* Posts by streaky

1436 posts • joined 5 Jul 2010

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UK Home Sec Amber Rudd unveils extremism blocking tool

streaky
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Re: 99.995% is impossible

Here's a video we've already told you is a terrorist video. Is it a terrorist video?

TBH this isn't how that works. It's here's a curated set of ISIS/not videos. Here's another *different* set of ISIS videos mixed with other, which are/aren't, what's the accuracy rate? If they did it the way you say their reputation would be in tatters by the end of the day, I doubt they're that stupid.

That being said with real world data the reality is it's going to be massively inaccurate. It's entirely possible for a tool like this to exist and kinda work but I'd suggest only using it for flagging videos for a real person to look at - although as others have pointed out meat-based AI fails at this sort of thing too.

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Bruce Perens wants to anti-SLAPP Grsecurity's Brad Spengler with $670,000 in legal bills

streaky
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One man's unethical is another man's successful. Not for nothing but people are dumb when faced with legal threats, jump the shark and take the cheapest option rather than playing it smart and going nuclear, scorched earth policy. If you win and win hard and the other guy pays the fees who cares what it costs - in fact, the more the better. You might consider that unethical, I call it a smart play - for no other reason than as a deterrent.

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Assange fails to make skipped bail arrest warrant vanish

streaky
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Re: A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

Surely the fact that he is still being persecuted/prosecuted long after removal of disputed facts, is grounds enough for reasonable cause that justice has not and is not being served and servered by judges?

That he's a bail skipper isn't a disputed fact, and that's what he's wanted for - at least today - and that's all that matters. If people are allowed to hide until everybody forgets about them it brings the entire legal system into disrepute. Given the people who put up his bail were let off for being simpletons it's fairly important that he not get away with it for that and because explicitly he's high profile, which is to say it passes the test of being in the public interest to prosecute him for that alone.

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streaky
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Re: @ Ben ... A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

Just a nit... being a grammar Nazi... the word is regardless not irregardless. ;-)

Trouble with grammar Nazis is they're almost always wrong. Irregardless is a valid word in English, whilst being strange at a technical level it is completely legitimate to use.

Also there's no such thing as Standard English which is precisely why English is such a great language, it evolves; in contrast to for example French. Hell, English is born of evolution.

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streaky
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By this argument, people are allowed to choose where they spend their custodial sentences. I don't see that being allowed to become legal precedent.

Precisely. He isn't being held in an actual prison then he isn't being held is the legal standard; being on the lamb in South America doesn't count else Ronnie Biggs would have never served time when he landed back in the UK; it doesn't count as time served and arguing it does is completely absurd. Sooner Assange realises this the sooner he'll be out of prison and deported to Australia so he can be deported to the US. If you're gonna fuck with legal systems at least learn how to do it right, be in a non-extradition country before you do it.

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In America, tech support conmen get a mild slap. In Blighty, scammers get the book thrown at them

streaky
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Re: Too mild in both cases

I'm wondering how long it's going to take for the next 2008-type crash.

Not that long but the eurozone banks still haven't fixed the structural issues that caused 2008, US banks have. Next crash aint coming from the US.

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EU bods up GDPR ante: Threatens legislative laggards with ‘infringement procedure’

streaky
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Re: In the words of Sir Humphrey

Just in case nobody gets that quip about the Germans, I direct your attention here. The last time it came up the German courts backed down to avoid being ruled against; but still uphold their belief that the German courts have primacy when they don't. Basically the German courts don't understand that the rules apply to them too, which is why they [Germans] enjoy being in the EU so much when other states that are around their GDP/Capita don't.

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streaky
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Re: In the words of Sir Humphrey

Couple of fixes: the Germans will continue to pretend their courts are supreme to EU law they don't agree with (protip: they're not), the Irish can't afford to enforce it despite being the state where it matters most, the Italians are too busy drinking espresso to notice it and we (the British) are off. That said it's going into national law anyway - and we resent it because it's half-baked, like most things that come from the EU.

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streaky
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Re: 2 Countries.

because European politics and machinations are so transparent

I'm regularly downvoted on 'reg for speaking truth about the EU but this is one of the few areas of clarity. Regulations automatically apply and don't need transposing into national law, states *can* if they chose to but they don't have to, it just supersedes any law in conflict.

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streaky
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2 Countries.

"just two countries having adapted their national laws"

The "R" in "GDPR" stands for "Regulation". Those 2 countries are ijuts because regulations don't require changing national law, they automatically apply and are supreme. If they wanted countries to change their own laws they should have made it a directive.

