* Posts by John Brown (no body)

11176 posts • joined 21 May 2010

Doom at 25: The FPS that wowed players, gummed up servers, and enraged admins

John Brown (no body)
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Re: You got the chainsaw! Find some meat...

Was Sir Pterry not preceded by Jasper Carrot mole hunting at night with a 12 bore?

Moles are evil incarnate!!!!

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Ecuador says 'yes' to Assange 'freedom' deal, but Julian says 'nyet'

John Brown (no body)
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Re: What will mostly

"In all cases , he'll fight it in the courts as far as he can,"

That's why he jumped bail in the UK. He'd fought it through the courts, losing at every stage and was due a final appearance which he obviously was expecting to lose as well, so he ran away from the consequences of his actions.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

"Shit my mistake, I of course do not know what I meant, and only you know"

You may well know what you mean. But if you can't communicate your meaning in a reliable and accepted manner, is it any wonder that no one else knows what you mean?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

"Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of "

He's not a prisoner, neither political nor otherwise, and never has been. At worst, he was under house arrest in a stately home until he skipped bail and self-imprisoned himself in the embassy.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

"my reading of the situation is: Moreno would hand Assange over to the British who would extradite Assange to the US with the understanding Assange would not face the death penalty. "

The UK would not extradite him to the US anyway. Sweden has first call on him. If the UK were, for some obscure legal reason, able to skip the Swedes and accede to a US extradition order, it would require the US to guarantee to no death penalty under any circumstances. The US/UK extradition treaty may well be unbalanced in the US favour, but there is no way the UK would extradite to anywhere where the charges could result in the death penalty being applied.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Yes, but you've omitted the most important bit...

"and its not going to be Trump's dong."

Of course not, Trumps dong is already over used fucking over everyone else.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: The photo

"The Leaker"?

(His superpower can be neutralised with Tenna for Men)

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'Say hello to my little vacuum cleaner!' US drug squad puts spycams in cleaner's kit

John Brown (no body)
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Pah! Amateurs!

If Q had built this, it would be motorised so it could move, have a pop-out gun, maybe a laser, and a super suck option!

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Linux.org domain hacked, plastered with trolling, filth and anti-transgender vandalism

John Brown (no body)
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Unhappy

A hijacking, not a hack

The post is required, and must contain letters.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Using Yahoo! mail for something important?

To people outside the world of IT, using a well recognised email address is seen as good. Maybe not quite so much nowadays, but until fairly recently, only the big boys and geeks had domain addresses. I still see signed vans with @aol.co.uk on them too, although these days it tends to sole traders or very small businesses and they've been using that email address for many years. They may even have their own domain and website, but that email address is what everyone knows.

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Bloodhound SSC reaches the end of the road for want of £25m

John Brown (no body)
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"After all one of the main objectives of the Bloodhound team was to fire up enthusiasm in hi-tech in a potential workforce currently destined for McJobs in the service sector."

The required £25m is probably less than if the Govt. had tried to do the school visits etc that the Bloodhound team already did. The project probably saved the Govt. more than they now need.

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Brit bomb hoax teen who fantasised about being a notorious hacker cops 3 years in jail

John Brown (no body)
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Re: "...and your motivation of seeking notoriety"

watching the bodycam video of the arrest on the Beeb website, he really didn't seem all that bothered about what was going on.

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John Brown (no body)
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"I actually think that aspect is really disturbing. While the perpetrator was given a 3 year sentence, in practice in the UK it means that he'll be out again in in 18 months."

I always assumed that the 50% time served was not automatic, but apparently for fixed term sentences of under 4 years, it is. Unless he gets up to some fairly serious bad behaviour inside, then yes, he will serve a maximum of 18 months minus time spent inside on remand. That's really not very long considering the amount of disruption and damage caused and the large number of victims.

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Galileo's magnifico measurement: 1976 redshift test updated

John Brown (no body)
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Devil

All well and good, but...

...what's it for? The article doesn't actually mention any examples of what this greater accuracy does to help us in any other area than "mine is better than yours". I'm sure there are very good reasons for doing this, but it's well out of my field so some hints in the article would have helped.

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Expired cert... Really? #O2down meltdown shows we should fear bungles and bugs more than hackers

John Brown (no body)
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"The difference is that buses failed safe - the network connections failed, but the buses still ran."

There was a comms failure on our local metro system the other week. Complete shutdown of the system resulted despite the fact there far fewer vehicles involved, no other vehicles other than authorised ones with trained operators, very few junctions, but, no, to be safe, it all has to stop. Could you imagine the reaction of roads being closed because traffic lights failed?

Admittedly, there are stretched os single line operation and even sections where the light rail shares track with main line trains, so I suppose those sections might be more dangerous to operate without comms or signalling.

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John Brown (no body)
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"But a look in their forums shows tons of people just screaming at them, who didn't even bother reading the news."

How were they supposed to read the news when their phone data connection was down? You don't honestly think they would have something old fashioned like a landline based connection or a radio or even a TV, do you? No, of course not. The world had just ended!

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John Brown (no body)
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Happy

Re: Acronyms

"No, these are all TLAs (Three Letter Acronyms)."

