* Posts by Dave 126

7884 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Batteries are so heavy, said user. If I take it out, will this thing work?

Dave 126
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Perhaps a little basic maintenance / checking should be included in the driving test? Low tyre pressure, low power steering fluid etc are dangerous. I would say RTFM, but many novice motorists drive second hand cars with missing manuals.

I've assisted a neighbour locate the water tank under the bonnet of her new Audi (not immediately obvious) and spent a minute with a mechanic of decades experience trying to find the dipstick in my VW Transporter (the engine wasn't one of the three variants pictured in the manual).

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SpaceX's internet satellites to beam down 'Hello world' from orbit

Dave 126
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Re: Litter louts- Worse things happen at sea

Sometimes old aircraft (with aluminium fatigue) and tanks are deliberately dumped in coastal waters to provide a structure for coral to grow on. I can't see an aluminium rocket stage in deeper waters being that bad for sea life.

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Samsung left off Google's new official Androids-for-biz list

Dave 126
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Then don't install the free Google apps. There are alternatives. As I said, Blackberry and others will manage an app store of secure apps for you, and allow you to control which ones your users can install. There are options. Whatever.

Your original assertion - that all Google Android phones are slurpy - was just incorrect. That is all.

If you find iOS a better starting place, then fine. I know the MOD issue Blackberry-controlled iPhones. But it remains true that not all Google Android phones slurp back to Google *if you pay them*.

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Dave 126
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Buying alternative secure app management from Blackberry or someone else is also an option. I won't provide solutions for all situations, since I was merely countering your original assertion that all Google Android devices are slurpy. Nor am I rating them over similar for iOS.

If your hypothetical company won't pay for software and services, then they only really have ad-supported or Freeware to choose from.

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Dave 126
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> No, you confused Enterprise data management with Google's cloudy services.

No, I really haven't. The very services you stated in your OP as being slurpy - calendar, contacts, notes, and app backups - are not slurpy if you pay Google to use them. Its called G Suite:

Please read about it before commenting again:

https://gsuite.google.com/intl/en_uk/features/

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Dave 126
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@Dan 55

That you are unconvinced is irrelevant - the organisations that will pay Google for these services enter into a legally enforceable contract with Google with terms understood by both parties.

A moment ago you betrayed the fact you were unaware that paid-for Google services even existed, so I'm not sure why you think you're qualified to comment.

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Dave 126
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Re: Who does Android Enterprise Recommended benefit ?

> I don't see how Android could be recommended for business when calendar, contacts, notes, and app backups are slurped off to Google,

If you are a business and pay Google for email and other services, they don't slurp data for advertising - or display any ads. This has been the case for years.

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The e-waste warrior, 28,000 copied Windows restore discs, and a fight to stay out of jail

Dave 126
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Re: Linux Mint is free

@Kubla Cant raises a valid point - many people use webmail instead if an email client and more applications every year can be used through a browser, rendering the choice of host OS moot. Obviously stuff that requires a lot of IO (say video editing) doesn't lend itself to cloud-hosting, but office suites and CAD can benefit from it (ease of administration, modest local hardware requirements, team working, document control, redundant storage etc. There will always be situations that don't have good internet access, but a lot of tasks are pointless if one can't email the end results).

If the above plumber uses Excel for his accounts, he would not appreciate a Mint PC. If he already used Google Sheets, he largely wouldn't notice the difference.

A friend of mine cheerfully watches Netflix through a browser on her MacBook into a TV... there is an MacOS client but we haven't got around to installing it ( though we should, it would mean that we could control playback from her iPhone without having to get off the sofa) because it works well enough.

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The Gemini pocket PC is shipping and we've got one. This is what it's like

Dave 126
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Re: But how do you make a phone call with it?

Sony make a little Bluetooth device about the size of a little finger. It has a small monochrome display, a 3.5 mm headset socket and physical call and media transport buttons. it can also be used as a standalone Bluetooth headset. As a bonus, it contains a standalone FM receiver, and has a clip for attaching to shirt pockets etc

It could be a good companion to this Gemini device.

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iPhone X 'slump' is real, whisper supply chain moles

Dave 126
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Re: I have one question.

tl;dr:

If you must have a front facing camera and other sensors, why not use the space beside them to display critical info such as battery life and signal strength?

Doing so offers a clear usability benefit over otherwise wasted space.

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Dave 126
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Re: I have one question.

Status bar information is the important stuff - battery life, signal strength, clock etc - that needs to be read easily. Adding icons for less important stuff is poor Information Ergonomics, since in effect lower priority information is being elevated to the same status - visually - as important stuff. In addition, the icons don't need to be high resolution. If a notch is cut for a standard camera, you might only be able to fit in say 14 status icons compared to 15 on an uncut screen.

