* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6988 posts • joined 31 May 2010

VMworld 2016: What happens in Vegas ... could be just a desert trip

Trevor_Pott
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Re: A trip to the Desert

The only thing good about the Nevada Desert are all the places that are not the Nevada Desert.

**** this "heat" noise.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I hope the writer can answer additional questions at the show...

Not going to the show, but can answer any ways.

1) There is Flash still in their products because they were spectacular dumbasses in denial of the problem for years and didn't invest in a post-Flex interface until it was damned near too late. They are now working as fast as they can, but didn't get serious about it until yay-not-very-long-ago, so it's at least another year before Flash is gone.

2) NSX is something VMware is investing heavily in. They are betting a lot on it.

3) You can't upgrade as you like because if you could VMware wouldn't make as much money from raping your wallets and telling you that you like it. I gave up having that argument with them years ago.

4) There is plenty of innovation occurring at VMware, but it is all super-tip-top-hush-hush secret stuff that may or may not see the light of day. The fact that you are asking that question validates my argument that it's time to let the world see under the kimono before Microsoft manages to win hearts and minds.

Once their customers leave them for Microsoft, those customers aren't coming back. Sadly, VMware either doesn't believe they can/will lose customers to a resurgent Microsoft powered by a top-notch hybrid cloud story, or they just don't care.

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VMware: We're gonna patent hot-swapping your VMs' host OS

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Glee!

The vast majority of workloads out there do fuck all except eat lots of RAM. CPU utilization in most datacenters - even with virtualization - is pathetic. Containers just give us a way to drive even more density and hope to get slightly better usage from our workloads.

Whole lot of stuff just wants to sit around waiting for something to do.

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My Microsoft Office 365 woes: Constant crashes, malware macros – and settings from Hell

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Thunderbird with Lightening

Absolutely. On multiple products. It's also worth pointing out that what each or any of us considered "smooth" might be choppy or unusable to others. I, for example, find anything slower than 60fps unusable and I tend to be picky about my mice because some setups - certain wireless USB mice, for example - have noticeable (to me, at least) lag when compared to wired PS/2 mice.

Compared to Josh, however, I might as well be playing a slideshow. For him, anything under 120 FPS is unusable and he's picky about which PS/2 mice he uses because lag matters that much.

Maybe you found a magic combination of hardware and software that works great. If so, congrats! For me, I haven't had such luck so far. And I'm far too poor to rebuy all my gaming gear. To date, none of the software produces anything usable for me, and I cycle through and retry every 8 months or so.

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Re: alternate mail/calendar client

I've tried the Exchange EWS provider. It's picky. It's usable if you sacrifice enough virgins to it and don't look at it funny, but not what I'd call stable. I never understood this because Android can talk to Exchange without any problems whatsoever, so I never got why Thunderbird would only update the calendar when it felt like it.

Also: trying to sync both exchange and gmail calendars on the same Thunderbird? This ends very badly. With Outlook I can use gsyncit. Not the greatest, but it mostly works. I have yet to convince Thunderbird to play ball. :(

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Re: Almost, but not quite, entirely unlike Outlook

What in your proposed solution actually centralizes the calendaring? And does all of this work on iPhones? Android? Mac? Windows? How much setup does it require per user? How fragile is it, both from a client side and from a server side?

This isn't just "a cultural issue". This is "a usability issue".

The issue around this is that what people want is the ability to walk into a car dealership, sign some papers, then turn a key and drive away with a car. They don't want to go to a parts shop, a machine shop, a metal shop and then to a hackerspace to assemble it all and ultimately end up with a car that can only drive 4 out of 7 days a week and can't make left turns.

What the open source crowd don't seem to understand is usability. With Outlook, my users can enter their e-mail address and password and that is all they need to enter. That's all that I, as an end user, need to enter. Everything else is handled through DNS and the client/server relationship.

One username and password gets calendaring, mail, contacts, distribution lists, public folders and more. Do you understand this? One user name and password. One application. One thing to troubleshoot. One application to learn. One application to teach.

No setting up multiple IMAP accounts. No downloading 5 different add-ons, only one of which is commercially supported, and two of which are no longer maintained at all.

At least the LibreOffice people have grokked that bundling and usability are important. They have figured out that any collection of interconnecting applications that important has to be maintained as a unit, so that no one piece falling behind (or being abandoned) threatens the whole.

