* Posts by Slx

544 posts • joined 5 Jun 2010

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ARM chip OG Steve Furber: Turing missed the mark on human intelligence

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Brain without a body ?

The other thing you have to remember is that the brain did not evolve as a stand-alone computer in a box. It's an integral part of an animal which is a body that is incredibly well adapted to its surroundings - it can move around with extreme agility and also can sense, feel, experience and is basically a deeply integrated part of that environment.

An artificial computer in a box does not have that multi-billion year evolutionary history of having literally evolved out of the environment that it is part of. Rather, it's a quite abstract creation built by the biological entities that did just that. So it is starting from a very different position.

So, it will be very interesting to see how this develops over the decades and centuries ahead. Also whether it's possible to ever make the jump to sentience and consciousness. We could be missing a trick with that and we will just end up with more and more intelligent computers that are still not really 'alive'.

I think, however, humans are pretty arrogant in assuming that we're the only animals that possess those two features too. When you look around the animal world, we aren't a hell of a lot different other than we've developed the ability to express and communicate abstract thoughts as sophisticated language.

Does that necessarily mean that other animals don't have them? I don't really buy that argument at all.

We're all just versions of the same basic vertebrate evolutionary model so it would make sense that we share a lot of the same mental faculties, just developed in different degrees and directions.

I think we just like to mentally separate ourselves from the other animals we have a sense of superiority and a big ego but also, probably because it allows us to eat them. If we thought about every hunted / farmed animal in a cuddly way, we'd probably have issues doing that.

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Re: AI Getting Nowhere

Very few computers can run on a cheese sandwich.

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The thing we forget about biological computers is that all the wiring also appears to be active processors. The only relatively recently discovered that the dendrites that connect the neurones are fully active signal processors.

Also brains aren't binary, they can have umpteen different complex electrical and biochemical nuances between 0 and 1 and they can combine all of those in vast numbers of complex ways.

So, I would suspect that 1 million ARM processors is still probably drastically less than 1% of a brain's processing power.

We're still a long way from mimicking what wetware does!

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NYC cops say they can't reveal figures on cash seized from people – the database is too shoddy

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This is like something you'd expect to see in an underdeveloped country!

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Apple's iPhone X won't experience the joy of 6...

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I find iPhones pretty decent (albeit pricy and locked down) hardware so I'm not going to slag them off, but I think it's amazing how much people get sucked into the PR hype around them.

It's just an iteration of an iPhone. They've tweaked a few things and speeded a few things up and put in facial recognition.

Apple do nice, steady, step-by-step upgrades they don't tend to change everything and confuse everyone as they know they're selling a consumer product to consumers primarily and not to the tech geeks (including myself) who inhabit these boards.

But, seriously - it's an iPhone! You'll find it works like an iPhone, it does iPhoney things and it will probably be fairly bullet proof.

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'Israel hacked Kaspersky and caught Russian spies using AV tool to harvest NSA exploits'

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Well, when you think about it, an AV scanner is potentially a perfect way of accessing a system at a very deep level.

I actually blame a Microsoft for allowing a situation to have developed wheee Windows has been so full of security holes that PC users are basically feeling they’ve no choice but to use 3rd party antivirus software. In many cases some of these packages even significantly impact performance, yet people put up with it.

If you’re installing software that’s essentially a “black box” that you’ve no ability to audit but that has deep access to all sorts of areas of your system, it has the potential to access a hell of a lot of stuff.

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European Commission refers Ireland to court over failure to collect €13bn in tax from Apple

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The problem is that the €13 billion is not being paid into the exchequer, it's going into an escrow facility for whatever period of time the court cases and potential appeals may take. It could be sitting in the escrow accounts for years yet.

Setting up facilities to store €13 billion in such a way that it does not end up pushing risks onto the Irish Government is not all that straight forward.

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This referral is actually a little pedantic as the state is in the process of collecting the tax and Apple has accounted for it already.

The problem is that the sums involved are absolutely huge and there has been a protracted negotiation between the Irish Government and Apple to ensure that Ireland is not left holding the can should there be any drop in the value of the escrow fund.

