* Posts by Dave 126

7035 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Did webcam 'performer' offer support chap payment in kind?

Dave 126
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>"He tried a goodbye hug during which he “accidentally had a hand a little low”"

>>"Accidentally" on purpose, He copped a feel.

That very well may have been what happened. However, we can't infer it beyond doubt from the account that we have been given. M'lud.

It does seem that he should be docked style points for hugging a client just because of her line of work (though it might have been that her character and body language caused a young man to misread a situation), but to deliberately read his 'accidentally' as 'accidentally on purpose' doesn't prove a thing.

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>What are virii infections?

A piece of foreign matter stuck under the 'i' key on the keyboard, obviously!

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Dave 126
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>one of the main reasons they kept returning to me for more work was that I didn't "expect freebies" or try it on with them.

Exactly. If you are professional, warmly courteous and reasonably groomed (which some folk consider an extension of courtesy), ladies who are so inclined may take the initiative. If the ladies are not so inclined, then trying it won't get you anywhere anyway.

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Dave 126
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> So why is it acceptable to grope someone just because of what they do for a living?

As he described it, it was an accident. I did the same a month ago, hugging (and being hugged by) a friend goodbye - she was wearing a backpack and so to complete the gesture my hand had to be lower on her back than it normally would be, accidentally brushed her bum on the way to the small of her back. In no way could it have been mistaken for a grope, a grab or a slap, and she didn't appear to notice - even though I felt a small, inward pang of embarrassment.

It's no fun for me to touch any part of a woman she doesn't want me to touch, but if you're respectful and not bad looking many a woman may grab your hand and place it on her body. The thrill is in her expression of intent more than the tactile feeling. Intent is important.

Hugs don't always go smoothly - if I have facial stubble, it will sometimes catch on a woman's hair and pull some strands towards me as we part.

Then there is there is the question of whether to do two cheek kisses (the norm in France, Spain and other countries) or just one... we just have to go by context, and most of the time we get it right. Abashed giggles on both sides is usually the result if we don't. In some contexts, friends will kiss each other on the lips; I don't instigate it but some women (and men from some cultures) will.

We're strange creatures.

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Dave 126
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Re: Only that

>ladies of negotiable affection

That's one of my favourite euphemisms, as far as I know coined by Terry Pratchett.

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Turns out there's a market for marijuana... plants' video surveillance

Dave 126
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Re: 10/10 for effort....

Aye, it didn't spend long describing the needs of the new breed of marijuana farm that has sprung up since its legalisation in several states.

Their stock control software could make an interesting article; the licences given to weed producers require that every gram has to be accounted for (for tax and other reasons). However, weed will lose mass (through evaporation) during the curing process, so the stock control software has to be able to account for this.

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China gives America its underwater drone back – with a warning

Dave 126
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@AC Well said.

El_Fev's idea seems to be that he can intimidate someone before a bar fight by showing him a video of him beating up a schoolboy.

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Dave 126
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>I think someone reminded the Chinese that if it goes hot hot, the only things left floating in the Chinese navy would be driftwood!,

And just wait til the cowardly Hun see the gleam of our British steel they run away crying and we'll all be home by Christmas, right? /s

If things got 'hot hot' between the two nuclear powers in question, it wouldn't just be people in Asia having a shit day.

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Testing times: Can your crypto-code survive the Google gauntlet?

Dave 126
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> named after Mount Wycheproof, the smallest mountain in the world,

I've just spent five minutes trying to chase down a source for its status as a mountain, but so far all my google results appear to form a loop.

Quite a few pages called it 'the smallest registered mountain in the world', but no where have I yet found what 'registered mountain' means.

I'll give it another 5 minutes and report back shortly.

[EDIT:] Ah, it would appear that there is no universal definition of 'mountain', and people understand that definition can vary from place to place. The very minimum is that it be a geological feature with steep sides that dominates a surrounding area - so Mount Wycheproof qualifies in those respects.

The UK generally uses a height of roughly 2000' or (300 M, or more than a few Brontosauri stacked nose to tail) to distinguish mountains from hills. I live and I learn!

