* Posts by Slx

493 posts • joined 5 Jun 2010

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HMS Frigatey Mcfrigateface given her official name

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Re: HMS Frigatey McFrigateface not official...

It's one of those jokes that only works once.

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US border cops search cloud accounts? Ha ha, nope, negative, no way, siree – Homeland Sec

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Could you really be bothered visiting the USA anymore? It's sounding increasingly little we're all assumed to be criminals and subjected to all sorts of ridiculous and intrusive nonsense.

Land of the free ...?!

Next time, I'll just go somewhere that's less of a police state like maybe China...

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Funnily enough, charging ££££s for trashy bling-phones wasn't a great idea

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And if the Tories keep flapping their mouths and causing Sterling to sink it could easily be £1200 by the time it launches.

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Oz government wants its own definition of what 'backdoor' means

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Politicians don't understand what they're dealing with...

While many politicians are motivated, quite genuinely, by fears of terrorism and criminality online, they really don't have a clue about what encryption technology is or how the internet actually works.

If you demand back doors, you'll eventually get them into mainstream services that are where the majority of us spend our time, but all it will do is push criminality into much more locked down and obscure systems that don't have a backdoor.

It's like they still seem to think they're dealing with the 1970s telephone network and that it's just a matter of tapping a few lines here and there.

What seems to end up happening is grand-scale spying on the innocent normal internet users who are up to nothing at all, while the real criminality online is probably going on very well hidden and away from mainstream services.

Also, baking in back doors assumes that they're somehow 100% securable and that only the good guys can use them. It also assumes that technology will be relatively static, which is absolutely not the case.

I just see backdoors opening massive security problems.

You even occasionally get politicians and other commentators suggesting that we should ban encryption entirely - in which case you might as well just switch off the internet as it would cease to function.

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Guess who doesn't have to pay $1.3bn in back taxes? Of course it's fscking Google

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Re: Change the law, then

The UK does profit enormously from it, just in other areas : see: City of London. It's largely successful because it's a regulatory haven of sorts with pretty flexible attitudes to many things.

From what I can see, the UK seems to also want to continue to have access to selling and processing EU financial services into the EU while not being a member.

Of any country in Europe, the UK certainly is not in a position to hold any moral high ground over Ireland on taxation or regulation.

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Apple building data centre in China to comply with tough cybersecurity laws

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I wonder will this mean they'll actually end up getting a firewalled version of iCloud services, without international connectivity for example?

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Robots will enable a sustainable grey economy

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Just as long as the nanobots don't go rogue and produce a world that turns to grey goo.

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Murdoch's £11.7bn Sky takeover referred to competition regulator

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Given the way the print media in the UK seems to think its job is to back parties and pursue ideological agendas, I don't really see why this merger isn't something to be very worried about.

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Google may follow Apple, design mobile chips in-house

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I sincerely hope they get their act together before they attempt to launch any more Pixel phones. The supply chain for the first Pixel has been horrifically bad. It wasn't available in most markets, and the countries that it was available in seemed to suffer from endless 'out of stock' messages on the store.

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Going to Mars may give you cancer, warns doc

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Is there anything that doesn't give you cancer? ...All the fun stuff seems to!

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What is this bullsh*t, Google? Nexus phones starved of security fixes after just three years

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Well, that is the first and last piece of Google hardware I buy.

As much as people love to bash Apple, it doesn't dump you without update support and actually is still supporting pretty ancient iPhones at this stage.

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Net neutrality blowback: Cities say no. Court says whoa. Trumpster blames Canada for not going slow

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Butt out of Canada !!

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Irish Stripe techie denied entry to US – for having wrong stamp in passport

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While they're busily harassing people at airports and indulging in paranoid xenophobic fantasies about terrifying foreigners (to a level that is now starting to take on an air of McCarthyism), the vast majority of US 'terrorist-like' attacks are still being caused by ... heavily armed Americans exercising their right to bear arms, no matter how unstable or stupid they are.

If you want to do something about keeping America safe, maybe take a look at the large numbers of unstable teenagers and others with access to insane amounts of military-grade weaponry, who with alarming regularity, decide to take their dysfunctionalism, angst and anger out on their completely innocent school colleagues.

However, they're not scary foreigners from places far, far away.

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Oh my God, 911 is down. Quick, call… aaargh!