But the mail nerds never get this. They seem perfectly happy with maintaining a spider's web or barely-compatible version-unbound components working in loose formation, and then going back every few years and reinventing the wheel.

I don't know about you, but I'm tired of reinventing the wheel. I just want the goddamned thing to work. I want it to work today. I want it to work tomorrow. And I want it to work 10 years from now.

E-mail is e-mail. Let's please just STOP FUCKING WITH IT. Let's stop having to reinvent, reconfigure, tweak, change, adapt, learn, relearn, teach, modify and change. Let's just get it right and then leave it the hell alone.

Computers are here to make our lives easier. Not endlessly faff around with in some insane attempt to be "more efficient" through constant - but ultimately useless and unproductive - change.

Show me an exact stack of applications - server and client - that replace Exchange and Outlook without having to retrain everyone, or redo every few years, or have a half dozen sign ins per user per device, and I'll be thrilled. I hate Microsoft in the gor'ram face. But a fist full of monkeys that all have to be carefully thrown in the right barrels is quite definitively also not the way.

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Re: The pain of it all

Windows 95 was 21 years ago.

Windows 2000 was 16 years ago.

Windows XP SP2 was 12 years ago.

Office 97 was 19 years ago.

Office 2003 was 13 years ago.

Windows 95 to windows 2000 was 5 years. The wait was worth it.

2000 to XP SP2 was 4 years. The wait was worth it.

Office 97 to 2003 was 6 years. The wait was worth it.

Microsoft hasn't produced end user productivity tools or an operating system since which count as definitive improvements over Windows XP SP2 (12 years ago) and Office 2003 (13 years ago).

I think I've been more than fair in giving them time.

Look: newer versions of software have new security features. ASLR and so forth. That's expected. That's part of the evolution of software over more than two decades. Other things (such as hyper-v) that were rightly their own product got rolled in. Fine. That's a business decision.

But what does Windows 10 offer me that actually makes my life better over Windows XP? And no, putting a gun to my head and saying "upgrade or the viruses will get you" isn't making my life better. What in Office 2016 makes my life any better, faster, easier or more productive than Office 2003?

No, Microsoft have created applications and an operating system that makes their life better, makes it easier for them to profit, and offer us nothing except fear and coercion to keep us on the treadmill. They're the Donal Trump of software developers and I, for one, am rather sick of their shit.

I just want the lights kept on so I can go about my day. I don't want to be confused, chastised or scared shitless all the time when I could be usefully contributing to society. Why - oh why - is that so very much to ask?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Low Hanging Fruit - Visio

"or modify your workflow for gmail"

Seriously? Is this what we, as an industry, have become? There are those among us that pull this shit not in meetings where determining top-down policy to foist upon the milled masses, but in casual conversation with peers?

This is walking up to someone and syaing "you're not trying hard enough to do it my way and that is why you fail" instead of starting with something important like, oh I don't know, why they should try at all!

Computers are are a tool to make my life easier. I am not here to adapt to the computer.

Also: compared to Visio, Draw is pretty butts. It's getting there, but it's still got rather a long way to go. Especially in having those diagrams read by Visio and vice the versa. It's usable and all, but only if you don't have to actually, you know, work with other people at any point.

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Re: Speed

Are you sure that's Office, and not "svchost"? It sounds a lot like the whole "windows Update will now eat one core of your CPU until the goddamned end times" problem.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Thunderbird with Lightening

You must not do much inside a VM that's graphics intensive. Response times in all the available platforms are terrible, and nothing supports Crossfire. Good luck playing Battlefield 4, Company of Heroes or the latest Quake. Especially if you want to win...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Stop whining...

Whining is my day job. Better question: why are you being an insufferable cocktoboggan? Don't you have something productive to do?

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Re: all those dumb "smart quotes."

I install with Ninite. I update with Ninite. I have done this for ages. No parallel or portable installs. So far as I know Ninite just runs a regular (albeit silent) install each time. I don't use extensions. Or much of anything. I just try to defang LibreOffice so that all the formatting stupidity is removed and it provides me essentially "Notepad with spell and grammar check". That's it. That's all the customization I do/request/require from my word processors.

I write in HTML. Really, all I want is Notepad with spell check. Why, oh why, can't we just have that?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: 2003 still rules! (for some)

You do know the add-on doesn't properly read or write the stuff that 2016 outputs, eh? A lot (a lot!) of errors. Especially with Powerpoint.

