* Posts by LeoP

117 posts • joined 9 Jun 2010

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Linus Torvalds drops Intel and adopts 32-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper on personal PC

LeoP

Re: AMD vs. Intel: War Games v3.0

"without the PCIe bottlekneck"

This made me again realize what an old fart I am.

Oracle to take IT out of the equation for HR, ship prebuilt metrics, KPIs to analyse carbon-based lifeforms

LeoP

What's more frightening ...

... than being pulled into the cloud that noone wants by a desperate billionaire?

Can only be: The results of this being used to do "analytics" on human beings.

There is no icon for disgust, please add one.

Now there's nothing stopping the PATRIOT Act allowing the FBI to slurp web-browsing histories without a warrant

LeoP

Land of the free

For which definition of free?

Please Mr. Trump: Build a wall. A big wall. Not only to the south, but all around. Keep that lunacy in.

Incredible how you can steal data via Thunderbolt once you've taken the PC apart, attached a flash programmer, rewritten the firmware...

LeoP

This is just another example ...

... of "physical access = complete compromise modulo time".

And this tends to be even cheaper and easier with "Smartphones" (i.e. smallish pocket computers) than with the PC counterparts - and I know quite a lot of people, who use the former to unlock the latter.

Some sanity might just help: This document is important? Encrypt it on a file level and PLEASE close it before letting you computer unsupervised.

On the opposit end of the spectrum, they might have all my "photos" folder. Well, the Memsahib might take issue with that, so not really all.

What do you call megabucks Microsoft? No really, it's not a joke. El Reg needs you

LeoP

Only one possibility

comes to mind, since I watch some random GoT episode yesterday:

Neverlearn Livebane

Forever mothballed: In memoriam Apple Butterfly Keyboard (2015-2020)

LeoP

Still, at least you can now eat ...

... a cronut at your desk without worrying about subsequent trips to the Genius Bar.

I always could. Since I need my notebook for work, not to show of wealth and/or moronity I didn't and wouldn't dream of buying such a device (and at such a price) for the privilege of running OSX "Vista" Catalina.

Prank warning: You do know your smart speaker's paired with Spotify over the internet, don't you?

LeoP

Cloudy days ...

... for anyone thinking he actually owns that expensive gadget he shelled out for.

And a briiliant burglery reconnaissence tool: If after the 17th loop of "Last Christmas" (or any title in the 1000 volume collestion "Songs I'd have hoped to never hear again") nobody is running out of the house with blood dropping from the ears, the target can safely be assumed as empty.

That awful moment when what you thought was a number 1 turned out to be a number 2

LeoP

This might explain ...

... the performance of the Banks when things got a bit rough.

Mix 1 part moronity with 2 parts of greed and you get a tasty taxpayer-bailout cocktail.

AI startup accuses Facebook of stealing code designed to speed up machine learning models on ordinary CPUs

LeoP

Re: Schadenfreude

Full disclosure: My first language is German, where the word "Schadenfreude" comes from.

It consists of "Schaden" (loosly translatabel to "damage") and "Freude" (loosly translatable to "joy"). So "Schadenfreude" is enjoying somebody else's damage.

Now I strongly reject the notion of me really enjoying something, that only damages Facebook! I will not settle for anything else than full destruction. My (bohemian in both senses) great-grandmother would have said (again loosly translated into modern english): They have already sinned more, then what can be counterbalanced by a single eternity in hell.

LeoP

One factual and one meta opinion

Let's start with the factual opinion: The important part in today's AI workloads is not so much a question of performance alone (you can throw a lot of hardware against it), but of performance per unit of energy consumption. It is rather hard to believe, that even the smartest trick can make a general purpose CPU work as efficient on such a specialized problem than a specialized (i.e. GPU) accerlerator card.

Now the meta opinion: Whatever is bad for Facebook is good for me. YMMV.

Broken lab equipment led boffins to solve a 58-year-old physics problem by mistake

LeoP

Not really

They are good in the breaking part, but seem to find the learning part quite a challenge.

Meltdown The Sequel strikes Intel chips – and full mitigation against data-meddling LVI flaw will slash performance

LeoP

The other wayround

Code, that is compiled with these handbrakes on is not (or at least less) susceptible to being attacked. So the deliberate compiler deoptimizations are for the victims, not the miscreants.

And why would an attacker want to slow down his code?