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I know a bit about legacy TDM switching systems and they can absolutely reroute traffic around a hardware or connectivity fault.

In fact, that's one of the main features that digital switching systems have had going right back to the late 1970s.

IP is more flexible, but claiming that this fault is some issue with the fundamental technology behind the legacy telephone network is absolute nonsense. You're talking about technology that was designed to route traffic around and self-heal in the event of the cold war turning hot or a natural disaster taking out a whole city.

These are not unsophisticated systems and support extremely robust routing. They're just not IP based digital networks.

It sounds like it's a badly designed legacy network, rather than anything to do with the core technology behind it.

Unless they're claiming that they're still using some kind of 1960s/70s era crossbar electromechanical switching ?!?!

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Brit ISP TalkTalk blocks control tool TeamViewer

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There's this horrifically dangerous app known by hackers as "the Web" which has been used to scam billions of people over the years.

They should probably block that too.

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Finally proof that Apple copies Samsung: iPhone 7 Plus halts, catches fire like a Galaxy Note 7

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High energy density battery - think of it like a lighter.

We have to accept a degree of risk with these battery packs. They're storing an increasingly dense amount of energy and have a slight risk of fire. They're more comparable to carrying a cigarette lighter than an old nickel cadmium battery.

One or two incidents doesn't mean the device is unsafe. The Samsung issue was a definite cluster of similar events.

In general, just take reasonable precautions with mobile phones.

Charge them at night on a non-flammable surface away from paper and fabric and not under your pillow, don't carry them in your hip or rear pocket if cycling or likely to fall and puncture the device etc etc.

Don't carry a damaged bent mobile next to your skin in a pocket.

Don't use faulty chargers especially unattended and check the cables for frays and the connectors for damage.

They're just a very very minor risk, but they are a risk nonetheless.

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Want to come to the US? Be prepared to hand over your passwords if you're on Trump's hit list

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Well, as I'm not a criminal and don't really feel like being treated like one just because I'm from a country other than the USA, I'll be giving the country a skip until it stops with this paranoia.

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More tech companies join anti-Trump battle, but why did some pay for his inauguration?

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The US once again leads the world with the best democracy money can buy!

They're simply hedging their bets and expressing their sacred conditional freedom of speech expressed through huge wheelbarrow loads of cash.

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Who's behind the Kodi TV streaming stick crackdown?

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Is this not an incredible waste of police time and public money on what is basically protecting a totally broken business model that can't be protected anyway.

If they made *everything* available in proper streaming services, the vast majority of people would pay for them. I think Spotify, Apple Music etc has proven that most people will be legal if the content is available for a reasonable price.

When you've a situation where studios are selling content to pay TV providers and doing exclusive deals where it's not available in certain territories for streaming, you suddenly have an issue where people will look towards illegal sources to get access to content that they otherwise have to jump through hoops for.

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Blighty watchdog Ofcom has a butcher's hook, clocks spectrum for 5G

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Brexit Imperial Wavelength of 16.89inches

Well, now that you're going it alone you can skip ETCI standards and go for good old Imperial Britianna Standards. So how about Generation V broadband on 16,89 inches.

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Humanity needs you... to build an AI bot that can finger rotten headlines

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It's basically impossible considering even humans struggle to do this

Laying off all the news editor and replacing journalists with churnilists was perhaps premature.

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Apple eats itself as iPhone fatigue spreads

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The technology has basically matured to a fairly standard shape and interface.

I don't think you're going to see as many wild changes from any of the phone makers.

It's a bit like the way we went from crazy PC physical designs and UI to a fairly standardised desktop metaphor back in the 1980s and 90s

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I would be very confident this is down to the headphone jack issue.

A lot of people I know have opted to skip the iPhone 7 because they aren't convinced by the lack of headphones.

Common myths I've heard:

1) People think you have to use the Apple wireless headphones and no other type works. Where as in reality any bluetooth headphones work.

2) People think you can't connect analogue headphones to the phone at all, whereas in reality it came with an adaptor dongle which most people will probably leave connected permanently to a pair of headphones anyway.

The only real issue I could see with it is that you can't charge and listen to headphones at the same time. That's pretty stupid and will mess up a lot of people's setups with older cars and so on.

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Doomsday Clock moves to 150 seconds before midnight. Thanks, Trump

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I'm not sure I take that doomsday clock all that seriously anymore. It's nearly as bad as those alertness colour coded warnings that tell you how panicked you're supposed to be.