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Re: Thunderbird with Lightening

If you have the super secret magical combination of Thunderbird-based stuff that Actually Fucking Works with Exchange and is still actively maintained, I'd love to try it. I played this game a year ago and damned near through the notebook out the window, the whole experience was so frustrating.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Enjoy today's 2-minute hate on MSFT

You'll be looking elsewhere. I'd rather be peeled than use that bucket of Bantha poodoo, and I think the others around here actually like Windows 10. They certainly don't seem to understand why I don't want Cortana, telemetry, all my searches being sent to Bing, etc...

That's a great big bucket of nope there, Rubber Ducky...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: LaTeX

Sorry, I don't keep my pee in jars. I also get out every now and again, and periodically touch the breasts of an actual living female. LaTeX. Sheesh. That's so far down the rabbit hole Dwarf Fortress players avoid it. *shudder*

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Re: Thunderbird with Lightening

Pfffffffft.

Not gonna happen. Or if it does, they'll probably contort it into a Google-esque nightmare.

Good things don't happen to normal people. Ever.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What does putting my Windows installation in a VM do for me?

1) So do backups. It's not like the bad patch thing is monthly. Especially not if you delay a week or two to let the uninformed through the minefield first.

2biii) that's all predicated on actually finding a Linux client. So far, no fun.'

3) Funny, I'd rather know that I'm infected. Smart malware, dumb malware...if there's a chink in my armour, I want air raid sirens and flashing lights and a world ending almighty push to find out how that SOB crawled in and then go build another wall.

5) If I could stick with Office 2003, I wouldn't have any of the problems from the article, now would I? I *love* Office 2003. It was the pinnacle of productivity software. That inability to read modern formats, however, means pretty much anyone who isn't a self-obsessed dickbag (I need to you put that in an older format) needs to use latest greatest. Securing old software is easy. Coping with the shitty bugs of new software is hard.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Thunderbird with Lightening

Yeah; twitch games in a VM make Trevor a sad panda.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Email alternative

I'll give it a boo. As long as it has an offline mode, it's worth a jingle!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Thunderbird with Lightening

Funny, I've experimented extensively with this and it doesn't work worth a damn.

...especially for Crossfire.

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Trevor_Pott
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Thank you google robot. Go back to R'lyeh and leave me in peace. Mortal minds were not meant to witness Google "design".

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OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooooooooOOOOoooooooooo...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What does putting my Windows installation in a VM do for me?

1) That's what containers are for. I'm investigating those instead for this use.

2a) We're back to "there isn't a Linux mail client that does what I want".

2bi)Or I could just run browsers with defences. Which, you know, I'd need under Linux anyways.

2bii)Or I could run LINUX in the VM for browsing, since it is lighter weight.

2biii)Of course, if I have my browser in a different OS from my mail, etc, it makes it a pain in the ass to open links.

3)If the malware has gotten far enough into my computer that it detects it is in a VM and decides not to run, I've already really fucked up somewhere. Rather keep the stuff a little farther out, thanks.

4) This is indeed an advantage. Unfortunately, the reliance of modern MS client software on hardware acceleration has really put a damper on this.

5) This is indeed an advantage. Unfortunately, Microsoft's constantly shifting formats mean I'll have to run the latest software, which may require the latest OS, which...

...goddamn it, I hate Microsoft.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: all those dumb "smart quotes."

I write my novels in code. HTML makes for goodly ways to mark up content.

...almost like it was designed for it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Thunderbird with Lightening

What does putting my Windows installation in a VM do for me? How does this benefit me?

Also: if I do that, I can't play games.

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Trevor_Pott
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Wrong. I stay with Exchange because of:

1) Calendaring

2) Centralized contacts (individual AND group)

3) Mail enabled public folders

4) Distribution groups

5) The physical layout of the UI (when using third party tools to get rid of the ribbon)

Of these are required at a server and a client level for me to ditch Outlook + Exchange.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What's Wrong with Slurp?

I use Evolution on my Devuan box. It's okay for light use, but no replacement for Outlook. Outlook 2011 on Mac was pretty good, but I haven't had a usable Mac in a couple of years.

Most of my boxes are still Windows 7. They're likely to be so long as I need things to do heavy lifting. Or until one of the open source clients gets stable enough, usable enough and without any obviously Suessian GUI elements enough to replace Outlook. Evolution is the closest in terms of UI, but as for the rest...

