* Posts by Jonathan 27

264 posts • joined 21 Jun 2010

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OnePlus cash equals 5: Rebel flagship joins upmarket Android crew

Jonathan 27
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Re: No microSD port?

I personally don't care if the microSD port is hard to access, as long as it's there. I'd rather buy one decent-sized card and leave it in there until I feel like I need more space than to swap cards all the time. A dual-sim card is pretty useless in the western world. OnePlus should have doubled up the functionality with a micro SD slot. My current Moto X Play is like that. The MicroSD card is on the bottom of the sim holder.

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Firefox doesn't need to be No 1 – and that's OK, 'cos it's falling off a cliff

Jonathan 27
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As a developer, you could hit F5 instead of the refresh button. Saves a second or two each time and if you do it 100 times a day it adds up.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: more needed than ever

I think it's funny that you should make that reference, seeing as the spyware in Windows 10 is a reaction to all the spyware in Android and iOS. Google is the big daddy of spyware, not Microsoft.

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Microsoft ctrl-Zs 'killing' Paint, by which we mean offering naff app through Windows Store

Jonathan 27
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Perfect

This is the perfect solution, I personally don't use paint anymore so I like the option to not have it installed if I don't want. I've already made use of the option to remove Windows Media Player and Internet Explorer from Windows 10. It would be nice to see Microsoft unbundle more of the software that ships with Windows so we can remove it if we want.

I know a lot of people have been talking about Notepad too, which I also don't really use (NotePad++ FTW). But I think a basic text editor should be bundled with the OS because you occasionally need it to get yourself out of situations with corrupted config files. I suppose I'd be ok if it was a store package, as long as it was installed by default. Microsoft also needs to work on the store, I never have issues installing anything from Google Play on my phone, but the Windows Store is always having install issues and I barely ever use it.

P.S. I noticed a lot of people haven't noticed that Microsoft has already removed calc.exe, the current one is just a launcher for the WinRT calculator app. As such it doesn't work if you corrupt your WinRT subsystem, as are parts of the start menu.

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The Atari retro games box is real… sort of

Jonathan 27
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Is there really a big demand for this? I don't think Atari has a lot of nostalgia left to support this.

As for timeline, it doesn't take too long to fabricate a case for a stock circuit board, load it up with ROMs, Linux and a 2600 emulator. I could knock out a "working prototype" of this product myself in a day. A Raspberry Pi could do it easily and they're cheap as chips.

My cyncism for defunct brands revived by marketers apparently knows no bounds.

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Don't panic, but your Bitcoins may just vanish into the ether next month

Jonathan 27
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Wow, this fills me with confidence about the future of Bitcoin! I love holding currencies that might be unreliable for an indeterminate amount of time.

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1Password won't axe private vaults. It'll choke 'em to death instead

Jonathan 27
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Re: Why re-invent the wheel?

Convenience, password managers autofill websites and keep your passwords (and history) organized as well as generate new random passwords on command. No one NEEDs a password manager, but they do save you time.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: KeePass

If you want a local or self-managed vault, an open-source product like KeePass is the only logical option at this point. It's not a matter of if but when will any commercial password locker maker decide that that < 1% of users that don't use their cloud service aren't worth supporting anymore. Companies aren't charities, so they're not going to keep supporting unpopular features, when the other option is so profitable.

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JavaScript spec gets strung out on padding

Jonathan 27
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Re: What about static typing!

Use TypeScript? I know, I know, it's not the same thing as static typing built into the language. All of the static typing solutions I've looked at for JS aren't very good, but I don't think Javascript's design lends itself to static typing. We'd probably be better off with a new scripting language... and then we get to the problem of people not wanting to change.

This is definitely the biggest debate in Web development right now... glad I'm not the one who has to decided where we're going.

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Intel bolts bonus gubbins onto Skylake cores, bungs dozens into Purley Xeon chips

Jonathan 27
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Re: SImplification

It's more complicated than the previous system, which was already ridiculous. There are more levels and more models overall. This system is completely impenetrable.

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Ubuntu Linux now on Windows Store (for Insiders)

Jonathan 27
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Re: Mensa

The vast majority of MCSE's I've met are totally brainless clods. I'm not sure if it's because the testing is so easy to game or if the training is just worthless but I don't really consider MCSE an asset when reviewing resumes, in fact I deduct points for it.

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Viking storms storage monastery wielding 50TB SAS SSD

Jonathan 27
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Re: Nice

SSDs can fail for no reason, I have one that died sitting on a shelf. Hadn't been used in years and then I plugged it in and the system wouldn't even boot (off its existing OS install on another drive).

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Nice

Form factor is an issue, my laptop can't accommodate anything more than one m.2 drive for storage. This isn't a real issue for me because I have USB drives, a NAS box and a desktop computer. But if you want a lot of storage in a thin and light laptop, NAND density is the only real solution.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: 50TB! I'll take twelvety.

Here's hoping, wake me when I can replace the 4 2TB drives I use for file storage with SSDs for a reasonable cost. I imagine they'd last functionally forever, because they don't see many writes and SSDs don't generally age much by being read.