If you paid too much attention to that bloody clock you'd die of stress long before doomsday!

Nuclear weapons however seem to prove we may never make it to being anything more than a severe but self limiting itchy rash that the Earth had for a while.

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Trump signs 'no privacy for non-Americans' order – what does that mean for rest of us?

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Well, that's billions of € or $ down the toilet for the US IT sector.

Lots of job losses soon as companies can't transact with the only other consumer market as big / bigger than the US.

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Irish townsfolk besieged by confused smut channel callers

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All resolved ;)

Well that's all resolved. Babe Station are moving to number ranges that don't clash and 3 of their models are en route to Westport to do some em, outreach.

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Re: Where's the EU when you need it?

07 isn't harmonised across the EU at all.

In Ireland It's the Sligo & Donegal / Northwest region in Ireland 071 XXX XXXX and 074 XXX XXXX

076 is weirdly used for VoIP non geographic numbers and everyone thinks they're ringing Donegal or Sligo somewhere.

07 xx xx xx xx in France is a mobile number.

Spain doesn't have 0, neither does Denmark or any closed numbering system without areas codes.

In general, harmonising phone numbering is really difficult as these things evolved from systems that were planned in the 1950s or earlier in most countries. You've a few narrow ranges like 112, 116 XXX etc that were clear to use in all countries.

112, the 116 codes and the 00 800 freephone systems are the only ones that are really harmonised.

The EU had a discussion about harmonising into a single country code in the 1990s but it was so ridiculously messy they gave up.

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Re: Where's the EU when you need it?

It would actually make matters worse. It would be better for neighbouring language countries to have visibly different numbering.

If Irish freephone was 0800 for example instead of 1800 we would have endless misdialling and no idea which 800 number was which.

its also almost impossible to avoid clashing with Irish landline numbering. It works quite differently from the UK, with each geographic region has a prefix and that's broken down into sub prefixes hierarchically,with the main city / town taking 1 usually.. it makes it very easy to figure out where a landline is.

The system uses almost the entire range though - 01 Dublin, 02 Cork region (021 Cork City, 022, 023...029 smaller towns), 03 - not used, 04, 05, 06, 07 & 09 are all in use and 08X XXX XXXX is mobile. Lower population areas use 5 digit local numbering, higher population 6 or 7 digit with the whole thing being slowly moved towards 7.

So basically, no matter what you assign in the UK it would potentially clash so, there's no point in worrying about it! It's the same between Austria and Germany etc.

Unless you'd a single EU numbering system and got rid of country codes and national dialling, you can't really resolve this minor annoyance.

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It's a problem in Europe where two countries share same language and media content

There's not a lot you can do about it really you will get the same number ranges appearing in different countries.

+353 98 XX XXX

dialled 098 XX XXX in Ireland is just a normal landline number that would have been in service probably been assigned and in use since the 1960s, if not earlier.

The issue is the UK have assigned clashing codes for premium rate numbers in one of OfCom's regular confusing new number ranges for special rate services.

Because the UK premium rate numbers are longer, it's likely that some Westport number(s) are being dialled repeatedly as the phone will start ringing after 098 + 5 digits, shorter than the UK number. So it could be a whole range of sex lines getting some random person's house.

Even if people wanted to call that number 00 44 98 XXX XX XX it would be unlikely to work as the call would not be billable at premium rate internationally.

It's the same between France and French speaking parts of Belgium, Switzerland etc. The Netherlands and Belgium, Germany and Austria etc. People occasionally misdial.

That's one of the reasons that Ireland uses 1800 rather than 0800 for freephone / toll-free.

Premium rate in Ireland is 15XX XX XX XX

For example 1550 XX XX XX "Fifteen Fifty"

"Local Rate" (whatever that means any more) is 1850 (Eighteen Fifty) or 1890 (Eighteen Ninety)

Oddly enough for those number ranges we tend to call them out French style.

For example to report a gas leak : 1850 20 50 50 "Eighteen Fifty Twenty Fifty Fifty"

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US govt can't stop Microsoft taking its Irish email seizure fight to the Supreme Court

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If they wanted to apply for a warrant in Ireland through the Irish police and courts there's nothing stopping them and they have not done that.

Instead, they want to legally establish in their own courts that they have universal jurisdiction.

