* Posts by Mike 125

129 posts • joined 1 Jun 2010

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Don’t fear the software shopkeeper: T&Cs banning bad reviews aren’t legal in America

Mike 125

Re: Great!! So we can all slag off the Register whatever their T's n C's say

wot???????

I love that some people don't even get the question, let alone the answer! Hahahaha............oh my lord!!!!!!!!! \i'm falling off my chair

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Mike 125

Re: Caveat Emptor

>> in the modern world where common sense has been removed and things are solely based on the accountants "lowest cost option" the companies set themselves up for this sort of situation

And in that world, it follows that there are individuals and companies which exist solely to post convincing fake reviews - the profits are enormous. Online reviews are entirely meaningless.

I take this line: If a company opts to sue for extremely thorough, independent, open, and free testing of its product, then it is insane and therefore to be avoided at all costs.

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Bill Gates says he'd do CTRL-ALT-DEL with one key if given the chance to go back through time

Mike 125

Re: why

>>what's wrong with making money?

Nothing at all. But I said "..._just_ making money...". IMHO there's something wrong with humans who have that as their primary motivation. (Having said that, I suspect it probably wasn't Bill's primary motivation either, to begin with.) He's clearly a very bright guy. But he could have used that intelligence to improve the IT ecosystem for everyone. But he didn't. Instead, he made it a whole shedload worse, unimaginably worse, which, as stated, I find sad.

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Mike 125

why

'Bill Gates says.............'

Why do we listen to this privileged pr'ck? Oh yea, he's rich. He's a rich tw't who was in the right place at the right time... to make money. He was not the least interested in improving the science and technology of computing, (which he hasn't), just making money, (which... yea... yea).

And that in my view, makes him a sad little man. Good hair though, for his age.

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Smart meters: 'Dog's breakfast' that'll only save you 'a tenner' – report

Mike 125

Leeds

>>The consequence of higher peak and lower off-peak rates is that there is a magic proportion of power you have to use off peak to be better off.

I had a flat *in* Leeds, which had E7 with the original big chunky storage rads, the real deal. There was no gas, I was out all day, so the arrangement worked pretty well. I sold it, and later was shown around by the proud new owner. He demonstrated his 'app', which allowed him to monitor the consumption of his funky new standard convector panel heaters... no storage in sight and still on E7. I didn't have the heart to explain.

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€100 'typewriter' turns out to be €45,000 Enigma machine

Mike 125

Typical

What an embarrassing wasted morning that was: on a new contract in Austria, I entered a default password, prior to a boot script changing the input language to German. To this day, I have to occasionally type 'Vozager123' to gain entry. Confound those Germans and their tricky keyboard mappings...

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Former GCHQ boss backs end-to-end encryption

Mike 125

progress

I heard the interview. It was striking - the interviewer understood the issues for a change. Hannigan was honest about the problem and its complexity. And basically he said what we've known for ages - it's not the data. It's the metadata which matters: who's connecting to whom.

When crypto can reliably hide your end points, things will start getting interesting again…

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Fast-spreading CopyCat Android malware nicks pennies via pop-up ads

Mike 125

'Due to sh'te software, other software does bad stuff'

Also, 'ESTABLISHES PERSISTENCY'.

Is persistency the same as persistence? How about 'CREATES SELF-NON-VOLATILITENCY'?

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AES-256 keys sniffed in seconds using €200 of kit a few inches away

Mike 125

Re: AES was not cracked, cut the click bait

>> but it would have been far more impressive had they pulled off the same trick against an x86 server running a busy workload

Indeed, but that's not the application at hand. Crypto is increasingly being done on small systems, smart cards, access control, IoT applications, etc. That's where the problem lies. So it's not clickbait, it's a real issue.

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Mike 125

ARM

ARM, yes indeed, so embedded.

Most of the focus on securing high end embedded devices in e.g. smart cards, is now about disguising crypto activity. Such an application avoids using CPU crypto instructions (of which ARM has many). It will just wait on a reply from the dedicated crypto block, which is designed to emit a constant/ pseudo random noise and current consumption signature.

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Report estimates cost of disruption to GPS in UK would be £1bn per day

Mike 125

Re: What a load of crap

>>What a load of crap

Yea, 'cos anyone trying to warn up front of problems is a doom-mongering moron. Bit like those pesky fire regulators. I bet they're all remainers too, right? It's not like the emergency services or communications, or stretched NHS workers, or anyone who actually does a real job depend on sat nav in any way, right?

