* Posts by John Brown (no body)

9343 posts • joined 21 May 2010

Brexit to better bumpkin broadband, 4G coverage for farmers – Gove

John Brown (no body)
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"Comparing parts of Kenya to Kent is a completely irrelevant comparison."

Not least of which, is building out their mobile infrastructure is, for much of the country, the first comms infrastructure it's ever had. There's no expensive landline system to maintain and expand in parallel or compete with.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Costed

"My betting is that this will not happen and the sticklanders will find that no money at all is available for their infrastructure for a number of years."

We already know that for certain. The UK has big financial obligations for shared projects and pension scheme that we are signed up that don't end on Brexit day. That's what the £billions "divorce settlement" is about. That's a good few years of payments that eat up pretty much all of the £350m per week.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Infrastructure

"Actually the last bit of the M1 was built about 10 years ago, extending it north of Leeds to the A1,"

Ah, you beat me to it (see further down). It's actually nearly 20 years :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Infrastructure

"The M1 may have started in 1959, but the last bit wasn't built until 1972."

FYI, the newest stretch is the Leeds East extension to the M1, opened in 1999.

And for the OP, I am, almost daily, driving through the A1 roadworks south of Scotch Corner where the dual carriageway is still being upgraded to 6 lane motorway. The A1/A1(M) in the North has been massively improved and upgraded over the last 20 or so years, significant stretches upgraded to 6 lane motorway and all those roundabouts through South Yorkshire and beyond are are now long gone. I'm not sure if they still have roundabouts further down like Biggleswade and Peterborough though. I've not been that way in a while

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: @ Charlie Clark

"No foreigners is what 17.4 million people asked for."

Really? Did you personally ask each and every person who voted to leave why they voted that way?

Based just on the people I know, people voted leave for different reasons, ditto for those who voted remain. You can't generalise why people voted either way.

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Gemini is shipping and we've got one. This is what it's like

John Brown (no body)
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"But why telephone, when you can e-mail or fax with one of those."

Wot? No app for sending Telex? No Morse key? Well, I'll not be buying one then!

Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells.

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Use ad blockers? Mine some Monero to get access to news, says US site

John Brown (no body)
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"I guess there's absolutely nothing stopping websites from selling ad space on their websites directly and managing them internally,"

Yes! Every Website needs their own Herb Tarlek

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John Brown (no body)
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"Perhaps the standby issue needs as much attention - both are wasting far too much of the world's energy."

UK government ran a campaign a few years ago telling people to turn everything off when not in use because all those standby devices used up a whole extra power station or some such big scary number. At the same time there was a programme adding street lighting to motorways.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Evidently someone out there thinks that's a good idea.

"On the main topic of the article, as long as the code used to mine on my machine is trustable, then I'm fine with it."

Does that include when you desperately need the laptop for something important and the battery is down to 20% and there's no nearby power outlets?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Go back to discrete ads served off your own machines

"Likewise, if I wanted to sell nursery school places, I wouldn't advertise them on El-Reg, but evidently someone out there thinks that's a good idea."

Exactly. Targeting the ads where the audience is does seem more sensible than stalking individuals all over the 'net and bombarding them with the same ads. That doesn't convert a "maybe" into a customer, it pisses them off.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: How about

"I'm setting myself up for a multitude of downvotes from freetards, but honestly - if a content provider doesn't get anything in return for their content, how can you expect them to be able to keep up doing what they're doing?"

There's a difference between a "freetard" (a word used by people who don't see the offensive link to the insulting term "retard") and people who are protecting their systems from 3rd party scripts which may be malicious. Salon, in their TOS, take no responsibility for their advertising being hijacked and potentially damaging my computer. If they choose to take responsibility for the data they serve to my computer then I may consider removing any blocking.

If they want me to see adverts, all they have to do is accept adverts from advertisers as image files and serve them from their own domain. If a site blocks me for using a protective ad-blocker then I'll go somewhere else. Very few sites have value to me in that respect.

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Careful with the 'virtual hugs' says new FreeBSD Code of Conduct

John Brown (no body)
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Re: What is a 'hug' ?

