* Posts by Jonathan 27

329 posts • joined 21 Jun 2010

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Mobe reception grief turns LTE Apple Watch 3 into – er, a dull watch

Jonathan 27
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I prefer my watches without wireless connectivity, thanks. Why does everything need to be connected to the internet?

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You lost your ballpoint pen, Slack? Why's your Linux version unsigned?

Jonathan 27
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This is partly the fault of yum's maintainers. There should be a blatantly obvious warning and acceptance prompt if you try to install an unsigned package. That would force companies to do it to prevent complaints from users.

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Compsci degrees aren't returning on investment for coders – research

Jonathan 27
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Re: Peak Code Monkey

I think it's more a factor of the amount of development that's web-based now than anything else. Front-end web development accounts for a large amount of that JavaScript demand. Combine that with HTML-based mobile app platforms and you're covering most of it. Some people are using JavaScript for server-side scripting too, primarily using Node.JS, but it's not a huge segment at this point.

It's more of a move towards web development than"hipster coders". If you value your future in this industry you need to make sure you web skills are up to date. If you're retiring in 10 years or less you can probably ignore it. I'm too young to ignore it.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Peak Code Monkey

I don't know where you went to school, but I had to take math and physics courses to get my Comp Sci degree.

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Uber Cali goes ballistic, calls online ads bogus: These million-dollar banners are something quite atrocious

Jonathan 27
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Do people really still say that? "the bomb"?

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Microsoft teases web-based Windows Server management console

Jonathan 27
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Why do I feel like this is just going to result in having to go 3 places to set things up in Windows server instead of the current 2. First Windows Server required using GUI tools, then they added PowerShell commands for SOME but not all functions. AND some settings are now ONLY accessible through PowerShell. Now they're adding a HTML GUI, that only supports a subset of functions.

I wish they'd at least finish ONE of those interfaces before building another one.

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Noise-canceling headphones with a DO NOT DISTURB light can't silence your critics

Jonathan 27
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These would never work, nor will anything else like this because people who are interrupting you at work always think whatever they want to talk to you about is too important to wait... Regardless of how unimportant it might be.

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Atlassian releases 'Stride', because HipChat isn't hip enough to whack Slack

Jonathan 27
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Stride makes me think of sugar free gum.

We currently use Slack and JIRA around here, and I can't see us WANTING to change that. But if Atlassian offers bundled pricing the beancounters may force the situation.

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Facebook ties JavaScript code together with Yarn

Jonathan 27
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Re: Adding to the confusion

First one to race to the trademark office wins.

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Dude who claimed he invented email is told by judge: It's safe to say you didn't invent email

Jonathan 27
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Re: Constantly Lying.

If you repeat something enough times people will start believing you. That's the only think his claim is based on. Even at the time he wrote his program, similar programs were already available. There is no fact behind his claims, just repeated claims. He uses methods commonly used in confidence scams.

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Connect at mine free Wi-Fi! I would knew what I is do! I is cafe boss!

Jonathan 27
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It seems like Alistair Dabbs is slowly becoming Simon Travaglia by becoming one shade more disillusioned every year. Keep up the good work.

P.S. Is it weird that I both think Ding is the stupidest thing ever and that I wish I'd thought of it first?

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Dell's flagship XPS13 – a 2-in-1 that may fatally frustrate your fingers

Jonathan 27
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Yeah...

I have a last-gen XPS 15 (9550) and I can tell you that the keyboard isn't an issue after you get used to it. It takes a few weeks, but after that you'll never think about it again. It also has an issue with being hard to open, not because the slot is hard to get to, but because you have to hold both sides of the laptop to pry it apart because the hinge is so stiff, that's annoying. I can't say anything about your other issues, my notebook has a power/charge LED and a 5 LED charge indicator on the side. The power button is also fairly large.