LeoP

The average bod vs. the average conman

Of course we see from the enlightened example of our Trumpian friends, that draconian punishment (including death) are a near guarantee for a very low-crime environment, peacfull streets and no cybercrime at all.

Speaking of it: Are you interested in an investment opportunity into an essential and lucrative bridge?

LeoP

Re: If these exploits carry one

Also from the FA: "However, LVI turns out to be most practically exploitable on Intel processors because of the combination of the facts that we have seen more Meltdown-type leakage sources there that can potentially be inverted, plus certain design decisions that are specific to the Intel SGX architecture (i.e. untrusted page tables)."

Quote-picking doesn't alter the real world.

BOFH: Here he comes, all wide-eyed with the boundless optimism of youth. He is me, 30 years ago... what to do?

LeoP

Re: A better essay on the state of IT I have not read

The quicklime references provide additional headroom to that undisputed lead.

If you're writing code in Python, JavaScript, Java and PHP, relax. The hot trendy languages are still miles behind, this survey says

LeoP

Collecting a few downvotes

First of all: I appreciate StackOverflow

This stems to a big part from those nasty bastards that pay my bills: The customers. A lot of our work is replacing outdated/buggy/no-longer-suppported/whatever systems and applications with something more robust that runs on a sane foundation (for varying values of sane). This often includes having to dip into the other system deep enough to make migration easier or sometimes even feasable. StackOverflow has this knowledege.

As a thank you, I tend to answer a selected "hard" question from time to time - quid pro quo.

Now the second flame war: There is no inherently bad programming language - and if there is, then neither JS nor PHP. It might be (and likely is) true, that the perceived easyness and accessability of the pair produces an out of proportion amount of inexperienced or just bad developers, but I consider it unwise to blame this on the languages. We create a lot of PHP - but we (at least try to) do it in a sane, controlled and responsibe way.

I do on the other hand know from personal experience a metric shitton of C{,++,#} code that should never have been allowed to leave the dark cave it was conceived in. And don't get me started on 100MB+ Java processes doing basically a "Hello, World".

Languages (and more important: Runtimes) are tools. Tools help. Tools do not replace skills.

Virtualization juggernaut VMware hits the CPU turbo button for licensing costs

LeoP

VMware

This is neither cynical nor a flame war, but an honest question:

Why would anybody use VMware for virtualisation in more than a Lab/SMB scale?

- If you are so big, that you feel the pain on 33+ core CPUs, you most likely have an IT department

- If you have an IT department, the actual people working there will want the money going in their pockets, not VMware's

- Xen and (even better) KVM cost nothing in license fees and scale much better, the HCL of KVM being ... close to everything ever built on x64.

- Just a handfull of VMware full-featured licenses will easily pay for a BOFH plus a PFY.

- The "ecosystem" (managability, storage options, ...) of the FOSS world have already bridged the gap and are often better than their VMware counterparts.

Vendor-bender LibreOffice kicks out 6.4: Community project feel, though now with added auto-█████ tool

LeoP

Re: LibreOffice Draw

Yesterday.

Microsoft previews Visual Studio update with added Linux love, many new features

LeoP

Fundamentally different approach

We take a fundamentally different approach to tooling - I understand, that this causes more maintenance effort but the resulting increase in productivity and happyiness ahs until now outweighed it by far. It may be hard to scale though.

The "normal" stuff:

For every project

- there exists a defined repository (duh). What's not in there dosen't exist.

- there exists an automatic build and deploy process to a defined set of targets (usually VMs, that are spun up from a template). What doesn't build there doesn't count.

- Deep testing in development is encouraged, but only the tests on the targets count

The "strange stuff":

Every developer choses whatever tooling he wants to fill the repository. Choise of Hardware (within a budget), OS, IDE, tools whatever are completly up to the developer. Want to develop in nano via SSH? Go ahead. Want Visual Studio? Go ahead. Use whatever makes you happy, but remember that the build target isn't your machine, but the project build-and-deploy bot.

Some chose to "make things run locally" first and then basically port to the target, others keep very close to the mothership - I don't care. It's the output and dev happyness that count.

Sure, we made your Wi-Fi routers phone home with telemetry, says Ubiquiti. What of it?