FML people are dopey. This is absurd on so many levels I don't even know where to start.

Nice to see people confusing directives and regulations - especially when it's the EU itself - it's always good for a laugh.

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streaky
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"the UK goverment want to hold data on EU citizens"

This is utterly untrue. That being said if you're a business doing business in the EU you'd arguably need to follow the regs for that data.

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Meltdown/Spectre week three: World still knee-deep in something nasty

streaky
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Re: Google and Intel;

So what are they going to sell instead?

Seats in the bankruptcy court.

Like Gemalto before they probably shouldn't exist at this point.

If Ford had a car where the steering wheel would randomly snap off and kill the driver nobody would buy fords until ford had a fix in place. Actually what would happen is ford would recall all the affected cars.

Oh wait too much logic. Intel still flogging CPUs not fit for purpose, so are, yes, many other companies - sux to be huge and the focus.

Said it before and I'll say it again, it's not clear we shouldn't have all gone back to living in mud huts over this. There are going to be new classes of bugs that derive from this flaw for years to come, somebody needs to do something about it in hardware, which means yes, you guessed it.

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streaky
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Google and Intel;

Mishandled all this right from the start. Google will get away with it because they don't make CPUs.. Intel, not so much.

Some things should stay buried, at least until there are proper hardware fixes and Intel (or anybody else) shouldn't be selling CPUs still at this point that are still vulnerable, not least because there's nothing to sue for a replacement for, which I'm sure Intel knows. Long term it's going to hurt them though.

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PC sales get that post-Brexit vote sinking feeling

streaky
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It's a shame that..

so much of this stuff is made in the UK. Obviously people not buying PC gear made here will ruin us.

Oh wait.

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OnePlus minus 40,000 credit cards: Smartmobe store hacked to siphon payment info to crooks

streaky
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Fk me.

Bought a phone in this period.. So glad I paid by paypal, oneplus definitely not in my circle of trust.

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Why did top Home Office civil servant lobby Ofcom for obscure kit ban?

streaky
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Redaction

Can we talk about how that's the most idiotic piece of redaction in all of history.

Firstly there's nothing in there requiring redaction from any perspective so why did it happen, and secondly what the actual fuck on being incompetent at it?

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streaky
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Re: Please mind the gap

that it provides some sort of gap in full take surveillance

Well it probably does to an extent but I doubt this is the real reason (certainly they're monitoring all mobile phones, all the time, c/o Gemalto). The civil service' primary role in government is witness protection for BT, anything that harms their market position must be stamped out, with prejudice. Hence the Ofcom link. natsec is just an excuse (as it tends to be).

Sure, though, if you operate a gsm gateway you can generate your own keys and decide your own cipher strength, all you need is the ability to write to sim cards which is a 10 quid on ebay type deal, and there's plenty of companies that will sell you blank writeable ones.

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France may protect citizens' liberté with ban on foreigners buying local big data firms

streaky
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Not like invest to exit is a thing or anything. I don't like it myself - it's why Europe and moreover the UK has nobody who is on a level with the likes of Microsoft or Google; but it *is* where the money is coming from. If you ban it the money stops, unintended consequence is you get less start-ups, you attract less talent and you get less tax receipts.

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Worst-case Brexit could kill 92,000 science, tech jobs across UK – report

streaky
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Not those exact words, but near as damn it. I can list companies, but I shouldn't need to - people should be aware of what has been said by actual businesses.

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streaky
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LOL

Meanwhile, in the real world, the massive tech investment continues with corporations saying "no we don't give a shit about brexit actually, in fact, it's why we're investing here"

Most polite thing I can say about Sadiq Khan is he's a clown who won't get re-elected, and weirdly not because he's delusional - but because he's incompetent. Weird that. This City Airport nonsense didn't help his case, especially when he's claiming to be some sort of environment mayor, undoing Boris' ban on their expansion - Labour have shown to what degree they'll take money to kill people.

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1 in 5 STEM bros whinge they can't catch a break in tech world they run

streaky
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Re: Isn't it a small minority

This commenty says to me: 'I was rubbish at my job so I'll blame 'diversity' for the fact that I never go promoted.

This comment says to me "I'm rubbish at my job so I'll blame the fact I'm not a white male for the fact I can't get ahead". Surely you see how lame this game is?

