>>the whole basis of the "experiment" seems flawed to me, they don't even mention if they had a control group of unpainted vs unpainted wasps fighting to compare traits with.

Strewth. The paper hasn't been published yet, and it is in that - as opposed to a press release or a 'chat' with the Reg - in which you would expect to find the details of the methods used in this study.

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Obi Worldphone MV1: It's striking, it's solid. Aaaand... we've run out of nice things to say

Dave 126
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Ah well.

Obi do a low-mid-range phone too, but without the swappable battery (cheaper phones seem more likely to have swappable batteries these days... ).

Strangely, the 'Obi Origin Story' posted on their website contains an Ali G reference "Big-up to the Slough massive though!" (both in http://www.obiworldphone.com/global/story as well as http://www.obiworldphone.com/uk/story ). Odd, because when I think of Ali G and mobile phones, it because he passes a Nokia to lady and says "Set to vibrate and finish yourself off" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVTRX7lp9uo

EDIT:

I had written the following, but I have removed it from the above post because it upon re-reading the website, it appears I imagined it:

"Beyond the styling, nothing really jumps out at me, except for the 'floating display', which means that the screen isn't taking the full mass of the phone if it is dropped. This simple concept appeals to the mechanical engineer in me - though of course a Mech Eng would want to do a lot of destructive testing, naturally, before retiring a verdict."

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Florida man sues Apple for $10bn, claims iPod, iPhone was his idea

Dave 126
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Re: HHG2

>Has Apple got anywhere with the Electronic Thumb yet?

Not yet, but Uber and Lyft have.

It's also worth noting that the Dynabook and the IBM-branded tablet from Kubrick's 2001 (1968) predate the HHGTTG. Douglas Adams died before playing with an iPod, let alone an iPhone.

If you want to go further back, HG Wells pushed for a global encyclopedia (which is effectivily what the HHGTTG is) in the thirties, though he took a step back from it because he thought his political views wouldn't help the project.:

In 1936, before the Royal Institution, Wells called for the compilation of a constantly growing and changing World Encyclopaedia, to be reviewed by outstanding authorities and made accessible to every human being. In 1938, he published a collection of essays on the future organisation of knowledge and education, World Brain, including the essay, "The Idea of a Permanent World Encyclopaedia".

- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._G._Wells#Writer

- http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/hg-wells-author-who-imaged-a-future-based-on-scientific-achie/7463446

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Dave 126
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Re: Newsflash: Nebuchadnezzar cliams prior art on rounded corners!!

The 'rounded corners' is what we in the UK would call 'trade dress' - like the shape of a Coca-Cola bottle or the shape of an Aston Martin's grill. In the US it is called 'design patent' and is not we call a patent in the UK.

Apple's objection was that Samsung used the same specific corner radii, making their phone look very similar to the iPhone, potentially confusing customers. It was never about a device having any rounded corners.

Regardless of who you side with, I think it's best if people understand exactly what the dispute was about.

Kind regards

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Dave 126
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Re: Many of Apple's ...

Apple didn't just draw a picture of a Newton/iPhone in the early 90s, they invested in ARM to help make it happen.

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Dave 126
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Re: Many of Apple's ...

>The iPod was copying Creative and iRiver with a case and silly control inspired by Dieter Rams' stuff for Braun.

I think you've got your dates muddled, Mage! :)

- The iRiver H120 wasn't released until 2003, two years after the 1st gen iPod. It used the same Toshiba HDD and battery as the iPod, but featured analogue recording.

-The iPod took its dial interface from a 1990's Bang and Olufsen telephone and from Sony AV gear, not Braun. The control mechanism on the iPod was superior to the iRiver. I had the iRiver H320 - it was a very good machine, but without a scroll wheel it was PITA to navigate long lists.

-The pre-iPod Creative player used a laptop HDD and as such it was the size of a CD-Walkman. It was not pocket sized.

In short, Apple got to market first with the right combination of size, convenience and capacity. Had they not, somebody else would have done - the essential part, the HDD, was available to anyone to use. It's worth noting that the iPod was $600 dollars when first released, and was FireWire and Mac only - indeed, most PCs at the time didn't have FireWire, and USB 1.0 wasn't fast enough. The 1st gen iPod wasn't a massive seller, but it got Apple's foot in the door.

