* Posts by John Brown (no body)

9897 posts • joined 21 May 2010

Tech bribes: What's the WORST one you've ever been offered?

John Brown (no body)
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Re: On another topic...

"(You're still going to want to give Salford a miss, though.)"

Isn't that the bit where the BBC is?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Moscow

Is that all? Pah! My mate in Africa regularly offers me much more than that if I'd only let him use my bank account to transfer some money from his dead uncles estate out of the country. He seems to have a lot of uncles who appear to die with alarming regularity.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Socks? Again?

"What the hell is with the socks? That's someth8ing your mother or grandmother give you for Christmas. Seems to be a very common handout by tech companies. Just weird."

California based, more specifically Silicon Valley based or influenced tech companies (or copying said tech companies) where socks are rare and exotic things. Next year it will be ties.

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There is no perceived IT generation gap: Young people really are thick

John Brown (no body)
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They look like rice crispys with a chocolate-like coating, moulded into doughnut-like shapes then drowned in icing sugar. I hope those "double points" are usable at the doctor surgery or a hospital.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: First time I felt old...

"What are vacuum tubes?"

Maybe you should have told here that she looks at one every day. If not a computer screen (25 years ago, might not have had one on her desk then), but certainly her tv screen.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Yo Dabbsy

"Exactly. It's usually 'The Station' or 'X Station' where X is its name. "

Same here, "The Station" for our local one, everything else $name station.

The only differentiator used locally was when we were referring to the Bus Station. There was never any confusion over arranging to meet someone because station on it's own always meant the railway station.

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John Brown (no body)
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"Thanks to the Internet Register comments section, I have the opportunity to be better informed about a wider range of subjects than has ever been possible hitherto. And so does everyone else, if they're prepared to take it. Is that a bad thing?"

FTFY, although the rest of the internet can sometimes be useful too.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Education is no longer designed to teach.

"Wot, you mean it was a podcast?!"

Funny you should say that. It quite probably is now. Radio 4Extra is currently broadcasting the original radio series every night so it's quite possibly on iPlayer.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Education is no longer designed to teach.

"because the questions types, formats and even questions themselves are re-used with trivial changes."

To be fair, you can't muck around too much with each years exam papers or you'd not be able to compare with previous or future results. But I completely agree with the comment re teaching to the exam. That was an obvious consequence of the "league tables" that most people saw coming. Not that that hasn't always been a problem, but the league tables exacerbated it.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Double entendre?

"That's funny! I really like your double ender". We got some rather strange looks...

LOL, that reminds me of usenet and irc discussions where some kid would type "viola" or "walla!" in complete confidence that they got it right.

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John Brown (no body)
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"I tried to explain - "four candles....you know, fork handles?" More blank looks."

I suspect that most youngsters today can't get their heads around the idea of going into a shop, walking up to the counter and having to read your shopping list out to someone who then goes off and gets each item. Without that cultural reference, the rest of the sketch makes no sense to them.

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John Brown (no body)
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"Let's start with the last word of that sentence, which will suffice to tell you everything that's wrong with boiled cabbage: it's gdmf CABBAGE, ffs."

It's also the main ingredient in coleslaw and one of the veg overflowing from your kebab. The only problem with boiled cabbage is most people boil it to death.

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Time to ditch the front door key? Nest's new wireless smart lock is surprisingly convenient

John Brown (no body)
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Re: re: if it was mains powered

"I am seeing both benefits and disadvantages to hooking up the external door(s) to mains power..."

Done properly, it could discourage people from trying their luck hoping the it's unlocked :-)

But I suspect by "mains", people are referring to a mains powered adaptor to push 5-12v into the lock unit.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Drilling Brass

"Don't try it with a normal drill though, it will jam."

Isn't that the point though? What burglar is going to go equipped for a job that's going to take longer that usual? As others have pointed out above, the vast majority of burglaries are opportunistic, eg unlocked doors, open windows etc. I wonder if there are any stats on the type of break-ins? Just how many burglars go equipped with a drill at all, never mind one for drilling brass. This feels like we are heading into the realms of pro burglars who will be after much more valuable takings than in the average house.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Keyless entry for residential property?