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Non-existent sex robots already burning holes in men’s pockets

Dave 126
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Re: A more achievable solution ...

The human partner's kinetic energy could be 'harvested' and reused. Just an idea.

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Sexbots could ‘over-exert’ their human lovers, academic warns

Dave 126
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>The Days of Perky Pat. With a reprise in The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch.

Ahhh, I've read Three Stigmata but not Perky Pat, whoch might explain why I was mild confused throughout. Of course I was expecting to be a bit confused anyways, on account of the author being PKD.

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Dave 126
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Re: I'm waiting for ....

Hopefully, by the time that whisky bottles become as intelligent as a barman, my car will be intelligent enough to drive me home without my input.

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Dave 126
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Hmm, all mobile mobile phones have to be capable of ringing emergency services - even without a SIM or passcode; the logic being that it is unacceptable for a device not to be able to call for help just because of a billing dispute.

It strikes me that any robotic simulacrum of a human that could pass as an adequate 'lover' would necessarily have the sensors and motors needed to detect and possibly react to a range of medical events (suspected choking, heart attack, stroke etc) that might befall their human 'partner'. Would it be mandatory that all such androids have to have the necessary software? So then, it is a nurse, as well as a 'lover'... from there, simple tasks such as feeding the cat (if you have a real cat and not a robotic cat) and cooking dinner wouldn't require much additional programming / training.

Of course, it is plausible that by the time such androids are built, humans will have microscopic biomedical sensors implanted in them as a matter of course, and that any detection of anomalous health data results in said data immediately being sent off-site to medical staff / systems, who can then remotely utilise any nearby sexbot / robot waiter / aircon systems* to mitigate the emergency until paramedics (human or robotic) arrive.

*There are a range of medical emergencies where the patient's life expectancy is increased if their body temperature is reduced. There is currently a device used that uses the large surface area of your lungs to rapidly drop your body temperature.

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Dave 126
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I'm actually more likely to over-exert myself for a human partner than I would if I were just out for my own pleasure. In fact when I stumble over an oasis during an occasional arid period, I'm likely to find myself aching all over the next day.

What will do for the ticky-tickers of hedonists is the use of pharmaceutical substances - but over exertion can happen when dancing vertically, not just horizontally.

For some reason I'm now thinking of a Philip K Dick story about a colony on Mars being fed a narcotic that only produces a hallucinatory idyll when the user is playing with miniature models of pleasant environments.

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It's round and wobbles, but madam, it's a mouse pad, not a floppy disk

Dave 126
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Re: ahh, floppy disks

Blanking plugs actually make UK sockets less safe.

Don't take my word for it, take Johnny Ball's:

http://www.fatallyflawed.org.uk/

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Dave 126
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Re: Poor instructions

>What was more interesting is that the number of the 'bumps' was such that when viewed under a bright mains filament light while spinning on the turntable, they should appear static (strobe effect) if the turntable was running at the right speed, but you had to look very hard.

@ 50 or 60 Hz? :) This is why there are four lines of dots on the platter of many turntables: two speeds of records, two common frequencies of domestic AC electricity.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not Snopes

>Stapling was a regular occurrence, if you were lucky, the staple would be in the top left corner and the disk would be untouched.

You could have got ahead of the situation by hole-punching the top left corner of every floppy, and doling out treasury tags!

Or just dole out A4 envelopes.

Staples are evil - just ask the person who has to the fix the photocopier!

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Dave 126
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Re: If I could have a dollar for every time…

http://arbitrary.name/blog/all/mac3.html

This fella shows the things he has removed from the CD slot from his Mac Mini, courtesy of his young children. His other blog entries show him to be a very bright man indeed, as I'm sure his children are. I mean, primary schools have toys where the child is expected to place blocks through slots, and putting foreign objects into CD slots seems to be a continuation of that game.

In previous decades, VHS machines suffered similar fates - I think you could even buy aftermarket panels to child-proof the cassette door. Small toys not too bad, biscuits and jam less so.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not Snopes

Part of me admires those users' resourcefulness and give-it-a-go attitude. It's probably the same part of me that found satisfaction in fixing a CRT monitor by smacking it smartly on the side.