But after saying that, I had a QC issue with my notebook that arose about 1 month in to my ownership of the laptop (GPU died) and it took, and I'm not exaggerating here, 3 months to get them to fix it. In the intervening time I actually got angry and built another computer. Since they fixed it I haven't had any issues with it, but it also doesn't get that much use... the desktop is now my primary computer. After my horrible experience with their support line I don't think I'll buy a Dell any time soon, especially since this isn't the first time I've had a problem with a Dell. I had an XPS 15 L521x and that thing was such a huge pile of crap that they bought it back, after 3 attempted replacements because the entire model is faulty.

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Continuous integration platforms are broken – here's what needs fixing

Jonathan 27
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Re: Stability

What I love is how npm package updates ALWAYS break something. Half the time the developer of the package has made so many breaking changes you have to totally re-write the code that calls that package. I wish I could say we're writing wrappers around every 3rd-party plugin now, but we're not...

This is annoying for front-end JS, but if you're using Node.JS it's horrible. Your entire application can require days of reworking when you update a single package, which then causes all of it's dependencies to update. And even simple Node applications have 50 - 100 packages because of dependencies.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Here's what I'd like...

Visual Studio + TFS supports almost all of your points there.

1. The build server is still a separate thing, but it uses the exact same compiler and generates the same error messages as a local build.

2. As above, they're the same messages and are delivered to whoever pushed to the build server, which can reject the build (gated build).

3. You can send selfsets to other developers, I think that might cover this.

4. You can set TFS to deploy to a set environment after every check-in, or at intervals and you can do it multiple times so that covers this entirely.

Requiring tests to pass also an option.

Anyway, my point is that Microsoft's tooling already supports 99% of what you want to do here. I'm really surprised this isn't common across the board. What are you using? Subversion? CVS? TI Pocket Calculators?

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Jonathan 27
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Re: re: No one "checks in" anything any more.

Not breaking the build is kind of a low bar for software quality and unit tests can only really test for things the developer can envision, and most problems with things I've written come from situations I'd never have thought of. This is absolute bare minimum.

I'm not saying continuous integration is bad, just that's not fool proof. Even after code reviews and gated check-ins you can still have problems.

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Biz sends apps to public cloud, waves 'bye to on-premises server folk. NO! WAIT!

Jonathan 27
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Locked in now, no chance to survive otherwise. Outsourcing is self-perpetuating.

Did I mention I work for a SaS company?

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The sky is blue, water is wet and UK PC shipments are down

Jonathan 27
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Yeah, it has nothing at all to do with the fact that PC sales are falling everywhere and Intel hasn't released a compelling new CPU since Sandy Bridge. Nothing to do with that.

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Sorry, but those huge walls of terms and conditions you never read are legally binding

Jonathan 27
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This is why I never accept EULAs, my cat Mr Fluffy does for me.

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What weighs 800kg and runs Windows XP? How to buy an ATM for fun and profit

Jonathan 27
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You say that, but I caught my cat the other day writing JavaScript in a vain attempt to develop an automatic cat food ordering bot. If his spelling wasn't so bad I'd be up to my neck in cat food by now.

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FYI: Web ad fraud looks really bad. Like, really, really bad. Bigly bad

Jonathan 27
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Seeing as almost all real humans are running ad blockers now, I don't think many advertisers would pay for ads if the people selling them actually told them the truth. Online ad fraud has been a problem since 10 minutes after online ads were invented and the situation has been going rapidly downhill since 2005 which is about when the average user discovered ad blockers, because Firefox extensions just made it so easy. I'm even running one now, although I white-list sites I like, like this one. I'm even running an adblock detector blocker.

Fun fact, did you know that there is no actual proof that advertising really changes anyone's opinion on products. The only thing it's been proven to do is let people know a product exists, if they didn't already. So advertising well known products like Coke and Tide may actually be totally pointless.

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Jonathan 27
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Yeah...

Quality products very rarely have annoying web ads. So if the ad is annoying you can be sure the product is a pile of crap you shouldn't buy so you're not missing out on anything.

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How to build your own DIY makeshift levitation machine at home

Jonathan 27
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Re: Hoverboards?

