* Posts by Mike 125

170 posts • joined 1 Jun 2010

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Leatherbound analogue password manager: For the hipster who doesn't mind losing everything

Mike 125

Re: I've got a better solution...

>>but it's labelled... we really do have that...

I was about 9 when I stopped labelling books. Was I a prodigy?

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Science fiction legend Harlan Ellison ends his short time on Earth

Mike 125

Class act.

"Harlan Ellison, the legendary science fiction author who kickstarted the 1970s "New Wave" of science fiction has died in his sleep.."

Somewhere in all his horrific dystopias, he found the perfect way to die.

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Mike 125

Re: Minor pedant

@jake

>>but to be even more pedantic, it's "&".

No, it's really not.

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Not OK Google: Massive outage turns smart home kit utterly dumb

Mike 125

Not reading articles again... and not thinking...

@stussybear

>>should still work locally, just without voice control.

Here we see the difficulty: people just refuse to accept the insanity- so they just vaguely sit, quietly talking to themselves, and gently rocking to and fro... "no, it can't do that... dribble dribble... no...that's not possible...".

If you're willing to accept a home life as unreliable, unpredictable and insecure as Windows 95, then continue using these devices.

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Creep travels half the world to harass online teen gamer… and gets shot by her mom – cops

Mike 125

Psycho creeps will always be with us.

>>the mother – who had no idea of her daughter's online interactions

And there, just there- that's most of the problem.

Not wanting to go all DM here, but in the UK the mom would probably have been arrested.

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What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

Mike 125

Disagree....

"I’d like to see C++ supporting a guaranteed completely type-safe and resource-safe style of programming. This should not be done by restricting applicability or adding cost[...] I think it can be done and that the approach of giving programmers better (and easier to use) language facilities can get us there."

I disagree. If it could've, it would've, by now. Performance and safety will always be in conflict.

C++ has been a Vasa for years. It floats because it's in dry dock.

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Tesla undecimates its workforce but Elon insists everything's absolutely fine

Mike 125

It's that easy.

Crashing a Tesla.

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Low AI rollout caused by dumb, fashion-victim management – Gartner

Mike 125

Re: Over-hyped, over-paid and over here

@Rich 11

Re: your link: (IMHO) biggest mistake Mr Musk made was going so hard on 'Autopilot'. Autopilot is why I don't want a Tesla. Beating the pants of any petrol road car is why I *do*. And I suspect that's the case for many potential buyers. If he'd just focussed on electric and performance, life would've been so much simpler. So I guess that's evidence that anyone can get caught up in the hype.

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You know what your problem is, Apple? Complacency

Mike 125

Re: The problem: Tim Cook is not a visionary like Steve Jobs

>>And like every other company, the companies that are ran by the accountants die.

The Big Four - four big exceptions.

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Uber 'does not exist any more' says Turkish president

Mike 125

Re: That's the way to do it.

@AC

That's interesting. Maybe it feels like a way to rebel, when you don't have many.

As for the line, of course it wasn't meant literally - this was back when TBBT was funny. For me it referred to the bigger picture, with the irony being that the character who always misses the obvious often speaks a deeper truth.

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Mike 125

That's the way to do it.

Sheldon Cooper:

"I like China. See, they know how to keep people in line."

Turkey too.

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A Reg-reading techie, a high street bank, some iffy production code – and a financial crash

Mike 125

Re: On time, on budget, good quality. Pick two

@AOD

lpCurrent++ = lpNext++;

If those are pointers, the left side is illegal in C. But assuming it's an indirection via a pointer, that implies a memcpy operation. The left side would normally show the indirection operator: '*lpCurrent++', but it could be masked by some textual trick. And remember that '*' is higher precedence than '++'.

So the statement behaviour is well defined and does what you'd expect: copy the content, then increment the pointers. Your tools must have been very broken!

But of course, the statement isn't threadsafe by any stretch. It breaks down into a complex sequence of loads and stores.

>>My "write for wetware" comment stands..

Indeed, and I completely agree.

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Mike 125

Re: On time, on budget, good quality. Pick two

@AOD

>>increment/decrement operators, I have direct experience of the clusterfuck that can arise from using those,

If you're discussing C, calling aspects of a 46 year old language 'a clusterfuck' may sound supercool and down wit da kids, but it's not as clever as you think. And the article is about assignment operators, not inc/dec operators which are indeed more interesting.

