* Posts by John Brown (no body)

7737 posts • joined 21 May 2010

Huge ransomware outbreak spreads in Ukraine and beyond

John Brown (no body)
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Evidence? Corroboration?

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50th anniversary of the ATM opens debate about mobile payments

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Extinct in ten years?

"it would probably cost them some significant amount of their profits."

According to the guy at our local corner shop, he has to buy the machine, pay to be allowed to use it and pay for a service contract which is supposed to a 24 service call out but they rarely arrive in less than 5 days, meanwhile he's losing sales. If he doesn't have the machine, he loses sales. This is all on top of the commission he's charged on every sale and the up front cost to be certified to be allowed to give them all his money.

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No way to sugarcoat this: I'm afraid Uranus opens and closes to accept particle streams

John Brown (no body)
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Re: It's always fascinating when they probe Uranus.

"supermarkets with high-volume traffic tend to favour the large-volume, two-winged variant (like this one) that does indeed "open and close" as it turns. Maybe the author had one of those in mind...?"

FWIW, that one in the video never opens either, at least not all the way through. It's like almost every revolving door ever, ie it works like an airlock.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: It's always fascinating when they probe Uranus.

And not only the naming of the door but "Uranus’ magnetic field swings open and shut like the aperture of a revolving door." sounds a bit off to me. A revolving door never has an open aperture. Maybe the author meant a sliding door, or even a bog standard door hanging on hinges?

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HMS Windows XP: Britain's newest warship running Swiss Cheese OS

John Brown (no body)
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"I am pleased to see they are running the "Professional" edition."

The Home edition only works when inside UK territorial waters.

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Concorde without the cacophony: NASA thinks it's cracked quiet supersonic flight

John Brown (no body)
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Re: A luddite writes... @scatter

"That's a whole day saved on the round trip - definitely not insignificant to me."

Only if the extra cost of the flight is less than the costs of the extra time.

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Researchers blind autonomous cars by tricking LIDAR

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Er ?

"Where did they get that 55 metres at 60 mph from and what is it meant stand for ?"

According to the article, they specifically mention that as the stopping distance ONLY, ie EXCLUDING thinking and reaction time, probably based on the assumption that for all intents and purposes, a AI car will react "instantly".

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Games rights-holders tell ZX Spectrum reboot firm: Pay or we pull titles

John Brown (no body)
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Re: No Comment

"No comment, no updates, no reply to emails, no refunds processed, no roll of honour, no manual, no delivery date, no peggi rating, no manufacturing, no packaging, no audited accounts and now no games."

...no harm to dolphins, vegan friendly, hypo-allergenic.

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UK Parliament hack: Really, a brute-force attack? Really?

John Brown (no body)
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Joke

"Theresa has agreed to the policy and looks forwarding to working with them for the next few years."

Are you saying it was the DUP that hacked them?

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Blighty's first aircraft carrier in six years is set to take to the seas

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Google Earth image

"Copyright _should_ be the year of first publishing, unless there is a major amendment."

And since Google Earth is being amended constantly, they probably just claim copyright as starting "now" in terms of the publishing date for the entire "map".

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John Brown (no body)
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"the appalling racket of any Type 45s that the Navy have"

It could be a double bluff. They are really very quiet, but until we need them to be, let's let everyone else think they will hear them coming. Nah, only kidding!

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Researchers solve screen glare nightmare with 'moth-eye' antireflective film

John Brown (no body)
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Re: They're missing the point

Yes, having also been around when the HSE regulations on screen glare at computer workstations were introduced, I often wonder how certain manufactures seem to have completely ignored them in recent years. IIRC I first noticed this when Apple went LCD flatscreen with glass covering. Many have done the same thing since then, producing "hard glass" screens. The reflection issues are lessened by the screen being flat in the first place, but the problem is still there.

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Men charged with theft of free newspapers

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Nothing is 'free'

"No circulation means no income which leads to lost jobs. So not a 'victimless' crime if it were allowed to continue."

I think you just made the use of ad-blockers a criminal offence!

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Microsoft recommends you ignore Microsoft-recommended update

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Flailing Helplessly

"Perhaps it's to encourage us to embrace the cloud?"