What's ultimately happened is the Irish Government and Apple have mutually agreed a way of investing the money to ensure it returns some kind of decent return on investment while it's sitting in limbo.

The EU seems to be under the impression collecting €13 billion in, as yet hypothetical, back taxes is a as easy as doing a VAT return for a small company. It's involving all sorts of complicated funds and vehicles to ensure that the money does not become a major risk to the state or the company.

The sums involved are not like someone collecting the council tax. You can't just put €13bn in a bank account.

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Re: Race to the bottom

It may well explain why they're so keen not to have any exposure to the ECJ.

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Oath-my-God: THREE! BILLION! Yahoo! accounts! hacked! in! 2013! – not! 'just!' 1bn!

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People still have Yahoo! accounts?!

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Life began after meteorites splashed into warm ponds of water, say astronomers

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You can see how a lot of people get freaked out by the huge knowledge gap and fill it with religious explanations.

We are still missing a LOT of the basics about how life began.

Life seems to me to be almost like some kind of fundamentals natural phenomenon that is linked to how matter and energy tends towards being organised.

If it's so random that it only occurs when some little clump of carbon based molecules start to behave somewhat logically, then it could be extremely rare or extremely common.

It's also possible that some of the carbon that's scattered throughout the universe is organised and has those building blocks.

I'm not sure that we'll arrive at an explanation until we encounter *very* primitive life somewhere else

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Finance sector is littered with vulns, and guess what – most can be resolved by patching

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This is the same sector that seems to think it's completely fine to process the majority of our financial transactions using a 16 digit card number + expiry date and a number printed on the back and very little else other than trust.

They also seem to think it's completely fine to protect your bank accounts with a 1960s magnetic stripe card and a 4 digit numeric pin number.

From what I can see, we get all up in arms if our email accounts don't have two-factor security and complicated anti-hacking measures, but we're fine with the whole notion of banks that have about as much real security as the piggy bank you had when you were 6.

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The award for worst ISP goes to... it starts with Talk and ends with Talk

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It just shows what a catchy name and good advertising can do for you!

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EU's tech giant tax plan moves forward

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So put in a few data centres and employ about 5 people

If Trump drops the corporation tax to significantly low levels, these companies will just go home and serve their customers out of the US.

Also with CETA, there's very little stopping them from upping sticks from Ireland, the Netherlands or Luxembourg and moving to Vancouver or Toronto and serving Europe from there. From a technical point of view, there's no particularly huge difficulty providing data centres in Europe.

I've a feeling that this is going to be a case of bite your nose off to spite your face and because the jobs really only crop up non-France and non-Germany, nobody will give a damn anyway.

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I would assume this will apply to French and German multinationals and national champions too?

Will Ireland and the Netherlands be able to apply similar rules to Renault or PSA or Siemens sales locally taxing turnover / revenue?

Or, is this just a big attack on the Americans?

Also I assume they'll be fine with the US adopting similar rules for Mercedes, BMW, Siemens, Nokia, L'Oreal, Airbus, all the European banks etc etc ? They really should have their revenue taxed on a US state by state basis.

I smell a trade war, particularly if Trump gets the idea that this is an EU tax grab on profits that should be being recognised in California or Massachusetts or wherever.

If you analyse a company like Apple for example, almost all of its value is being added in California in terms of technology and all of its physical production is in China or other locations in the far East. It could be a reasonable argument to describe their entire EU operation as nothing more than a supply chain and suoport service and write it off as "cost of sales" and recognise profit back home in Cupertino.

If US corporate taxes do drop there's potentially an end of the needs for serious EU or overseas HQs for any of these organisations. It's a virtual world and you can do anything from anywhere. If you've a smooth EU-US trade agreement, why would you need a HQ in Ireland or France for that matter either. You could just do it all from home.

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Spanish govt slammed over bizarre Catalan .cat internet registry cop raid

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I find this whole incident has changed my view of Spain. I would be thinking twice about investing there and certainly about ever living there after the way that the Catalans have been treated in this.