My point is that if a front facing camera must be fitted to a phone, the area to the sides of the camera might as well be used to display critical status information. The concept is sound in principle. This auxiliary dispkay area *does not* need to be a part of the main display, and might use a display technology with its own advantages (eg low power e-ink or OLED) when the main display uses a different technology.

However, fitting another component has its own cost implications - though probably not as high as cutting a notch *at this time* (though in future I don't know - the OLED does need to be cut from a larger sheet anyway, it become one process but with an ever so slightly longer tool path)

As for full video, most content is 16:9 but the ergonomics of holding a phone and reading websites are pulling phone screens towards 2:1 (aka 18:9) - any notch area isn't being used for video anyway.

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Dave 126
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What hasnt been said...

Is that the price tag of the X gave Samsung confidence to raise their thin margins on their flagship phones. If they know the X isn't selling well withs its price tag, that has implications for them on more than their screen division.

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Dave 126
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Re: Beginning of the end ?

I was very tempted by an 8 Plus until last week. I'm seriously impressed by its camera, but being on holiday I pulled my premium compact camera - Lumux LX 7 - out of its drawer and fell in love with it again. At the same time, I tried placing the iPhone 8 Plus of my travelling companion in my trouser pocket and fuck me it's heavy and large. Damned fine camera and image processing though - in all but dimly lit scenes it competes favourably with the Lumix.

So, it's a OnePlus 5T for me when I get back to Blighty (and Lumix in jacket pocket more regularly), and this poor Nexus 5 will be put out to pasture.

Heck, might even nab a Sony RX200 MK II or Lumix LX 100... £500 buys a shit load of very good pocket camera these days. Those improvements we've seen in tiny phone camera sensors? They scale.

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Dave 126
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Re: So Someone Learn me....

The purpose of R&D is to create a temporary market advantage that outweighs its cost. Heavily outweighs, if you're doing it right.

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Dave 126
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Re: Maybe Apple

> You know a company has ran out of "innovative ideas" when the advert they use to sell this phone is of a blonde girl singing something, and showing how her face can be used to animate a shit.

If you're unaware of how much teenage girls and young women use their phones on an hourly basis compared to the rest of us, I would not employ you to sell phones.

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Dave 126
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Re: I have one question.

The top of most phone screens just display a few simple icons most of the time - no reason not to share that space with a camera. The issue is implementation - LG made a phone with a discrete screen next the camera, not a bad idea.

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Dave 126
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Re: Don't Apple do this every year?

If I wanted to use Apple's excellent AR silicon, I'd wait til they make a model with rear-facing active 3D scanning.

Other note: LG's OLED phone screens haven't been universally praised this last year -- see Google Pixel. LG's TVs are superb, but they use a different substrate.

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Dave 126
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Re: Presumably Android would have to be tweaked...

Google is ahead of you:

https://www.google.com.vn/amp/s/www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2018/2/12/17003326/google-android-p-redesign-notch-support-assistant-integration-rumors

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It's been 50 years since those damn dirty apes took the planet by storm

Dave 126
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Re: The original lost me in the first few minutes.

An all-female crew, cryogenic storage and a turkey baster is a better way of colonising another world.

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Dave 126
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Re: Great Apes

****Spoilers ahead****

I love the part where the chimp psychiatrists take the chimp protagonist to a human reservation in the mountains to seal his recovery from this delusion that he was ever a human. "Out of the mists could be heard the calls of the humans. 'Fuck off. Fuuuck off!' "

*** End Spoilers ***

And Mr Self write it before Twitter was a thing.

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No sh*t, Sherlock! Bloke suspected of swallowing drug stash keeps colon schtum for 22 DAYS

Dave 126
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Reminds me of an Ali G quiz on what you do in a stop n search situation:

"... or B, do you stick it up the police officer's bottom?"

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Dave 126
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The Geneva Convention only covers combatants in war - which is why tear gas can be used legally on your own citizens but not on enemy soldiers. Indeed, tear far and similar substances are originally developed for warfare, but after the Convention the manufacturers had to lobby for a new market: "Crowd Control".

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What did we say about Tesla's self-driving tech? SpaceX Roadster skips Mars, steers to asteroids

Dave 126
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Given Musk just wants humanity to create a sustainable colony on Mars, he wouldn't be too upset if the Chinese stole the baton and ran with it. Remember that he's going to make his Giga-factories open source.

Besidee, a big hurdle was merely proving that this approach works and that is now clearly public. For the medium term, the US surveillance agencies won't be paying a Chinese company to launch their spy satellites.

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Timeout everyone. Y'all know that Musk's $500 'flamethrower' is literally a Boring blowtorch?

Dave 126
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Re: they missed s trick.

And if you lived in many parts of Australia, a flame thrower - or even a carelessly discarded dog end - is a very bad idea.

