* Posts by John Brown (no body)

7253 posts • joined 21 May 2010

Would you believe it? The Museum of Failure contains quite a few pieces of technology

John Brown (no body)
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Happy

Re: FFS...

So? Are you saying the Mac is worse than Windows for "intuitive" UI design?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: FFS...

"People use Microsoft in whichever way they find it because it's relatively intuitive."

For some relatively low value of "relatively"?

Star Trek IV

Engineer Scott (in the 1980's): "Hello Computer"

Other Guy: Why don't you use the mouse?

Scotty: (picking up the mouse like a microphone), "Hello Computer"

Intuitive interface? Yeah, we've heard of that.

BTW, it took me ages to find my way around the control panel (and to find the control panel), when my wife stupidly upgraded to Windows 10. My "intuition" was telling me where to find settings, but MS was thwarting me by hiding them in non-intuitive different places.

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US surveillance court declined less than 2 per cent of applications

John Brown (no body)
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Re: The land of the ....?

"Animal Farm might be worth reading too"

I heard that David Cameron read that one and grew a great affinity for Napoleon as a result.

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FCC greenlights small cell free-for-all in the US

John Brown (no body)
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Re: This is great

It's not about new towers. It's about putting 5g kit on top of existing lighting poles and the city has to be notified. The change is that if the city doesn't respond yay or nay within a fixed time period, then it defaults to yay instead of the current nay.

I don't even see it as a big change. It's just putting pressure on city planners to respond in a fixed time frame instead of dragging things on because they can't be arsed to reply.

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Base specs leak for Windows 10 Cloud – Microsoft's wannabe ChromeOS assassin

John Brown (no body)
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"ChromeOS does al of the above right,"

...and from talking to people who do school IT, the Chromebook management portal is pretty good and mature. Those with experience of both seem to prefer Chromebooks to Apple in schools these days (Speaking about the UK here)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I wonder if this hardware

It'll almost certainly be a locked down UEFI secureboot with no other boot keys present or option to add. Remember WindowsRT?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Two words really

"Now Google and the Chromebook are the platform to beat."

...and judging by the slide in the article, MS aspirations are to equal only 1/3rd of the match points and not try so hard on the other 2/3rds. If that's their attitude, Windows Cloud sounds about as useful as Windows Phone!

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LinkedIn U-turns on Bluetooth-enabled 'Tinder for marketers'

John Brown (no body)
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"sometimes a useful way to ping them when I can't find their new email address."

If their contact email address changes when they change companies, maybe they don't really want to stay in touch, otherwise they'd give out one of their personal email addresses.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Deleted on all of my devices

Data slurp, eh? And who owns LinkedIn?

Well, there's yer problem...

Funny (not!), isn't it. Not so very long ago, most people would have answered "Google", by reflex, to a question like that.

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Shooting org demands answers from Met Police over gun owner blab

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Stickers?

"On your front window? Announces there is a gun in the house and makes you a target."

No, it identifies you has having something valuable enough to be worth protecting. Not really all that much better, granted, but smartwater is not just for gun owners.

Actually, I was more surprised to learn that in London there are 30,000 licenced gun owners. I know London is a big place, but that still seems like rather a lot considering the UK gun laws/restrictions. Maybe the urban rabbit problem is worse than I thought? ;-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Smartwater?

"b) "Smartwater" just selling UV ink marking kit? Typically available under £5 in the high street, maybe even Poundland."

IIRC, their product is uniquely identifiable to the customer. Much more sophisticated than daubing your postcode on with "invisible ink"

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Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

John Brown (no body)
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Re: My thoughts on this ...

"Yes, I sometimes install that (XFCE) too as a fall back solution. Easier to fix a desktop from a desktop"

Isn't that what TWM is for?

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(You can't) buy one now! The flying car makes its perennial return

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Calories (or whatever measure of energy expenditure you prefer)

"Spin bikes? You go to much posher gyms than I do."

What's the difference between a "spin bike" and a "normal" exercise bike?

(No, since I ask, I've not been to a gym in many, many years. Do they still have medicine balls and indian clubs?)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I liked the Moller...