It's actually patronising in the extreme - so they seriously think Ireland is utterly incapable of handling a legal case or do they just think that they've a case that's so weak or might not stand up in an Irish court?

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UK ISPs may be handed cock-blocking powers

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I really hate this kind of prudishness and puritanical nonsense.

There are far, far, far worse things out there than sexual images of adult humans doing adult human things to other adult humans.

Extreme violence, beheadings, radicalisation, abuse of all sorts of vulnerable people, vicious bullying etc etc but nope, it's all about cock blocking!

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Trump's FBI boss, Attorney General picks reckon your encryption's getting backdoored

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There's a bit of a lack of comprehension of how the Internet actually works.

Without strong encryption, the internet would become as secure as a chaotic market market in a bazaar somewhere with everything just sitting there in easy reach of shop lifters.

It's effectively like removing the walls from your house.

Fundamentally, the problem is the political debate is about as IT savvy as a bunch of 60-70 year old guys having a drunken bar conversation about it. They're totally clueless but highly opinionated and think they can solve everything.

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CIA boss: Make America (a) great (big database of surveillance on citizens, foreigners) again!

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Don't worry, it's not like the US has a president who makes statements about his 'enemies' or anything like that.

I mean, there's no risk whatsoever that anyone might compile a list to go after personal vendettas.

It's also not like any agencies or anyone associated with the US Government has ever used leaked private information to destroy a political candidate or anything like that.

Nothing to worry about! - just let he nice man install CCTV in your bedroom and hand over your HDD contents, just in case you might be a liberal leftie or some kind of dangerous paranoid 'investigative journalist' who should be safely sent off to some kind of mental institution for questioning authority or for patriotic reeducation.

Let the war against fake news begin...

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Why Theresa May’s hard Brexit might be softer than you think

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I'm still confused how this is going to work for Northern Ireland.

It's lovely that she values the historical and familial ties between Britain and Ireland, but I still fail to see how the hell we are going to keep the CTA (Common Travel Area) working. Effectively, all that ever guaranteed was freedom of movement of people and labour.

Ireland and the UK recognise eachother's citizens as non-aliens. So, basically if you're Irish in the UK or British in Ireland, for all intents and purposes (including voting rights in parliamentary elections etc) you're treated as a local, in a way that goes far beyond EU rights.

They're not even required to produce ID - although, for practical security reasons in airports it happens.

However, on the land border between the two countries it's not even marked. It's as visible as the border between two counties in England and probably less marked than the England-Scotland border as we tend not to play it up. The only way you would realise you'd crossed is the road markings change from a white line on the edge of the road and (ironically) standard European type signs in UK (Northern Ireland) to an orange line at the outside of the road, US/Aussi/NZ style orange warning signs and km/h in the Republic and your mobile phone might alert you to roaming.

HOWEVER, that never applied to to the movement of goods, services or capital and that's where this lovely sentiment all falls apart. If the UK is not part of the single market or the customs union, we end up with a customs border which will be exactly the same, if not worse (as if the UK doesn't join the customs union) as the EU-Turkish border.

While it means that your average Irish or British citizen can pass freely across the border, if you have a bag of shopping with you from the local supermarket you could be done for smuggling.

Also since the 1990s, Irish and Northern Irish economies and infrastructure have begun to become shared and deeply integrated. For example the electricity networks are owned and operated by the same companies, interlinked at various points at just regular transmission voltages and share common standards. The telecoms networks are largely intergrated in a very local way and have been for many decades - a local call is a local call. The Republic had agreed to fund road infrascture in the North where it facilitated interlinking regions like Donegal (extreme Northwest of Ireland in the Republic). There are loads of examples of this kind of thing.

Many, many businesses also just operate as if there's no border at all. So, everything from logistics to supermarkets, to agrifood, to you name it tend to operate on an all-island basis. Cutting Northern Ireland off from the Republic at this stage could be hugely damaging to the North probably more than the Republic as it's the smaller and less financially flush partner in the relationship. A lot of Northern SMEs are very dependent on having access to the rest of Ireland for trade. So, I would assume the UK is planning a sizable buffer fund while it readjusts its economy, to avoid it spinning into a depression?

There had also been growing integration of things like health services and you've various cross-border bodies that are effectively QANGOs for areas like tourism, food safety and so on.

You've also got a North-South Ministeral Body and the British-Irish Parliamentary Assembly, which is pretty unique in any EU context.