If the Spanish Government has an argument against Catalonia leaving, present it! There are lots of good reasons why it makes sense to stay together. However, if they just adopt what look like the kind of bully tactics that you would see in some kind of authoritarian state, well then they will simply get the publicity that they deserve.

I am genuinely shocked with the way this has progressed and I think it really shows that Spain hasn't developed into a proper democracy after the dictatorship.

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Why the Apple Watch with LTE means a very Apple-y sort of freedom

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I may be being paranoid but...

I am not at all concerned about wearing a Bluetooth or even WiFi device, but I have to say I'm bit entirely comfortable about wearing an LTE or UMTS device in permanent contact with my body.

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The SIM is very much about what GSM standards brought : open freedom to change operator.

If you've no SIMs, you've a risk of lock in. This was always the case with US standards like CDMAOne /I-95

Virtual SIMs will have to be very tightly regulated to ensure we don't just lose the benefit of physical SIMs

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Sacre bleu! Apple's high price, marginal gain iPhone strategy leaves it stuck in the mud

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Re: £1,149

In the demo (if you read the text on the screen on the phone) it was prompting for a password to enable FaceID.

This is normal iOS behaviour and exactly what it does with fingerprint ID. If the phone has been rebooted, it will not allow you to activate biometric security without entering the password first.

It was a presentation failure rather than a technology one.

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A point - it didn’t fail during the demo. It prompted for a password.

I don’t like facial recognition but I will pull you up on a point : The technology didn’t fail during the demo. If you look at the phone display it prompted for a password because the phone has been restarted. This is exactly how iOS handles fingerprint biometrics too. You will be promoted for a password if the phone has just been booted and it won’t accept fingerprint ID until then.

That being said the lack of fingerprint ID is pretty stupid. They could have built a sensor in on the back of the phone. I suspect they didn’t because it works have ended up looking way too close to an android device.

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Homeland Security drops the hammer on Kaspersky Lab with preemptive ban

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It won't be too long now before you have to install your "America First Chip" to access online services.

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Weird white dwarf pulsar baffles boffins as its pulsating pattern changes over decades

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My theory is that it's likely to be a star surrounded by pre or post planet debris that is coalescing into larger blobs causing the light to be stronger when they're more organised and then they bash into each other every so often splitting up scattering the light, then they coalesce again. So, we're observing a brightening and dimming effect as the light/radiation is obscured/scattered and then picks up again, depending on how organised the debris is at any given time.

It would make sense to me that solar systems would go through long periods of stuff coming together and bashing into each other and splitting apart until eventually the only objects that survive are ones with clear paths and you get an organised, non-chaotic solar system like ours.

It's also quite possible that loose debris (in huge quantities) could do something like that very quickly. It could be just balls of rubble / dust coming together then smashing apart in a matter of a few years.

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Act fast to get post-Brexit data deal, Brit biz urges UK.gov

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If you’re an EU wide bank with a UK HQ, you’re are already abroad once Brexit happens.

It would be a bit like a bank with US wide operations having it’s HQ in Japan.

The UK seems to not be quite getting its head around what being a “third country” means. You’re going from “home turf” to “strange and far away land”. “Onshore” to “off shore” financial Centre.

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Re: "You mean planes and ships lacking spare parts and proper equipment for duty?"

Powered by eco friendly hot air and bluster?

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Not going to be easy.

Given the British government's penchant for data retention, spying on citizens and deep ties to US intelligence, I think this could be a very long negotiation.

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US government sued by 11 pissed-off travellers over computer searches

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You used to only expect this in undemocratic authoritarian states...

The is the kind of thing you used to expect when entering strange authoritarian states with extreme, paranoid regimes and definitely not the US or other countries that would claim to be bastions of freedom.

It's very like what you might have experienced living in East Germany.

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Internet addict sent to an anti-addiction boot camp is no longer an addict. Because he's dead

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Strange how nobody ever gets treated for book addiction. Yet people get lost in novels for hours and even days at a time.

That being said, I don't think that anyone should be making light of a young guy being killed in a boot camp in an authoritarian state.

Whatever happened, it sounds absolutely horrific.