"If they had ever gotten it to work, reliably, safely, & (hopefully) cheaply,"

Yeah, it's looked pretty but until someone invents a Mr Fusion, it ain't ever going to happen. Using thrust to keep you in their is very, very costly without decent sized wings. Wings which can't be strong enough and foldable/stowable to offer much lift unless they are small which means very high horizontal speeds to be useful. Compare a jet fighter with a glider.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: "The first commercial flying car in the world is now a fact,"

"as a plane its range is ridiculous. "

And it's not even a plane. It's a gyrocopter. I suspect there's a good reason there aren't all that many in use around the world.

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Drunk user blow-dried laptop after dog lifted its leg over the keyboard

John Brown (no body)
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"A nice person doesn't peelet the dog pee in the laptop. A nice person doens't melt the laptop. And certainly, a nice person doesn't dump this stinking motherfucker of a messed up laptop at IT expecting it to be repaired."

At least not without including a decent bribe.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Yeah, that happened.

"Realistically if that happened to me I'd pull out the battery and hard drive, then hold the laptop under the shower,"

The manager concerned was pissed at the time. How pissed is another matter of course, but one tends to make not quite fully fully rational decisions after a few jars.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Back in the day...

"Why people think washing circuit boards is a terrible idea after they've been hosed in beverage is a mystery. "

I hosed out an HP Officejet once after some dipstick left it stored upside down in a box. Ink everywhere. But lovely and sparkly clean afterwards. Drying it out took some time with a fan outside on a warm sunny day and re-lubing all the moving parts, but it worked a treat afterwards. Not recommended, but this was back when HP Officejet MFPs were still new on the market and quite expensive to replace.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Back in the day...

"Many years ago I was working on the weekend shift when someone spilt a can of Fanta on to the keyboard of the main system console of our production mainframe (keeping the banking system up for the weekend to allow people to withdraw money from "new fangled" ATMs)."

Most places, it was a serious offence to have drinks or food anywhere near a system, least of all the system console of a mainframe. Actually spilling it and causing damage would likely be a sackable offence back then.

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Web celeb product whores told to put on the red light – or else

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Links or it didn't happen

"lack of link to said half naked celebrity? "

Admitting that you can't find porn on t'interwebs is a damn good reason to post as AC, ya wimp!

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Cuffing Assange a 'priority' for the USA says attorney-general

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Is an Australian even allowed to run for Parliament?

"Rule number 1: No poofters!"

Sadly, it seems many didn't get the comedy reference.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Administrations go after leakers

"We now have a UK PM that wasn't voted for"

Oddly enough, I've never voted for a PM. Just like the vast majority of the UK population. That's now it works in the UK. We don't do presidential elections here. I do wish people would stop trotting out that tired old line.

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Hard-pressed Juicero boss defends $400 IoT juicer after squeezing $120m from investors

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Juicing is bad

"That means 35+ years ago, minimum."

So, you are now at or about the age when doctors start prescribing 'statins by default, which almost all include avoiding grapefruit in the warnings paperwork. Get some quick! :-)

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New MH370 analysis again says we looked in the wrong places

John Brown (no body)
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Re: I want it found

"just to stop all the conspiracy theories."

I agree with this pots! Lets start with something simple though. Find Flight 19 first to gain some experience in shallower, calmer waters. How hard can it be?

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Online ad scam launders legions of pirates and pervs into 'legit' surfing

John Brown (no body)
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Re: The advertisers need to fight back!

"obtaining some US visas is much less hassle than passing a CAPTCHA is these days"

Aaaaand...BINGO!, we have a winner! No one will do the Captchas. Win-Win all 'round, no ad-blocker required.

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John Brown (no body)
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Pirate

The advertisers need to fight back!

They could start by only showing the ads once the viewer has proved they're a legit person who wants to see the ad by passing a Captcha test. That'll sort out these despicable criminals and their automated ad impression systems!

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Trump's self-imposed cybersecurity deadline is up: What we got?

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Bah!

We have our own wannabee Trump. Corbyns big talking point today was how he is going to win against the rigged system. Sound familiar?