The rest of me shudders at the idea they might just be the same folk for which the following was printed on a packet of cough lozenges: "For oral administration only".

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View from a Reg reader: My take on the Basic Income

Dave 126
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The Amish

The Amish make very little use of technology that has been developed in the last couple of centuries. Yet they don't find it a chore to erect a barn without the use of the latest DeWalt power drill. In fact they claim to enjoy it, because they are surrounded by lots of their mates and no one individual has to that much work. I'm inclined to believe them, based on my own activities: Do I like feeling useful? Yes. Do I like messing around with lots of mates? Yes. The meaning of life is to fart about, as Kurt Vonnegut said.

Too little work is bad for you. Too much work is bad for you. And the Amish, despite a bigger than average occurrence of some medical conditions due to their limited genetic pool, are healthier than the wider population.

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Dave 126
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Tax workaholics.

We tax tobacco (in part) because it it leads to heart disease which costs health service. Yet we don't tax people who work damage themselves by working too much, especially if they already have a comfortable dwelling and reliable vehicle.

I only offer this observation to stimulate ideas.

Felix Dennis said that in retrospect he wished he'd stopped working 18 hour days when he'd reached £30 million, and instead retired to plant trees and write poetry. Yet he didn't do that - he continued working long hours out of habit, as he put it. Planting trees and writing poetry are better for your health than cocaine and prostitutes (though he said that he gave those up when he reached sixty years of age).

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Dave 126
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Re: Universal Credit

>If we are just improving the lot of one portion of the population, and that comes at an overall cost to everyone else, then we need a more refined approach.

I'm not sure that we are only considering one portion of the population. At the moment, lots of people have too little work, and lots of people work too much to the detriment of their health, happiness and family relationships.

Bertrand Russell made a distinction between active leisure and passive leisure. Active leisure is walking to the pub, learning a musical instrument, pottering around in your workshop, laughing with your friends, baking a cake. Passive leisure is slumping in front of the television with a glass of scotch (because the working day has left your knackered).

If nobody was allowed to do more than twenty hours work a week, we would be more likely to adopt active leisure activities - which are better for our health, happiness and relationships. Healthcare costs would be reduced. Fuel costs would be reduced, because we wouldn't be in such a rush. When we were at work, we would be approaching our tasks with greater concentration and less resentment.

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Dave 126
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Re: Can't you find a different forum?

>Surely there are plenty of other places on the Internet to discuss politics? I come to The Register for technology news, not this crap.

Technology is developed and applied to reduce labour, so why the hell do you think a discussion about jobs is unrelated to technology?

We have combine harvesters that allow a single person to harvest acres of cereals. We have machines that move earth and mix concrete to build shelters. We have pocket calculators that do the work that was once done by specialist human workers. This has been the case for decades. It is presumptuous to assume that technology will have no further effect on our social and economic lives as we look to the future. To refuse to consider these issues is to be wilfully ignorant.

Go away and read up on human history.

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'I told him to cut it out' – Obama is convinced Putin's hackers swung the election for Trump

Dave 126
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Re: Exponential Reprisals

>however, if the other side knows what your approach is things start getting complicated.

Hence why in some games it can be an advantage to be seen as a complete nutter.

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Dave 126
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Re: DNC - Remove the mote from your own eye

>The Daily Mail, home of the clickbait headline?

That is very true. However, they can't falsely attribute quotes to people without recourse, in the way that a Twitter account might.

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Beauty is in the AI of the beholder: Young blokes teach computer to judge women by their looks

Dave 126
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Re: arXiv

@find users who cut cat tail

Congratulations on having your post published by The Register. :)

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If at first you don't succeed, send another Mars lander – this time a deep driller

Dave 126
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Explore Martian lava tubes instead?

The technical challenges of exploring the Martian lava tubes with drones or rovers captures my imagination more than drilling into the surface. Obviously lava tubes would once have been sterile, whereas sedimentary material is more likely to contain evidence of any past microbes - so they might not be scientifically interesting. However, lava tunnels might be suitable for human habitation, providing protection against radiation, micrometeorites and temperature fluctuations.