When IT manages to reliably construct large scale systems which actually work, instead of the repeated fiascos sucking tax payer dollars, then it'll have time to snipe.

For now, I'd keep a low profile. Sadly, It's not like govt. will take any notice, they seem to have rather a lot on. So no need to pooh your pants.

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The biggest British Airways IT meltdown WTF: 200 systems in the critical path?

Mike 125

BA v NASA

I think the analysis of failure is spot on. But we're missing the fact that one system is ‘high availability’, the other ‘safety critical’. Only reputation died at BA.

Ironically, the reasons for the failure are identical. But the bigger fault lies with NASA, by far. From what I remember, they *did* rip out and start again... which worked.... until Columbia.

Complexity is hard, and harder to manage, which is why managers don't do it.

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Elon to dump Trump over climate bump

Mike 125

The British Official Monster Raving Loony party is already fully across the AC issue. Manifesto proposal number 1. Cool on the outside:

To combat global warming and climate change all buildings should be fitted with air conditioning units on the outside.

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Mike 125

Lest we forget. (Ta Graun.)

"Twenty-two senators wrote a letter to the president when he was said to be on the fence about backing out. They received more than $10m from oil, gas and coal companies the past three election cycles"

James Inhofe, Oklahoma

Oil & gas: $465,950

Coal: $63,600

Total: $529,550

John Barrasso, Wyoming

Oil & gas: $458,466

Coal: $127,356

Total: $585,822

Mitch McConnell, Kentucky

Oil & gas: $1,180,384

Coal: $361,700

Total: $1,542,084

John Cornyn, Texas

Oil & gas: $1,101,456

Coal: $33,050

Total: $1,134,506

Roy Blunt, Missouri

Oil & gas: $353,864

Coal: $96,000

Total: $449,864

Roger Wicker, Mississippi

Oil & gas: $198,816

Coal: $25,376

Total: $224,192

Michael Enzi, Wyoming

Oil & gas: $211,083

Coal: $63,300

Total: $274,383

Mike Crapo, Idaho

Oil & gas: $110,250

Coal: $26,756

Total: $137,006

Jim Risch, Idaho

Oil & gas: $123,850

Coal: $25,680

Total: $149,530

Thad Cochran, Mississippi

Oil & gas: $276,905

Coal: $15,000

Total: $291,905

Mike Rounds, South Dakota

Oil & gas: $201,900

Coal: none

Total: $201,900

Rand Paul, Kentucky

Oil & gas: $170,215

Coal: $82,571

Total: $252,786

John Boozman, Arkansas

Oil & gas: $147,930

Coal: $2,000

Total: $149,930

Richard Shelby, Alabama

Oil & gas: $60,150

Coal: $2,500

Total: $62,650

Luther Strange, Alabama

(Appointed in 2017, running in 2017 special election)

Total: NA

Orrin Hatch, Utah

Oil & gas: $446,250

Coal: $25,000

Total: $471,250

Mike Lee, Utah

Oil & gas: $231,520

Coal: $21,895

Total: $253,415

Ted Cruz, Texas

Oil & gas: $2,465,910

Coal: $103,900

Total: $2,569,810

David Perdue, Georgia

Oil & gas: $184,250

Coal: $0

Total: $184,250

Thom Tillis, North Carolina

Oil & gas: $263,400

Coal: $0

Total: $263,400

Tim Scott, South Carolina

Oil & gas: $490,076

Coal: $58,200

Total: $548,276

Pat Roberts, Kansas

Oil & gas: $388,950

Coal: $28,825

Total: $417,775

Sum total for all 22 Republican signatories: $10,694,284

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Microsoft Master File Table bug exploited to BSOD Windows 7, 8.1

Mike 125

Re: XP not affected

>> run c:\> start c:\$MFT\123 but I did that too and only a message box was shown wit a red x icon and ["Windows cannot find 'c:\$MFT\123'

Now repeat the command. I'm on 7. The first time, I too get 'not found', and no other symptom. But if I enter it again, the machine locks up.

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Dyson celebrates 'shock' EU Court win over flawed energy tests

Mike 125

Re: Petty?

OK suckers, here's watt I think:

For a hoover, efficiency is suckage per watt, per volume of dirt sucked.