Well, something certainly seems to be blowing in the wind!

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SpaceX nails two launches and barge landings in one weekend

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Even old curmudgeons are happy!

"NASA ought to be hiding its face in shame "

Standing on the shoulders of giants. And NASA is one of the bigger giants and it's always nice to learn from the mistakes others made before you got your chance to make those mistakes. That's not to denigrate the achievements of SpaceX, but how long would they have taken to do this without what NASA and others did before them?

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Capita flogs Asset Services division for £888m

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Hmmm...

It sounds like 90% of what's left of Crapita actually do. I wonder if they'll outsource all their own back-end admin staff to the buyer? How much investment do the Crapita "bosses" have in the buyer? Where will they go if Crapita goes tits-up?

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AES-256 keys sniffed in seconds using €200 of kit a few inches away

John Brown (no body)
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Re: AES was not cracked, cut the click bait

"However, given the nature of this attack, in a noisy server room you'll be bloody lucky to discern a single signal. For now."

Radio astronomers are pretty good at sorting out a relevant signal from all the others. Likewise the guys still talking to Voyager.

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John Brown (no body)
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Black Helicopters

Re: How well was the PC prepared? TEMPEST?

A solution that could be used in tables at coffee houses, perhaps, to steal customers keys then snoop. However what is the cost/benefit?"

Just keep an eye out for the man in the trench coat with a white carnation buttonhole using his laptop then you go up and take his order, being careful to make sure the process takes at least a few minutes.

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Heaps of Windows 10 internal builds, private source code leak online

John Brown (no body)
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...or a scam to make it easier for MS to sue all coders who produce any code that looks even slightly similar to something in MS own codebase. MS will claim they saw the source code and go with wilful infringement instead of just infringement.

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John Brown (no body)
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Worth noting, of course, that MS supposedly checked over their systems and said nothing was taken.

It appears they missed a bit.

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Florida Man to be fined $1.25 per robocall... all 96 million of them

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Lack Of Security

There are many valid reasons for "spoofing" a phone number, eg someone from the hospital phones you and present the main switchboard number to you. Or any large organisation where calling back the specific number which called you might not be the best option. How do you police that in a way that doesn't cause problems for those who have a valid need for the service?

Calling for this sort of "law" is why the world is swamped with petty little laws that cause no end of problems for the majority in often misguided attempts to thwart a minority. Draconian kneejerkery on UK gun and knife laws have caused problems for many people but no significant effect on either gun or knife crime. The obvious government style "fix" would probably be to order telcos to limit how many and how often a phone call can made.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Where do the fines go?

That's just a matter for the credit control department of the telecoms company to deal with."

Isn't that cruel and unusual punishment? NO ONE expects the Credit Control Department!

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Virgin Media router security flap follows weak password expose

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Who actually uses the router ?

"I assume that if you using just as a modem, then any attacker would have to have access to your network anyway (either through direct connection or wifi on your router) to use this vulnerability?"

No, an attacker, at best, will be banging on the door of your router. If it's a decent router with strong credentials, ie much stronger than the VM SuperHub (Other crap ISPs routers are available) then they likely don't have access to either the router or anything on your side of the router.

Even if they do spend time trying to get through your router, the fact you are not using the ISP router with it's weak attack surface means you likely will have a stronger security policy inside your LAN too. They'll most likely not bother and move on to the vast number of people who think their LAN side is secure behind the default ISP router with default credentials.

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Ex-NASA bod on Gwyneth Paltrow site's 'healing' stickers: 'Wow. What a load of BS'

John Brown (no body)
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WE used to have individual squares of toilet paper too

But ours wasn't tied up with a poxy ribbon. It was nailed to back of the bog door!

(we couldn't afford Izal and their fancy cardboard boxes!)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: @45RPM

"if you're happy using your custom made Linux PC then great for you, if you use a Mac and it works for you, that's fine."

Fair enough. But how do you feel about Windows(tm)(r) users?

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BOFH: Putting the commitment into committee

John Brown (no body)
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"These people just don't seem to understand that other people don't feel as strongly as they do when it comes to certain things."

Ah, you've met our marketing team then?

