* Posts by streaky

1500 posts • joined 5 Jul 2010

Former NSA top hacker names the filthy four of nation-state hacking

streaky
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Re: Rofl

If Russian *haven't* tried to influence the US and UK votes then their spooks just aren't doing their job properly.

But here's the thing. Mind blown, you ready?

Our spooks are doing their job properly. The yank spooks are. There's two investigations in parliament led by remainers. There's one in the US congress (might be senate I can't be bothered to check) - they've compelled evidence out of the companies that a) want the UK to remain in the EU and b) have no trouble finding the trump related bots, know what they're posting and know who they're posting about. When I say they didn't go on brexit I don't mean I don't know if they did - it's a fact, they didn't, the end. Unless you have actual evidence that isn't somebody trying to sow the seeds of chaos (they saw you coming btw) - you don't really get to make claims to the contrary. It just didn't happen.

If you want to know what did happen maybe give a shit about your fellow human and you might learn a few things about immigration, economics and leaving people behind - or just generally treating people like crap and expecting things to carry on as they are before; plus the whole we'll be richer out thing.

Fsking daily mirror readers, honestly.

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streaky
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Re: Rofl

Russia can be as thrilled as they like - although again there's zero evidence of this - I have a hard time thinking Russia is that stupid and given how hard they go on people pro brexit and leave off remainers I see no evidence of any sort. Outside the EU's instinct to appease this doesn't end well for them.

Ignoring that we know who the bots are, we know what they're doing and we know that they didn't go on brexit. That's a fact, interview who you like.

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streaky
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Rofl

Remainers still trying to claim it was Russia wot won the Brexit vote despite there being no evidence of it turned up across at least 3 governmental and who knows how many military intelligence investigations of it on both sides of the Atlantic?

Every time you say this you look even more stupid.

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Can, can, can you buy it, CANCOM? Brexit's made it cheap(er), man: Firm inks OCSL deal

streaky
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Re: Rule Britannia

a) Yes

b) What difference does it make? Why is it that the same people who are so eager to stay in the EU are the people with the biggest problem with foreign ownership of companies?

c) Are people actually pretending that before we voted to leave the EU British companies weren't bought by foreign companies?

d) It's all FDI and FDI is good.

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Amazon meets the incredible SHRINKING UK taxman

streaky
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Re: Just say No to Amazon

Many of the more 'important' tax havens are British protectorates

I understood what you meant, they're protectorates, we don't write their laws - they're independent nations. Stop trying to tag us with something that isn't us. I'm sure we could exert pressure, and we have been that's why the UK has a bilateral TIEA with some of these, but they're not the UK any more than Canada is the US.

Can't just throw our weight around, this isn't the 17th century.

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streaky
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Re: Just say No to Amazon

do you trust your politicians to be any better at clamping down on tax avoidance after Brexit? I mean, the have been quite defensive of tax havens generally...

Yes? As for defensive of tax havens we have very little say over the tax regimes of foreign countries. We *COULD* force them, but it wouldn't be cricket - as long as they're playing by the same rules as Switzerland it's hard to have a problem and the UK has been leading the fight on this - so what's your point?

As I pointed out elsewhere the EU avoidance directive is just a poor facsimile of UK law on this, [5] years later. We can only deal with what we can deal with is the issue at hand here.

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streaky
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Re: Just say No to Amazon

If you want corporations top pay more tax get the House of Conmen to change the tax laws. It's realy that simple.

There's literally no way to stop this, the way payments move through Europe is *literally* by design of the EU. This stuff isn't in any way complicated. If you tax Amazon fabricating sales in the UK to Luxembourg that's a violation of two of the four pillars of the Single Market (the one you remainers want to stay in). Literally impossible for parliament to resolve (today) - it would end up in the ECJ and we'd be fined millions per day.

You can't moan about this AND want to remain in the EU, it's silly.

By the way because it's a free movement of capital, goods and services viol it would also arguably be a double taxation treaty violation. Only those of us who want to leave the Single Market get to moan about this stuff, it's right there in the rule book.

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streaky
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Re: Turkeys stage a referendum on Christmas.

How can HRMC do anything about a tax situation created by one of the pillars of the EU?

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streaky
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Re: Just say No to Amazon

until they pay the same level of tax as a UK based business would on that profit.