Insurance company - "You were burgled but there's no sign of forced entry? That's a shame. Goodbye."

This type house security is reletively modern. Car companies have been doing to for longer. And look how many "secure" cars are stolen using tech to by-pass the keyless security,

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John Brown (no body)
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"If it was mains powered with a battery back up..."

That was one my first thoughts too. Why not an external power source option which can keep a rechargeable battery topped up in case of power outage?

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CEO insisted his email was on server that had been offline for years

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Deleting emails

But literally my users are instructed "Don't delete anything, there's no point. And especially not email, which is so tiny as to be pointless".

And not forgetting, of course, that in many jurisdictions there is a corporate responsibility to retain all emails up to some age threshold whether the user has deleted them from their own mailbox or not.

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Facebook privacy audit by auditors finds everything is awesome!

John Brown (no body)
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Dunno, but if they are claiming FB is clean and hunky dory, they may have just made themselves an even bigger target for hacker/conspiracy theorists looking for evidence of $something.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Who audits

"the auditors ?"

Sir Pterry might know.

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British Crackas With Attitude chief gets two years in the cooler for CIA spymaster hack

John Brown (no body)
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"He is a hacker, this to me says he's probably not a fighter so he'll either go upstairs with the nonces or he'll go into general population. "

He's going to a young offenders institute. It's basically a residential school. They spend 6 hours a day, 5 days a week in classrooms. Yes, it's still a prison environment, but it's far from being an adult prison.

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John Brown (no body)
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"Clearly not a danger to anyone and most probably learned from his mistakes so what could he have done to piss off the authorities?"

The reported lack of reaction by him to the verdict suggests he may not have learned his lesson yet.

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Amazon, LG Electronics turned my vape into an exploding bomb, says burned bloke in lawsuit

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Health Hazard?

"the thing is, I know I am not allergic to penicillin so if I have a minor injury that looks a little too red around the edges, I should be able to go the pharmacy and buy some Amoxicillin over the counter."

Take too much and it will kill you.

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Drama brews on high seas as Playmobil ship running out of steam

John Brown (no body)
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"I suppose being totally inedible is a big advantage."

It's PLASTIC!!!! Deliberately put into THE OCEAN!!! Won't someone think of the LITTLE FISHIES????

Did any journos ask Attenborough for a comment on this story?

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Planned European death ray may not need Brit boffinry brain-picking

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Airborne visible light weaponry...

"We already have a defensive shield... it's called "The UK's weather".

Although as I type this there isn't actually a cloud in the sky... but you get the idea."

Easily solved. Just arrange for some sort interesting stellar display and you can guarantee an overcast sky.

Yes, the one with the unused binoculars in the pocket.

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Twenty years ago today: Windows 98 crashed live on stage with Bill Gates. Let's watch it again...

John Brown (no body)
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Re: "That must be why we're not shipping Windows 98 yet," quipped Gates.

"Either quick thinking or a case of anticipated.

Whatever the case good response."

Agreed. Love him or hate him, he did handle that rather well. I can imaging a lot of other CEO types who would handled that rather...rather...differently :-)

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Two's company, Three's unbowed: You Brits will pay more for MMS snaps

John Brown (no body)
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"It does seem a peculiar position to take,"

Not when you look at the legal position. If it's a "material" change to the contract then the customers have the right to cancel without penalty. But the law doesn't define what a "material" change is and so it's open to "opinion". They're betting, with good odds of winning, that no one will challenge their "opinion" that it's not a "material" change. By challenge, I mean in a court of law.

Standard corporate practice. Keep pushing the boundaries until challenged. "Pay off" the challengers with deals or out of court settlements or, if deluged with challenges, back down. At all costs, avoid a legal ruling so you can try it on again with variations next time around.

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John Brown (no body)
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"don't allow the full amount of data for tethering"

I've never understood...

a) how they know if you are "tethering" or not

b) why it matters anyway.

You pay for, say 10GB of data, why should they care or need to know how you use it?

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LESTER gets ready to trundle: The Register's beer-bot has a name

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Starter kit

"Good solid mechanics with an open interface for control. Solves the mechanical issues and lets you concentrate on navigation and avoiding spillage."