The challenges are locomotion (how does it crawl, climb or fly around?) and control and communication (how do you get a radio signal from the underground probe to the surface?). Lots of fun for engineers to be had here! :)

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Microsoft's Edge to flush Adobe Flash in Windows 10 Creator’s Update

Dave 126
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Re: so much hatred for continuing smokers

>A publication done back in 2010 estimated the cost to the UK of smoking, was just under £14 billion a year. The income from taxes at the same time was around £10 billion.

I've just skimmed through, and nowhere does it include savings to the government by not having to fund the pension and social care costs of those smoker who die prematurely. I won't speculate as to how such figures would alter the final balance, but they are conspicuous by their absence.

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Dave 126
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Whilst we're at it, there is a Chrome setting that lets you mute the audio on individual tabs. Go to chrome://flags in a new tab. Search for the 'Enable tab audio muting UI control' flag.

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Give us encrypted camera storage, please – filmmakers, journos

Dave 126
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Re: Well I'm going to keep sir sitting here

@Gold CD

Yeah, some sort of fancy SD card with a hidden partition seems a good idea. A few different ways of implementing it.

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Dave 126
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Re: no! Fairly pointless, really

>If the crypto is public-key, with the private key kept in a safe country, the journalist in the field cannot be forced to decrypt.

Alas, nor can the journo in the field review the photos, or select which photos (from potentially GB's worth) she wants to send down a slow, unreliable ADSL line to her editor. Nice thought though. :)

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Dave 126
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Is there any way...

..encryption could be built into the SD/CF/XQD card itself? The camera would send plaintext to the card, and the card would encrypt it. The MiFi wireless SD cards are a precedent for a card doing more than just store what a camera sends it.

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Dave 126
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Re: Shouldn't be hard for Nikon to do

You evidently missed the photos of men on the moon - taken by a digital Nikon, if you are to trust their digital signing.

Nikon's digital signing got broken after a couple of months if its release.

Even without border guards nabbing your SD card, loss is not uncommon. Maybe a reason to leave it in your camera and use a cable instead?

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Blue sky basic income thinking is b****cks

Dave 126
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Re: Mixed feelings

>We would, potentially, still need a system to root out the work-shy

Work-shy. I think that needs unpacking a bit. There are lots of activities that people do for recreation that are equivalent to paid or useful work. It's just much of the paid work has been made unenjoyable (paperwork, nasty bosses, petite rules).

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US think-tank wants IoT device design regulated, because security

Dave 126
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Re: Wishful thinking

>"Small cost-sensitive internet-of-things developer teams have little incentive to invest in rigorous security testing."

Is it not yet possible for dev teams to just buy an off-the-shelf 'known good' secure IoT module? I thought ARM (and probably others) were working on an IoT platform (hardware and OS) that smaller developers can then build their application onto.

Ah, found it. ARM mbed. The Wiki article doesn't give much clue as whether it's been widely adopted though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mbed

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For God's sake, stop trying to make Microsoft Bob a thing. It's over

Dave 126
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Re: Destroy All Monsters

Yep, there is no technical reason (just developer time) why we can't use Post Comment to send a correction to the Reg Editorial team. There is obviously a mechanism for 'deleting' posts by a Reg moderator - could this system be automated so that any comment with REGCORRECTION in the title is 'moderated' instantly and thus isn't displayed in the thread, but is forwarded to the article author?

Help us to help you!

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Bluetooth 5.0 emerges, ready to chew on the internet of things

Dave 126
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Re: Is it still called an industry standard if

iOS has never supported the Bluetooth file transfer profile. I believe files can be transferred between devices with the use of a 3rd party app (such as 'Bump'), which is how I'm assuming how pocket-sized wireless dye-sub printers connect to iPhones.