March next year when they can't book UK sales to RoI, Luxembourg, others any more. Be there and watch the fun. See also Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple and others. One of the reasons high up on my list of reasons to leave (it's a long list but this is a pretty good one) - the open door policy the EU has to taxes, making states pay the costs of companies like Amazon selling in the UK but allowing them to pay taxes where they feel like no matter how synthetic the relationship in the transactions. No wonder tech companies love the EU so much.

By the way before anybody does what some smart arse tried to do to me the other day on twitter, the EU tax avoidance directive is a very late and very poor copy of our own tax avoidance rules - and it most definitely does not deal with this problem.

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OpenAI bots thrash team of Dota 2 semi-pros, set eyes on mega-tourney

streaky
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Terminator

Kappa

This story being a confluence of things that interest me, and being 5+ years into my Dota learning curve (which makes me a complete noob) and having watched the games I could break all this down, shame it's 6am, had I realised that el reg was covering this (should have know, being Paris Hilton related) I would have commented before now and cleaned up some of the insanity.

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streaky
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Are there any good games that don't rely on APM and click-speed, but more on considered strategy?

Dota?

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Cache of the Titans: Let's take a closer look at Google's own two-factor security keys

streaky
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Re: Ah, the tyranny of choice ...

A "soft" yubikey would add to the market take-up of this technology

Yeah and it'd be about as useful as SMS 2FA. Right reddit?

The point of a hardware token is you can't just pull keys out of them because they're isolated and usually have mitigations from physical attacks (spot the problem with a soft key). We've been doing this for decades and we have the solution. It goes on your key right, it's cheap and it's easy to use. Not sure why people need to confuse a simple problem.

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Brit web host biz UKFast gears up to IPO on London Stock Exchange

streaky
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Expanding

Lawrence Jones, CEO at UKFast, told us the national tech market was expanding, and “a float gives us the funds necessary to capitalise on the opportunity

But muh brexit!

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Microsoft Visual Studio Code replumbed for better Python taming

streaky
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Re: If you want proper Intellisense, use a statically typed language

C# is a nice language, but the statically typed bit and relationship to intellitype is pure unadulterated nonsense.

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streaky
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Re: Visual Studio 2017 is still a mess full of bugs and no ISO installer...

Visual Studio Code *is not* Visual Studio. They're completely unrelated. Are people actually getting them confused? Actually yeah that is on Microsoft really. If you're off Windows, use your package manager. If you're on windows why on earth would an iso be a thing, it's tiny and there's an MSI. Plus also it's 2018, connect up your 56k modem.

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streaky
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Re: Where are the holy relics

Problem with the memes is it's far and away the best cross platform IDE that money doesn't need to buy. In fact it's very close to being the best IDE full stop.

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No, seriously, why are you holding your phone like that?

streaky
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Uhm..

I've seen literally every single one of these on display in London with zero sense of irony. People do not know how to use a phone, it's bizzare.

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Ticketmaster breach 'part of massive bank card slurping campaign'

streaky
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WHY...

Are people putting third party analytics etc on pages in scope for PCI-DSS. Just why; also why isn't PCI, Visa, Mastercard etc doing anything about it? Think we're overdue some adults in the sandbox who are in a position to give a shit removing card services from these people.

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UK.gov: New London courthouse will focus on crimes of a cyber nature

streaky
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Re: Will they fund the specialist lawyers and digital forensics experts?

I don't see why it makes a difference to the courts process. You need that kind of thing in the police and CPS.

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UK.gov IT projects that are failing: Verify. Border control. 4G for blue-light services. We can go on

streaky
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Re: [Sniff][Sniff]

Smell that? That's the smell of preparation for control to be taken back.

Nuhuh. And it'll all be better with EU procurement rules.

Oh wait, this is happening under EU procurement rules, wonder if there may be something wrong with them? Maybe not but wouldn't it be nice to be allowed to modify them.

Also btw the remainers, MPs, Lords, press, EU and the executive all confused on this concept of taking back control - and sovereignty - this isn't something for government, it's about voters being able to affect control of exactly this stuff. No more excuses, valid or not, that it's somebody else's fault. That's why a lot of people in government don't like it - because they'll be expected to actually do their jobs.

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Startup bank Monzo: We warned Ticketmaster months ago of site fraud

streaky
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Monzo..

Second time I've seen something related to Monzo in a few days.. Has somebody finally decided to actually... compete.. with the main banks?

Tell me you support U2F and consider me a customer.

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UK Foreign Office offers Assange a doctor if he leaves Ecuador embassy

streaky
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Any 6 year old looking at the statistics of how much the NHS is paying for paracetamol and other stupid nonsense that you can buy huge packs of for like 20p shouldn't have much trouble understanding why those rules are exist. Any other country in the world you'd be shot in the face for even asking.