It was a strange time - the first MP3 players were from unfamiliar names like Rio or LG, and the Japanese, though they had done much research in the area, hadn't got involved. Some were sold with only enough capacity to store a few songs. There were still competing formats of memory card, too, before we largely standardised around SD. Until I got an iRiver, I didn't bother with MP3 and stuck with my Sharp MiniDisc player (1999, with scroll wheel).

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You can be my wingman any time! RaspBerry Pi AI waxes Air Force top gun's tail in dogfights

Dave 126
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Read in depth

The humans were at a numerical disadvantage.

The mission analyzed in this document features two blue fighters

vs. four red. The red aircraft begin over a defended coastline and

the blues are 54 nautical miles due west

The white paper itself is fascinating though! Go to page two:

http://www.omicsgroup.org/journals/genetic-fuzzy-based-artificial-intelligence-for-unmanned-combat-aerialvehicle-control-in-simulated-air-combat-missions-2167-0374-1000144.pdf

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Dave 126
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Re: I S'Pi with my little eye...

So, to boil your post down to its essentials: You're asking why it is possible for some software ( game playing in the realm of physics) has been developed for an ARM chip which is better than that written for some other chip from a year or two back...

I'd say it's plausible. The thing about software is that you can never know if your algorithm is the fastest that can be written. Also, the last few years has seen a lot of work down on autonomous vehicles - there is more prior work to draw upon.

If you've ever tried to swat a fly then you will know that the hardware to control some damned good flying doesn't have to be big - if the software is good enough.

[You've used the wrong icon. If you hover your POINTER over the ICON it will tell you when it should be used. If you don't have a mouse or trackpad - i.e you are using a phone or tablet - then it might be best if you don't use any Reg icons, since the lack of MouseOver means you won't know what they mean.]

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Dave 126
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Re: Hopefully this will mean cheaper planes

>The first thing to employ would be nuclear weapons to clear the skies, followed by anti.aircraft missiles...

I'm assuming you mean the EMP effects of nuclear explosions. That'd do it.

Research into EMP blast is ongoing - both in the offensive ("can we make an EMP 'cannon' without a nuke?") and defensive ("How do we protect our shit if our enemy uses EMP?")

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Dave 126
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Re: "forces to be deployed without human loss of life"

Years ago, I watched documentary about cats.

They said that cats rarely fight, because of displays of power - the weaker cat would soon realise it was the weaker cat, and thus bugger off to hiss another day.

This documentary, Tiger on the Tiles* by Desmond Morris IIRC, doesn't fully inform my armchair strategic thinking.

Nor does that episode of Shatner Star Trek, the one when a star system's internal battles were simulated by a computer and the virtual causalities calculated - then each side would have to kill a corresponding number of its own citizens. It was neater - no infrastructure damage.

I guess the film The Last Starfighter, is now out of date. (In this film, a young 1980's American lad proves to be very good at an arcade video game. It turns out that the video game arcade cabinet was a plant by aliens involved in their own war, and that they were recruiting pilots from uncontacted planets. )

WHOOAH! I've just Googled the above film - It turns out Seth Rogan has been wanting to remake it, but he tweeted that Steven Spielberg told him that not even he has been able to get the rights - the film's writer won't give it up. Probably a canny move - the film might be more powerful in a few years time if recreational Human Interfaces (VR, HUD, AR etc etc) come closer to military gear.

*Yeah, I was watching cat video before broadband internet.

** I like Ricard. Not Picard, Ricard. Which I have been drinking tonight. With water, obviously; I try not to be a jerk. But I may be off topic ish.

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Magnetic, heat scanners to catch Tour de France electric motor cheats

Dave 126
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Re: Tech

>Let's face it. Bikes need some new technology besides weight shavings and hipster wood paneling.

We all want new super-duper energy dense batteries for our phones, cars and power tools, so when Tesla, Dyson, Samsung or whoever mass produces them, electric bikes will benefit.

Weight savings, suspension and vibration control have been the areas that have evolved the most over the last thirty years. Adding a motor changes things

Round in these hilly parts, there are quite a few electric bikes in the pub car park. The result is that the bikes are no longer designed with weight savings as the main focus - instead, panniers or pillion seats are incorporated into the frame- making the bicycle more suitable for day to day ('nip to the shops') use than perhaps a traditional racer or mountain bike would be.

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Thunder struck: Apple kills off display line

Dave 126
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Real issue is the interconnect:

Apple's iMacs have had 5K displays for a couple of years now, but there is no way for most current Macs to drive an external 5K display.