Of all of my iPhone-owning mates, I've only heard one friend complain about this issue in ten years. Not surprising really - I've used the BT file transfer on my Android phone once, maybe twice in the same period. I'm not saying it isn't frustrating when you stumble upon the limitation, though! :)

- https://www.quora.com/Why-does-iPhone-not-pair-with-other-non-Apple-devices-via-Bluetooth-to-transfer-files with link to iOS list of supported profiles:

- https://support.apple.com/en-gb/HT204387

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Dave 126
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Re: Reliability?

Same here. I used to find Bluetooth a bit flaky, so it's a case of 'once bitten, twice shy'. These days though, depending upon the two devices, it can be pretty solid. However, Mr Rueger and myself can't be the only people who have some residual mistrust of BT's reliability.

For applications like smartwatches, where one needs to trust that notifications on a phone are passed on to a watch (or key fob, or headphones), reliability is crucial. 85%, to use your number, just isn't good enough.

My Huawei phone connects to my cheap Tesco BT speaker reliably, but my Sony phone refused to connect to a Ford Transit stereo on occasion. I've heard a lot of criticism of Smartwatches, but I haven't read of many complaints of patchy BT connection on the better known brands (i.e Samsung phone > Samsung watch, Apple > Apple, etc), so I get the impression that BT can be reliable these days if implemented properly.

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Huawei Nova: A pleasant surprise in a 5-inch phone

Dave 126
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Re: Is this a joke?

>There are more comparable mid-rangers to the iPhone 7 in size than this, but we can't have a phone review without the mention of an iPhone

The iPhone is a common object out there in wider society, so most people will know roughly how big they are without owning one. The are dozens of different Android models used by people I know, so most folk won't know a Galaxy A 3 Aqua Compact Plus if they saw one.

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China is building a full scale replica of the Titanic to repeatedly crash into iceberg

Dave 126
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Re: Life Imitates Art

For those who haven't seen it, Rick and Morty resembles what you would get if you put Hitchiker's Guide, Futurama, and Family Guy in a blender and poured it over Back to The Future - if Doc Brown was a barely functioning alcoholic. In other words, it is brilliant.

The Simpsons featured a Rick and Morty-themed couch gag, the longest they've ever done - it's effectively a 2.30 minute episode of Rick of Morty. Here it is:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ecYoSvGO60

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Apple Watch sales go over a cliff: Down 2.8 meellion per quarter in a year

Dave 126
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Re: Someone is lying!

>IPX7: Immersion in water of up to 1m for 30 minutes.

And that means it is water resistant, in that it resists water for a period of time.

Water Proof means that a watch is impervious to water. It isn't my distinction, and nor is it arbitrary; it's physics. Here's a handy chart of the activities that water resistant and waterproof watches are suitab;e for, courtesy of Casio:

http://mygshock.com/wiki/images/f/f1/Casio-Water-Resistance.jpg

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Dave 126
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Re: What iiiiis it gooood for? Absolutely nothing! (say it again)

>Hey tech companies - find a need and meet it, don't make a shiny widget and try to convince us we need to buy it.

I get where you're coming from, but what you say is easier said than done. How does a company identify a need or a desire amongst its potential customers? Let's look at some different approaches:

- Focus groups. Hmmm. As Henry Ford might have said: "If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have asked for a faster horse".

- The CEO wants it. Hmm, one assumes that the CEO became the CEO because he wasn't an idiot. However, his life style may be very different to that of his customers. This approach can work though - the Sony Walkman was born from a request by their CEO to his engineers, because he wanted some way of listening to music on trans-Pacific flights.

- Self-starting inventor or designer. This approach can work - at least you know at least one person wants the product. However, the designer might not realise how niche his requirements are, or he might get so caught up in the process of refining his design that he becomes blind to any larger market.

- Studying the target market. Unlike focus groups, this approach is more objective. At its simplest, it could be a time-and-motion study. It can be very labour intensive, and involve filming people complete day-to-day tasks, before spending lots of analysing said data.

- Samsung throw everything out there and see what sells. They made a range of smartphones of different sizes and lots of people bought the big ones. Lots of studies might have suggested that using a big phone with one thumb is a chore, but evidently users were willing to take a hit on that in exchange for being better able to show photos to their mates.