"dogs don't have attorneys"

Only because no one gave one a camera to take copyrighted photos with. Yet.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: People should stop with the thought crimes.

"SJW"

That must have passed me by. Mentioned a lot but I have no idea what it is.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Oh my fucking gawd/ess ...

"I'm loving the outrage but it's a bit vague in it's targetting!"

By the nature of the organisation, it has to be. There are people involved, volunteers, not paid staff, who are from all sorts of cultures and backgrounds. What might be offensive in one culture might simply be the height of politeness in another. eg <loud belch>, yes that was a lovely meal.

This, of course, is all the more reason for any code of conduct to be fairly generic and keep away from specifics do's and don'ts, especially long lists of don'ts.

Code of Conduct.

1. Be polite

2. Don't be a dick.

Job done.

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This job Win-blows! Microsoft made me pull '75-hour weeks' in a shopping mall kiosk

John Brown (no body)
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Re: The big question

"Is about the role. Was it managerial and compensated as such, or was it just rated as managerial to avoid paying overtime?"

In the reported case, definitely the latter. This was MS taking the piss to avoid extra costs. She worked way more hours every week than a normal job would entail. Not just now and then, but every week. She wasn't allowed to take on staff so she could take lunch or rest breaks, which implies she worked alone. If she was working alone, then she had no staff to manage, so she wasn't a manager. There will almost certainly have been as area manager who looked after her and similar retail "booths". She was a sales clerk on what might at first have appeared to be a good salary until the reality hit home and she was being paid 20% more than a 40 hour waged clerk but doing about 100% more hours.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: To be honest...

"You wouldn't have had to make all that effort of moving to Linux if Windows wasn't so crap, would you?"

It's probably less effort to move to from Win7 to Linux than from Win7 to Win10. It;s certainly quicker!

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The e-waste warrior, 28,000 copied Windows restore discs, and a fight to stay out of jail

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Linux Mint is free

"I've found that most people are capable enough to look for the settings menu when they want to change a setting. It might be called something different, and in a different place, but most people know what they are looking for, and will recognise it when they do."

Ans MS are well known for screwing with the control panel with every new release of Windows, so that;s certainly no barrier for a user switching. In fact, MS have gone one step further with Windows 10 and effectively have two control panels with similar/different/overlapping functions that may or may not change the setting the user wants to change.

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Japan's Robo-Bartenders point to a golden future

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Bah!

"If it could appear on a clipboard checlikst owned by Rimmer or Lister, it's a bloody vending machine!"

And based on the article, it doesn't do feedback or analysis, so is in no way a robot. It just follows a precise and pre-programmed sequence of events that requires each beer selections to be understood and consistent between deliveries. If they change to very different type of beer, it will need to be re-programmed for that beer because it can't learn from it's actions and results.

And anyway, there's no such thing as a generally acceptable "perfect pint" because different beers and different people have their own standards of perfection. My perfect pint WILL NOT be designed and dictated by some marketdroid at $big_beer_co

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John Brown (no body)
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"Your head the morning after a skin full of NBA -->"

No real aficionado would refer to it as NBA. It;s Nukie Broon (which fits the icon better too)

Of course, now that's not even brewed in Geordieland, let alone Newcastle, it's not the same anyway, so re-branding as NBA might not be a bad thing.

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John Brown (no body)
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"What is this shandy you speak of?"

Back when I had a valid passport, I once went "down south". I believe down there they call it London Pride.

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Flight Simulator's DRM fighter nosedives into Chrome's cache

John Brown (no body)
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Re: They'll get away with it...you wouldn't!

@FuzzyWuzzys

No idea why you got downvoted, but you are spot on. If an individual does this to a company, if they get caught they go to court because a Police complaint is made and it's taken seriously. All it should take is one single complaint to the Police over this case and investigation should start. But you know it won't happen, If, and it's a big if, there is enough of an outcry, then maybe some government department might be persuaded to start some sort of weak investigation and wrists might be slapped, maybe a small fine.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: They are probably Android developers as well

"Android developers, and ad-targeting firms seem to think that grabbing as much as they can off your device is fair game."

Anyone here do dev work on Android apps? Does the Google Play Store report back failed installs when a uses clicks NO to the overarching permissions requested?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: They're not first and won't be the last.