Understanding why they were added, (back in the day), requires a good level of understanding as to what happens behind the scenes of an innocent looking line of C.

Just saying, dude. And I agree with your 2 from 3 comments.

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As Tesla hits speed bump after speed bump, Elon Musk loses his mind in anti-media rant

Mike 125

All the best, Elon.

Agreed.

This was kind of inevitable. 'Socmed' is a universal amplifier of the worst aspects of human evolutionary inheritance. To say it is not a force for good is a dramatic understatement.

But it's a shame people don't recognise the absolute need for a PR advisor/ handler, before the whole thing goes public. Do the ranting down the pub with a mate.

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UPnP joins the 'just turn it off on consumer devices, already' club

Mike 125

Re: Knocking on my firewall door

>>the principle that stupid honest people shouldn't be allowed to suffer at the hands of crooked clever people is very widely accepted.

Yea, except for when it actually matters:

"No. Do not coat my apartment block in super-flammable cladding."

"No. Do not blindly accept my exceptional bank transfer request, without at least a second factor authentication and authorisation."

I could go on...

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Windows Notepad fixed after 33 years: Now it finally handles Unix, Mac OS line endings

Mike 125

Re: How much Slurp did Windows add to Notepad with this "Fix"?

>>What useful function did they take away?

Differentiating line endings. That was its only useful function.

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It's World (Terrible) Password (Advice) Day!

Mike 125

Re: Sigh

>>...as a psychologist, I have to say I guarantee you that not only is the cognitive load of trying to remember twenty-three random words...

Making it to the end of one of your sentences overloads my cognition.

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'Your computer has a virus' cold call con artists on the rise – Microsoft

Mike 125

>> Nothing happened.....

If nothing happened it was probably TalkTalk. I'm with them, and use the following logic: Based on their performance, anyone actually employed by them is barely capable of making *any* sort of call. So if there's a call, it's not from TalkTalk. Also, I only use VoIP, which means I'm anyway off-grid more than half the time...

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2001: A Space Odyssey has haunted pop culture with anxiety about rogue AIs for half a century

Mike 125

> This groundbreaking film went into pre-production over half a century ago

It's staggering how little progress has been made since, both in SF film story telling, and in 'properly' smart computing.

Ah well, back to my PowerPoint slides.

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Corking story: Idiotic smart wine bottle idea falls over, passes out

Mike 125

> spend money upfront on a device that can only be used with its cartridges

I hate anything with cartridges - Epson printers, 16+ bladed shavers, guns, those appalling little coffee things, now wine. The list goes on.

As for why Kuvee failed, that's obvious: it didn't have Bluetooth.

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It's Pi day: Care to stuff a brand new Raspberry one in your wallet?

Mike 125

>> a history of sucking badly in the Bluetooth department

EVERYTHING BT has that history, and future. BT is a piece of sh't.

Pi - great stuff. Less emphasis on grunt please - we have Intels for that, and look where it got them.

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23,000 HTTPS certs will be axed in next 24 hours after private keys leak

Mike 125

I don't want to kick a man when he's down but..

..oh go on then.

Inside a shed out back of Trustico.

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RIP... almost: Brit high street gadget shack Maplin Electronics

Mike 125

>> it was a mere pamphlet

Yea true, but back in the day, RS would only supply to company accounts - Farnell too, as I remember. Maplin would send you 1 resistor, 2 ceramic caps and if you could afford it, a matched pair of OC71s!

'Maplin Electronic Supplies, Rayleigh, Essex', burned on my memory.

Another good company gone bad. Very bad.

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Neil Young slams Google, after you log in to read his rant with Google or Facebook

Mike 125

>> I'm embarrased

You should be.

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The Gemini pocket PC is shipping and we've got one. This is what it's like

Mike 125

The V1 sounds a bit rough

Some of us went through the pain of having to use pre-NT MS Windows for real work. We know what 'V1' (and earlier) feels like. And I'm damn sure this is not like that.

I was on the point of buying a WileyFox recently. It's tough out there.

Best of luck to all concerned. I'll be in the queue.

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The blockchain era is here but big biz, like most folk, hasn't a clue what to do with it

Mike 125

Re: What it is

>> And contrary to the way cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin work, the confirmation process does not have to be resource-intensive. (That resource-intensive confirmation process is central to how Bitcoin works, but it's not a fundamental requirement for blockchain in general.)