On top of that you've now got BVIS - British Irish Visa Scheme that allows mutual recognition of certain classes of business traveler visa so that citizens of China and India can travel to both countries on a single visa. It's a little like a mini-Schengen between the UK and Ireland.

How the hell is all that going to work after Brexit?! An awful lot of it is predicated on both countries being EU members.

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From a practical point of view, only two things in that speech stood out to me.

1. It will go to a vote in parliament. That's likely to have been what's calmed markets.

2. They aren't looking to remain in the single market and want semi-detached status in the customs union.

So, rather than a Norwegian or Icelandic EEA style model, what she's actually described is something along the lines of a Turkish relationship with the EU, only a bit weaker as she's not really that committed to the customs' union idea, more just a vague wishlist type option.

The only positive I've seen is that she's keen not to rip up the Common Travel Area which would have impacted Ireland very badly. Although, with the UK potentially being outside the customs union and definitely being outside the single market, that relationship is largely going to back to pre-EU days where it only applies to movement of people, not goods or services.

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Boffins link ALIEN STRUCTURE ON VENUS to Solar System's biggest ever grav wave

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It'll turn out to be something like slow moving sulphur snow clouds or something we aren't used to looking at. The scale of it would seem far too big to be anything artificial or life-based. Although, there's no harm in sending a probe to take a look...

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US watchdog sues Qualcomm for 'bribing' Apple to swallow chips

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Re: WiMax?

The major advantage of it for mobile networks is that's part of the 3GPP standards and has full backwards compatibility with previous 2G GSM and UMTS. It's also providing an escape route for Qualcomm CDMA-One / 2000 / EV-DO standards which Qualcomm have actually discontinued development of.

WiMAX also does not function very well at high speeds, rendering it useless on the intercity trains and even European-speed motorway travelling. The networks aren't designed to deal with terminals moving faster than 120km/h vs 450km/h for LTE.

So basically a public WiMAX network would be hugely problematic for most European, Japanese and other intercity trains which typically run at at least 160km/h to 200km/h or in the 300-350km/h range at high speed.

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Chelsea Manning sentence slashed by Prez Obama: She'll be sprung in the spring

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I'm assuming this is final, right? There's now way Trump could roll back on a predecessors commutation?

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Solaris 12 disappears from Oracle's roadmap

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Considering, SPARC and Solaris are used by some major corporate customers, including banks, I can't see this going down well at all.

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UK's lords want more details on adult website check plans

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I'm sure it'll simply be a subcutaneous NFC chip implanted by your local vet.

Once that's there you register on the national database perv-register.gov.uk, install the special snoopware to give full access to your pic or mobile and voila! You will get access to images approved by the Home Office.

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BT installs phone 'spam filter', says it'll strain out mass cold-callers

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People also need perspective and to chill out a bit!

I do think though people need to stop getting so 'rattled' by spam callers. There's a lot of total over-reaction to relatively small volumes of calls.

I know a few people who get absolutely ridiculously annoyed by them. I realise they're annoying and they waste a couple of minutes of your life, but you can always hang-up or tell them to feck off!

In the big scale of things, it's a relatively minor nuscance unless you're getting absolutely bombarded with calls.

I completely stopped using my landline largely because I have no need for it anymore.

It's the same with my office phone, I don't think anyone even rings my desk anymore. Everything goes to my mobile. It's now largely just a slightly retro looking 1980s style paper weight with buttons and lights. Anytime I check the fixed line voicemail at work, it's invariably people trying to sell me conferences I don't want to go to.

I really do think the PSTN is finished other than as an incoming number for businesses.

Other than a few elderly relatives, I just don't ring landlines at all and mobiles are so cheap these days it's no cost saving anyway. In most cases, if I ring someone's landline, it will ring out / go to voicemail as many aren't plugged in anyway. It's definitely a legacy technology.

I'm in Ireland though so maybe there's still more landline usage in the UK and US?

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I'm in Ireland but spam calls were one of the reasons I just ditched voice service entirely on my landline. I just went wirh VDSL (up to 100mbit)! "Fibre" without a dial tone.

Voice service was bundled with broadband in the past and i never really used it. I didn't even plug the phone in to wall.

I think the pstn is likely to be as relevant as the fax machine in a very few short years.

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UK can be a 'world leader in 5G', you say? Er, our 4G still takes a beating from Peru

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Just call LTE Advanced 8G job done.

