* Posts by streaky

1127 posts • joined 5 Jul 2010

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'Exploding e-cig cost me 7 teeth, burned my face – and broke my sink!'

streaky
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Re: Sounds like me to be a good reason....

But.. nicotine is safe (on the scale of things) to vape. You're in more danger eating a salad than vaping. Not that I'd suggest people just take up vaping who aren't already smokers because why bother but lets find a grip.

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streaky
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Re: Was that vaper built by Samsung?

400% chance whatever happened it was nothing to do with heat in the place it's supposed to be created.

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streaky
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Re: Damaged his sink?

Yeah likely the mod is at fault. Don't use mech mods kids they hurt. I personally think they should be illegal because dumb people need protecting from themselves and I say this as somebody who was very vocal about the TPD's relevant sections.

My well-versed theory on this is fake batteries given the model is commonly faked and the chemistry of HG2's (INR/NMC) is very stable. No kidding the HG2 is very commonly (and very well) faked. I just bought 4 of them coincidentally a few days ago (from a trusted reputable source) and despite testing them to prove they're legit I'm still slightly paranoid they might be fakes - because that's where the danger is. Reality is even when those specific batteries catastrophically fail they shouldn't fail in that manner.

When these events come up the people involved never completely list their gear publicly very conveniently.

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Ex-Autonomy CFO pleads not guilty to charges he inflated the company's value

streaky
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Re: Accountants eveywhere need to watch out

In all fairness when you offer yourself up to acquisition to a US company you have to expect you might come under jurisdiction of US law. Problem is as I've said before the US legal establishment's penchant for abusing wire fraud law - they'll use it when there's no wire and no fraud involved. UK criminal justice system only really does that with terrorism legislation.

Accidentally dropped some litter on the floor whilst making a call to a relative? Wire fraud! Go directly to jail for 145 years, do not pass go.. What boggles my mind is how okay US citizens are with this stuff.

Worst part is it's all HP's fault anyway which is why the class action..

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Brexit contributes to backup appliance sales fall

streaky
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Re: Sterling devaluation triggered a move to cloud backup?

Yeah it's absolutely nothing to do with Brexit, that's the starting point.

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UK Parliament suddenly remembers it wants to bone up cyber security *cough* Russia *cough*

streaky
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Re: Re-inventing the wheel

It's 2016 and you really have to ask that?

Better question is wtf are GCHQ doing given it's supposed to be half their job. Oh yeah that's right I 'member...

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Crumbs. Exceedingly good cakes, meat dressing price hike in wake of the Brexit

streaky
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Re: it's easy to resolve...

instead cut back on illegal wars

I get that people think this stuff is funny but our illegal wars are actually a large portion of UK GDP- both in terms of keeping people directly employed and being able to produce stuff that can be exported. World peace would cause world depression - and tech advancement would grind to a halt fwiw.

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streaky
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Rates of inflation are a myth in the real world. Basket prices used to measure don't necessarily match the cost of things we're actually buying and have no relation to volumes people are buying at.

If the rate is 5% it doesn't automatically mean people are having to spend 5% more to get the same items - because there isn't much stopping people switching brands and yes that does drive the importers nuts; but it should. Not that there's a better way of measuring price increases at a macro level. Well we probably could with supermarket data but only supermarkets have that...

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You have the right to be informed: Write to UK.gov, save El Reg

streaky
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Technically speaking it's to make it so cases are less likely to go to court. Skipping arbitration (by either side) would be assumed by the courts to be somebody trying to abuse process. Very few people who don't work in news media should or would have a problem with any of it. In fact I suspect if you polled the general public one would find that most people would think it doesn't go nearly far enough.

Much as I enjoy reading the 'reg; claiming you're not Murdoch press so it shouldn't apply is a pretty sorry excuse - the potential for damage is so extreme in these cases something needs to be sorted out and there shouldn't be any exceptions. Think before you publish is what the media forgot in times of twitter that would protect them from all of this.