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PC not dead, Apple single-handedly propping up mobe market, says Gartner

Dave 126
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Re: Not rocket science

I said things CAN be done on phones and tablets - I did not say that they offered an optimal experience for all tasks. A Swiss Army Knife isn't the easiest way to open a tin of beans but it will do it and you'll still get your dinner.

I was outlining what Joe Public might use a home PC for. Remember that the context of this article is PC sales, so it's moot to only talk about what professionals and enthusiasts use PCs for.

If someone once mainly used their PC to transfer photos from their camera to backup media, what happens when their phone's camera is just fine for family snaps? Exactly.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not rocket science

He has a point though - thirty years ago a home PC wasn't essential for many people. The common tasks many people now put them to - writing letters, very light spreadsheet, internet browsing, managing photographs - can be done by a phone or a tablet with a keyboard.

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Apple whispers farewell to macOS Server

Dave 126
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Re: Steve Jobs was a software and hardware guy...

Under Jobs, Cook's expert management of the supply chain actually facilitated creativity. R&D spending at Apple grown exponentially under Cook. Whatever faults he may or may not have, withholding funds to designers and engineers isn't one of them.

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User stepped on mouse, complained pedal wasn’t making PC go faster

Dave 126
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A short bit of string and a dab of glue could help here!

Actually, the most useful thing I've ever added to my phone isn't an app but a short length of bright orange ribbon. Why? Well, phones being black and slim could not be design better to hide in the gaps between sofa cushions, down the side of car seats. Heck, I once spent half an hour looking through the cab of my van before finding the phone in front of the instrument cluster.

The orange ribbon makes the damned thing so much easier to spot.

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Dave 126
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Re: underneath the keyboard

Set up the system to sound an alarm when the password written on the Post It is entered - a clear sign an unauthorised person is trying to gain access. Your real password will of course be Post It. Next month your password is Post It On Monitor, then Post It In Drawer, then Post It On Colleague's Back With Kick Me Written On It

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Dave 126
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Re: Old as the hills

> I've tried to pinch-zoom a book before, been confused for a split-second, and then had to sheepishly go and find my glasses.

I once approached a busy road on foot, and had a sensation of wanting to press Pause on a remote controller, as one would to pause a video. Weird. Haven't had it before or since, but feel that creativity comes from messing around and trying things in new contexts.

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Dave 126
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Re: If somebody does not understand...

Urgh! Transferring photos from a camera to a PC often involves so many unnecessary steps! Even 'Make device safe to remove' involves one more click than it should, and half the time, after a pause, decides not to work because a window is still open. I hate it.

For many people, looking after photos is a primary reason for using a PC. Thank heavens many find phones are adequate for family snaps (and many phones are far better that the digital cameras many people were using a dozen years ago).

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Dave 126
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More subtly, my dad was constantly asking me how to close programs on his Android phone - twenty years of using PCs had taught him that not actively closing things would result in pig slow performance.

Similarly, in Spotify he would keep asking "It's now paused, yeah, but how do I *stop* it?"

Both of his learnt habits stemmed from when users were expected to compensate for imperfect technology. When the technology improved - OS memory management, app state saved to non-volatile fast storage, whatever - it confused him.

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Dave 126
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I don't have housemaid's knee!

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Dave 126
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Re: Hey Gran!

And yet sewing machine foot pedals made in the 1980s do look like big beige mice! And a beige PC case is roughly the same size as a beige sewing machine.

There's possibly a deeper lesson about user experience here, specifically Information Ergonomics, muscle memory and Alzheimer's.

Why would the foot pedal be in the desk at the start of the session? Some mothers would pick up the pedal to stop toddlers sitting on it.

The other possibility was that the old lady knew exactly what she was doing and just reckoned that winding up the computer guy was a splendid bit of sport!

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We won't need to go outside if these haptic tricksters have their way

Dave 126
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Re: One little word

After spending twenty minutes strapping on the suit, you find you need to take a pee. Or the doorbell goes.

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Dave 126
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The other day a fellow Reg reader said that current VR kit is like an acoustic coupler, I didn't didn't get what he meant at the time. I do now. Translating digital information into physical movement only for our bodies to translate that sensation back into electrical signals does seem to be a limited approach. It's like trying to convert an MP3 to a WAV by recording it to cassette tape and then MiniDisc, and then holding the earbuds up to a microphone.

We either need brain / machine interfaces or drugs. Lots of drugs. A la The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch.

Until then, a comfy chair, side table and a reading light placed near a stereo with big speakers (at low volume) will do me!

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Acronis: Ransomware protection! Get yer free ransomware protection!

Dave 126
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I've asked before, but:

How resistant are NAS boxes to Ransomeware attacks? Do they blindy write over known good backups with corrupted files at the behest of the infected PC? Can they be configured to create a few backups on an A, B, C basis, and only allow changes any one in a 24 hour period?