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This'll be the next thing Trump crows about: Apple assembling servers on American soil

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Re: What's old is new again

Actually, looking at the logic board most of the components are made in the USA, Japan and Korea.

Processor: Mototola

Other chips : VSLI Technologies, Philips and AMD.

The memory seems to have been made in Korea but it's not branded on the chips.

I can't see any chinese components at all.

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Re: What's old is new again

I'm pretty sure I've an ancient Macintosh Classic made for the European Market in Ireland, not the USA.

It was a skirting European tarrifs arrangement rather than taking US jobs, but Apple has had a Cork, Ireland base since 1980.

It even carries the Irish Mark of Electrical Conformity, from the days before CE marking.

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FM now stands for 'fleeting mortality' in Norway

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Re: Very unlikely to happen here in Ireland for one reason - centralised control doesn't exist..

€30 (which according go Google is NZ$ 45.30) gets me:

30GB 4G data (which typically runs at about 50-70Mbit/s) [YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Pokémon Go are unmetered - so much for net neutrality]

Unlimited Irish Calls (landline/mobile)

Unlimited Irish Texts

50 Mins of international calls (including mobiles) to pretty much anywhere.

No contract as I own my own handset.

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How Apple exploded Europe's crony capitalism

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Re: what the hell's it got to do with Europe ?

I'm very confused as to how you can compare "European GSM" to Apple. Apple is a device maker and software company. GSM is a set of largely open industry standards (3GPP) covering GSM 2G, UMTS (3G), LTE and a whole load of supporting and associated technologies and protocols. The GSM Association is simply an industry body.

Apple's phones are running on GSM standards for communication - GSM 2G, UMTS, LTE etc.

It's a bit like trying to compare Samsung to the IP and the ISOC.

GSM made it possible for open standards that have made handset development a hell of a lot easier. Had it not been for GSM and its associated standards, you'd have a kludge of proprietary commercial networks like CDMA-One in the USA which would have required non-standard chipsets, special licensing, custom handsets etc etc.

GSM threw the door open to a plethora of equipment manufacturers, handset makers (including Apple and all the Android makers) and umpteen telcos that were able to roll out networks far more readily than they would have been with locked-down standards.

Before GSM, you basically had to approach someone like Motorola and buy a complete network and were locked into a particular system on their terms.

Incidentally, GSM spun out of a European Union project which was aimed at smashing down the barriers between mobile networks in the 1980s and creating some kind of a framework for pan-European (and beyond) mobile services. It achieved that by creating an open standard and getting players to corporate. Before GSM there were just islands of proprietary analog systems in different European countries, roaming was impossible, there was no obvious path to data services etc etc.

Incidentally, Nokia hasn't gone anywhere. Its handset division failed and disappeared but the company itself is still one of the key players behind mobile and fixed line infrastructure and has acquired Siemens networking division and also the enormous Alcatel-Lucent which included Bell Labs and all of Alcatel's gear and patents.

It's very likely that your mobile handset, home phone in your house or your internet traffic is traversing Nokia or Ericsson networking equipment.

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Re: Paperbag vs PureView

I don't really agree that the hardware's become worse - Rather that the focus is now entirely on smartphones, so any feature phones that are available very, very cheap and basic. 10+ years ago those were the mainstay of the mobile phone companies' business and they poured resources into designing and building them.

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I don't think this is a fair criticism of GSM at all

I think this is a grossly unfair criticism of GSM and it's crediting Apple with market smashing innovation it did not have.

GSM was hugely liberating as it made it possible for the first time for consumers to pick their own hardware and mobile carrier. From day one, it mandated a SIM card which gave the consumer control to bring hardware they owned from network to network without any need to do anything other than swap a smart card.

Before that you had absolutely lock-in and on US CDMA networks you still do.

When Apple launched the iPhone first it was incredibly locked to networks, far more water tightly than any other device I've encountered. They're extremely difficult to unofficially unlock and unless you're buying the phone outtight from new you're very much controlled by your network. It's understandable where they subsidise the phone.

European networks also implemented full number portability long before the US and many other markets and had generally more competition.

All telcos all over the world had a notion they were going to be content providers and put you in a walled garden of WAP and iMode and so on. That didn't work out as mobiles became capable PCs and an expectation of full open internet access was the norm.