LeoP

This comes at a good point in time

A few days ago I was asked by a client (for whom we normally don't do any networking, but hey there is the water-cooler/coffee-maker/whatever talk) to help them think how to expand their (currently Ubiquiti) WLAN - stay with Ubi, roll their own or go "Enterprise". I forwarded them a link to this article at ca. 11 p.m., and got a reply along the lines of "so one possibility just dropped" within 5 minutes.

This tells me, that they are quite serious in both ways.

Lies, damn lies, and KPIs: Let's not fix the formula until we have someone else to blame

LeoP

Been there, done that

Yours humbly is from a country that is better known for its musical than for its technical prowess and whose biggest telco was at that time a mostly state-owned partner of Vodafone (now a daughter of America Movil after a more than boitched privatization job).

Their claims of 95+ percent availability seemed rather absurd then, about 90 was what everyone would have guessed (remember that this means double the downtime).

Now: The clue for the why is in the first paragraph: It was a mostly state-owned telco. Management was picked by their party affiliation and willingness to do what some politician wanted, not by what was best from a technical perspective.

Larry Ellison tiers Amazon a new one: Oracle cloud gets 'always' free offer, plus something about Linux

LeoP

Larry must be desperate

Let's face it: Using a public cloud offer always comes with a measure of lock-in: A spectrum from just "convenience lock-in" where the effort of moving a workload to another provider or self-hosting is just a resource-costing nuissance up to a "systematic lock-in" where you need to rebuild a lot of components to make it even possible to move to a different vendor. We have come to accept this and many (if not most) mitigate as good as possible.

The only reason we are willing to even consider accepting it is an uneasy trust not in the vendors, but in the market forces moving them: If one cloud vendor were to start screwing his customers more than the pain threshold, he would have a very hard time acquiring new customers and stall his growth - which is very near to a death sentence in an industry where economy of scale is a major effect.

There is one thing though: For many of us (and this definitly includes me) this trust does certainly not extend to Oracle, whose business model is sometimes perceived as "lock, screw and blackmail". And while this does work with (mosty legacy) applications that are tied into the main Oracle Database product, the idea of beginning or extending such a relation to cloud hosting does not go down well with IT departments. And forcing a product into goverment contracts via the courts doesn't inspire confidence as well.

So Larry made a cloud, and nobody wants it - if not coerced with one of those beloved audits, basically nobody signs up. Beware of a furious and desperate Billionaire!

Harvard freshman kicked out of US over OTHER people's posts on his social media

LeoP

Re: So to gain entry into America you MUST......

I'd go to America quite voluntarily - Canada seems a very nice place to visit - just not to Trumpistan (formerly known as USA).

Please don't equate AMerica and the USA, that's "Fake Olds"

Microsoft middlemen rebel against removal of free software licences

LeoP

It is what's between the lines that is really important!

There have been many (both enlightened and whining) comments in the last years that Microsoft has basically given up on the SMB (and maybe "Power User") market:

- No more Exchange in SBS

- No opt-out of "Telemetry" below hundreds of seats

- Mo more WIndows for mobile

- More of that stuff.

Well, IMHO this is nothing else than completion of the circle: If we don't care for the SMB market, then why would we care for those supplying it?

What I am quite curious about is, whether there is some vacuum starting to establish and how it is going to be filled.

Akamai CEO: Playing games from the cloud? Seems too expensive to be viable right now

LeoP

Economics

First of all: I don't game, so the blind is speculating on colours here.

But: I assume a decent gaming rig will cost over 1000,- (Euros, Dollars, Pounds doesn't really matter) - let's say 1200 to ease up the calculations. This means, that with a subscription cost of 50,- the hardware alone will cost two years worth of it, not taking into account the power it uses at your end (a.o.t. on Google's end). Most hardcore gamers I know will consider a 2 year old rig hopelessly outdated at least concerning the GPU. Add to this the cost (in expertise and time) of running Windows 10 and outsorcing all that to bigger players (pun intended) and only owning what is basically a smart-TV-sans-TV might actually be a good value proposition for the less tech-savvy.

Bring it on, Chipzilla! Nvidia swipes back at Intel in CPU-GPU AI performance brouhaha

LeoP

Fair and square

Far be it from me to defend intel. Far as in at least a few galxies.

But in the name of fairness one has to make clear, that Nvidias GPUs have never undergone such scrutiny - and they would have fared rather poorly if they had: Just the NVENC part (which makes up a tiny proportion of the GPU) leaks the last image of every encoded stream to any Dick, Tom and Harry who create a new context.