OK, got it. So the 'mining', (competitive, rewarded verification) is not central to the blockchain. That's the bit that was missing for me! Thanks.

But then blockchain becomes simply a distributed, crypto-verifiable database, right? And that already exists, right? Classical distributed database theory has long solved the inherent 'race condition' problem, a problem which Bitcoin descriptions always dramatically claim Bitcoin has 'at last' solved.

So, can someone fill in the bits I'm missing...? Unless...............

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Microsoft works weekends to kill Intel's shoddy Spectre patch

Mike 125

Same old....

The Intel dude says "We use speculative because the customer demands speed at the cost of security."

The software dudes say "We use C because the customer demands speed at the cost of security."

I'm seeing a pattern here.

The Intel guy was so clearly constrained that he offered nothing, and his arguments against open hardware were weak - hardly a surprise. Bring on open hardware.

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Hehe, still writing code for a living? It's 2018. You could be earning x3 as a bug bounty hunter

Mike 125

Re: Lottery winners earn more than you.

>>and went back to their day job

...or killed themselves. There is no sufficient reward for debugging other people's (peoples'.....?) crap code.

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Boffins closer to solving what causes weird radio bursts from space

Mike 125

"We can not rule out completely the ET hypothesis..."

Also, "Nigel Farage suggests UK may need second Brexit referendum to settle question of EU membership...."

Can this really be anything-can-happen Thursday?

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Here come the lawyers! Intel slapped with three Meltdown bug lawsuits

Mike 125

Re: MINIX anyone ?

>> Is that why Intel used MINIX for their other 2017-security-related-disaster ?

Intel security team meeting held back in the day, (all records erased):

"Guys, the lawyers say we're clean on any old x86 garbage. But the NSA access path - that's gotta be rock solid."

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Meltdown, Spectre: The password theft bugs at the heart of Intel CPUs

Mike 125

Re: Colour me surprised ....

>Now will people believe me ?

I won't believe you, because you sound like a 'holier-than-thou' bellend. Just whinging on about how crap everything is helps nobody.

It's pretty obvious that if we're serious about security, we need open hardware *and* software. The question is how to get there with the hardware.

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Someone tell Thorpe Lane in Suffolk their internet sucks – they're still loading the page

Mike 125

Re: Average of one household perhaps?

>> no-one gives a fuck about the Trimleys.

Worked at Schlumberger 1994-96. We had Mosaic and we were all in shock and aaawwwwwe. And yea, I can attest to the lack of f'ck about the Trimleys, even then. But because of that, I always imagined Suffolk had great Internet. Wrong it seems, unless you're a dirty energy monster.

I now have unreliable Internet, rather than low speed, caused by audible crap on the landline. The fault is 'intermittently persistent' and very annoying when the DSL connection drops just as the F1 lights go out.

The ISP tells me "If Outreach call, and they don't find the problem, we'll charge you." And I now say "I just don't give a flying f'ck any more....." and arrange Freesat.

Everyone's got a story.

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NiceHash diced up by hackers, thousands of Bitcoin pilfered

Mike 125

>>It doesn't solve any issue unless you're a criminal

Or a gambler.

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Linux laptop-flinger says bye-bye to buggy Intel Management Engine

Mike 125

>>It is an antonymous op

OOps autocorrect - I think you mean autonomous.

But yea, no driver required. The ME is so powerful it doesn't depend on some piffling little driver. It is omnipotent. My Dell has a new BIOS version specifically to disable ME. Lucky ME.

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Give 1,000 monkeys typewriters, they'll write Shakespeare. Give them robot arms, and wait – they actually did that?

Mike 125

Phhht. Shakespeare thinks he's so great.

>Give 1,000 monkeys typewriters, they'll write Shakespeare.

Question is, how long would it take before they write "Hey, hey, we're the Monkees."?

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The Reg parts ways with imagineer and thought pathfinder Steve Bong

Mike 125

So..

So is fake fake news, news?

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Alexa, please cause the cops to raid my home

Mike 125

'this story is more than 24 hours stale.'

We come for the angle, not the order. If you don't get that, one has to ask... why are you here? Alexa?

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YouTube sin-bins account of KRACK WPA2 researcher

Mike 125

patches

"Patching is already well under way."