Can a NAS box be configured to only turn itself on for an hour every two days?

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Google can't innovate anymore, exiting programmer laments

Dave 126
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Re: Hire the best person for the job

I can only imagine that it must be galling to have got a position on merit but have colleagues assume you got it to fulfill a quota?

- white English male

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Dave 126
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Re: Google doesn't innovate?

Your examples may be nice pieces of tech, but they're a tiny drop compared to the oceans of Facebook and AWS, the examples the article gave of what Google has been trying to catch up with.

You've listed tweaks, not market game changers.

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RIP Ursula K Le Guin: The wizard of Earthsea

Dave 126
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I've not read all of the Hainish cycle, but those I have gave me the impression they had in part inspired Iain M Banks' Culture novels. That isn't knocking Banks in any way - like le Guin, he had his own convictions and depth of thinking.

Iain Banks and Margaret Atwood led a tribute to le Guin on her 80th birthday on Radio 4:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00j3xd5

Programme currently unavailable, but good chance it's online somewhere, or else may soon be repeated on Radio 4 Extra in the sad light of her passing.

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Europe slaps €997m antitrust fine on Qualcomm

Dave 126
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Re: and Apple's fine is ?

The onus of responsibility lies with Qualcomm, not Apple. If, for example, Apple had signed a similar exclusivity contract with a small supplier of modems that didn't enjoy a dominant market position there would have been no breach of the Anti Trust law.

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'There was no monetary incentive for this' = not what you want to hear about your tattoo

Dave 126
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Re: Zune

What else was he ever going to be famous for?

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Dave 126
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Re: Life changes, tattoos don't

Anton has a point: those tattoos have really held back Mr Beckham's otherwise promising career and rendered him unattractive to all women.

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29 MEEELLION iPhone Xs flogged... only to be end-of-life'd by summer?

Dave 126
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Re: £999 ? spend less than £50

I've got on well with a 45 quid 4G Android, budget price makes you overlook its compromises, though to be fair it did the essentials (calls, maps, Chrome, WhatsApp) without fuss. It was also lovely to just not care if it fell on concrete.

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Dave 126
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Re: Marketing genius.

> So sad but so true. I feel a breakaway online republic coming on, one that rejects this idiocracy based version of society

You've given me a great idea for a TV show. Technocrat Island, or Nerd Tribe or Misanthrope Colony or whatnot. Not a show I would watch, well not unless it all goes Lord of Flies, but one that will make money. Pro tip to contestants: your survival more likely if you can enthuse others to the merits of not thumping you.

That's the trouble with Internet tribes and flame wars - not enough real sticks, real stones and real flames.

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Swipe fright: Tinder hackers may know how desperate you really are

Dave 126
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Re: You Don't Have To Be Lonely...At HackersOnly.com

Indeed. So, there's two ways of seeing the profile pic of local men on Tinder:

First way: build a WiFi snooping device and leave it in a bar.

Second way: just log into Tinder as a woman.

Second way sounds easier - if you are a woman or have a female Facebook account. Ashley Madison this isn't.

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Half a terabyte in your smartmobe? Yup. That's possible now

Dave 126
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Well, having a large capacity SD card makes it easier to back up multiple lower capacity SD cards, no?

And as you say, some equipment will record to two cards simultaneously - some at daft Res and frame rates (though that's starting to hit the limits of the bus the SD card sits on). Sony, Nikon and others are beginning to support a card that sits on a PCIE bus.

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Dave 126
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FiiO had a model with a scroll wheel, though most if their range is touchscreen Android based. A few if their models have dual SD card slots - currently up to 2x 256GB, but someone might have got 512 to work. They mostly use ESS Sabre DACs, which have the reputation that Burr Brown or Wolfson used to enjoy.

There are other vendors offering similar kit, ranging from £100 to £stupid, but their names escape me right now.

Like discrete compact digital cameras, PMPs haven't disappeared completely due to smartphones - the survivors have just got better and and less expensive.

However, some versions of Samsung Galaxy phones, some of the LG G and V series phones and some others offer very good audio quality (the dac and amp stages) - and will take SD cards and offer more flexibility in terms of content than the dedicated players

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Dave 126
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Re: Slang

I don't think those of us who responded are the same cats who downvote you!

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Dave 126
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Re: That's a lot of data to lose

> *You can put some apps on the memory card, I have in the past. I didn't notice a slow down to be honest.

Well not all apps are that big, and some of the bigger apps keep their resources (example, in a game model textures) on the SD card. The way Android treats SD cards has changed over the years, and sometimes swapping a card (to transfer data between devices) can sometimes cause issues for apps.

However, most Android phones' internal storage is slower than iPhone NAND (see Anandtech benchmarks) so difference twixt internal and SD card storage speed is less pronounced.

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