All anybody sensible wants is an even playing field on both sides. I'm personally all about meritocracy, you get the best person for the job, no matter what they are and you go from there. Employers can't, nor should they be, artificially trying to solve society's past ills. Simply doesn't work, why would anybody try to hire somebody who isn't the best fit for the job they're trying to fill? It's a nonsense, any company doing this isn't going to be in business for long unless they have more money than sense (see: google et al).

I literally couldn't give a toss, I have no issue getting hired - but I can understand why people are annoyed; and women and racial minorities have to work with the very people they're actively trying to piss off, that's a recipe for stupidity. Regardless, companies are actively doing themselves harm which I find utterly hilarious, so carry on. Incompetence is pervasive through management culture in tech so there's nothing new here.

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streaky
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Re: Isn't it a small minority

Let the race to mediocrity commence.

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No wonder Marvin the robot was miserable: AI will make the rich richer – and the poor poorer

streaky
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Re: Poor Poorer.

Not wanting to go full nerd, but I'm fairly sure this is what Roddenberry was trying to say with the economics of Star Trek - that there's a point where we don't have to do anything, basically the system gets *so* efficient that people can't even work if they want to and capitalism just fails to function and people have to do things because they want to as opposed to because they need money. At that stage cash stops being a usable thing.

I'd hate to predict how far along that path but there's things coming down the mountain that when they hit we might get to that stage. Self driving cars, robots in the home that can physically do things you'd otherwise do yourself and obviously the encroachment of factory automation - the more there is the less jobs there are for less skilled workers. If I don't need a cleaner, don't need an uber/taxi driver, don't need to make the things I'd buy that's a huge chunk of the unskilled workforce, the capitalist system dies with it.

I don't think it's a huge problem in the long term, I think we'd all get by with not having to work, I could cope with a perpetual holiday if I don't need to pay for things - but the transition will be massive social upheaval and we might already be there.

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streaky
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Poor Poorer.

Strictly speaking, if allowed to run its course, what will actually happen is it'll end the economic system.

If nobody needs to (or can) work and the rich own all the wealth and literally can't find enough ways to spend it the capitalist system dies. There's already evidence western civilisation is on the border of this point, one only has to look at the sheer volumes of cash governments are pumping into banks to keep them lending and the proportions of low paying service industry jobs in some countries.

If Germany ever near completely automates its car industry (and it will within the next 25 years, it'll need to just to stay even remotely competitive) it'll be the final nail in the coffin and the world will be forced to reinvent itself, and all that accumulated wealth will mean nothing. Peak capitalism has passed, it was some time in early 2008.

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CPU bug patch saga: Antivirus tools caught with their hands in the Windows cookie jar

streaky
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Isn't placing your trust in ONE vendor who by nature can't catch everything ALSO bad juju?

The chances of you getting hit by a virus or malware that a reasonably competent AV vendor hasn't accounted for and another has and you happen to have picked the right AV vendor combination to cover that venn diagram is almost nil - in fact it is nil. If you're a target for the CIA, usually you'd know and frankly you should be taking precautions like, I don't know, maybe not so much with the running of the Windows. Also, yeah, therein lies the trick when choosing AV.

Each to their own, but running two AV products at the same time isn't really viable, potentially it could do more damage than malware could.

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streaky
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Re: Logic

I can't tell if this is serious or not ^

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streaky
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There are people who run multiple AV products

This kind of thing is extremely bad practice, most people who work in security and AV vendors have been telling people to not do it for at least a decade, at least as far as active protection goes. Race conditions playing around in kernel memory space is bad juju.

Just don't do it.

Now having AV soft where one does your active protection and another that can scan but actively protecting the system is kinda viable, the answer in that case would be yeah, you better hope that the one you have doing the protection is the one that is compatible. If it isn't..

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streaky
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Re: Logic

You'd have to actively disable things to get into this state, namely defender. Sure defender is garb, it wasn't I don't think ever supposed to be that great but I'm sure defender will set the key (edit: Microsoft do explicitly list it on their spreadsheet). Defender will only disable itself, and will always disable itself if you're running other AV.

If you've specifically decided to go naked as it were, it's kinda your own fault and you should be paying attention to things like this. As for lawsuits, you're the one making the positive step not Microsoft, there's no liability here.

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India denies breach of its billion-strong 'Aadhaar' ID system

streaky
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Please..

do the needful.

God I hope that is google translate at it's best and not how the complaint is actually worded - though I suspect it is.