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Mastercard launches card that replaces PIN with fingerprint sensor

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Fingerprints...

"...the password you leave on everything you touch."

Exactly! A fingerprint is a username, NOT a password.

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Trump's lips sealed on surveillance, complains EU privacy chief

John Brown (no body)
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Re: "We've given them time"

I think there's two different levels here. Data given freely to US companies by people, eg signing up to Facebook, and data sent off-shore for processing without specific consent, eg IIRC was it Lockheed Martin who were given the entire UK census data to process?

Neither are safe within UK law, but I'd be more concerned about large datasets being sent to the US without the data subjects consent.

I still upvoted you though because it's the gradual "nudging" away from an expectation of privacy that has got us here in the first place.

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You just sent an on-prem app to the cloud and your data centre has empty racks. What now?

John Brown (no body)
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modern data centres run in the low twenties.

There was one in Leeds I used to go to every now and then. On a hot summers day, temps reaching 30c (yes, that's extremely hot for the UK!), wifey asked me why I was putting my coat in the car. It was fecking *cold* inside that place!

The fur lined one --------->

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SPY-tunes scandal: Bloke sues Bose after headphones app squeals on his playlist

John Brown (no body)
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Re: you need to have both GPS and Bluetooth turned on to use it

"It might be linked with the continued and growing use of bluetooth beacons for the delivery of context local information (in museums and the like)."

But BT is very short range, so by definition, your location is "known" to a BT beacon far more accurately and reliably than any location service can provide, especially indoors in a museum.

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John Brown (no body)
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"When oh when will there be a rebellion against data slurping?"

Sadly, never. Because there's a fool born every minute who will never, ever read a licence agreement or care about their privacy. Those of us who care are a tiny minority. The rest just want their shiny.

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Opportunity rover gets bored of spot it's explored since 2014

John Brown (no body)
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"If you have ever seen an elderly, experienced, carpenter working out imperial dimensions you'll understand the utility of quarters, eighths ,sixteenths etc. Use the metric system and it is calculator or a pen and paper."

Alternatively, have you ever seen a young, experienced carpenter working out metric dimensions you'll understand the utility of working in base 10 throughout. Use the imperial system and it's "WTF is that?" :-)

Although it's funny reading people writing about using British Imperial units as "proper American" units :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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"Last I heard, NASA is American, funded by Americans, so if they want to measure in corn dogs, that's their prerogative."

Maybe so, but they already screwed up big time by using old-fashioned measurement before.

"Hey, is that measured in milli-football fields or micro-football fields?"

Maybe not. Milli- and Micro sounds too metric. More likely in 1/3rds, 1/8ths or thou.

Football fields can be used for area too. And maybe use footballs for volume. How many footballs of fuel do we need?

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John Brown (no body)
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Facepalm

Re: This article needs some translation to english

"Does it include the bits behind the "goals" that have the team names on it, "

That must be a bugger at half time when the change ends!

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Silicon Valley tech CEO admits beating software engineer wife, offered just 13 days in the clink

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Justice may be happening already

"And Cuberon's website doesn't list him as a CEO anymore either. Clearly his business partners (or the angel investors) in the business were not impressed either and booted him."

There's a mission statement on the home page credited to him as CEO

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Cuberon

"Cuberon - CEO."

According to Linkdin, he's the Chief Executive Officer of a company with an employee count of "1 to 10".

I bet they also have a company President and Vice President too. FFS, it's a tiny little start-up pretending to be a multi-national! All you need is an Owner/Manager, not a fecking CEO!

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John Brown (no body)
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FAIL

Re: @Symon

"Ditto your apparent understanding (or lack of) of the cupcake insult."

There are 23 pages of definitions at Urban Dictionary. I'll leave to to you to tell us all which one I was using and which one you think is the "right" one, eh?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: @Symon

"I'd be quite happy to find out he'd been beaten to within an inch of his life in jail and if you don't like that snowflake"

Aw, the poor little cupcake still thinks vigilantism is ok in a civilised world.

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If you've stayed at a Holiday Inn you may have lost more than a good night's sleep (like maybe your bank card)

John Brown (no body)
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Franchise?