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Blighty’s beloved Big Ben bell ends, may break Brexit bargain

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I'm surprised they haven't blamed a completely fictitious EU directive demanding the bongs be standardised to metric Eurobongs.

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US prosecutors demand data to unmask every visitor to anti-Trump protest website

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Re: Ooops

Off to the reeducation centre to be sprayed orange and made to study The Art of the Deal!!

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Hopefully this is deemed unconstitutional, but it shows just how dangerous a combination of data mining and an authoritarian government can be.

If it's allowed to stand, I really would worry about the future of the USA as a functioning democracy, as this would have a massive chilling effect on freedom of speech. You would have to think about potential implications of every website you visited. That's pretty much how people have to behave in authoritarian states like China and really is contrary to reviving the USA would claim to be.

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South London: Rats! The rodents have killed the internet

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Cheese.

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Insulation choice!

While cheese has excellent insulation and lubrication properties for blowing fibres down ducts, using it to coat fibres was probably never the best of an idea.

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Mediocre Britain: UK broadband ranked 31st in world for speed

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The PSTN has nothing to do with modern broadband.

I'm finding some of the comments here discussing the POTS/PSTN network a little amusingly irrelevant and I think it's also something that clouds political and media discussion a lot. It's a bit like a discussion about steam trains. It's 1980s technology, used for legacy services and has no bearing on broadband speeds at all.

Modern broadband networks are using the same copper lines as PSTN services, but they've absolutely nothing, whatsoever, to do with TDM circuit switched technology behind traditional PSTN/ISDN services, they just share the copper wiring for the 'last mile'. Cabinet launched VDSL doesn't even use the full line back to the exchange. In fact it would be a lot easier to just provide the VDSL service without the dial tone and the long line.

The telcos all initially had a notion that POTS/PSTN was important enough to warrant rolling out MSANs to street cabinets and provide dial tones down the line and various vendors came up with solutions for this, However, with the death of demand for domestic / residential POTS services, the massive increase in use of mobile phones and a consumer acceptance that you can provide a phone service using VoIP from a local ATA in the router or a VoIP handset has changed all of that. There's been a major loss of interest in ripping out the old TDM equipment and replacing it with modern modern gear, rather they will run it down until it's got far fewer users left, then make a switch to much smaller scale equipment for the laggards who still need dial tones.

If a cable company can get away with providing POTS using VoIP from a device in your home, there's no reason BT, Eir, Deutsche Telekom or AT&T can't do exactly the same using VDSL or FTTH and a similar device.

Offices increasingly don't use ISDN or PSTN lines either. There's a very rapid move going on to smaller businesses using hosted PBX in the cloud type services and VoIP handsets - it allows home office workers, remote sites, hot desking and far fancier routing options than was ever possible with your own PBX. Meanwhile larger companies are increasingly using SIP trunks in place of ISDN to plug their PBX gear into the telcos.

Telephony is just an app on a data network. Nobody cares about POTS equipment anymore, least of all the vendors or the telcos. They just want to sweat the last bit of useful service out of existing gear before they have to rip it out.

What's holding things up in the UK at the moment is lack of real competition. You've multiple brands all using OpenReach networks and then you've got Virgin offering a fairly mediocre cable modem service. If you'd a real FTTH player in the market, or if Virgin really cranks up the speed, OpenReach will be forced to respond. Until then, they'll all keep charging you high prices for mediocrity.

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Re: All I wanna know is...

A steep and constant decline in the number of landline minutes on the PSTN.

You can take a look at any Ofcom report in the UK or ComReg statistical report in Ireland. The number of minutes and the number of access channels (lines) is sinking rather rapidly and mobiles are beyond 100% penetration.

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How do they get away with calling VDSL "fibre"?!

The one thing I've never understood is how BT / OpenReach and their Irish counterpart, Eir (eircom) were ever allowed to call VDSL / VDSL2 "Fibre".

I mean a dial up 56k modem ultimately got carried by fibre when the signals left the exchange.so by that logic it was "Fibre" too.

My view of it is if they're not providing FTTH with a fibre at your premises, it's copper!