It isn't for me to say if any of these example approaches is superior - they have all at some point resulted in some popular products.

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Dave 126
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Re: Someone is lying!

The first Apple Watch what is generally referred to as Water Resistant - rain, splashes, perhaps a quick dunk in the sink are okay, but nothing more. If you wear it in the shower, don't subject it to the jet of water.

Water Proof means you can wear a watch whilst swimming - as Apple advertises their MK II models as being suitable for.

These are the long accepted terms in the watch industry. People can be confused by '30 Metres' or '50 M' waterproof, but the 'depth' is only a proxy for pressure.

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Dave 126
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Re: Casio

>It seems they did deliberately rip off the shape and size of the Casio calculator watches from the early 80s.

The size will have been a balancing act twixt battery life and bulk - and even now that compromise is unacceptable for some.

As for shape, once Apple had settled on a rectangular display there were only so many forms the watch could take.

Dolphins didn't 'rip off' the shape of sharks, but they appear similar because they are both subject to the same constraints. :)

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Dave 126
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Re: couldn't buy one

Indeed:

research firm IDC published a report estimating that Apple Watch sales last quarter were down 71 percent year on year. The figures weren’t surprising considering that Apple released the new Series 2 line right at the end of the July-September period, with supply constraints lasting well into the current quarter

- http://www.theverge.com/2016/12/6/13852560/apple-watch-sales-tim-cook

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Dave 126
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Re: Smart Watch needs a reboot.

>Aside from the security issues involved, the trouble is that all you're really saying is that a smartwatch would be useful if it was a smartphone.

That isn't what he saying. He wants a watch to function as a house key, a car key fob, or a bank card - if the security can be nailed down (a question of implementation, not concept).

What is notable about these applications is that they don't require a power-hungry display, or even a power-hungry continuous connection to his phone.

> Taking a phone out of a pocket is not difficult and takes only a second or two, so simply doing the same as a phone but on your wrist is not enough.

That is a second or two, repeated many times a day. And you might have muddy hands, or it might be raining out, you might have your hands full with shopping, or you might not want to bring your phone with you. I wear a conventional watch because I don't want to fumble into my pocket just to tell the time.

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Dave 126
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Do look around, there are a few takes on simply styled, analogue connected watches being released at the moment.

The appearance of Skagen watches might appeal to you, too. They're a touch too big for my tastes (44mm ish) but they are slim.

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Dave 126
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Re: Someone is lying!

Aye:

The timing of Cook’s essentially public comments is notable, coming the day after research firm IDC published a report estimating that Apple Watch sales last quarter were down 71 percent year on year. The figures weren’t surprising considering that Apple released the new Series 2 line right at the end of the July-September period, with supply constraints lasting well into the current quarter — basically, this summer was a bad time to buy an Apple Watch.

The new model is slightly more suitable for fitness-related use than the MK I, as it has waterproofing.

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Dave 126
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Re: Watches are still jewellery

The Mondian watches do have a nice uncluttered display, but I really like the Casio MQ 24 analogue watch, yours for around £7.00. Its just so simple and modestly competent that it is hard not to like it. A few quid more will get you a similarly-styled Timex with an 'Indiglo' backlight.

It might not take as many beatings as a steel-cased watch with a sapphire crystal, but you could buy a dozen of them for the same money.

That said, I often wear a small (38mm) wind-up watch from around 1968, again with a very readable display (white hands on dark grey face), beautiful without being affected. I don't wear it at work though, I wouldn't want to damage it. Last week I broke a Casio F-91 W 'Terrorist Watch' at work (£5.00), and I didn't care - it's almost a 'consumable', like the tyres on your car.

I don't like the current vogue for large (42mm+) analogue watches - they are garish and impractical.

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Local TV presenter shouted 'f*cking hell' to open news bulletin

Dave 126
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Re: Erm

>You'll be telling me next HIGNFY is scripted. "9:10, Paul, you can start saying "twat" now. But no fucks till 9:20"

Not quite, but you will occasionally hear the continuity announcer say:

"And now our drama, which contains strong language from the outset"

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