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Doormat junk: Takeaway menus, Farmfoods flyer, NHS data-sharing letter... wait, what?

John Brown (no body)
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Devil

Re: Spam all the post boxes!

Maybe we could all phone the line, giving our postcode and claiming to have received one of these letters and are querying why they are why they have our data and can we please opt out. I can imagine a fair bit of head scratching at their end when they have messages from all over the UK.

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UK and Ecuador working on Assange escape mechanism

John Brown (no body)
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"when the total cost had already hit £11m."

Unless that was a special job filled by officers on overtime, or they employed extra officers to account for that job, then the actual cost was a few less officers available for other duties. I'm sure it caused extra costs to be incurred but I take that £11m with a truck load of salt.

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Lordy! Trump admits there are no tapes of his chats with Comey

John Brown (no body)
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Re: The Truth?!

"there might be tapes but now they're inconvenient so he is willing them out of existence."

He only said he didn't make any tapes, nor does he have them. That still doesn't preclude someone else making a recording and keeping it at Trumps behest, either specifically in this case or simply as a matter of course. It does all rather sound like lawyer-speak and out of character for a TrumpTweet.

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Genoans flout terror ban with bumper basil hand baggage policy

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Why would anyone bother?

"having escargots (snails) with HP sauce."

Yay, someone found a way to make escargot palatable!

The shellsuit .............................>

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Canadian sniper makes kill shot at distance of 3.5 KILOMETRES

John Brown (no body)
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"To put that into perspective it's about the long edge of a business card at the distance of a meter so while considerable it's not exactly a lob."

Just to add into the mix, no one here knows what the difference in altitude was between the sniper and the target.

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Humanity uploaded an AI to Mars and lets it shoot rocks with lasers

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Such a shame...

"before we leave ESA."

What? When's that happening then? Are we also going to cut the UK free from the continental shelf and sail off somewhere else because we are leaving everything with "Europe" in it's name? Is this why the SNP is investing in large anchors?

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John Brown (no body)
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The chances of anything coming from Mars is 99%.

FTFY

Incorrect. Million to one shots happen nine times out of ten, so that would be 90%

<mutters>Bloody ignorant roundworlders!</mutters>

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Tesla death smash probe: Neither driver nor autopilot saw the truck

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Still driving?

From 13:36:12.7 (US Pacific time, so 17:36:12.7 local time) through 13:36:25.8 the car's data logging reports "Vehicle alert consistent with collision damage", and a number of sensor fault/sensor missing messages, including "Brake controller CAN node is MIA". So even if a brake command was issued, there would have been no response.

Thanks for that. I didn't get that far. It does raise an interesting question for their roadmap to autonomous self-driving cars though. If the person inside (no longer the driver) has no mechanical linkage to the brakes, then the car really must have a failsafe method of applying the brakes in a power-fail emergency. I don't think actual self-driving cars have been in that sort of catastrophic event yet, mainly because they tend to go slow under relatively controlled conditions with a "minder".

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Still driving?

"The question is, why would the scenario you mention trigger the brakes?"

Part of enhanced cruise control include automatic braking such a catastrophic loss of and changes in sensor data, along with the sudden deceleration the crash most likely caused sounds to me like an ideal time for the system to apply the brakes. The fact it then went off the road, past a pond and then hit a tree also strongly indicates that it's time to hit brakes as sharply as seems safe.

It's worth also bearing in mind that this is not just enhanced cruise control but is part of a specific path to self driving according to Tesla. Crash avoidance is part of the existing system and has been trumpeted as saving lives. But it only seems to work if all the sensors are working. The loss of a load of sensors and massive change in data from other surviving sensors didn't appear to trigger any sort of reaction.

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Darkness to fall over North America from a total solar eclipse

John Brown (no body)
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Re: My home town...

"a thousand cameras flashed (why?)"

Because the vast majority of people who take photos are basic "point'n'shooters" and have everything set to full auto. Phone users in particular will most likely have the flash set to "On" rather than "Auto" or "Off" so they are always ready for that quick snap. Then they wonder why the battery doesn't last long :-)

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The Internet of Flying Thing: Reg man returns with explicit shots

John Brown (no body)
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Re: cover most of the Earth - except...unluckily for them, Iceland

"The busy no electronic devices allowed Europe to N America route ?"