As for refused referrals - maybe actually need one and you'll get one? 99.9999999% of things that happen medically on the NHS are because that's the right thing medically, excepting negligence, which again, happens all over the world. Only difference is in the UK you actually see the numbers. "devastating ignorance even among senior consultants" - my lord.

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streaky
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Re: His paranoia is understandable. And justified.

He was involved in the release of highly sensitive information which reflected poorly on a superpower.

The real problem is the people who got it out which the US full well knows. If the US could figure out what to charge Assange with they'd have had him extradited years ago; it's very easy to do, even from where he is.

Just because you are paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you.

Doesn't mean they are either. I don't believe for a second Assange is this paranoid, if he was he'd have never come to the UK where it's easy to get extradited to the US in the first place, he'd have stayed in Sweden or done what shall be henceforth known as "doing a Snowden". At the time this would have been very easy. He WANTED it to go this way because nobody is actually that stupid.

He's a useful idiot and his story will end the same way as the stories of all the useful idiots before him; forgotten and unwanted and that's what really scares him.

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In non-startling news, EFF says STARTTLS email crypto is mostly done wrong

streaky
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DNS

since most DNS requests are still unauthenticated (see the section on DANE above), an active attacker can still man-in-the-middle the initial DNS request and convince the sender that the recipient doesn’t support MTA-STS

That might be true, is in fact, I've spoken about it here and elsewhere a number of times but a unified solution is going to be messy. Personally I think there's a number of protocols we should be looking again at and the email ones especially are part of this - like how we guarantee jurisdiction if security services come with warrants - but you can't solve all of this in one go. You really have to let DNS security be DNS security and email security be email security and then pin mail server auth to dns. We've seen from PGP how messy solutions don't solve the problem. The problem is MITM from otherwise well configured servers.

Offer me the protocols and if I believe I need more secure email transport I'll use it.

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What does it take for an OpenAI bot to best Dota 2 heroes? 128,000 CPU cores, 256 Nvidia GPUs

streaky
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But I'm not convinced it would win at broader strategy and map management.

It's free to innovate. Evidence suggests it does. You can see from the 1v1 matchups some of the ways it does this, it's been known to do very weird things that work and pros are saying, y'know, I didn't even consider that.

Sure people managed to cheese it but eventually it'll learn to deal with cheese and then you're losing again.

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Trademark holders must pay for UK web blocking orders – Supreme Court

streaky
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Boffin

Can. Worms. Open.

with Cartier's barrister, Adrian Speck QC, claiming that ISPs were "profiting" from rights-infringing content and therefore ought to divert those "profits" into the costs of court order compliance.

That's quite a leap in law. By the way it's not massively differentiated from how you end up with the EU taxing links. Problem is it opens up a can of worms.

By this legal logic carriers profit from DDoS attacks and should be liable for damages incurred. By this logic funeral services providers profit from car accidents and should pay costs for them. Just because somebody profits from an event, legal or otherwise, doesn't make them liable. Then again I've always said that carriers should be forced to require all their customers to deploy something that produces the same effect as BCP-38. Oh hey, there's an ambulance for you to chase lawyers of this world.

Like I said it's a leap, a deeply illogical one.

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GDPRmageddon: They think it's all over! Protip, it has only just begun

streaky
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Mushroom

No but I might be saying that other countries are hypocritical when it comes to this stuff, especially certain EU states I already named. Actually not might be, they just are.

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streaky
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Brexit.

The EU hasn't stopped data flows to the US with FISA, secret executive orders and congress in the US not recognising the right of privacy (or any constitutional measures for that matter) for non-US citizens outside the US. Germany also has similar legal fabrications in their legal system, which FWIW the UK does not have - a UK court treats a Philippine person in the Philippines the same legally as a British person in the UK.

If the EU has a problem with UK data protection they can fuck right off even more than they already can honestly. At least what we do is basically out on the table. The same can't be said for the French or German security services.

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Off with e's head: E-cig explosion causes first vaping death

streaky
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Re: limit vaping to 20 watts

limit vaping to 20 watts

There's no issue with wattage. The problem is directly related to unregulated mods. You have an unreg mech mod and you short it it's going to be whatever the battery chucks out in a short. THAT is the problem. If you're going to regulate such a thing FWIW, keep it sensible, it has to be at least 150W. Minimum.Again the problem here isn't a regulated mod; it's unregulated ones.