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Nvidia: Using cheap GeForce, Titan GPUs in servers? Haha, nope!

streaky
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Re: Unenforceable.

Bohhooohoo nvidia gpus aren't artistic work.

What are you talking about. Nvidia are doing *fine*.

Couple of things, using copyright to enforce licensing clauses that don't pass the laugh test that directly relate to a piece of hardware you bought because a company makes the hardware that you pay through the nose and hands out drivers for for free to make sure you can use and therefore buy the hardware in the first place is *absurd*.

Secondly if you can't do business in the GPU space because GPUs don't make enough money (bahahahaha, again doesn't pass the laugh test) then don't make GPUs, go open a coffee chain.

Also Nvidia are having no issues licensing decades old patents thank you very much.

By the way, like I said, even if what you're saying here is valid (and it isn't, lets be clear) - how exactly could nvidia possibly hope to enforce it?

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streaky
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Re: Why would one want to use Nvidia?

It's not 2008, this driver thing isn't really worth talking about, AMD and nvidia have fairly solid linux drivers that perform perfectly fine. DKMS solved most issues and if you want open source nouveau is perfectly (more than, in fact) adequate these days.

Also AMD gave up on being competitive around the launch of the R5-9 which is why I abandoned the laborious wait for a RX Vega and bought a 1080ti hybrid instead.

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streaky
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Re: Unenforceable.

More importantly who cares what nvidia think. They're in no position to enforce regardless. They're not going to send the GPU police to your DC to check if you've been naughty or nice. So your card dies in half the time their overpriced gear does. I bought a $1000 card, got two years use out of it by which time it's obsolete anyway, saved myself $9000 and oh dear they won't cover it under warranty (they couldn't prove regardless), oh dear what a shame never mind.

GeForce and TITAN GPUs were never designed for data center deployments with the complex hardware, software, and thermal requirements for 24x7 operation, where there are often multi-stack racks

Also this, right here, is bullshit. That's my problem nvidia, thanks.

I've been telling people for years that the nvidia DC-approved GPUs are a complete waste of time and money, hilarious that it seems people have finally cottoned on to nvidia's price gouging (which is so extreme that it'd embarrass even Apple) - and even more hilarious that nvidia think they can do anything to stop it. Stop ripping people off and people will buy your "enterprise" (enterprise here is a synonym for bullshit, as it usually is) gear.

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UK.gov needs help getting folk to splurge on full fibre and 5G

streaky
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Re: End Openreach, BT, Monopoly

Nothing to do with BT's monopoly that it obviously abuses in the view of anybody who pays attention. Anybody could challenge BT's position and they do.

The problem here is the government throwing taxpayer funds at BT (and this has been going on since long before we had a tory government) for building shitty networks that aren't fit for purpose. Basically what they've said is here's a huge pile of cash, go connect people at 10mbit. What they should be saying is here's a big pile of cash, you must connect everybody to the internet at 10-100mbit depending on how close to the centre of a city they are and you must only use the cash for building out infrastructure that works at at least 300 mbit and is capable of 10gbit+ with existing technology if it's ever needed, which is to say install actual glass fibre directly to people's houses. Reality is though BT should have been doing this in the 80's.

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EE Business Broadband digital transformation: Portal offline until July

streaky
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Yup.

Showing across EE's entire business honestly.

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Los Angeles police tell drivers not to trust navigation apps as wildfires engulf area

streaky
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Re: Don't drive into a raging wildfire...

This is the point. It isn't don't trust your GPS system, it's open your fucking eyes and look where you're going. Literally just occurred to me though, this could get interesting if self-driving cars ever become the norm and you're napping in the back and your car drives you into a wild fire and says fuckit you're on your own friend.

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Quentin Tarantino in talks to make Star Trek movie

streaky
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Re: Well Discovery has the occasional swearing

an insult to Gene Roddenberry's Legacy

BPLZ.

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streaky
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Re: Well Discovery has the occasional swearing

I'm told hardcore Trekkies hate it

Nope, we love it.

Check reddit trek nerdville for double confirmation. It is, as a matter of fact, epic.

Only people who hate it are pretenders, people who have probably never even seen it.

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Why does no one want to invest in full fibre broadband, wails UK.gov

streaky
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Re: All aboard the gravy train…

I disagree, although I totally see your point.

Certainly at the bare minimum when BT is replacing cable anyway and when new housing is being built (and especially in this case) BT should be specifying that house builders lay fibre to people's houses, at the very minimum so it can be upgraded in future.