The right to publish freely has been abused by people calling themselves journalists - I don't think any of what the government is doing is going to solve any of the problems in the world but it does improve access to redress when it goes wrong. If journalists have a problem with this stuff they should talk to their peers; this stuff is legitimately the absolute minimum that could be done.

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Gluster techie shows off 'MySQL of object storage' Minio projects

streaky
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Re: anyone using mysql for simple key value store

I'd dispute that in various cases honestly, there's all sorts of good performance, infrastructure and data integrity reasons for doing it. 'reg readers very anti-MySQL though so send in the downvotes.

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Landmark EU ruling: Legality of UK's Investigatory Powers Act challenged

streaky
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Re: Yup...

ECHR is a Council of Europe body, UK will remain in the Council of Europe when it leaves the EU.

People still making faulty assertions about what EU membership actually means, ECHR [the convention] is full of derogations that UK constitutional law doesn't allow for - they can do more whilst we're in that they would if we were out.

I realise that 'reg commentards are generally quite pro EU but at least do a *little* research before you downvote.

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Support chap's Sonic Screwdriver fixes PC as user fumes in disbelief

streaky
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First Line

But first line support had to sign off on every job

Revenge of the dumb processes. If your first line support is so smart why are they in first line. That's not how this works.

"sign off" yeah thanks bruh.

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Firefox to give all extensions their own process in January

streaky
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Re: From memory...

Unlikely, if anything I assume it'll get worse. Does anybody actually care though?

Why so much is going on when all I'm doing is typing in a text box (or even not using Firefox) is a total mystery to me.

Leaks plus GC one assumes. Gotta love JS.

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Banks 'not doing enough' to protect against bank-transfer scams

streaky
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So what is the argument for making the banks liable anyway?

They'll be insured against losses plus the banking system can do things internally to clawback losses that consumers can't - for starters.

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Give us encrypted camera storage, please – filmmakers, journos

streaky
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Re: Shouldn't be hard for Nikon to do

The problem with your argument is that bandwidth is a limiting factor. Most places where photojournalists report on stories that are liable to endanger them, don't have enough of a communications network to instantly transmit a 64Gb + card full of pictures safely out of the way.

Right but it was an *or* - I think it's viable to do it securely at the technical level I just don't see the value in it. Carry a tablet, carry a laptop.

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streaky
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Re: Shouldn't be hard for Nikon to do

Know what, just don't leave data on your cameras. Strip the images off the memory cards, put them on tablet/laptop/phone and crypto them and/or use this thing called the internet the cool kids are talking about to ship them securely somewhere. If they gave a toss we wouldn't be having this discussion because photographers would actually be trying to secure their data. Yeah on thinking about it there's no reason for any of this to be part of a camera's system.

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streaky
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Re: Shouldn't be hard for Nikon to do

At rest it's very very easy, given we're talking about crypto at rest... Entirely possible to do securely in firmware, if you trust the firmware - if you don't you're boned either way.

I'd say the main problem is it doesn't really change anything, if you're talking about photos in countries where there's not a sane rule of law what's to stop them cutting pieces off you in a room somewhere until you give up keys or forcing your finger onto the reader or whatever.

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Higher tech prices ARE here to stay. It's Mr Farage's new Britain

streaky
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Re: Brexit means brexit.

could I respectfully suggest that includes those who think their legal understanding exceeds that of the members of the UK Supreme Court?

No for two reasons: firstly that we don't know what the supreme court thinks yet and secondly that I'm not entirely sure the government has put it so succinctly that it's easy to understand to them. They're going to have their for/against biases either way - they're fairly well documented but hopefully they can view the case on legalities rather than those.

I'm in a low wage job or unemployed. They can't come after me for the money, I haven't got any. Someone else will have to pay for this. Someone else will pay for this. No skin off my nose

That's interesting, I'm high wage employed working for an international company - difference is I understand the economics. There's no left or right wing case for continued membership which is why the centre ground is owned by brexiteers.