You want a hoverboard that will only work if placed inside a levitation chamber?

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HBO Game Of Thrones leak: Four 'techies' arrested in India

Jonathan 27
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Are you going to pay the insurance premiums? I think not.

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Pssst, wanna know a secret? MongoDB has confidentially filed for IPO, reports suggest

Jonathan 27
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Re: MongoDB ... never by choice

I think it's easy to use, for one thing. That's using Mongoose, from Node.JS and only if you almost never query on anything but ID. That's very specific, I know.

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Jonathan 27
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Very few people in the USA would get the reference.

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Not another Linux desktop! Robots cross the Uncanny Valley

Jonathan 27
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Re: BBC TV programme "Hyper Evolution: Rise of the Robots" is

Technology hasn't failed us, there is just a subset of swindlers that oversell the current state of technology that ultimately disappoints us. AI that can genuinely learn is possible (although dangerous), but we're so far away from that at this point that it's only realistic in science fiction. Anyone who claims otherwise in the near-term is either a hopeless optimist or an intentional swindler.

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Apple weans itself off Intel with 'more ARM chips' for future Macs

Jonathan 27
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Right, as all children were.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Doesn't seem very feasible

It's more likely that app writers will have to write a separate background process that is executed on the ARM processor. You can't migrate processes between two different CPUs running different architectures.

Apple should just go all in and build an ARM-powered MacBook Air (Or MacBook Lite, or any other name marketing likes) to slot under an x86 MacBook and MacBook Pro. Then they can see if it will sell. I think it will, at least to their core audience, people who don't know what type of CPU is in their computer.

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Slurping people's info without a warrant? That's OUR JOB, Google, Facebook et al tell US Supreme Court

Jonathan 27
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Re: dont know

Make you never surf the web either, that's where they get most of the data.

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APT-style attack against over 4,000 infrastructure firms blamed on lone Nigerian 20-something

Jonathan 27
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Cybercriminal, seriously? Is it 1995? I thought we dumped that prefix already.

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Google bins white supremacist site after it tries to host-hop away from GoDaddy

Jonathan 27
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I'm not sure that argument holds water. Allowing people with really unpopular opinions speak their mind generally doesn't end up with them gaining a lot of support, just a lot of derision and mocking. Regardless of how hateful their message is, letting them talk about it makes it easier to combat.

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WannaCry vanquisher Marcus Hutchins pleads not guilty to flogging banking trojan Kronos

Jonathan 27
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Re: Framed?

Wait, you think transporting the oil via train is safer than through a stabilized pipeline? Are you crazy, or do you just not realize that the oil was being transported either way and the pipeline is just cheaper and safer than the alternative.

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Old Firefox add-ons get 'dead man walking' call

Jonathan 27
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Re: unfortunate

Can't you install the Chrome version of uBlock Origin? Wasn't that the point of web extensions?

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Really?

It works, they just don't want to support it. Those are different things. You can install Windows 98 on an Intel 7th generation Core processor as well. Doesn't mean it support all the new features of that processor.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Does any browser team manage to communicate with actual users?

I think you've missed the point of Mozilla entirely. They're an open-source project that doesn't get any funding from users. So therefore, they don't care what users think. They do what they want, similar to many other open source projects. GIMP comes to mind particularly, because it's had a terrible user interface for years, but instead of fixing it the team just constantly talks about how they think it's better than any other option, years and years after everyone else ditched floating palettes, they're still there in GIMP.

To distill this down, Mozilla doesn't care what you think. If you don't like it switch browsers.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Bonkers

If you don't like it, switch browsers. Outdated browsers aren't really an option with the pace the web moves at now, you'll quickly find the gates start coming down on you once you're a year or so behind.

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Jonathan 27
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Nah, every browser maker is dropping NPAPI because it's an in-process binary specification and they want to go with a HTML-Javascript implementation that's easier to sandbox and integrate with their browsers. Everything being Javascript (or HTML5 as hipsters like to call the new ECMAScript versions) is much simpler for browser makers and web developers. This is helpful, particularly for security. NPAPI leaves security in the hands of 3rd party plugin developers and there have been many instances of those developers dropping the ball, particularly Adobe with Flash and Reader plugins.