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streaky
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Re: Here we go again

Mechanical mod, misused.

Mech mod. Period.

They're dangerous, one of the fundamental issues with vaping regulation missing the key points. We know what's dangerous, risky and what isn't and none of the regulations are addressing any of this.

Mech mods are dangerous, even for experienced users. People saying they're not are exactly the kind of people who are going to blow their own faces off; if you're saying it's not dangerous because I'm smart you're not half as smart as you think.

There's no reason for this to be a thing. Use the right battery chemistry and a *regulated* mod. AFAIK there's been no serious incidents where users have used regulated mods whereas all the incidents I've ever seen are directly related to mech mods. There's simply no reason for them to exist and certainly no reason for them to be sold, or legal. They're not cool, they're overpriced - and you're going to hurt yourself.

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Government demands for people's personal info from Microsoft reach all-time low

streaky
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Re: Government requests for people's data from Microsoft fell

Maybe there is no longer any need for it to be "requested".

No joke I'd assume that means this, it'd be interesting to do a statistical analysis of customer numbers of Microsoft, Google, Apple and a few others and compare it with volume of data requests to see if there's a relative change. If I was Microsoft I'd be doing this right now.

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Car-crash television: 'Excuse me ma'am, do you speak English?' 'Yes I do,' replies AMD's CEO

streaky
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Re: F1 is a Car Crash

All in all it feels like a FIA PR exercise to the environmental lobby

I've said it before - there's a way out of this for F1 and the FIA and it isn't electric cars. It's HICEVs - essentially normal engines fuelled by hydrogen. It's wins for everybody; environmentally, for car makers, and for fans of racing. Doubt it'll happen because of the electric car cabal wasting everybody's time and money though.

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streaky
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Re: Why should he?

I wouldn't recognize her or most other tech CEOs.

Nope, me neither. If she'd just mugged me I wouldn't be able to pick her out of a line-up and fwiw same Intel's CEO.

Some of us have to actually do work and couldn't care less about c-levels.

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streaky
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Re: F1 is a Car Crash

in fact it's much better as there are no ads

Speaking as somebody who actually has Sky Sports - clearly you've never seen Sky Sports F1; there's plenty of ads.

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BT pushes ahead with plans to switch off telephone network

streaky
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The hell is a blackout?

On a more serious note of the 5 people that still actually use a landline 4 of them use wireless phones that take power from the mains anyway. The odds of that one person needing to call 999 is almost zero.

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Google, AWS IPs blocked by Russia in Telegram crackdown

streaky
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Re: GLAP

This is politics, not technology.

It's the technological implementation of a political will. And that implementation is embarrassing to banana republics.

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streaky
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Re: MInor Correction

The difference is one is a person talking, the other is a country going out of their way to actually make something happen. Also relieving people of opposition via 5th floor windows.

I don't know at what point torture made it into the discussion.

Also snoopers charter isn't a counter-argument, it's a case-study.

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streaky
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Black Helicopters

Re: MInor Correction

blah blah Amber Rudd blah blah

But as all of us with our heads screwed on stated at the time the stuff AR stated didn't matter because what she was talking about simply isn't a thing. You'll note it hasn't gone anywhere.

It's not a reflection of what "her" world looks like in any way, it's a reflection of some countries are completely lawless and others aren't. We have the rule of law, for AR to get her way (we can debate how serious she ever was, apparently you think she was more serious than I do) - what she was talking about would never make it through the Commons and if it made it through the Commons it'd never make it through the Lords and if it made it through the Lords then British courts would put a stop to it right pronto.

Spot the difference?

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streaky
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GLAP

So smart.

This is the same Russia that the mainstream press here is scared are going to hack our nuclear power stations to self-immolate?

Give me a break.

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Congressional group asks FBI boss Wray to explain Apple lawsuit

streaky
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Re: Still...

Which questions would you ask?

If we give you powers to force decryption via frontdoor (btw, no, it's not a backdoor) what's to stop people using crypto technology developed elsewhere that's outside the reach of said powers?

If the answer is "nothing" - protip: it's "nothing" - what's the net benefit to the US of you having those powers?

Protip #2: people stop buying Apple devices so, y'know, it's the opposite of a benefit.

All the wrong questions.

The answers to the questions that have been asked are effectively "because". In fact some of the questions that have been asked are essentially why aren't you decrypting things for fun and profit yet, you definitely should be. They're leading questions.

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streaky
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Still...

.. asking *all* the wrong questions.