"Google says it is a European directive, that doesn't have the same dissuasive power. It only frightens the bean-counters."

Except that an approved and enacted European Directive means that each member has to enact into law the said Directive. It only sounds like guidance, but in fact it is the law. The guidance bit can seem deceptive in terms of force of law, but the term "guidance" is to direct EU member governments on what is needed in law so there may be some variations locally but the meat of the directive is actual law across the EU, Google is well aware of the situation. They have lawyers experienced in dealing with the EU and EU law.

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Crunch time: Maplin in talks to sell the business

John Brown (no body)
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"It will be interesting to see what happens to all the retail space in the long term. Hopefully developers can build housing on the out of town sites."

A lot of out of town shopping centres are built on ex-industrial (or at least commercial of some sort) land. The clean up process for commercial or shopping centre redevelopment is a lower bar than clearing up for residential development. If the local planning department are on the ball and do proper due diligence, it might be expensive to build houses there.

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John Brown (no body)
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"They should've moved to a Screwfix model years ago."

I bought something from Screwfix a few years ago, maybe 4 (or more) but they still post me a thick paper catalogue at least once per year. Seems such a waste.

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John Brown (no body)
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"Nowadays, it's very easy to buy anything you want online and have it delivered to your door, and for components, that's what I would invariably do."

Yeah, but browsing a Maplin catalogue, with all the IC pinouts and often example circuits, tech specs for everything, often triggered ideas for projects, especially in this young teens mind at the time. There was a huge amount of reference material in there, all in one place that you rarely get now. It's much more fun to flick through a thick book than to randomly click on links on a web page that may or may not take you to something related. You really can't "browse" the internet the same way you browse a good catalogue/reference book for ideas or new information.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: "exactly the kind of thing Amazon won't send next day because it's only 99p"

"My father runs an hardware store, but more and more people just come for the stuff they can't find on Amazon - but really, you can't keep open only for marginal sales, and you can't compete with Amazon on prices."

Yes, the same people whinging about losing the local, specialist shops are the people causing them to close by not using them. The small independents will likely have that odd thing that you need because they know that if they have a reputation for being helpful and stocking those odd bits that sit in the back room for years will make people remember them and shop there. But the chains steal the low hang fruit end of the business, killing off the independents and the chains never carry the odd bits because they have accountants costing the square footage of the shop and demanding that every square foot pays for itself with rapid turnover. Unlike the independent who want to earn a decent wage for him/her and the staff, the chain has debts which must be serviced and shareholders who demand growth and dividends.

We lost are handy car parts shop a year or two back. It's a "nail bar" now. The guy retired and no one want to buy the business. But he did/does own the shop and the flat above, so still has an income (or the option to sell the asset), unlike a chain which would almost certainly see it as a cost centre, ie they are renting.

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A print button? Mmkay. Let's explore WHY you need me to add that

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Golgafrinchanian Moments

"Stick it up your nose."

Ah, we need another committee! We need to research if people want nasally installed fire.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I'm not sure what the point of that article was...

"but if it's Good Enough, then people will use it."

Like using a spreadsheet as a database :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: And despite all this users telemetry...

"... .application usability went down the sink because "designers" believe they "know it better", and enforce upon users silly and stupid design ideologies."

For years, the primary application I use in my job had menus down the sides, on a 4:3 screen, so there wasn't really enough width to show everything cleanly, but leaving unused space at the bottom of the screen.

Eventually, the app was redesigned such that all the menus were along the top, giving the full width of the screen to the useful data. Great! Except we now all have wide-screen monitors and all those fscking menus taking up vertical space means the useful stuff disappears off the bottom of the screen and there's loads of space at the side. Twats!

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Why have a print button?

"I love my tablet, but even if I had a work one, I just don't see it being as fast to search as I can flick through a well-organised folder with dividers for the important sections."

Yep, been saying that manuals turned into helpfiles. Not mention ebooks, reference ones in particular. They can be great if you know what you are looking for and the correct word is in the index or search results, but when you have something in the back of your mind or on the tip of your tongue, a manual flick through a paper book can far more quickly reveal the correct information. On a similar note, it's often quicker to flick through a book than to load up the help file or document, click the search function, type in the hopefully correct incantation and maybe get the right result, which is what IAS was saying. In other words, I agree with his pots!