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Dave 126
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FireWire was still used on camcorders which recorded in AVCHD, which was a compressed format but of good quality. In fact the decoding of AVCHD carries a processing overhead, so Macs would convert it to the larger-file sized (but less CPU intensive) Apple Intermediary Codec as footage was transferred from the camcorder.

FireWire was never a failure. It was used for years and years, but only by people who needed to use it. This Shaun Nichols person seems to have gone full Anna Leech.

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Maplin Electronics demands cash with menaces

Dave 126
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>That might work if they weren't so insistent on selling £3 HDMI cables for £30.

Where you find a Maplins, there is normally a Tescos or an Asda nearby who will definitely have HDMI cables, external HDDs, 3.5 mm > 3.5mm/phono etc

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Dave 126
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Re: dorky looking weirdos

The origins of electronic music owe much to surplus WWII kit. In the UK it became muzak for radio commercials, on the continent it was considered avant garde art.

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Dave 126
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Tricky.... Maplins serves the overlap between people who are into hobbyist electronics and PCs, and people who don't order stuff over the internet. It's not a big overlap.

Also, their alternate business model has been eaten into by the gay hook-up app Grindr, if this story from the Daily Mash is to be believed:

http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/society/maplin-is-where-men-meet-for-sex-2014013183134

“But tell the wife you’ve got to nip to Maplins for a phono audio to HDMI converter and she never asks any probing questions.”

Eleanor Shaw of Bristol, whose husband is a Maplin regular, said: “I knew he couldn’t need that many external hard drives. Deep down, I knew it.

“It even has pulsing disco lights in the window.”

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Utah sheriffs blow $10,000 on smut-sniffing Labrador

Dave 126
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Re: Bag of chips?

>As an aside, my estimate is that you would need 228 metric tonnes of punched cards to store a DVD

I was thinking that 228 tonnes would make a big flip book for naughty animations.... I went looking online (Rule 34), but all i found was this [car] porn for Subaru. Basically a mile long wall with image cells, the car is driven past and the door pillars act as shutters:

Safe For Work link:

http://www.ufunk.net/en/insolite/une-animation-flip-book-geante-de-1km-de-long/

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Dave 126
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Re: TOP TIPS #53

Ah, so that is where the Youtube series "Will it Blend?" originated! Here was me thinking the reducing of electronic gizmos to dust was just a promotional series for a brand of food processor!

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Huawei taps ex-Nokia devs for 'secret phone OS project'

Dave 126
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Re: maemo

http://cdn1.computerworlduk.com/cmsdata/slideshow/3378839/03_Tizen_mobile_OS_thumb800.jpg

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Holy kittens! YouTube screens go blank

Dave 126
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Re: "Funny" error messages

Lately? They've been around for as long as I remember.

"Windows is checking for a solution to the problem" always has me in stitches!

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Not smiling for the camera? Adobe's Creative Cloud suite can fix that

Dave 126
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Re: The spirit of Zelig lives

>this will increasingly devalue photographs as a source of future historical record

Patented in 1947, may I present this photo-retouching table?

It vibrates the photographic negative that the artist is working on, so that brush strokes are rendered invisible:

http://petapixel.com/2014/10/19/adams-retouching-machine-helped-old-school-photoshoppers-retouch-negatives-hand/

Before we used the term 'photoshopped', we would talk of people being 'airbrushed' from history.

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Apple pollutes data about you to protect your privacy. But it might not be enough

Dave 126
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Re: Sick and tired

>Does Google map thing replace an A to Z?

It can do. Other mapping and navigation solutions are available.

As an added bonus, Google Maps will show areas of slow-moving traffic in real time, and so suggest routes that are quicker at the time. It will also show you where you are on the map, and be up-to-date with business address and even show you photo so you know when you are there. It will also tell you the opening hours of a public house, and at what times it is typically busy.

Of course the downsides are that you need some battery life in your phone (though most cars can be fitted with a phone charger) and either a data connection or the foresight to pre-load map data onto your phone.

In fact, this is very good example of the 'herd benefit' of using anonymous data from many users - Google know when their is congestion because some Android phones will be sending speed and location data to Google - so if everyone on a particular road is going at 40 Mph when an hour earlier they were doing 70, Google knows there is an accident or roadworks. Of course, Google being Google, they do have your identifiable location data too unless you opt out of it, but it still stands as an example of the concept.

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Dave 126
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Re: Sick and tired

>Odd that no one has mentioned that stupid Beacon rubbish thing that Apple were punting.