There seems to be debate about whether the router and client both need patching. In a domestic setting, (DSL router serving pcs and phones), do we need to hassle the ISP for new router FW?

Thanks.

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Real Mad-quid: Murky cryptojacking menace that smacked Ronaldo site grows

Mike 125

Re: I'm OK with this

Once upon a time, we searched for ET. Ahhh innocent bygone days.

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NatWest customer services: We're aware of security glitch

Mike 125

password specifications..

" this writer was asked to enter the 11th digit of a password to an online account that only contained nine characters."

This probably stems from another frequent failure in password specification. They always specify n_charsmin, but very rarely n_charsmax. Isn't it time there was a standard for this stuff?

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Don’t fear the software shopkeeper: T&Cs banning bad reviews aren’t legal in America

Mike 125

Re: Great!! So we can all slag off the Register whatever their T's n C's say

wot???????

I love that some people don't even get the question, let alone the answer! Hahahaha............oh my lord!!!!!!!!! \i'm falling off my chair

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Mike 125

Re: Caveat Emptor

>> in the modern world where common sense has been removed and things are solely based on the accountants "lowest cost option" the companies set themselves up for this sort of situation

And in that world, it follows that there are individuals and companies which exist solely to post convincing fake reviews - the profits are enormous. Online reviews are entirely meaningless.

I take this line: If a company opts to sue for extremely thorough, independent, open, and free testing of its product, then it is insane and therefore to be avoided at all costs.

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Bill Gates says he'd do CTRL-ALT-DEL with one key if given the chance to go back through time

Mike 125

Re: why

>>what's wrong with making money?

Nothing at all. But I said "..._just_ making money...". IMHO there's something wrong with humans who have that as their primary motivation. (Having said that, I suspect it probably wasn't Bill's primary motivation either, to begin with.) He's clearly a very bright guy. But he could have used that intelligence to improve the IT ecosystem for everyone. But he didn't. Instead, he made it a whole shedload worse, unimaginably worse, which, as stated, I find sad.

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Mike 125

why

'Bill Gates says.............'

Why do we listen to this privileged pr'ck? Oh yea, he's rich. He's a rich tw't who was in the right place at the right time... to make money. He was not the least interested in improving the science and technology of computing, (which he hasn't), just making money, (which... yea... yea).

And that in my view, makes him a sad little man. Good hair though, for his age.

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Smart meters: 'Dog's breakfast' that'll only save you 'a tenner' – report

Mike 125

Leeds

>>The consequence of higher peak and lower off-peak rates is that there is a magic proportion of power you have to use off peak to be better off.

I had a flat *in* Leeds, which had E7 with the original big chunky storage rads, the real deal. There was no gas, I was out all day, so the arrangement worked pretty well. I sold it, and later was shown around by the proud new owner. He demonstrated his 'app', which allowed him to monitor the consumption of his funky new standard convector panel heaters... no storage in sight and still on E7. I didn't have the heart to explain.

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€100 'typewriter' turns out to be €45,000 Enigma machine

Mike 125

Typical

What an embarrassing wasted morning that was: on a new contract in Austria, I entered a default password, prior to a boot script changing the input language to German. To this day, I have to occasionally type 'Vozager123' to gain entry. Confound those Germans and their tricky keyboard mappings...

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Former GCHQ boss backs end-to-end encryption

Mike 125

progress

I heard the interview. It was striking - the interviewer understood the issues for a change. Hannigan was honest about the problem and its complexity. And basically he said what we've known for ages - it's not the data. It's the metadata which matters: who's connecting to whom.

When crypto can reliably hide your end points, things will start getting interesting again…

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Fast-spreading CopyCat Android malware nicks pennies via pop-up ads

Mike 125

'Due to sh'te software, other software does bad stuff'

Also, 'ESTABLISHES PERSISTENCY'.

Is persistency the same as persistence? How about 'CREATES SELF-NON-VOLATILITENCY'?

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AES-256 keys sniffed in seconds using €200 of kit a few inches away

Mike 125

Re: AES was not cracked, cut the click bait

>> but it would have been far more impressive had they pulled off the same trick against an x86 server running a busy workload

Indeed, but that's not the application at hand. Crypto is increasingly being done on small systems, smart cards, access control, IoT applications, etc. That's where the problem lies. So it's not clickbait, it's a real issue.

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