Google puts Chrome on a cookie diet (which just so happens to starve its rivals, cough, cough...)

LeoP

Looking forward to "the Facebook brwoser", "the Amazon browser" and friends

Maybe we will get some browser competition after all?

Welcome to the advent of "Apps" on your general purpose computer. Except it won't be any longer.

Owner of Smuggler's Inn B&B ordered to put up a sign warning guests not to cross into Canada

LeoP

Canada! America! Canada! America!

Canada is part of America (some would argue the most sane part of it):

Canada is NOT a part of the USA (which of course explains why it is often seen as the sanest part of America).

As of 2019 the correct wording is "Look, boy! Now I'm in Trumpistan! Now I'm in Canada! Trumpistan! Canada! Trumpistan! Canada!".

On a more sobre note: Please don't help spreading the "fake olds" that "America" and "USA" are synonymous.

One click and you're out: UK makes it an offence to view terrorist propaganda even once

LeoP

Can I expect a knock on the door?

Of yourse you can. Since your Internet use is monitored in real time thanks to the spook's charter, this is automated.

Epyc move: Supermicro plunges into Cascade Lake’s Optanical waters

LeoP

Intel hopes ....

... it will outperform the Epycs by 4% with a price premium of 400%.

They'd better hope, not only Apple has fanboys.

Vitamin Water gets massive publicity for new flavor: Utter BS

LeoP

Re: Bah. It's just the usual "Too good to be true" promise

Since yours truly lives in Vienna let me elaborate: Vienna City services (from trash collection to dog tax) are organized into "Magistratsabteilungen", or "Divisions of the Magistrate", called MAx with x being a Number between 1 and somewhere around 70.

The series is about an imaginary "MA2412", the division responsible for Christmas decoration - you can imagine that a division of civil servants having exactly nothing to do for 10+ months of the year (and I mean exactly nothing, not the figurative-but-true nothing) creates a good backdrop for a comedy series.

Bad thing though, that neither script nor acting nor ... ahem ... anything in that series is of better quality than what would be produced by a "Magistratsabteilung"

Germany pushes router security rules, OpenWRT and CCC push back

LeoP

Giving the vendors a choice will give the users a choice

Let's assume the average lifetime of a SOHO router is N years (I'd suspect N to be around 5, but I may be quite wrong - it's important to make it a fixed number mandated in the standard).

Now give the vendors a choice:

EITHER: Guarantee FW security updates (within 72 hours after being notified of a vulnerability) for 2*N years after the last sale.

OR: Guarantee the user the ability to run firmware of his choice based on either the Linux or the BSD kernel with all drivers provided as open source.

Vendors, that do not comply are liable for a fine of 200% of their yearly sales plus all damages, that any user suffered because of such an omission.

International politicos line up to get shot down by Facebook

LeoP

The tax man cometh

So, why have those parliaments not yet voted for a special tax on "non-responsive" companies? Something around 99 Pennies/Cents for every Pound/Euro that these peoples pay to Facebook should catch their attention. This ofcourse includes Pounds/Euros spent by others for ads shown to the respective peoples.

British fixed broadband is cheap … and, er, fairly nasty – global survey

LeoP

Re: streams rather than downloads?

If your downloads are corrupted by jitter and lag, you should google for "TCP"

LeoP

Re: streams rather than downloads?

Yup. And these bits have to go down that pipe every single time you listen to that song, not just once.

Apple breathes new life into MacBook Air with overhauled 2018 model

LeoP

1199 - seriously?

So a low-power non-upgradable landfill netbook with a 128G SSD, a keyboard with a MTBF of a few hours and no usable ports will cost twice a reasonably specced Lenovo?

Thanks for the offer, I beg to decline it though.

Techie was bigged up by boss… only to cause mass Microsoft Exchange outage

LeoP

Re: while maybe wiping your machine with rm -rf *

Well, who wants remote clicky-mousy for server administration instead of a text file that can be copied, edited, copied back just in case, etc. might actually be "wiping your machine with rm -rf *".

From the point-of-view of the universe, he or she might also do less harm in a Windows environment.

Official: IBM to gobble Red Hat for $34bn – yes, the enterprise Linux biz

LeoP

Less pessimistic here

Quite a lot of the "OMG" moments rests on three assumptions:

- Red Hat is 100% brilliant and speckless

- IBM is beyond hope and unchangeable

- This is a hostile takeover

I beg to differ on all counts. Call me beyond hope myself because of my optimism, but I do think what IBM bought most is a way to run a business. RH is just too big to be borged into a failing giant without leavinf quite a substantial mark.