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: It's known in other industries as "Root cause analysis"

"Biro? Six months ago I started using my italic fountain pen for the first time since my 20's."

Wow! You can write? manually with a pen? That'll make it easy to send secret messages that no one else can intercept. The security services must be wondering what to do if that ever catches on. How will they monitor everyone?

(Asimov dropped this into a short story, many, many years ago. Two school kids who learn the ancient art of reading and writing to send each other "secret" messages)

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KFC: Enemy of waistlines, AI, arteries and logistics software

John Brown (no body)
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Re: If you wanted to create chaos

"Increasing the limit would decrease congestion and thus reduce chaos. Dropping the limit would cause congestion, thus increasing the chaos."

There's no one size fits all solution and your generalisation doesn't work in all situations, as the westbound M62 "smart motorway" upgrades in the Huddersfield/Bradford areas shows. It used to be slow/standing traffic for miles because everyone rapidly joined the the back of the queues. Now, with the speeds managed down for miles before the "blackspots", the small amount of congestion caused by large numbers of vehicle joining the motorway, especially on uphill slip-roads, clears fairly quickly because the traffic is approaching at much lower volumes. Ditto for the M1 North at J34 for Sheffield.

I'd much rather be doing 5-10 miles at 50 than 3 miles at 70 and 7 miles at 0-20.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Human element

"As I was driving in and out of Poole yesterday I had a deja vu moment. Bridge support roadworks, just like they had a year ago. But this time with a twist. Alternating between inside line closed signs with use both lane signs. How could anyone think this was sane."

Depends on the modelled traffic flow predictions. The theory is that if everyone queues up in the one lane the traffic queue will extend back to the previous junction and cause even more issues there. Reminding everyone to use both lanes and merge at the last minute stops that happening. In practice, that last minute merge often slows the traffic even more than people merging ASAP and can end up causing both lanes to be congested back to the previous junction in rush hour-like conditions. I guess it's risk management based on expected levels of traffic.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Opportunity

"The answer is flip the new switch on your dashboard that lights up the clever little display fitted to the wing/fender of you car showing a carefully crafted "STOP" sign. AI in other cars screech to halt."

Funny! But the more mundane answer is that the waiting car will broadcast a request to merge and the approaching cars will all slow slightly to create a gap for your car to quickly merge into with the minimum of delay, probably much less than happens now when a human driver stops to allow a merge and causes a tailback with a standing wave that take many minutes to clear.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: smart roads that tell the car what it needs to do

"Why isn't there more progress on automating railways?"

That's already pretty much a done deal. It's the cost and will to upgrade the infrastructure and the inertia of the unions that is stopping it. I mean, FFS, most of the recent rail strikes have been about which human, train driver or conductor gets to open and close the fucking doors at the station!!

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Have I missed something? - SMITCH79

"Or the town council want to try out something new like change all the one-way streets around."

Apart from during a transition period, that's probably a very good example of something that could become very easy to do. If the vast majority of cars are AV/AI and permanently connected, it would be obvious have a national mapping infrastructure such all cars have the same map updates, with pretty much real time access.

This would also pretty much eliminate the need for road signs.

Whether we'll ever get to that stage is another matter, but the transition period is going to require far more complex and expensive systems than will be required once (if!!) AV/AI vehicles become the norm.

Taking just the UK, if all road vehicles were AV and connected at all times, even the tiny little rural roads with 10ft hedgerows such as in the south west should be usable since each car will "know" about all the other cars in the area long before they come into view and be able to negotiate who goes where and when, maybe just adjusting speeds slightly so opposing cars arrive at passing places together or re-route, effectively creating dynamic one-way systems.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Have I missed something?

"so am a bit sceptical about those, and whether they'll be much use once the vehicle is 5+ years old."