Apparently the young are so much smarter than people who have been round and round with the EU; or those of us who have worked for companies that have been munched up and asset stripped and all the jobs moved to Germany. There's many fundamental problems with the UK economy and the EU isn't the only one but it is the biggest elephant in the room and it's charging around breaking the tea service - then we're supposed to want to stay in because roaming charges and we don't have to get a visa (pretending for a second there won't be a visa-free travel agreement anyway).

The UK will be far happier and richer out.

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streaky
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Re: Brexit means brexit.

In case you haven't noticed we still don't have a definitive answer to the constitutional way to invoke Article 50

We have a definitive answer, just waiting on supreme court to do it's job right and confirm that essential truth. It's a legal argument, some people who think they're smarter than they are think that invoking article 50 is the job of parliament because it affects people's rights. It's fundamentally legally flawed because invoking article 50 doesn't change a thing and fwiw parliament can't invoke article 50 even if it wants to. If it held a vote today and decided it wanted to and created a law it would have to ask the executive to do it because it can't. This stuff doesn't have to be complicated.

FWIW on all the other nonsense in this thread - yes some of us leave voted that people probably don't get the actual situation but also we have no problem with people doing the right thing for the wrong reasons. I still think Starkey summed up the non-economics up best recently.

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streaky
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Re: Brexit means brexit.

This was a rational decision that prices in the uncertainty and short-term pain. The poll sponsored by Open Britain (a pro-EU campaign group) and cited in The Guardian (a pro-EU newspaper) was designed to produce the response it got. No surprise there.

Nah man we're all racists who can't do math or look at economic data that's what it is.

Either that or there's no positive case for staying in the EU, there's certainly no downside to leaving and a massive potential upside to to leaving.

In a world where UK exports to the EU are falling, exports to the rest of the world are increasing and we can can do trade deals with countries we want to rather than being blocked by the EU who doesn't want to trade with those countries because it hurts Germany are we going to stay or leave? That's right.

The European project isn't really for the UK. I don't really wish ill on the countries still in (if they ever rebuild the EU the way it should be built I'd be happy to vote for rejoining but right now it's a disaster with a huge democratic deficit which is why you hear EU professional chair sitters talking about populism = bad without stating how they'll rebalance the democratic deficit - which is easy by the way - you just swap the legal positions of the European Parliament and the Commission; Parliament decides law and the Commission should be checks and balances as opposed to how it is today) but it really is a protectionist disaster designed to keep the UK in check and flow cash on the macro level to Germany as opposed to what it was supposed to be for.

Not for nothing but it's going to be decades before people forget de Gaulle's attitude [problem].

More on topic: higher prices means a reduction on imports of things that we don't explicitly need there and then - so what.

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Snowden: Donald Trump could get pal Putin to kick me out of Russia

streaky
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Re: Live by the sword.

He chose not to go after Trump like he did Clinton, that's for sure. The third party nonsense was Snowden being far more naive than he thinks he is.

Greenwald similar approach. Too busy attacking Clinton to see what's coming in the back door. I don't care beyond the comedy value of it. Greenwald is still doing it in fact. Live by the sword; there are worse things than Clinton if you're this kind of actor. Unless Trump really is the Russian agent he tries his best to look like - in which case you're good, carry on.

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streaky
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Re: Live by the sword.

I follow him on twitter, pro-Trump, anti-Clinton was the way I read it. I couldn't care less even if I tried but I read what I read.

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streaky
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Live by the sword.

Shame that he was so anti-Hillary in the campaigns.

That being said Snowden probably safer that ever given Trump is just a Russian agent.

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Latest loon for Trump's cabinet: Young-blood-loving, kidney-market advocate Jim O'Neill

streaky
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Re: Organ payments

Speaking as somebody who had a kidney removed as a child for health reasons and still has only one but potentially might need one in future and frankly probably could afford to buy one, don't be a clown grumpy.