The test should suck a calibrated volume of dirt, and measure energy used and time taken.

"A sensor puts the Siemens Q8.0 and Bosch GL80 models into low power mode in pristine conditions – such as a lab test – then ramps it up again for everyday use."

So it's clearly a defeat device, as per VW. What other function can it have?

I like Dysons - they're big and shiny.

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Just how screwed is IT at the Home Office?

Mike 125

Hello

'Traditional' Big IT is going from bad to worse. I predict the following: Google and their 'AI' algos. will step into this bleak, tumble weed, money sucking void. And Govt. will sigh with relief. Why? Because nobody in trad. Big IT has a f'cking clue how to make things better. Whining and whinging about how ignorant Govt. is changes nothing. Trad. Big IT has no f'king clue either. So, Google, bring it on. And we only have ourselves to blame.

Now, back to the snooker, which is also a bit crap.

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Mike 125

Re: Two more disasters here.

Really? That's what you pick out of this story? Get a grip.

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Hard-pressed Juicero boss defends $400 IoT juicer after squeezing $120m from investors

Mike 125

Re: The value of Juicero is more than a glass of cold-pressed juice

"Juicero’s mission is to make it dramatically easier and more enjoyable to consume more fresh, raw fruits and vegetables, and that’s a really tough nut to crack. "

...said in all seriousness. I think we know where the nuts went.

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Boffins fabricate the 'most complex bendy microprocessor yet'

Mike 125

Re: 8-bit is fine

>>In fact you could offload the display to your phone or your watch.

...which is how IoT will eventually come of age: 1) a tiny local (bendy?) processor, low electrical and compute power, but with some HW crypto blocks and sensor interfacing, loosely coupled to 2) an arbitrarily complex display/GUI device - smart phone, lappy etc.

Until then, we can all sit back and enjoy the complete f'kwit entertainment show :0

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Tesla 'API crashes' after update, angry rich bods complain

Mike 125

Re: @Chris

@AC

>>Tesla were the first to prove to the Prius socks and sandals brigade that you could go electric without becoming the equivalent of a slow cyclist in the bus lane to traffic around you and actually have fun doing so <<

I agree with all that. Tesla proved 'buttock clenching' could go electric, and beat petrol at its own game, and hats off.

But the craziness is not about that. It's about the guaranteed insecurity and unreliability of the equivalent of a smart phone. This is a f'kin car, not Angry Birds. Why didn't Tesla stop with the buttock clenching thing? Why have they spoiled it with all the kiddy app/smart phone garbage?

They pushed too far and now are in danger of wrecking the whole thing, which is a shame. It also distracts from what really matters - the drivetrain, battery, etc etc. Just focus the f'k on that.

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Smart meter firm EDMI asked UK for £7m to change a single component

Mike 125

secure?

Is there some serious, open, detailed security analysis of these things? If not, then history tells us they *are* vulnerable. Presumably they use embedded 'secret' keys? And how is all that managed at the other end? Also, lots of other standard questions on proprietary ‘security’...

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I'LL BE BATT: Arnie Schwarzenegger snubs gas guzzlers for electric

Mike 125

Arnie

People, you're getting too hung up on the detail - there's only one news story here:

Hmmm. Arnie, he buy big, shiny, electric car. Hmmm. Arnie good. Hmmm. Big, shiny, electric car good. Hmmm. Me want big, shiny, electric car too.

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Microsoft Germany says Windows 7 already unfit for business users

Mike 125

>>reserved for freeloading scum who would never pay and pay and pay, but would just get one measily OEM license and keep it until the hardware died.

You mean like, I buy a product, and just expect the f'king thing to work....... Wow. Now there's radical. It'll never catch on.

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You have the right to be informed: Write to UK.gov, save El Reg

Mike 125

Not this again...

Goddamn it - giving me stuff to think about which *matters*. I didn't go into IT for that.

Signed.

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Plastic fiver: 28 years' work, saves acres of cotton... may have killed less than ONE cow*

Mike 125

Re: Not much of a chemist then?

@Lee D

>>because that money has to last 20-30 years in the field without any kind of maintenance.

Where did get those lifetimes? They are crazily optimistic.