Apple doesn't generally distribute phones straight to consumers anymore than Nokis did. You could always buy a Nokia or any other phone totally independently of a network but you had to pay full price. The exact same case applied to iPhone from day one. They were when more likely to he networks subsidies and locked because people generally don't like handing over €700 -1000 for a phone and would rather fund it through a carrier subsidy.

GSM has been a phenomenal set or technical standards that are fully open to use. Networks can a use equipment from multiple vendors. There is no lock in to proprietary standards unlike CDMA One / CDMA 2000 or other single platforms.

There's been an absolute revolution in technology in the last decade and a half in terms of mobile technology and European driven standards have been at the core or that.

Nokia's handset division failed because Nokia didn't have the technical ability to develop a useable OS and touch screen environment.

Nokia, Ericsson, Siemens, Alcatel, and others European handset makers along with US players like Motorola, Japanese companies like NEC and Fujitsu came to the handset business as a development of their telco equipment operations. These companies, especially Nokia, Alcatel, Siemens and especially Ericsson are massive network equipment companies and have been for decades (over a century in the case of Ericsson). They're Europe's Bell Labs counterparts. They had no experience of producing direct consumer products. The provided telephone exchange and their model historically was selling to telcos.

Meanwhile other entrants like Sony, Philips and Panasonic etc had experience in consumer products especially in audio visual stuff.

NONE of these organisations were computer companies producing software for consumer and business desktops.

What happened quite simply was the technology hit a tipping point, a paradigm shift, where the device was a mobile PC, not a phone. So it was inevitable that silicon Valley had a huge huge lead. An iPhone has a lot more in common with a Mac than it does with a telephone.

That's why Apple and Google dominate. These devices are PCs.

Just like 1980s and 1990s landline telcos and cable companies didn't make it into online services and interactive TV, mobile telcos soon discovered they're also just dumb pipes and don't really have the v ability to develop the killer apps.

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That's the way the Cook, he stumbles: Apple CEO pay cut as sales tank

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I think Apple are failing to realise that their professional creative market was actually what drove their 'cool' for years. They've been undermining and frankly pissing off professional users - i.e. trend setting designers, digital artists, photographers, journalists, video producers, web developers etc etc for some years now by mucking around with dropping support for products.

1. Final Cut Pro had become an industry standard almost and it was radically changed causing major upheaval for video editors and producers who had trusted it.

2. Aperture was dropped.

3. They made the MacPro into some kind of weird looking ornament instead of the ultra-practical workhorse that many pro-users loved. Did they actually ask pro-users what they wanted? Nope! They decided that the one thing that your typical music producer or graphic designer would want is a tiny computer that you can't expand easily without a spaghetti junction of wires.

4. Then to top it off they produce a professional-oriented laptop (certainly price wise anyway) that has removed all the ports?!

Generally :

1. Removing the headphone jack?!? Why? It saved almost no space worth worrying about and pissed a lot of people off.

2. Magsafe. It was a brilliant little feature that saved many an Apple product from ending up on the floor. Why get rid of it for USB-C.

Is Apple just letting some designer who hates ports dictate technical policy?

iPads: iOS is too limited for the advanced hardware that's in the iPad pro. It needs some kind of touch-friendly version of macOS to really make any use of it.

iOS:

It's too rigid and isn't changing with the times at all. The simple grid of icons that you have to shuffle around like a 1970s tile puzzle is really very limiting.

It also needs to open the door to a few things like other web browser rendering engines. The block on that seems absolutely stupid. Also the lack of any kind of access to the file system is completely stupid.

macOS:

1. Breaking age-old logical ways of doing things.

Why the hell did they feel the need to change the File > Save / Save As approach to saving things in so many Apple developed applications? I have ended up accidentally messing up versions and screwing things up because I didn't duplicate the file before making changes and suddenly realised that because there's no longer user-control over saving, it's just making changes to a live document. It's really unintuitive and breaks a very standard concept of how to deal with files.

2. iCloud integration - It's lacking transparency and too much is automatic. I have found that I have accidentally put stuff into the iCloud that I had never intended to. This included work documents which would be subject to data protection requirements. I was really annoyed that this was so easy to do.

I've also discovered that colleagues had put their entire Desktop into the iCloud without realising exactly what they'd agreed to.

3. iCloud lack of transparent access to the file system / inconsistent access to it anyway. It needs to just be a normal drive more like dropbox.

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