...well, let's just say I wish more resources were being put into it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Interesting quote on Google's mail client

I wouldn't even know where to begin. Everything. I hate literally everything about it. That, and they keep changing the UI.

If you want the cold, hard truth of the matter all the complaints will boil down to "it's not Outlook 2003". Because what I want is Outlook 2003. I don't want "smarts", or "evolution", or "differences". I want it to look and feel, and behave, and respond to my muscle memory exactly like Outlook 2003.

And Gmail is about as far from Outlook 2003 as one can possibly get.

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Re: What's Wrong with Slurp?

Office 2003 had everything I needed or wanted, except the ability to talk to the latest versions of the documents. 2010 had that fucking ribbon bar and ----++++CARRIER LOST

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Office likes to integrate with Window

Seems to nuke my configs every second or third update on Windows 7...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Email alternative

Interesting. Does it do more than just mail when connected to an exchange server? I need that whole "calendaring and contacts to persist across devices" thing. And is it a locally installable client that caches all the data when the device is offline?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Enjoying the pain?

Unfortunately, all the other housekeepers either shoot your pets or straight up light you, personally, on fire.

Fuck of a choice.

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Last time I checked you only get mail off of POP3 or IMAP, and none of the calendaring, contacts and so forth that I actually need. Especially that I need to persist across multiple devices in real time.

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It's time for a discussion about malvertising

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Pushback

Who adapts seems to be directly related to the age of the primary shareholders. People are very slow to change. They are unlikely to do anything about the oncoming asteroid until it hits. Then they'll claim "woe is me", fold the company, and retire.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: "The ad networks see no percentage in ensuring clean ads"

The problem with a market-driven approach is that, inevitably - and probably quite quickly - the "trusted ads" network will become a monopoly. Shortly thereafter they'll expand what they offer. Moving ads. Video ads. Scripts. The next thing you know we're right back at malvertising, except that there is now only one advertising provider and they hold all the cards.

So long as there is a percentage in using malware-like techniques to advertise at you, they will build a system to do so, and we will pay the price. The only secure alternative is to forgo those kinds of ads. That means NOT using a mainstream ad network...or using subscriptions/pay-per-view.

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Re: We can't tell them how much they should be paid..

I was actually talking about being willing to pay that per month. $100/month for proper, no-holds-barred investigative journalism? Sign me up. SIGN ME THE FNORD UP.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Pushback

To be perfectly honest, I'm not sure more than a handful of publishers around the world have the financial reserves to push back. Everyone's running at the knife's edge. The advertisers hold all the cards.

The publishing industry, I think, waited too long. They've lost their power.

That's why a startup like Blendle is needed. To give the publishers an alternative. So that they can say "Microsoft, if you don't treat us right, we can and will use Apple!" Or something. The metaphor and mixing and understanding...

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Trevor_Pott
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Happy

Re: Thank you

Hmm. I don't think I've ever been accused of being an adult before...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Thank you for your honesty

Why thank you!

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TechCrunch defaced by self-professed 'white hat' hackers

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Oh c'mon

Not entirely sure you know what you're talking about.

It's reasonably easy to secure Wordpress from any but the best of the best. You can hide the administration URL either through obfuscation or by ensuring it only responds if you are SSHed/VPNed in. You can enable 2 factor authentication. You can put rate limiting and auto-banning on.

Wordpress is also fairly easily configured to auto-update.

In short: while there are risks with Wordpress, just as with any software, it has come a long way and is absolutely ready to be used professionally. Assuming you have the foggiest clue in hell what you're doing and take the time to secure it.

Of course, your custom-coded website that isn't regularly reviewed and is full of at least as many bugs per line as Wordpress will totally be safe and secure, while remaining as functional over time and with a TCO that is even remotely close. Sure is.

Now excuse me while I dig out my fuzzer...

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Microsoft delays Azure updates so you can catch up with the cloud

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not surprised

Why would Microsoft care about you? Or anyone? They're Microsoft.

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Netflix and not chill

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Maybe

Yeah, VPN blocking is why I cancelled. If I can't watch the shows I want to watch, why keep paying?

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Microsoft silently kills dev backdoor that boots Linux on locked-down Windows RT slabs

Trevor_Pott
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Re: not long before RT slab-tops are completely worthless

Aye. Buy good tires. Replace them when they start to go. Today, that's really all you need to do for most of Canada.