How long does money last? That depends on the denomination of the note. A $1 bill lasts 18 months; $5 bill, two years; $10 bill, three years; $20 bill, four years; and $50 and $100 bills, nine years. Bills that get worn out from everyday use are taken out of circulation and replaced.

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Mike 125

Re: Not much of a chemist then?

@AC

>>I too wonder how long it takes for those loony eco-warriers to work out

You sound like a Daily Mail reader from, let's say, the 1980s. Things have moved on. Someone screwed up by not foreseeing this mess. Yes, they screwed up.

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Vegans furious as Bank of England admits ‘trace’ of animal fat in £5 notes

Mike 125

Re: why...

>>and similar SANE reasons...

And now back in the real world...

I can only hope that after they factored in the potential costs of cleaning up the PR+social media mess and probable reformulation, it was still worth the risk of starting with tallow.

That's sanity, but I doubt that's what happened.

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Mike 125

why...

>>there is a trace of tallow in the polymer pellets used in the base substrate of the polymer

2 questions:

1) Why tallow - is there no synthetic option?

2) Why didn't the people who decide these things foresee the inevitable fuss?

Maybe a page was missing from the requirements spec.

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Qualcomm now offering US$15k for security bugs

Mike 125

not hardware..?

The article:

"Qualcomm's been bitten by the bounty bug, signing on with HackerOne to offer up to US$15,000 for vulnerabilities in modems and processors."

The Qualcomm link:

"In order to be considered for a reward, submissions must correspond to certain types of software running on specific hardware."

Strictly it's not vulnerabilities in processors, although the boundaries are becoming increasingly blurred, what with microcode updates and other such distopian nightmares from the pits of hell.

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TalkTalk teen hacker pleads guilty as firm reveals £22m profit jump

Mike 125

>> to get away from mob justice from dicks like you.

Absolutely right. AC what a pillock.

Me, I'd give the teen a job, and mould him for my own nefarious purposes... And no, not that.

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What do you give a bear that wants to fork SSL? Whatever it wants!

Mike 125

>>Didn't the IETF bloke just say stop making up new protocols to do the same thing? Same goes for libraries.

No. The protocol is the abstract behaviour e.g.

RFC: 793 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL

Only one of those is required (plus multiple revisions!).

The 'library' is the implementation. And there can can be thousands of those, depending on detailed platform requirements.

Unfortunately, in the security sphere, both the protocol and the implementation matter, which is why it's hard.

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Tesco Bank limits online transactions after fraud hits thousands

Mike 125

Is this different?

Is this different in nature from what has gone before? This is a mass random ability to extract cash from a huge number of accounts. This is not some jerk clicking on a dodgy email. Is it a zero day on the 2 factor authentication system? Are all the affected accounts accessed by mobile?

The frustrating thing is that we will never be told the detail. Whistleblowers blow, stop sucking.

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Twitter trolls are destroying democracy, warn eggheads

Mike 125

old and sad

I'm old and sad enough to remember trolls destroying comp.lang.c, in the late 90s. Back then, it was a venerable, respected font of knowledge, before StackExchange, where old school, real computer science people hung out. The arrival of the trolls was quite shocking. The arguments against the experts, and against long established principles and 'truth' were disturbing. It was the sheer effort the trolls put into their attacks, which made it different and new.

Monty Python:

"Argument is an intellectual process. Contradiction is just the automatic gainsaying of anything the other person says."

"No it's not."

"Yes it is.”

etc.

But the trolls were not contradicting. They were arguing, but they were wrong. It was a good lesson in what was to come.

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Zilog reveals very, very distant heir to the Z80 empire

Mike 125

Re: Whilst I recharge my car....

That's one creeping feature too many: a few excess uS spent in the MM thread, and the PFC thread will cause a major puff of smoke! Ahhh... those far off days of 'proper engineering'...

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Londoners react with horror to Tube Chat initiative

Mike 125

>>I think you are missing the whole point.

No, you are.

Being forced to stand opposite some hippy cretin wearing a "Tube Chat?" badge would massively increase social anxiety.

(Back in the day, social anxiety was known as the desire to 'punch someone in the face and run the f'k away' when they got too close, or worse, attempted any form of social interaction.)

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Legend of Zelda cracked with 6502 assembly language glitch

Mike 125

Things have moved on.

>>6502 assembly language glitch...

>>...and in turn to overwrite memory used for other game functions, in effect "breaking" the game

These days, we use advanced, high level languages like C to do exactly the same thing...