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streaky
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Re: All aboard the gravy train…

They're pushing towards, regardless you don't have to rip up pavements to do a national FTTP roll-out - seems like one of those mythological ideas people have about the way things work. Regardless if HO can do it locally with no government help and be a viable business it can be done nationally by BT with the government help that they are getting. There's plenty of this going on in the rest of the world if you want other examples.

None of this would be so bad if BT didn't know exactly how to do it.

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streaky
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Re: All aboard the gravy train…

the timeframe for return on capital is unsuitable for the private sector

Explain Hyperoptic and peers.

The actual reason is BT are happy getting free taxpayer funds to *not* do it thank you very much, one of the fundamental reasons why current government strategy is broken.

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Net neutrality nonsense: Can we, please, just not all lose our minds?

streaky
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Re: What's really going on..

If Netflix had to pay its fair share of overall internet backbone support costs as a percentage of IP packet traffic, their business model likely would fail. Ditto Youtube.

Pretty sure this is my point.

You don't just magic a service into existence and expect everybody else to pick up the tab just so you can be viable, for much the same reason as I don't ask 'reg readers to buy me a new McLaren every year. i.e. the world doesn't work like that.

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streaky
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What's really going on..

Netflix and a few others have managed to do something Russia could never do - bend the entire psyche of the planet to their will with zero blowback. What's relevant here is Netflix don't want to pay for infrastructure to carry all the bandwidth their service uses caused, ultimately, by no peers taking traffic off them because there's no mutual benefit. Never was, never will be. It really is quite impressive how their PR machine has completely deluded millennials into thinking it's about them. It isn't.

There are solutions to this that won't cost netflix huge sums of money to deliver content, they're already using some of them - as much as I like stranger things and mr robot if these services aren't viable at a price point with the infrastructure we have and without netflix, amazon, google et al (to be fair to amazon they do have mutually beneficial traffic arrangements, google too to a lesser degree, it's mostly netflix causing the problems) et al investing then they're simply not viable.

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Huawei's Honor 9: The only mobe of its spec asking 'why blow £500?'

streaky
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Re: huawei and honor updates...

Can't speak for this range specifically but I've found Chinese devices to suffer with this issue badly, it's an area where Chinese tech companies need to put a bit more effort into keeping up with the Joneses. I'm always wary of more expensive items from China specifically because of this.

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China plots new Great Leap Forward: to IPv6

streaky
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Re: RFC 2460..

128 bit addresses don't fit in any standard data type

Define standard. Use a math lib. GUIDs are 128 bit ints too and they're everywhere. "hard" and "i can't be bothered" aren't the same thing.

Also IPv4 and IPv6 coexist happily if people stop listening to consultants who sell them stupid ways to migrate their networks. You're doing it wrong, coexistence was solved many many years ago, there's a solution for every problem and your problem might not really be a problem.

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streaky
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Re: RFC 2460..

Something is obsolete when the purpose it serves is better served by something more modern. Not just because it's old.

Yeah alright I may have not considered that people might assume that I meant it's old is the only reason. It's still usable but now we have new information there's technical reasons why it would be obsoleted given half a chance.

Anyway, IPv6, just do it.

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streaky
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RFC 2460..

Technically speaking IPv6 is RFC 1883 - it was named IPv6 and used 128 bit address space so this is arguably true - and was written in 1995. Of course they're not exactly the same spec but it's important to note how disgusting it is that a protocol that was designed so long ago that it is arguably obsolete (wall time) is hardly deployed by anybody, everybody looks like an idiot in this scenario.

IPv6 deployment is *easy* and we should stop pretending it's difficult and just get it done.

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Dark fibre arts: Ofcom is determined to open up BT's network

streaky
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Seperation..

despite the legal separation of Openreach

I take issue with this. Despite the fanfare Openreach is "separated" from BT like Youtube is separate from Google, i.e. in name only, and not really even that. As long as we pretend they're actually distinct companies when they're not nothing will change.

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Mythical broadband speeds to plummet in crackdown on ISP ads

streaky
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Re: Well...

The problem is VM are really an amalgamation of lots of different networks. Some were good, some were bad and they've done nothing to improve the situation. So in some parts of the country you get advertised speeds and in other parts you get massive contention and frequent kit failures.

Worse than that there was a time when they flogged ADSL gear on BT's network branded as virgin product which did them massive reputational damage. Whoever came up with that one was a moron and should have faced the firing squad.

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