All seasons have gotten me through urban driving, all the hiways south of Athabasca in Alberta, and even through white-out blizzard conditions on the Coquihalla. I'm not sure I'd go up a corduroy road on them, but then again I'm pretty sure my wimpy little Scion XB would disintegrate on one of them anyways.

Now, some of this might be due to the fact that if it's stupidly awful outside I can choose to just not travel for a day or two. Benefits of both of us working from home. I doubt it, however. I think things like traction control and ABS probably have more to do with it. That and the fact that we've actually advanced tire design and materials technology rather a lot since the 70s...

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Keep up the pressure on the telcos, Canada

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Semi-Obsolete concept: FTTH as an "Urban privilege"

Why would I be polite? Politeness is obfuscation which is orthogonal to accurate communication, which is my sole purpose here.

And labeling organizations of people "sociopaths" absolutely is helpful. It makes it perfectly clear that I don't accept that individuals choosing to work in groups absolves those individuals - or the group - or the requirement to act morally.

What's stupid is the idea that as soon as blame can be shared (or ducked), morality doesn't apply. Equally stupid is every single individual who supports, tolerates, ignores or does not actively resist that concept.

Any society that rewards sociopathic behaviour, in individuals or in organizations, is deeply flawed and required massive change. Period.

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Re: Semi-Obsolete concept: FTTH as an "Urban privilege"

Large urban agglomerations are different; the high density means that risk can be spread out. Also, existing infrastructure keeps the cost per unit the same or lower compared to rural runs for everything but labour...but your get a lot more bang for your buck from urban work than rural work.

Re: sociopathy: you're trying to justify conscienceless behaviour by saying that operating in a group removes the requirement to act like a human. You might believe that to be true, but I think that makes you a fucking monster.

As for the rest, I'm very glad I upset you. You seem to need to be upset. Yes, telcos care what colour your skin is. Every corporation of any size does. They care because the colour of skin, along with other factors (such as where you live) play a role in determining the statistical likelihood of your being a good investment, a likely customer and so forth.

Ultimately, what corporations want is your money. But no corporation of any size invests equally or blindly. They put their money where there is the greatest chance of the highest return, and every conceivable factor that can be plotted and sounded is analyzed in order to ensure that investments are optimal.

Maybe you should learn to disconnect your own political leanings from discussions. Clearly I've touched a nerve by bringing up the fact that corporations - and especially the people who run large ones - don't operate in a socially beneficial, altruistic or even colour-bind manner.

Now I, personally, believe that is deplorable. It is behaviour we, as a nation, ought to regulate against to ensure equality. If you wish to believe otherwise that's your choice. Your morals are you own; you've your own right to them, just as I've a right to think you a monster. I'm content to leave it at that.

If you are, however, going to deny that discrimination as a facet of investment optimization happens, then you're a fool. One who is part of the problem because ignorant attempts to defend the telcos prevents us from collectively addressing the problem.

At the end of the day the hard truth is this: unrestrained market capitalism is prejudiced because it magnifies the extant socioeconomic dichotomies inherent in society. Socioeconomic dichotomies present for the most part due to prejudice.

This magnification of socioeconomic divides reinforces them and in short order we have a feedback loop. Especially when dealing with critical infrastructure such as utilities significant efforts must be applied in order to level the playing field and overcome prejudice and the resulting socioeconomic dichotomies. To date, I am unaware of any society that has found a workable alternative.

It's also been pretty conclusively proven that simply wishing the problem away doesn't work. But you keep right on trying, if you feel that you must.

Cheers.

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Re: Is it even possible to run fiber in muskeg?

Not done much work up north, I see. The ice roads are only needed for the heavy stuff. We have plenty of equipment that will haul less than a tonne of cargo (man + fibre) from A to B.

It's all about having great big huge surface area. They're based on the glacier crawlers that are enormous, but exert so little pressure they can run over your foot. Also good for not screwing up the ecosystems.

And why, exactly, would armoured cable need to be buried? What is going to harm it? This stuff is used to surviving oceans. This includes things like boat anchors and the like. A few caribou and some methane fires aren't really going to irk it much.

And if you did need to somehow bury it? Then bury it when you make the next ice road. Those are semi-permanent structures anyways; the next time they redo the corduroy they can cheerily run some fibre. Hell, we run pipelines all through hell and gone relatively easily; the cost of them is in the environmental assessment and the labour, not the materials.

Muskeg sucks, but it's not the 80s anymore. We have managed to master certain types of year-round travel.