Cops called after pair enter Canadian home and give it a good clean

LeoP

No problem leaving the door open here in Austria ...

... since miscreants most likely don't know, that my dog's looks and her behaviour differ heavily. She is also very curious, turning her attention immediately to everything that "normally isn't there".

And just in case we would find the burglar and the bitch sleeping arm in paw in the hallway, when her alpha-brainwave emitter did the job and made him fall asleep while giving her the dose of cuddling she insists upon.

Alibaba pulls dust covers off its new London cloud presence

LeoP

I beg to differ

"China" is a strong point - but so are "Trumpistan" and "Amazon"

Whoever uses cloud and whatever for needs to understand, they are putting their data into the hands of other people - the rationale for it being to put the problems and a part of the cost there as well.

Understanding this, I am very hard pressed to think of China as more dangerous than the UST.

Last year, D-Link flubbed a router bug-fix, so it's back with total pwnage

LeoP

Re: Some unpatched models have OpenWrt available

> As ever, OpenWrt might not be appropriate for your needs

I can't imagine a scenario, where it is less appropriate than a D-Link vondor image.

SpaceX touches down in California as Voyager 2 spies interstellar space

LeoP

Isn't it amazing

how much the abilities of NASA, indeed our abilities as mankind to think in long-term projects, build long-lasting stuff, make very much from very basic ingredients have deteriorated, and how much our expectations have kept pace on this downward spiral.

I do hope, that the speed of this change doesn't increase any more - lest I am still alive, when it hits the fan.

The age of hard drives is over as Samsung cranks out consumer QLC SSDs

LeoP

Re: QLC? It's not the one for me

While QLC is not for me either, I can't let your argument stand: Every level adds one bit of information per cell, thus doubling the capacity. So SLC->MLC is x2, MLC->TLC is x2, TLC->QLC is x2, etc.

This does however not excuse its other shortcomings.

Oracle Database 18: Now in downloadable Linux flavour

LeoP

Re: Long live Windows production servers

It is 2018 and if you still roll out Oracle RAC you deserve Windows.

Quantum, Linux and Dynamics: That's the week at Microsoft, not a '70s prog rock band

LeoP

Re: Powershell on Linux

I beg to differ.

Your argument is completely valid, but ir relies on an assumption: That knowledge of BASH scripts in the Windows sysadmin population is either constant or decreasing. I am seing the exact opposite in the real world. It might easily be, that legacy PowerShell scripts will be just another account in the technical debt department, when POSIX-type shell scripts are still the de facto standard.

Oracle wants to improve Linux load balancing and failover

LeoP

Fair and square

It is exceptional, that Oracle does (or tries to do) something good. Let's take a minute to appreciate this - god knows, when this will happen again.

Science! Luminescent nanocrystals could lead to multi-PB optical discs

LeoP

Or just forget the Multi-PB stuff ...

... and create a cheap 40TB medium. Could actually be quite usefull.

Europe's scheme to build exascale capability on homegrown hardware is ludicrous fantasy

LeoP

I beg to differ

First of all: I agree 100% with this being a laughable idea in the proposed timeframe.

But: I do think it is time for Europe (including Britain!) to change from a pure consumer perspective of IT technology to a more active and innovative approach.

Am I the only one to hear the crackling in the structure of our beloved and well-understood workhorse architectures? Wouldn't right now be a good point in time to explore alternative ideas while Intel cleans up its mess and the overwhelming part of the big name's budgets go to IP lawyers rather than R&D boffins?

Not all exploration leads to immediate success - but why let that stop us from trying? Let's not pass on a chance to become a more confident player in IT research, maybe make the tech a bit better all over the place and get a speck of "independent of others" (which I tend to think of as a big illusion) to show as well.

The butterfly defect: MacBook keys wrecked by single grain of sand

LeoP

Re: But...

The german saying for that is: "Shit ordered, shit delivered".

LeoP

"Der Reg" actually

Yours humbly has german as his first language and during his long ago first years learned the hard way, that inanimate things tend to carry a rather random gramatical gender in this weird language. The Register would most definitly be a male specimen, just as "the Standard".

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