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Hackers able to turbo-charge DJI drones way beyond what's legal

Jonathan 27
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Re: DJI can't police this.

Even if DJI was the only company that made drones, they couldn't stop this. Sure, software hacks are really easy, but if you couldn't do that you could do hardware hacks instead. Say, hack the altimeter to display all values over the limit as their high - the limit. You can't really totally control a product that's out in the user's hands. This is a job for law enforcement.

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Microsoft drops Office 365 for biz. Now it's just Microsoft 365. Word

Jonathan 27
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No one is willing to pay for an OS now, they're certainly not willing to pay for updates on a yearly basis.

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His Muskiness wheels out the Tesla Model 3

Jonathan 27
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Just put a hole in the wall so you can open the car door, problem totally solved ;).

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Wikibon drops bomb, says Intel's Optane could be a flop...tane

Jonathan 27
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I think Optane is likely to become one of those superior proprietary technologies killed by a cheaper, more open standard that's nearly as good.

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Google ships WannaCrypt for Android, disguised as Samba app

Jonathan 27
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If you read the comments on the (linked) repository, they are working on SMB2 support. It will probably tip up in a few weeks.

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Sysadmin bloodied by icicle that overheated airport data centre

Jonathan 27
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Poor Allen, foiled by poor workmanship. I can't see this happening here in Canada, you can't get away with something like this because it would freeze every year, for about 3 months at a time.

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FREE wildcard HTTPS certs from Let's Encrypt for every Reg reader*

Jonathan 27
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Re: Certificates + BlockChain technology = Authorityless Certificates

How do we deal with the constantly increasing performance cost?

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Multiple servers?

You'd have to write your own script/application to distribute the certs. I don't think there is an available OSS solution. Let's Encrypt is targeting personal and small business sites that don't care to pay for a more-expensive cert provider, so I'd guess that anyone with multiple servers can probably afford to pay GoDaddy, Verisign or whoever.

I personally use Let's Encrypt on my personal sites, which are run off one Amazon EC2 instance. But for work we use the more expensive certs and will continue to. What's $100/year if the company makes millions?

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Jonathan 27
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Re: There is a dark evil danger to the big uptake of HTTPS

I'd recommend not using any public Wi-Fi, they're not secure. A VPN is a minimum, but even then I'd be wary because anyone on the network gets local network access to your device (except in the most expensive Wi-Fi devices, which they're probably not using).

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Jonathan 27
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Re: An admirable effort.

I think you bring up a good point. The majority of people don't understand what a TLS (secure) connection actually secures and just think it's vaguely "safe". I don't know how we could communicate that what it means is that the communications between your browser and the website are encrypted and verified.

Browser manufacturers are doing a really bad job of communicating that right now. Chrome, for example has made it increasingly difficult to check certificates, you can't even get them from the lock icon anymore. They're hidden in the page inspector.

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Windows Insiders with SD cards turn into OneDrive outsiders

Jonathan 27
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Re: Uninstall OneDrive

I'm cool with it.

1. This is the most minor thing in the world, this only affects a very specific use-case and you can get around it by converting your drive to NTFS.

2. Some of us have 1Gbps bidirectional fibre.

3. Haven't yet, I've had OneDrive (SkyDrive) since the beginning.

In case you plan on saying anything else, I do have local backups as well, but I want an extra set of copies in case the place goes down in flames.

Besides, who's "more trustworthy"? Google? Amazon? All the giant multi-nationals would sell you out for a nickle if they thought they could get away with it.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Place holders

That's why they didn't work properly and programs would try to open the placeholder file instead of downloading the file properly. That is why they killed the feature and re-wrote it.

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Feelin' safe and snug on Linux while the Windows world burns? Stop that

Jonathan 27
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Re: Reality check

It's the #1 desktop OS, so it's the biggest target. Although there have been some interesting ransomware attacks for Mac OS too. Very few people use Linux as a desktop OS and those who do are on average, fairly technically adept. These attacks require the user to download a fishy file to start off, so Windows is the primary target.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: about 12 per cent of servers run non-Windows OSs!?

That number is just as ridiculous as the web statistics companies that claim 90%+ of web servers run Linux. Their methodology is bunk, because SpiceWorks has no way of knowing what servers people who aren't their clients are using. Just like the web statistics companies only detect the OS on edge node servers so if you use a Linux-based web balancer (like almost everyone does regardless of app server) they think you're running Linux.

You're right to be skeptical of statistics like this, because they're in general, totally unreliable. No one has enough data to compile such wide-ranging statistics.

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Toyota's entertaining the idea of Linux in cars

Jonathan 27
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Re: Please keep it simple

I think you're going to have to either build your own car or buy one manufactured before 1980 to get that. Cars have been using ECUs for ages. If it has fuel injection, you're using software control somewhere.

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Jonathan 27
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Separate modules all over the car is one of the primary reasons BMWs and Mercedes are so expensive to repair. Most cars are better off with the solution Japanese manufacturers use, which is to limit the number of components. Less to go wrong.

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Microsoft boasted it had rebuilt Skype 'from the ground up'. Instead, it should have buried it

Jonathan 27
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Re: So why then does Slack launch Skype if I click on a number?