LOL, yes, that one. I'd forgotten about that. So, maybe not such a good time to announce new in-flight consumer WiFi services in the hope of selling it to operators.

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Walmart tells developers to stay away from AWS

John Brown (no body)
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Re: There are alternatives

A bit like the Amazon delivery lockers appearing in supermarkets around the UK? Order cheaper from Amazon and have it delivered, for you convenience, directly to the shop where you may have purchased the item from anyway.

It'd be an interesting exercise to match items delivered to, eg Morrisons supermarkets which could have purchased directly from the shop and how many people actually collect their Amazon parcel from the lockers but don't shop there. Do Amazon pay rent for the space and does it increase or decrease Morrisons sales?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Can't wait until google gets into the supply chain...

"Now I realize these are somewhat US-centric."

There's quite few Aldi shops in the UK. There may even be one or two in their home country of Germany.

And your mashups of GoogleJoes and GoogleAldi may be more closely related than you think

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Breach at UK.gov's Cyber Essentials scheme exposes users to phishing attacks

John Brown (no body)
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But those who applied and failed won't be on the public list. Maybe the phishers will be after those companies to "offer services" on how to pass?

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Ad 'urgently' seeks company to build national e-ID system

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Might it be the proposed EU citizens registration for the UK?

"We don't kneed a completely new system."

Of course we do. It's the British way. And anyway, the Minister has a brother....

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Children's fingerprints

"and it means those in receipt of free school meals don't stand out."

Except in thoe schools were the "freebies" have to go last. Yes, it does happen, and no, I have no idea who thought it might be a good idea or their reasoning behind it.

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Queen's speech announces laws to protect personal data

John Brown (no body)
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Re: The good news is that she didn't mention Trump is visiting...

He seems to be overly concerned that there may be protests instead of throngs of cheering peasants. I think he's waiting for reassurances from gov.uk that they will be marshalling the citizenry along the routes with orders to cheer or face re-education.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: "Smart Meter Bill"

"Hardly a surprise it was in the manifesto,"

So were many other "promises" that, barely days later, didn't make it into the Queens Speech and are effectively dead now.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: "And what about being offline and not risking to die in a building that caught fire?"

And there's a potential 4 000+ other buildings that are at risk of their cladding going "whoosh."

Apart from being an expensive one-off to pretty up a building with longer term savings in not having to go and re-paint, does this cladding do anything other than hide 60's and 70's concrete brutalism?, ie is cladding a cheap alternative to getting rid of eyesores or is it actually useful as external insulation?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Is this a deterrence?

"the proposal sounds like someone wanted to tick the "keeping the public safe from terrorists" checkbox, without bothering to consider whether it was an effective way of doing it."

IIRC, it was even more woolly than that. They are going to set up a commission "to look at sentencing to see if it's appropriate". Theoretically, that could mean reducing sentences although the most likely outcome will be a big fat nothing after a year of meetings and lunches at our expense.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: to protect personal data...

That'll be more like 3 years in prison and £4000 fine plus court costs.

...and a victim surcharge. There's always a victim. The Govt. is the victim in this case.

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Tesla's driverless car software chief steps down

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Not a good fit...

"So it doesn't look like Apple wants him back, either."

...or maybe after 10 years of Apple, and 6 months in Tesla, he's at a point where he wants to work somewhere where there's a bit less of a toxic "work always comes first" environment.

I spent 12 years in a relatively high pressure environment. I'd never ever want to go back to that. Some people thrive like that, some only while young, many don't.

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Conservative manifesto disappears offline – then mysteriously reappears

John Brown (no body)
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"Plus the lack of a crown has given her a chance to troll parliament with her EU-flag themed hat."

ROFL, I just had to go look at the BBC news site and you're spot on!

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Microsoft admits to disabling third-party antivirus code if Win 10 doesn't like it

John Brown (no body)
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Re: '34 years of development - Windows 10 is the result'

"Sits back and awaits the downvotes"

Downvoted primarily because you requested it, but also for doing precisely what you complained about. Lumping all users of one OS into the same boat.

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