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Audi works with Chinese technology companies to develop intelligent cars

Mike 125

Re: The world is changing

Absof'kinlutely. I worked on GSM mobiles, way back when Japan came to the UK just to get the application processor to talk to the DSP. The West now goes East for an order of magnitude higher level hardcore smarts. Wow. How it's all turned around.

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ABBA-solutely crapulous! Swedish router-maker won't patch gaping hole

Mike 125

wrong

ᗅᗺᗷᗅ, not ABBA.

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Samsung: Hackers can't pwn our NFC payment kit. No way, nuh-uh, not true (Well, OK, maybe)

Mike 125

Re: You can't argue with a working proof of concept video.....

@DougS

>>but sometimes doing things the right way gets compromised due to wanting to >>drive down cost...i.e. making the payment terminals cheaper.

Yes, and also compromised by inappropriate speed optimisations: an extra 13 digits to create a properly safe MAC, all going over NFC, could be seen as taking a few ms too many. Usability always trumps good security.

This is fun - it's a fair bet Apple use the same system.

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If you use ‘smart’ Bluetooth locks, you're asking to be burgled

Mike 125

ha ha

>>If you use ‘smart’ Bluetooth locks, you're asking to be burgled

It's funny because it's true.

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Osram's Lightify smart bulbs blow a security fuse – isn't anything code audited anymore?

Mike 125

Re: Why is it

>>it has TWO, read em, TWO functions. On and Off,

For a bit of romance, it's sometimes useful to set something in-between...

The anger can be focussed far more widely than IoT. I don't want to go all hippy, but since consumer culture began, we've been buying crap we don't need. This is just one more insane example.

Also, security is not done well on PCs. So why would we expect it to be done well on IoT, which has huge platform constraints?

This whole thing was inevitable, like the next financial crash.

/> Hippy mode off.

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414,949 D-Link cameras, IoT devices can be hijacked over the net

Mike 125

Re: Your wifi cam is not directly accessible from the internet

>>These devices (and I have some myself) are behind firewalls

And so is your computer, so that's ok then. What *can* everyone be worried about. Beats me.

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Magnetic, heat scanners to catch Tour de France electric motor cheats

Mike 125

I love Bluetooth

>>Bluetooth-operated motor

Add that to the list of ludicrous Bluetooth applications, along with the BT padlock and BT electric toothbrush.

Being bored one day, I used Amazon Customer Questions & Answers forum to ask if the toothbrush also has Ethernet. I was earnestly and with great sincerity informed "No, sorry, it does not."

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NASCAR team red-flagged by ransomware attack

Mike 125

TeslaCrypt

>>Leavine Family Racing (CSLFR) has admitted paying off ransomware runners after one of its main test computers got infected with Truecrypt malware.

That's TeslaCrypt, not Truecrypt.

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Holy Crap! Bloke finishes hand-built CPU project!

Mike 125

Re: Not the same thing

But Babbage dreamt of a mechanical same thing:

Wiki:

The Analytical Engine incorporated an arithmetic logic unit, control flow in the form of conditional branching and loops, and integrated memory, making it the first design for a general-purpose computer that could be described in modern terms as Turing-complete.[5][6] In other words, the logical structure of the Analytical Engine was essentially the same as that which has dominated computer design in the electronic era.[3]

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Mike 125

Re: Hydraulic valves, I trust?

Babbage been there, done that, (in theory).

https://plan28.org/

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Ransomware scum build weapon from JavaScript

Mike 125

Re: How exactly does this execute?

Create a .js file containing:

WSH.Echo("Hello world");

WSH.Quit();

and just click on it in Windows Explorer. The rest follows.

'Windows Script Host' execution environment is enabled by default because it lets people 'do stuff'.

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Chaps make working 6502 CPU by hand. Because why not?

Mike 125

Re: It's not that big...

>>takes up his entire living room!

...not to mention life.

>>just over 11 transistors per RAM bit

Discrete - that is seriously impressive.

Good Luck to all obsessive hobbyists - that's how the ball gets rolling.

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Siemens Healthcare struck by rebranding madness

Mike 125

is that PC..?

Can you say Boutiqueers? I don't think that's allowed these days - depending on where you stress the syllables.

Siemens Healthcare has long been a laughing stock- so I guess this insanity suits.

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