No one, except for the Bluetooth SIG in their specs for Bluetooth 5.0, which will have 8x the bandwidth for 'connectionless traffic' than previous versions.

http://www.informationweek.com/mobile/mobile-devices/bluetooth-5-five-things-for-it-to-know/a/d-id/1325970

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Dave 126
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Re: as Apple hasn’t been on reliant on digital advertising

>On the other hand there are undoubted benefits from Google's mining if, like me, you live a life unlikely to attract the attention of either the police or criminals but suffer from increasingly failing memory.

The drug smuggler Howard Marks was once asked how he, a man who smoked a lot of hash, could remember enough of his past to write a best-selling autobiography, Mr Nice:

"Oh, that was easy, the FBI had me under surveillance for years... I just asked them for their file on me under their Freedom of information laws."

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Dave 126
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Re: So what happens....

Dear Camilla,

I believe you may have confused Apple's differential privacy with something they implemented in OSX Safari a few years ago.

It was the the feature in Safari that would make advertisers believe you had visited sites that you hadn't - presumably websites drawn from a pre-compiled whitelist (so no KinkyStuff.com or ISISareCool.org).

Differential Privacy is different, so take a few minutes to scan https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differential_privacy

At this stage, exactly how Apple will implement it is not known, but the concept is that Apple will have data about all their users, but can't reverse engineer that data (because of maths) to identify anything about an individual user.

Of course it goes without saying that the implementation key.

Kind regards

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Dave 126
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Re: So what happens....

>IOW, they probably already have ways to differentiate differential privacy.

Akin to encryption, it depends upon how the differential privacy is implemented in the real world. From what I understand, it is built upon proven mathematical ideas.

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Dave 126
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>Google can read all my email if it so desires; but as that's an informed choice I don't see the problem. (I see it as the price for the convenience of Gmail).

Also, Google have not suffered any massive security breaches, a la Ashley Madison, Sony et al... Google seem to be capable of keeping your data out of the hands of blackmailers and extortionists.

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Dave 126
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Re: So what happens....

Eh?

The agencies don't just use one data point to identify would-be terrorists, the chances of injected noise giving you - and no other Apple users - the profile of a terrorist are practically non-existent.

In any case, this data would have to captured by the agencies in transit, because the whole point of differential Privacy is that you can't be identified from Apples data.

Differential Privacy has been developed by academics for years. Most technical experts welcome its adoption by Apple, but of course they look forward to seeing the actual implementation before passing any judgement.

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Rejoice, fatties: Giving chocolate electric shocks makes it healthier

Dave 126
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Re: From comments around the internet

You've not been to the United States, have you?

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Kremlin wants to shoot the Messenger, and WhatsApp to boot

Dave 126
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I really don't think that Snowdon thought that Russia was all sweetness and light before he sought asylum there.

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Dave 126
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Re: This is a good thing!

>Without the proprietary biggies, the public will then turn to open communication platforms following open communication standards that no country can control.

Sadly I suspect your thinking is wishful: the average user won't bother. For evidence, look at how many people use Facebook Messenger.

Sometimes it can be better to to side with the big corporations, since they aren't as easily cowed by governments. Sometimes, that is. I'd sooner trust Apple - since their business model is to empty my pockets for hardware - than I would Facebook, which has both Ayn Rand-ian ideologies around privacy and an advertising-based business.

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Microsoft joins battery-saving browser bandwagon with Edge claims

Dave 126
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Re: ad blocking > all

Edge suspends Flash content on tabs that aren't visible. Chrome doesn't do that by default.

The video tests MS conducted were based around streaming Netflix. I tried to find further info about the tests, but couldn't. However, it wouldn't be worth MS fudging the tests because of the backlash should they be found out. (And in any case, their findings reflect independent results).

Curiously, Netflix is only available in 1080p on Edge and IE on Windows, and on Safari on OSX - all other desktop browsers are 720p, and both HTML 5 and Silverlight are used.

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How's your driving, Elon? Musk tweets that Tesla Model S 'floats'

Dave 126
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Re: I would like to know

Just to clarify:

If you are driving on a road that is flooded to a foot or two and there are other vehicles using it, don't go fast just because you are in a Chelsea Tractor - the resulting wave has fucked* the engines of smaller diesel cars and vans that would have been just fine had you not shown up.

If you are crossing a river in the back of beyond in a 4X4, then for sure, do want you your training and experience tells you is best.

* This was the term our mechanic used - I assume it is technical.

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