Hopefully this is something that will be addressed as AI car legislation is introduced. Manufactures will be legislated to provide update for the life of the vehicle. Hopefully the lawmakers will consider what the true "life" of the vehicle is and not assume that everyone gets a new car every year or two like they do. It's already difficult enough for the less well off to keep and maintain a car in the current MoT/anti-pollution regime we are in now. Someone running an old banger isn't really in a position to take advantage of "scrappage" schemes. The cashback/discount is no where near enough to being a new car price down to their level.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Have I missed something?

Should be "Hold the lever to keep the switch gear between the two tracks in an attempt to derail the train & thus kill some, or all, of the people on the train".

It's called the Trolley Problem, not the Train Problem. Trains don't often come into conflict with pedestrians at points.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Have I missed something?

"use a better image set for road signs"

The AI also needs the ability to parse and understand the printed instructions on the temporary yellow roadworks signs which, although designed to fit within the regs, are not standardised in the wording.

Also, part of the A1(M) northbound was closed yesterday evening and I had to follow the diversion. Luckily I know the area and followed my nose rather the diversion and re-joined further up away from the congestion on the latter part of the diversion route.

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John Brown (no body)
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"Shitbottle."

Yes, that was my first thought too. It seems to be a sport up there to see how quickly the recently replaced/repaired/cleaned road signs can be defaced again.

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Opportunity knocked? Rover survives Martian winter, may not survive budget cuts

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Bluechip Gofundme...

"Google, to get a head start on Mars Street View"

Nah, waste of time. Until the planning applications are first lodged, Google don't even know where the streets are going to be.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Robot manufacturing

"What am I missing?"

If it was anywhere close to doable, both technically and economically, we'd already have mobile mining/smelting machines trundling across the seabed. The deep sea mining is looking like it's about to start, but processing and smelting will happen on the surface, not in some self contained remote robot. I strongly suspect any form of space resource usage will only happen if and when a commercial company sees a commercial benefit.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Fly me to the moon

"Now we know that there's f* all on Mars it's time to leave it."

I suggest you spend more time studying Uranus and leave the real science to people who know what they are talking about.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: It won't save any money

"There ARE costs at 3 levels. First is the Deepspace Network costs. Second is Mars-relay-orbiter costs. Third is project-direct costsfor MER."

But who are you paying the money to and will you be be saving anything by not paying it? The answer is they are basically paying themselves so no, at best the money goes somewhere else. The real question is will the money be used more effectively by using the resources on other projects.

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US docs show Daimler may have done a Dieselgate – German press claims

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Testing irl

"update...at the cost of 10% less maximum power ...would you you take the update?"

Hang on, say again, I wasn't listening, are we talking Intel, VW or Apple here?

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Hands up who HASN'T sued Intel over Spectre, Meltdown chip flaws

John Brown (no body)
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They may not accept they've done anything wrong if a court tells them they have but that would be between themselves and their sense of their own importance and of no significance to anyone else. and will than appeal that decision and any others for as long and as high up as possible and drag it out for so many years that any compensation will barely be worth anything after inflation.

FTFY

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Software next?

"I am guessing that the UK will have to wait until Europe address this before any reperations from US companies are forth coming."

I'm guessing that will likely take more than 14 months too, so may not be of much use to UK customers.

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John Brown (no body)
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"Remember when you opened your retail CPU box, there was paperwork? You had to read it. By not returning your CPU, you accepted the EULA."

Nope. Contractual terms you can't read until after opening the box are null and void. You enter into the contract at the point or purchase. All valid contractual terms must be available at that point. Unless, of course, Intel include in the EULA the refund of the "restocking fee" a retailer charges for returning an opened item and maybe an inconvenience fee for trying to impose contract conditions after the purchase, but of course, they don't. There's never anything in a EULA that might benefit the buyer, which probably makes it invalid anyway since that would be an unbalanced contract purely in favour of Intel.

Just as an eg, I've seen EULAs in UK retail products from US companies which state that any legal challenge can only occur in $home-state, which is an outright illegal term in a UK sales contract, especially when said US company has a UK or EU office.

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Oi! Verizon leaked my fiancée's nude pix to her ex-coworker, says bloke

John Brown (no body)
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Re: If you insist on snapping nudies...

"no risk of exposure"

Isn't a photo without exposure a bit pointless?

Yeah, the one with the light meter in the pocket ----------------->

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