"Since it is a franchise operation it's up to the hotel owner to install the more secure system,"

So the franchisor can't tell the franchisee what to do? Maybe the franchisor needs to be updating it's franchise contract to include some security requirements along with the branding requirements. After all, it's franchise name which gets sullied (and maybe sued) when things like this happen.

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Fixing your oven can cook your computer

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Coincidence?

I had one of those too a few weeks ago. I said I didn't have a Hotpoint, it was a Zanussi and hung up. He obviously took note because within a week I got another similar call asking about my Zanussi washing machine. I told him I didn't have a Zanussi, it was a a Bosch. Still waiting for that follow up so I can tell him I have a Hotpoint and start it all over again :-)

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Australia scraps temporary visas for skilled workers

John Brown (no body)
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Thumb Up

Re: Facebook?

(* Which you only have access to if you have paid with all your personal information and submit to ongoing monitoring of your internet activities)

Ah, it was a rhetorical question then?

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Debian bins keys assigned to arrested Russian contributor

John Brown (no body)
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Re: 'twas a bit more than organizing protests

"But if you're going to be a social/political activist aiming to piss off a government with a reputation for dirty tricks, then hosting a service such as TOR which allows illegal acts to be potentially traced back to you is probably not the brightest idea, it leaves you open to blame for the acts of idiots or even government agents out to pin things on you."

The fact he may be a political activists who runs a TOR exit node would imply he'd be pretty stupid to post "incitement" from his own IP address in the first place, so yes, I'd say it's pretty likely it was someone else exiting through his node

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Mozilla abandons experimental Aurora Firefox channel

John Brown (no body)
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train model?

What's train model? Something to play with instead of doing their jobs?

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Oh snap! UK Prime Minister Theresa May calls June election

John Brown (no body)
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"If anything recent elections have told us that you can't be sure of anything. I think she will actually reduce her majority."

A proportion of people who voted leave did so ti stick it to the government and may do so again. But Labour seem to still be self-destructing, which may balance that out. This ones a tough call as to which way it will go. I'd quite like to see another coalition to put the brakes on Mays ambitions, but on the other hand, we, as a country, don't want to be dithering during the Brexit negotiations. And don't trust Corbyn with his hands on the reins. At this stage I have no idea who I might vote for, although any vote against Labour genuinely won't count anyway. We've had a Labour MP almost since the Labour party was founded with little signs of a sea change in this constituency.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: This goes to show one thing

"Fixed term parliaments are only supposed to be undone by votes of no confidence in the government, not to allow the PM to call snap elections when it suits them."

Or a vote of no confidence. Or repealing the Act. Or a new law (Statutory Instrument, anyone?) to amend it and effectively neuter it.

Also worth bearing in mind the Tories created the Act too, but now find it inconvenient.

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Feel guilty for scoffing Easter chocolate? Good news: Scientists have made NEGATIVE mass

John Brown (no body)
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So, they invented...

...Cavorite?

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NASA agent faces heat for 'degrading' moon rock sting during which grandmother wet herself

John Brown (no body)
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Trollface

Re: Time to voice your disapproval...

I hate what happened as much the rest of us here, but no enough to create a facebook account!

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RIP Bob Taylor: Internet, desktop PC pioneer powers down at 85

John Brown (no body)
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Re: ping bob.taylor

I must admit, I was thinking of dig rather then ping then realised that could be taken in bad taste.

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John Brown (no body)
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"Over the last few years we've seen a generation start to pass: Doug Englebart, Dennis Ritchie, Robert Morris, Bob Norris to name but a few others. And still the kids seem to think that nobody over 40 ever knew anything."

I think that;s more a reflection on our ageing process and the time period of the effective birth of the industry as we know it. Same applies to "celebrities" (and I mean the ones who work for a living!). As a child we were blissfully unaware of the regular deaths of actors, but now they seem to be dropping like flies because it's the ones we grew up with rather the old fogies we'd never heard of as kids.

Having said that, Bob Taylor seems to have been one of the huge "stars" that most of us never heard of, RIP.

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