There's a very long list of reasons why buying organs should never be a thing and why it's illegal in the civilised world.

Aside from that all the effort/money that would go on setting up an even close to safe system would be better spent on getting people to donate when they die. Tax breaks of inheritance and the like is something I've talked about before, but there's many levers that can be pulled to fixing the lack of donations - making it a legal default position for starters. If you're not a donor and aren't otherwise medically disqualified you shouldn't be eligible to receive them either; or at least should be put low down in the list.

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streaky
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"Left bias" assumes that there's two or more possible positions to take on the issue. Trump is filling his cabinet with nutties and swamp dwellers. Some of these guys literally are the swamp and own the trademark to it that he claimed he was going to drain. Left or right a child can see he's making it worse. One can't balance the unbalanceable else you end up contorting like the BBC does.

His secdef choice might be the smartest thing he's ever done though..

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streaky
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Re: Free Market Protect Us

I believe that O'Neil doesn't deny global climate change, but that its due to man

They're equivalent concepts like believing that the dinosaurs were around 3000 years ago and the belief in the existence of god. If you believe one you must therefore believe the other; basic logic. It aint the fish causing measurable change at key points that fits with models and theory.

I personally (as somebody who has no problem with the idea of climate change being a thing) think that science and education is failing when it comes to certain aspects (for one that we still use the term global warming quite liberally when it isn't just warming that happens) - and I also get concerned with the argument that change = warming = planet death; which absolutely might not be the case and frankly probably isn't.

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HBO slaps takedown demand on 13-year-old girl's painting because it used 'Winter is coming'

streaky
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Re: overhaul?

This has nothing to do with DMCA, it is plain old good trademark law and the idiotic "use it or lose" clause in it. That clause is long overdue for clarification and relaxation

Only somebody who's never discovered the joys of safe harbour in the DMCA would say something so silly.

Actually take away the safe harbour stuff and the DMCA would be a reasonably functional piece of copyright legislation. It'd still excessively favour copyright holders but at the same time at least people could make it work.

Making bullshit copyright claims should implicitly be viewed by the legal system as perjury and result in people being disbarred when they do it and then they might actually look at the shit they're sending out. Yes I am suggesting lawyers should lose their livelihoods for a first offence, then maybe it'd restore faith in the system and practitioners.

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China is building a full scale replica of the Titanic to repeatedly crash into iceberg

streaky
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Alert

...

I don't mind this as far as it being Chinese, it was of course a seminal event in naval safety and a lot of people died - it's hugely important to learn lessons.

My thing is what would the Chinese think if we built a Tiananmen Square theme park complete with tanks running over protestors - an event they not only haven't learned from but spend a lot of their time obfuscating the memory of.

That's what I thought.

Maybe a theme park where visitors play Chinese people not in "the party" trying to stand for election.

Titanic we know why and how it happened and a whole raft of safety and legal standards emanated from it; a kid's theme park might not really be appropriate but I do like the idea that the Chinese acknowledge that when people don't really give a damn about safety other people die.

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US commission whistles to FIDO: Help end ID-based hacks by 2021

streaky
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FIDO

.. won't even push their own U2F standard so what hope is there? Think only one of the huge list of members actually deploys it (Google).

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Russia's bid for mobile self-sufficiency may be the saviour of Sailfish

streaky
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Re: Balkanisation of the Internet

What happens when *paranoid* state actors get involved. The internet was built in the first place and continues to be run by state actors. Nobody told them the hardware is far more likely to be backdoored than the software.

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The UK's Investigatory Powers Act allows the State to tell lies in court

streaky
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Re: Surely this is where an independent judiciary ...

There are many many many precedents. It's also a fundamental part of UK constitutional law and sits right alongside the principle of equality of arms (none of this comes from EU doctrine, incidentally).

Also yeah, courts would refuse to hear such cases where there wasn't other evidence, all this stuff is court-inadmissible; hell even fully warranted target-specific wiretaps of phone conversations are inadmissible in UK courts. IPA isn't for court cases.