"So installed Slack has tight integration with Skype and I have yet to figure out how to remove it."

No, it doesn't. It uses Windows associations to launch your assigned phone software. Numbers in my Slack launch 3CX for phone calls because that's what I have assigned. You can change the association or you can remove Skype. Either will fix your problem.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: Hmmm.....

A truer thing has never been said.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: "This new app is absolutely terrible"

Or the new Opera, which is also based on Chromium.

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Jonathan 27
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Oh man is the new Skype app terrible. Those cards just keep getting in the way, and it's SO SLOW. How is it SO SLOW? I liked the old Skype app. The new one doesn't really do any more and the interface is constantly getting in your way.

I'm so happy that we use Slack at work so I'm not forced to use Skype's new app on a regular basis. I think this will probably be enough to get my friends who do use Skype to switch to something else.

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Looking for an Ubuntu Unity close cousin? Elementary, my dear...

Jonathan 27
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I don't know about Elementary being similar to Unity, I think it looks more like Gnome 3.0. Last time I tried to use it I ran into driver issues with the installer and it wouldn't work regardless of how hard I tried. Maybe I'll give it another shot. A new user-focused Linux distro is generally a good idea.

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Robots will enable a sustainable grey economy

Jonathan 27
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Re: Dumb yanks

Statistically, life is much better for elderly people in cities. Because of their limited mobility, cities allow them to get out and do more things. I'm not saying anyone should be forced to do anything, but it's something to think about.

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Why, Robot? Understanding AI ethics

Jonathan 27
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Re: Different people?

You're probably right, self-driving cars have to be massively better, near perfect, before they'll be popular.

And yes, some people definitely consider themselves bad drivers, and a lot of them are actually wrong. It seems more based on that person's level of confidence than their actually ability. Although lack of confidence or overconfidence can both be really dangerous on the road. I should know, every accident I've ever had has been caused by overconfidence.

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Ker-ching! NotPetya hackers cash out, demand 100 BTC for master decrypt key

Jonathan 27
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Re: Can't anything be done??

You're right, but you missed laundering through exchanges. You can take your bitcoin and trade it for Ethereum, Litecoin or whatever, trade that to another exchange and keep going through a few cycles. It becomes near impossible to trace, especially because most exchanges aren't willing to reveal their records. And there are plenty or exchanges located in uncooperative or highly privacy-law gated countries.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: And...

I don't remember IBM being a great company, how long ago was that?

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Bonkers call to boycott Raspberry Pi Foundation over 'gay agenda'

Jonathan 27
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Re: @Wolftone - the whole bible?

No, the new testament is all about repenting your sins and believing in Jesus. Or else you go to hell regardless of anything else. Jesus or hell.

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Blighty's Department for Culture, Media & Sport gets 'digital' rebrand

Jonathan 27
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Should just re-brand to Department of News and Entertainment. Covers all those things and has less words.

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For all the chaos it sows, fewer than 1% of threats are actually ransomware

Jonathan 27
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Re: fewer than 1%

Go easy on the guy, his mind only works in integers.

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Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

Jonathan 27
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If they treat it like they did the Windows solution, it will go off the rails. Ubuntu doesn't remain magically secure without updates. Could you imagine them running a version of Ubuntu that was contemporary with Windows XP now?

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How to pwn phones with shady replacement parts

Jonathan 27
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I really disagree with the conclusions here, why is it the manufacturer's duty to guard against the possible evils of third party hardware? It's the customer's choice to go which cheap knock-off parts and guarding against them is explicitly anti-consumer, plus it costs the manufacturer more money for the additional components.

For the vast majority of customers this would be a negative.

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America throws down gauntlet: Accept extra security checks or don't carry laptops on flights

Jonathan 27
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"We cannot play international whack-a-mole with each new threat"

Then why institute this at all? whack-a-mole is exactly what this is. Not only that, the laptops are still on the plane anyway, just in the hold. How does this improve safety at all?

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Intel's Skylake and Kaby Lake CPUs have nasty hyper-threading bug

Jonathan 27
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Re: Disable hyperthreading? Ouch.

Probably because native English speakers would all pronounce that thread-ripe-er.

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Jonathan 27
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Re: This is gonna suck.

Best Buy "technicians" often have no training at all, some might have A+ (which honestly, is a worthless certification). I wouldn't pay them to clean out my cat's box.

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Cisco and McAfee decide users just can't be trusted not to click on dodgy attachments

Jonathan 27
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Re: users just can't be trusted not to click on dodgy attachments

In a large enough company training gets expensive, especially if you have high turnover. Say, in a call center.

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Jonathan 27
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Well, they are right, some users can't be trusted to not click on malware laden attachments. Otherwise no one would be sending them because the ROI would be 0.

McAfee? I trust them about as much as I trust John McAfee and that ain't much.

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Latest Windows 10 Insider build pulls the trigger on crappy SMB1

Jonathan 27
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Re: Yawn

You can close tabs with the middle mouse button (normally the scroll wheel) in every modern browser. Quick pro tip.

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