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Re: It would be interesting to see the methodologiy

It would also be useful to know why people are testing their speed.

For example, I think some of the stats in any survey risk self selection bias,distorted by people with technical problems or bad quality connections being over represented because they need to use services like speedtest.net more regularly than those who are happy with their service.

Or you'll get people with really fast services testing to show off.

I'm more likely to feel that real world reports from services like Netflix or Akamai are more likely to remove self selection bias.

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Ironically, despite all that renumbering, the number of land lines is falling and the number of landlines in serious use is probably lower again as many people only have one because it was bundled with ADSL or VDSL.

Those traditional telcos like BT are only slowly beginning to realise that their primary business is data and that telephony is nothing but an app.

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Re: Yep pretty much says it all

Where the Netherlands will always have a huge advantage is very high population density and extremely good planning.

The UK, Ireland and quite a few other places have to battle against badly throughout planning and often very low density housing sprawl rather than planned communities.

The Dutch also made a much better plan for delivering competitive open fibre to home. The UK and Ireland both landed themselves with their respective privatised PSTN incumbents, neither of which have a vision for anything other than milking maximum profits from minimum capex.

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The major issue in the UK, Republic of Ireland and also a huge % of France is density of housing.

No developed country is coming from the position of rebuilding clapped out voice networks and actually, they're all aging at this stage. Whether you're talking about the UK, Ireland, Germany, France etc they're all phasing out voice networks that are using digital technology that traces all the way back to the early 80s or even late 70s.

There's nothing particularly amazing about the UK voice network. It's very comparable to any other Western European, North American, Japanese or Australia or NZ PSTN. You're still relying on large numbers of very old System X and Ericsson AXE switching. Here in Ireland we've still got plenty of modernised but partially ancient AXE and Alcatel E10 switches where were originally installed in 1980. The same applies in France. The Germans are getting rid of Alcatel S12 ana Siemsns EWSD. Belgium just completed a full migration to softswiches and MSANs from S12 and EWSD too.

Nothing at all unique or unusual about the UK network other than Marconi/GPT System X was never really used much outside the UK. You've Ericsson AXE switches that are identical to those used here or in countless other places around Europe.

To roll out FTTH those same excellent but now ancient voice networks need to go. There actually getting so old that in many cases vendors no longer actively support them. Development for them stopped quite some ago.

You're talking about technology that may be coming up to 40 years old in 2020 and has already been in service for longer than it was probably ever intended to last. If you think about it we were ripping out 20 and 30 year old crossbars and analogue electronic systems in the 80s and 90s and they are considered very old fashioned. Yet, somehow 80s TDM technology has hung around long after it was predicted that we would have moved to all IP.

If your in a country with dense, apartment based living however, rollout of FTTH and other technologies is a LOT easier as you can typically connect large numbers of homes in very cheaply. This has massively favoured countries with high rise housing and apartment focused dwellings while leaving most of the English speaking world as well as France and similar places with an extremely expensive task of rolling out fibre to low density suburbia and even ultra low density suburbia in Ireland and parts of the states and Canada.

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Infosec eggheads rig USB desk lamp to leak passwords via Bluetooth

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and this is why I'm wary of public USB chargers!

I never really understand the attraction of USB charging points on wall sockets. Just use your own mains adaptor that has no data capabilities.

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Virgin Media only adds another 127,000 homes to Project Lightning

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The Virgin Media UK cable network spec must have been lower bandwidth than what Liberty / UPC were doing elsewhere. For example, Virgin Media on the former UPC network in the Republic of Ireland offer 360Mbit/s domestic and 500mbit/s business connections almost everywhere that's cabled.

We're still trailing the UK on average broadband speeds, but I'd say a large drag factor is the high level of rural homes in the Republic, urban broadband is pretty decent if you are able to get cable and FTTC is 100mbit/s

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KCOM whacked with £900k Ofcom fine over 999 call handling

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Well, it would it it were implemented correctly!

It can't build its own fibre routes or data centres! It's just very flexible about data routing.