Can one of those things handle carrying at least it's weight, maybe double it's own weight? I'm thinking gimballed tray + multiple pints here.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Lester makes perfect sense!

"Whilst I don't have access to the full crew roster of Red Dwarf, and there may well have been a Lester on board, the curry & beer loving protagonist from Red Dwarf was Dave Lister."

I suspect he knows that, but a play on words doesn't work quite so well if you don't actually play with the words :-)

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EU under pressure to slap non-compliance notice on Google over pay-to-play 'remedy'

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Hmm

"People are free to stop selling and buying through google. They are free to use other sites and even price compare for themselves!"

Because they are near as dammit a monopoly. Google has even been verbified by the general public. How often to people "google" for something instead of search, even if they are using a different search engine?

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John Brown (no body)
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"The Google Shopping entity (which is distinct from the Google which shows you the search page) is under all of the same restrictions as the true third parties, which was the point of the promise to run Google Shopping with a profit. "

It's a legal and accounting fiction though. IIRC, ToysRUs in the UK would have been in profit if the US parent, a separate legal entity, wasn't bilking the UK operation for every last penny to support it's US loss making operation. If they are owned by a parent or part of a group, then money can be transferred at the whim of the execs.

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Here's another headline where NASA is dragged through the mud for cheap Mars wise cracks

John Brown (no body)
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Joke

Re: When they have finished there....

Maybe you should upgrade to indoor plumbing?

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BT pushes ahead with plans to switch off telephone network

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Oh well

"Sure, for an injury, you could call on a landline but then you're tied between the landline and your patient unless he happened to collapse in a very convenient location."

Aren't most people using cordless phones at home nowadays?

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Scissors cut paper. Paper wraps rock. Lab-made enzyme eats plastic

John Brown (no body)
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Re: It is just me that's noticed.....

They definitely weren't dumping it in the ocean in 1987, otherwise NYC wouldn't have had the garbage barge incident:

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/trash-fight-long-voyage-new-york-unwanted-garbage-barge-article-1.812895

Thanks for that. That's probably the incident that got distorted in my hazy memory and made me think they were dumping it at sea.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I found out how to "recycle" PET bottles years ago.

"1 Buy the cheapest bottle of spring water available.

2 Place by the bed and drink as desired.

3 Refill from the tap when empty."

I do a lot of driving. Insulated cooler bag, ice pack and the same disposable water bottle for, I think, about 3 years now. I go for the "sports" bottle type with the flip top cap and it only gets replaced if the flip top hinge wears out. They are remarkable durable for "one shot" water bottles. The current one is about 700ml, a decent size, and cost about 35p at ASDA. Fill every night, leave in the fridge and the bag + icepack keeps it cool all day except on rare very hot days and the car is parked up for more than a few hours.

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John Brown (no body)
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"I watched it when it was first broadcast.... yes I'm that old...."

Although I was old enough to watch and be terrified by Dr Who, Doomwatch was deemed too adult and real for me by The Powers That Be, ie parents, but I did get a DVD box-set of the surviving episode recently. Most of it still stands the test of time very, very well.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I'm not much of a chemist/biologist

"Reassembling those links into new chains gives you back a new plastic."

You just need some very, very tiny tweezers!

(Yeah, the plastic mac with suspiciously ever embiggening holes in it)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: It is just me that's noticed.....

"Black Jacks and Fruit Salads were 1/2 p each when I was growing up."

Pah! Kids!. They were 4 for a penny when I was a kid (that's 1d not 1 new penny too!)

Technically, they cost a farthing each, but even I'm not quite old enough to remember actual farthings.

(and yes, for you youngsters, farthing as in the Penny Farthing Bicycle, so-called because a penny was a large coin and a farthing, a 1/4 penny, was very small)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: shipping it around

"a solution to those who found themselves wanting to purchase more than the pint of milk and loaf of bread they;d originally intended,"

And our local Morrisons (probably a chain wide decision) are no longer going to provide single use bags at all now. So those times I pop in for a one or two items and impulse buy more, do I just stop and not buy those items or do buy yet another multi-use bag at whatever price they are now charging? I suspect this might be a short lived decision if the bottom line is hit.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: shipping it around

"Unfortunately the re-usable bags have a much larger carbon footprint than the 'single use' bags (about 150 times greater) while the 'single use' bags usually get re-purposed, thusavoiding the need for buying other plastic bags for the secondary purpose."