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Chernobyl cover-up: Giant shield rolled over nuclear reactor remains

streaky
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Re: Good luck to building the same for Fukushima.

Yeah AFAIK there's no plan to do anything with the upper bio shield right now, running through the thing with a bulldozer would "allow" it to be stabilised doesn't mean they will - but I get what you're saying; it's not like it's built to prevent work being done to it. I think currently the plan is just basically keeping the dust in as much as possible if it does fall. It's so heavy any attempt to do anything with it will result it in falling regardless, hence I'd just fill it with boron and sand - boron for the obvious and sand to vitrify anything that has residual heat and for support in case anything does fall and it'd keep the dust down and also reduce the fall height. They tried it after the accident because it's a sensible thing to do but they couldn't get near enough to get anything in there - at least now there's cranes in place relative containment that it might be worth filling what's left of the reactor vessel with. Honestly at this point you could probably mostly encase it in reinforced concrete and forget about it to a certain extent - would make it easier to work around for sure. NSC opens up a lot of options for making it safer.

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streaky
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Re: Good luck to building the same for Fukushima.

NSC isn't for stabilising the upper bio shield, I don't think anybody dare touch that, they are going to be stripping the roof off the old shield though because it's a mess. IMO the best thing to do would be to fill it with a mix of sand and boron and leave it for a few decades - sand would help protect it if the bio shield did fall.

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streaky
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Re: dosage, scientists regularly go inside the reactor building itself, even the most radioactive part which is all the crap that leaked out the bottom of the reactor is relatively safe to work around for a short period now.

As I pointed out elsewhere to people being stupid about this - even huge radiation doses are reasonably treatable with intensive care, it won't implicitly kill you like people imagine. It's very not nice but can be treated, one of the biggest threats is actually infection because it will destroy your immune system. In fact it's intentionally used for that when doing things like marrow transplants. Radiation cancers tend to be from things like getting particles stuck in places you don't want them like the throat or lungs.

Just don't ask Putin how much Russia paid towards the new containment building.

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UK's new Snoopers' Charter just passed an encryption backdoor law by the backdoor

streaky
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Re: How long until

But whereas previously your complete browsing history was recorded by a pseudo-legal system under the pretext of National Security, and presenting that as evidence in a court of law would involve admitting their capabilities, now they can just print out the logs from the ISP and present that.

All they can say is you connected to a server at a certain time, which in most cases would also include thousands or millions of other people at the same time. That's not evidence of any sort. So yeah, what's this law for again?

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streaky
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Re: Provided by?

It is currently a jail-able offence to not reveal an encryption key when demanded - even when it is not possible to prove that there is anything encrypted

This law is totally untested in the higher courts, and is the antithesis of various parts of fundamental UK constitutional law. Every time it's ever looked like being tested the governments that have been around since it's been enacted have ran away screaming - it's only there to scare people into cooperation.

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streaky
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Re: Provided by?

The key here is for people providing services to use libraries that are sourced from outside the UK and there isn't really anything the govt can do even if they wanted. My reply to such a demand in my software would be along the lines of "go talk to the openssl guys, I can't help you I'm not a cryptologist".

There main specific concern here is nobody is going to trust UK crypto products ever again (assuming anybody ever did) and nobody is going to set up business here doing any kind of crypto work, but again it's not as if anybody ever seriously did anyway.

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streaky
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Re: How long until

the intent of the Act is largely to legitimise activity that was already going on

No, no it isn't.

ISPs were not logging this data because it wasn't required for billing, unlike say phone records. That's entirely new capability. It also doesn't legitimise or de-legitimise anything GCHQ were up to, nor does in grant on oversight to civilians to take them to any sort of task; even if we assumed they were capable.

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Small ISPs 'probably' won't receive data retention order following IP Bill

streaky
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Re: Next steps

Your own comment proves why it'll never happen, that's literally the end of the economic system.