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Worries me a little about VoIP replacing TDM

As telephony becomes an app on what is increasingly just an IP network, I senvdelu hope that the telcos are being made to plan their networks as robustly as the old designs.

The old digital telephony networks were basically designed to be indestructible, even if a war kicked off and a city were wiped off the map, they could reroute calls.

I'm seeing a lot of moves away from small, very distributed digital TDM exchanges that could do some degree of independent routing around problems. They're being replaced by reliance on large softswiches in data centres and increasingly when you're dealing with smaller providers using their own VoIP networks you've no idea what level of resilience you have.

Regulators need to be much more proscriptive about insisting on proof the networks won't just fall over due to a single point of failure.

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Foot-long £1 sausage roll arrives

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El Reg has a pies and baked goods section now?

IT relevance? Was it made by an artificial intelligence perhaps?

You can't make something that size for £1.00

Either it's a loss leader to get publicity (most likely) or, the ingredients are frighteningly cheap.

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Off-messenger: Chinese chatbot ain't no commie

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I’m sure we will get a statement about how the chat bot is now living in complete freedom in a comfortable apartment in Beijing and simply does not wish to speak to anyone any more and is definitely *not* in any kind of special patriotic reeducation centre...

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CMD.EXE gets first makeover in 20 years in new Windows 10 build

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There are still lots of bits and piece of Windows that could do with a makeover. I still find it odd that a company with the vast resources at Microsoft’s disposal produces an OS that has bits and pieces that look like they’re from decades ago. You’d expect absolute GUI consistency across Windows 10’s own components. Surely it can’t be THAT hard to achieve.

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Si vous comprenez ces mots, vous êtes français ou l'intelligence artificielle de Facebook

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Savez-vous qu'il est possible de comprendre le français, sans être français, ou une intelligence artificielle :P

I look forward to seeing some of its translations, as it is extremely difficult to comprehend language without context, even for a human.

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WannaCry-slayer Marcus Hutchins 'built Kronos banking trojan' – FBI

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Proportionality ...

It’s a very strange case and the allegations do not seem to fit, when you consider his public spirit motivated shut down of WannaCry. I suppose we will start to hear the detail of the allegations in the coming days

My major concern is that if someone is convicted of something like this in the USA, the sentences are usually absolutely disproportionate and you can expect something that carries insane amounts of prison time, in what is one of the harshest regimes in the developed world.

It’s a very strange world at times!

Whatever happens, I hope he’s getting good legal support and backup from the UK Foreign Office and that they have not just capitulated to whatever it is the US asked for, based on the UK government’s desperation for a trade deal after shooting themselves in booth feet with Brexit.

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New iPhone details leak: Yes, Apple is still chasing Samsung

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I know it's uncool to say anything positive about Apple, but...

I know everyone loves to hate iOS and iThingies but I have to say that I find my iPhones have outlasted almost any other mobile hardware I've ever had. I'm currently using an iPhone 6S+ with a beta of iOS 11 running at the moment and it's a very solid device that just gets the job done. iOS is a bit locked down and conservative with features, but it works and tends to be very well laid out and consistent. They've also finally addressed a few major peeves like lack of a file manager in iOS 11 and it seems to be capable of talking to a lot more than iCloud Drive ... Dropbox, Google Drive etc seem to be supported.

I've a Nexus 6P of the same age, and it has lumps out of the bezel, the screen's chipped, there's a hump at the side of it, it turns itself off at random because of badly designed button placement / excessively easy to switch off software.

Meanwhile, the iPhone just keeps working despite having been dropped, thrown in bags, dumped into my pocket, sat on, played with by toddlers, slept on by a cat...

Also, I find Siri works very well in the car, in a way that Google Assistant doesn't - i.e. I can easily get it to play music, podcasts, deal with spotify, etc etc.

Also the notion that Google is ending Nexus 6P support in September 2017 has made me swear I will never buy another Google device again. Absolutely shocked that they're just going to dump the device like that. I've much older Apple stuff still getting regular updates.

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Petition calls for Adobe Flash to survive as open source zombie

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I think it’s really time it was just let go. The sooner legacy Flash junk gets off the web, the better.

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