You do raise an interesting point there, but I suppose it all boils down to individuals. I have almost no need to re-use single use carrier bags and the shopping bags we use are now coming up to 3 years old and still going strong. In my case, I'd say we already broke even on the carbon footprint and are now in debit.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: It is just me that's noticed.....

"Yes - that's exactly what I meant. Not blaming China - if blaming anyone, then blaming the UK for just paying to push the problem onto someone else."

For that matter, does New York (other US coastal cities are available) still barge it's rubbish out to sea and dump it? If not, how recently did they stop?

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Size does matter, chaps: Oversized todgers an evolutionary handicap

John Brown (no body)
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Joke

"However, thankfully they have started to mount at least one urinal lower, so those more "gifted" among us don't have to get the end wet."

Those of us more evolutionarily advanced are hoping for urinals mounted a bit higher so it's not such a long shot to hit :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I knew it!

"I knew it! I'm a survival expert!"

You are Bare Grylls and ICM£5

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US government weighs in on GDPR-Whois debacle, orders ICANN to go probe GoDaddy

John Brown (no body)
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"To be honest, why should the rest of the world comply with a law Europe has developed. Why should the US, Asia anyone else?"

Isn't this what the US does all the time?

And anyway, it ought to only include data on or about EU citizens. And didn't the US set up a new data protection ombudsman recently to "protect" EU data held in the US? Not law, mind you, just an "agreement" and a "promise". I don't see that there's anything to stop the WHOS lookups simply not returning private details of individuals whose address is in the EU.

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Car-crash television: 'Excuse me ma'am, do you speak English?' 'Yes I do,' replies AMD's CEO

John Brown (no body)
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Re: F1 is a Car Crash

"switch cars midway through a race."

Really? I've never watched FE, but maybe they should be looking at ways for fast swap battery packs if they want to truly demonstrate the technological advancement and "trickle down" to road cars.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: F1 is a Car Crash

"I didn't realize people knew this much about people who drive around in circles over and over again."

Circles? I think you know more than you claim since you are confusing F1 with NASCAR.

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Having ended America's broadband woes, the FCC now looks to space

John Brown (no body)
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Re: This is targeted at rogue broadband mini satellites

"Allowing space to be a free for all would be a disaster."

No one's asking for a free for all. There are international bodies to oversee the locals around the world. People are just a little taken aback by the FCCs later claims that they can control those other local governments, ie claiming they have to approves a launch or frequency allocation handled in another sovereign domain. Certain US agencies sometimes seem to forget they are still just "locals" on the world stage. Most countries have their own satellites nowadays and there are many more places they can launch from other than the USA.

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Whois is dead as Europe hands DNS overlord ICANN its arse

John Brown (no body)
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Re: so who do you report abuse to, now?

“Then Natwest can request to have their info shown.“

That is exactly my point.

Is it? Natwest, as a business, doesn't have personal information in it's domain registration details, it has business contacts which are not personal and so not covered by GDPR anyway. No need to request anything. Just declare on the registration application or renewal that the domain is business or personal and declare that the details are correct. It's not complicated, plenty of registries already do this.

It's not as if they are being asked to create backdoors that only good guys can access. Maybe it's time to start playing hard-ball with some of these orgs claiming to be too big to fail/block when they are (or will be) breaking the law instead of saying "hey don't do that, you've got a year to fix it"

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Unstable operation coming soon...

"Exactly. So the public isn't able to discover who registered dodgybusiness.com without expensive and cumbersome due process. "

You are assuming that dodgybusiness.com was so inept as to register with their correct details. You are also misunderstanding the point of GDPR. Dodgybusiness.com is a business and so must publish it's contact details and is not protected in that way by GDPR. But they probably used a registrat that doesn't care or check the details anyway.

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Best thing about a smart toilet? You can take your mobile in without polluting it

John Brown (no body)
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Get nailed by a carpenter

"the ringwash feature must have been designed by Karcher, he told me when he first tested it, it nearly lifted him off the seat while giving him a power enema, kind of put me off trying it."

Bastard! See icon.

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