And all of this is before I begin my discussion of the modern hoverbarges. Field tested primarily in Minnesota, these units are beginning to see increasing deployment in Canada's northern reaches. The two big factors that have restricted hoverbarge deployment in the past have been cost per hour to operate and a lack of reliability in the coldest winter months.

The latter issue has been solved by a couple of different companies and the current theory is that if the extraction industries in Canada start to buy into the hoverbarges then the overall costs will go down. A lot of this has to with the fact that the next-gen hoverbarges are using better components than the current LCAC hovercraft most militaries use, and there is an expected convergence resulting in lower component costs, etc. But that's really another discussion entirely...

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Re: Semi-Obsolete concept: FTTH as an "Urban privilege"

Sorry, but you're wrong.

A) "Middle class" isn't enough to justify running Fibre To The Bush. A household income of $100k, while certainly fitting in the upper end of "middle class", is enough to justify it. That does, however, leave most of "middle class" households not remotely worth the time and effort.

B) A little over 10% of Canada's population is Asian. (That number including all of Asia (including India) and not just pacific Asians.) The overwhelming majority of these individuals live in urban agglomerations of over 1M people. They also are not equally represented amongst households making more than $100k; that is still disproportionately dominated by white people.

Based on your screed, I am going to presume you are from Vancouver. In part because you talk about BC issues, and in part because you seem to believe there "plenty of Asian people". Vancouver being, of course, where individuals of Asian descent are dramatically over represented compared to the rest of Canada's major cities, to say nothing of the smaller towns.

Regarding BC's smaller communities, you couldn't be more wrong. A lot of what I wrote is due to first hand experience that I and others I know well have encountered in trying to get broadband into communities in BC. Mostly communities not too far off the Transcanada, and usually considered to be nice vacation destinations.

The rest is based on efforts here in Alberta, and working with people in Saskatchewan, Ontario, Nunavut, Quebec and the Maritimes. Of those, only SK is really different from the rest.

Lastly, I disagree entirely on your personal take on the work "sociopath". You are, once more, incorrect. A sociopath is an individual possessed of the capability to turn their ability to feel empathy on and off at will*. This is abnormal. Most human beings are unable to stop themselves from feeling empathy.

Normal people are not rational actors in an economic sense. This is one of the very first things that economists are supposed to learn! This is Econ 101 stuff right here!

Human beings don't always do what is objectively "best" for themselves, assuming your only criteria for "best" is greed. We will pass up economic opportunities to care for friends, loved ones and pets, for example. We donate to charities, support social programs like universal health care and even do things like spend hundreds of hours a year updating wikis online. None of which are economically "rational" activities.

The purely economically "rational" actor is a sociopath. No empathy. No remorse. No guilt. No anything that doesn't directly benefit the actor. So yes, the telcos are absolutely acting as model rational actors, but in doing so they are acting like sociopaths.

As for "with telcos' goodwill"...dream on. Never going to happen. They will be forced to behave with some form of compassion at the point of a gun only. It goes into law, and those laws are enforced with guns. Until the day the last appeal is exhausted, they will strip mine our populace for every last bent copper.

Like the unrepentant sociopaths that they are.

*Depending on who writes your definitions, the difference between a sociopath and a psychopath is that a sociopath is capable of empathy, but can dismiss it at will, while a psychopath is incapable of empathy at any time. The linguistic validity of this depends entirely on which school of psychology you happen to follow.

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Missile bods MBDA win Brit military laser cannon contract

Trevor_Pott
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Re: and of course

Notice anything in particular about the nationalities of those who get prosecuted for war crimes...and that that don't?

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Tor board swept under carpet after Appelbaum 'sex misconduct' claims

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Balanced Board

You what's not nice? That we have to actually care about such things.

A) At what point does {whatever} equality* start being normal?

B) At what point do we stop with "positive/negative/right/left/upsidefown discrimination" and people can start doing the jobs they actually want to do in life without having to worry that if they born with the wrong {thing that is measured to determine group status} they'll have a harder time getting a job?

*And how do we measure {whatever} equality? Is it only equal is {group} is represented the same amount as {other group}? Is it equal if the representation roughly parallels the proportion of {group} in society? Which {group}s do we count? Why {group}1 and not {group}2? Do we only count against the perceived "dominant" {group}? Who determines when the "dominant" {group} stops being dominant? Do we then have to change against which {group} everything is measured?

Prejudice just sucks all over. Why can't we all just treat eachother like people? :(

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