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Tech billionaire Khosla loses battle over public beach again – and still grants no access

Jonathan 27
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"Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom killed that proposal out of fear that upsetting Silicon Valley billionaires would damage his chances to win the Californian governorship in 2018"

This corrupt politician should be forced to resign immediately. The American voter's corruption tolerance is now so high their scumbags think they can get away with anything. Sadly I think that might be true.

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Revealed: The naughty tricks used by web ads to bypass blockers

Jonathan 27
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This is exactly the sort of thing that increases the uptake in ad blocking technologies. The more intrusive the advertising methods, the more people block. This is a circular problem and advertisers are just making it worse. Blocking ads is much more simple than blocking ad blockers, so I'm guessing that ad supported publications are going away, unless they can come up with another business model or convince their readers not to block their ads.

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At last, a kosher cryptocurrency: BitCoen

Jonathan 27
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Re: Not kosher at all....

At least magic beans have some food value. I'd take those over BitCoen.

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Jonathan 27
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"hopes to raise as much as $20m through an initial coin offering that aims to sell 100m worth of BitCoen digital tokens to investors"

For anyone not familiar with crypocurrency, this is what is generally referred to as a premining scam. Nothing supports this valuation and you're unlikely to see a return on investment. Anyone can just launch a crypocurrency and if they're already doing things like this you can't trust these developers at all.

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Microsoft's Surface Pro 2017, unhinged: Luxury fondleslab that's good...

Jonathan 27
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Re: "If you don't have a Surface Pro, I suspect the price is why"

I doubt it, 99.9% of people don't have a problem with Windows 10. And don't bother replying saying how much you hate Windows 10, I'm fully aware that half the people who don't like Windows 10 are members here.

P.S. Surface Pro is totally capable of running Linux, but you'd be crazy trying to run Windows 7 on it. The touchscreen support is terrible.

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70% of Windows 10 users are totally happy with our big telemetry slurp, beams Microsoft

Jonathan 27
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Re: It's easy .....

I'm assuming you're never accessing any web sites as well then? Because that's where the real data gathering is.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: MSFT and Facebook

The Google option not to serve targeted ads does just that, they still slurp all your data all the time. I don't really see much practical difference, they still have all your data.

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How can you kill that which will not die? Windows XP is back (sorta... OK, not really)

Jonathan 27
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It does, go read the source. It has all the market share. Android is number 1 overall, followed by Windows, then iOS.

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Jonathan 27
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The Windows OS shares are based on the percentage of the total Windows number, so they don't add up like that.

Windows 7 has 45.76% and Windows Vista 0.93%.

Windows 7 is still more popular than 10, despite Microsoft's heavy marketing offensive.

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Jonathan 27
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I'd liken it to a big shiny stone tower built on top of a slowly rotting wooden foundation.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: april 2019 and the pink elephant in the room that nobody wants to talk about.

Those POS systems are probably not included in these numbers. Not unless they're accessing the public websites these numbers are pulled from.

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Jonathan 27
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The way they check is by measuring reported OS on web browser requests, so it doesn't differentiate between a VM and bare metal install.

P.S. "XP Mode" in Windows 7 is just a Hyper-V VM with Windows XP on it.

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Microsoft Surface laptop: Is this your MacBook Air replacement?

Jonathan 27
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The work MacBook Air I had for about 4 years was constantly receiving firmware updates. They come through the app store. Very convenient, why would you not want firmware updates? Every laptop I've ever bought has needed nearly constant updates (except the Alienware m14x R2, which only had 6 ever). The Dell XPS 15 I currently own is the worst. I think the firmware gets updated at least once a month. Windows update is starting to distribute firmware now too, but it seems significantly behind the manufacturer, at least for my Dell.

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