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What's an RDBMS? Don't ask the UK's data protection watchdog

streaky
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Re: Derp

It is not possible for the ICO to do a 'surprise raid'.

Hence my point that the ICO shouldn't have taken the lead. Data protection isn't the most serious of the allegations with this case. They can get a warrant later for the stuff the police have collected and separately prosecuted at their own pace.

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streaky
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Derp

Not defending the ICO but this whole thing was mishandled from top to bottom. Firstly the guy wanted to make a name for himself so instead of going to the police he went to the press who dutifully plastered it out in public for all to see and give CA plenty of time to duck and cover. Secondly, yes, it is a job for the police, not the ICO (not initially anyway). It's true that data protection laws are alleged to have been broken, but also if the guy is correct so have tech crime laws like (several sections of) the CMA. The police can just go to a magistrate and get a PACE warrant without alerting them that it's coming.

Reality is though the guy seems to have been complicit by his own account and left it very, very late to be both a whistle-blower and be protected as one.

Regardless of involvement of the police though, this was utterly balls'd up by the press right from the start.

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Facebook supremo Mark Zuckerberg has flunky tell UK MPs: Nope, he's sending someone else

streaky
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Facepalm

Re: Rule Britannia!

The UK is hardly going to help itself in this situation by going it alone outside of Europe

I don't know where people get this nonsense from but it isn't even worthy of satire. Every time remainers spout this crap another 20k people convert to the cause because they realise how retarded their side is.

You may now downvote me for speaking truth.

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streaky
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Re: The heat is on

He knows the UK MPs just want to grandstand for domestic consumption

To be fair this almost never actually happens. Even when Rupert Murdoch showed up he was fairly treated. Asked tough questions and came across poorly, but he was fairly treated.

Zuckerberg's problem is that as CEO of a fairly major organisation he doesn't seem to do public very well.

Zuckerberg better hope that his peon can answer all the questions they want to ask to their satisfaction, parliament can hold people in contempt for not appearing and also, frankly, has the power to recommend legislation that could hurt Facebook which frankly might go down quite smoothly. Personally I'd want to ask them questions about their tax affairs and booking UK sales to Ireland to avoid (some would say evade but I couldn't possibly comment) paying tax as a more important issue but that's me.

FWIW being held in contempt can cause issues with the fit and proper persons test that I'm sure Zuckerberg would prefer to avoid.

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Meet the open sorcerers who have vowed to make Facebook history

streaky
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Just Kill Me..

and entails extending IMAP (b.1986) to create secure, authenticated group chat.

No, please, make it stop.

It's like these people who think PKI is about indentity as opposed to securing a two-way communication and we end up with the shitshow that is is EV,

STOP making protocols do things they're not intended to do. Just stop. You overcomplicate the protocol and it ends up being useless at the thing you wanted to do anyway, and nobody will use it.

There are plenty of secure "chat" protocols that work very well, we don't need this. Also nothing but anybody who thinks people use Facebook for chat in great numbers is a tool. Go back to sleep.

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YouTube plan to use Wikipedia against crackpots hits snag

streaky
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Facepalm

Derp

Google made its fortune by capturing the labor that went into building the web

I realise google bashing is fun for many and often reasonable, but lets at least try to keep it sensible - unless 'reg is trying to be the Breitbart of tech in which case carry on..

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Elon Musk invents bus stop, waits for applause, internet LOLs

streaky
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Actually tunnelling under stuff isn't the expensive / controversial / time-consuming part.

No but it's what makes it particularly infeasible in the megacities where you'd hypothetically need this stuff most.

Honestly the best answer to transport in megacities is reducing the number of journeys people have to take which is apparently what has caused TFL to "lose" 20 million journeys a year - people working from home.

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Vaping on the NHS? Don't hold your breath

streaky
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I used to smoke 20 a day and I found 12mg when I first started to be a problem if I was chain vaping for long periods, but people should start at least on what they're comfortable with. I find one of the issues is people trying to combine switching to vaping with cessation, which is trying to quit smoking and vaping at the same time; that's not going to work in most cases. Switch to vaping at whatever is comfortable (the TPD makes this a serious issue in the EU which is exactly part of the issue this article is discussing) but if you can, do it. When you're comfortable vaping you can reduce nicotine, maybe even some day quit but I find the idea of trying to quit smoking and vaping at the same time to be an absurdity in compounding issues - in my view it's why traditional quit aids themselves don't work. Quit smoking and THEN quit nicotine.. if you want to - but you don't really have to.

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