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streaky
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Coffee/keyboard

Don't see how Brexit applies. I voted for it and I didn't expect a government who didn't want it to have a plan, that's utterly absurd. Various parliamentary groups published reports before about what it'd look like and how it could be leveraged but parliament aint the government.

This is a totally different issue where the people driving the law don't understand the law or any of its implementation details or effects on basically anybody at any time - including FWIW the people its supposed to be targetting who the government has admitted will not be bothered by it.

No need to be mad because your side couldn't produce a decent argument for staying in that was actually positive for people outside London.

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More than half of punters reckon they can't get superfast broadband

streaky
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Re: Copper cabling, crap service

This is plenty of bandwidth.

No, it isn't. It's a dog's breakfast is what it is. It's true that in the middle of nowhere we could use that sort of speed to cover up the fact we're getting short-changed, but in urban areas is astonishingly poor form.

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streaky
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Re: Copper cabling, crap service

Telcos don't install cabling in new builds, the developers do it.

Even if this is true, and I don't think it is because usually openreach show up and do it - it'll still be specified by BT. I don't think the power cut thing is true either because we don't have such a line on FTTP and nobody is shutting Hyperoptic down, plus it'd be an absurd rule to have given chances of the thing taking the power out also taking the phones out (storms/floods would be most common in the UK). But lets say both those things are true for argument's sake - there's ways around power like say backup batteries for phones or also requiring copper twisted pair with the FTTP; the reality is when you're installing cable it's no major cost to install others at the same time which is why various services piggyback road digging when they can. The install thing is a case of BT/OR specify the network standards anyway even if it is true. Indeed it'd be super easy for BT to specify the requirement to also ship fibre onto planning applications and that will all fix itself.

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streaky
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Re: Copper cabling, crap service

The big problem here is if new housing is being built the area should be having fibre installed direct to premises country-wide and it should have been happening for at least the last 15 years but what's actually happening is they're installing copper. This is probably the biggest fail here; that's causing the most absurdity.

Once they have that sorted then we could be looking at getting other areas upgraded from copper but they've not even got that sorted yet. And they're getting massive taxpayer funds.

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Fibre pushers get UK budget tax reprieve

streaky
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Re: 5 years - then another 5.. and another

I have no issue with poor service to non-city areas, there's all sorts of good economic reasons why it's expensive to do and there's a certain level of acceptance that it's hard, even the nordics get that. It might even be possible that in trying to give everybody equality of access we're actually harming the network itself.

My issue and it'll continue to be my issue is we're as a country (from tax revenues) and as individuals (as customers) paying through the nose for very crappy service from very crappy networks even where the economics of FTTH/P make perfect sense purely because we keep using the worst available options for service delivery. Somebody in government needs to get a grip on the actual roll-out of decent service rather than just throwing money at it and hoping the problem goes away because it never will.

It'll take far more money than we're talking about to re-roll FTTH to countryside areas, even with somebody competent pushing it.

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Allow us to sum this up: UK ISP Plusnet minus net for nine-plus hours

streaky
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Welcome to Post Truth journalism.

Oohh 'reg upset somebody.

I like how the thing in 2016 is for people to label anything they don't like (and I fail to see how this would make anybody not connected with PN this angry) post truth. Maybe it's just the rediscovery of truth?

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Open sesame: Alibaba to open its first data centre in Europe

streaky
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Re: Cloudy Security?

it would be subject to EU data protection laws

Doesn't stop the NSA (or GCHQ or the BND) doing whatever they like so why would it stop the Chinese?

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streaky
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Pint

Tulips.

"We want to establish cloud computing as the digital foundation for the new global economy using the opportunities of cloud computing to empower businesses of all sizes across all markets"

Oh good it's tulip mania all over again. We don't know why we want cloud but we want cloud because cloud. Cloud amiright? Also cloud, it's the future. Year of the cloud you might say, 'cos cloud.

[off in the distance] .. cloud!

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