Ok, so what is M2M then? TLAAN? (Two Letters And A Number)

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Tech support discovers users who buy the 'sh*ttest PCs known to Man' struggle with basics

John Brown (no body)
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"We standardized our network pcs on Macintosh for three reasons: robustness (took 3-4 months in a hellish environment to kill them; PCs lasted weeks);"

You were lucky with that Apple warranty. That sort of environment would normally void any warranty or service contract unless specifically written in and at significant annual cost. I bet the Apple of today wouldn't accept it :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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"he had a knotty problem with a word document he was writing. He showed me the screen that had a single line of large point text on it,"

Is that even possible on any word processor? A basic plain text editor, maybe, but as far as I can remember, every word processor I ever used going back to Electric Pencil on a TRS-80 in the late 70's would auto-wrap at the end of the line. Had he somehow managed to set the right margin to something insane?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Alternatively...

"Communication skills are key in any walk of life, explaining things is a communications skill we should all practice."

I think he's referring to the fact that the support desk is used a low cost training budget. If the staff are not trained in the first place, then the support staff have to do the training over the phone, on the fly.

Having said that, I did spend 10 years training users across the "PC boundary", ie on CP/M and similar, then through the "IBM PC revolution" and had to become quite adept at analogies because most of the users were coming into IT usage completely "cold". They may have seen blinkenlights and spinning tape drives on TV, or maybe even used a typewriter, but computers? Nope, No experience, no prior knowledge to build on. Sometimes it was tough going, but much of it was dealing with the wonderment many of them experienced :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: It's 2018

"But guess what he's an auto electrician"

So he only works on old cars then?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I spent two years in tech support

"START? RUN? Where did one begin?"

No idea, but the Commodore PET had a RUN/STOP button :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: The right attitude

"(Though someone *should* have explained them the point of Page Up/Down keyboard keys at some point, so...)"

It continually amazes me how many people, both those with years of desktop experience and those fresh from school who have no idea about keyboard shortcuts or any of the special keys on the keyboard and are constantly grabbing the mouse to do basic stuff like page up/down, file save, close window etc.

I suspect that it's basically a lack of training or poor teaching. Or those doing the teaching never learned either and are passing on their lack of skills.

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You're legit and you know you are... Thanks to chanting racist footie fans, linking to dodgy stuff isn't necessarily illegal (well, in Europe)

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Drunken *Soccer* Fans

In the majority of the world, it's football. In only a very few countries does football need to be called soccer to differentiate it from Rugby which has been mis-labelled as football :-p

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Good English law

"So linking content IMPLIES fact?"

Not at all. That's not what the ruling implies.

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It's official. Microsoft pushes Google over the Edge, shifts browser to Chromium engine

John Brown (no body)
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Gimp

Re: And who got fired for taking all the wrong decisions?

"Systems admins will care as they will need to learn how to administer a registry-less system."

If there was any chance of your fantasy coming true, you can be sure that MS would choose a SystemD based Linux.

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John Brown (no body)
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The real news is that MS are giving up on browser security as being too hard and will now blame all future bugs on the soon-to-be underlying Chromium.engine.

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Why millions of Brits' mobile phones were knackered on Thursday: An expired Ericsson software certificate

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Limited number of customers

Yes, this.

"network disturbances for a limited number of customers in multiple countries"

"some 32 million people were without cellular service,"

I suppose, technically, it was a "limited number of customers". It was limited to their entire userbase. "Limited" is one of those wonderfully ambiguous words which can imply "only a few" when used in the right way but is still technically correct when the PR is called out and it's actually everybody who is affected.

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UK spies: You know how we said bulk device hacking would be used sparingly? Well, things have 'evolved'...

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Equipment interference

Not all.

Transuranic heavy elements may not be used where there is life. Medium atomic weights are available: Gold, Lead, Copper, Jet, Diamond, Radium, Sapphire, Silver and Steel. Sapphire and Steel have been assigned.

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Awkward... Revealed Facebook emails show plans for data slurping, selling access to addicts' info, crafty PR spinning

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Users should pay to use Facebook

"There was also U/usenet which was a global news group service "

Is, not was. There still some thriving groups, just not as many as there used

to be.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Yes, they really seized them

"After all, nobody would dream of taking to the US a laptop full of data known to be of interest to the US government... Unless they wanted the US government to have it."

It's all rather reminiscent of the various 5-eyes spooks mass-spying on each others citizens because technically they can't mass-spy on their own.

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After all that! Ofcom proposes BT as only broadband universal services provider for whole of UK (except Hull)

John Brown (no body)
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Yes.

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Waiter, what's this? SpaceX delivery delayed for a day by moldy food

John Brown (no body)
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Spelling!

You owe me a new keyboard!

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Not too concerned about the mice

Not to mention that they are studying disease progression in the rodents and that mould could well be penicillin :-)

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Oz opposition folds, agrees to give Australians coal in their stockings this Christmas

John Brown (no body)
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Re: "Not available in this country"

"I predict tech companies will just withdraw their software from Australian sale or distribution as the simplest way to comply with the new law."

I wonder who will blink first? It'll be a balance "can we do this for less than the loss in profit if we pull out of the market?" This must be balanced against, "if we pull out, will our competition stay and make a killing by taking our market?". Whoever pulls out first leaves a larger market for the remaining players, who might then find it worth while to create a special back-doored version for a suddenly enlarged market. Or the big boys will do it anyway, at a loss, until the smaller fry give up or go bust.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: And so it starts

"I was expecting the UK to be first to bat, but no, it's Australia."

The UK is still part of the EU, and may well be still subject to EU rules for some time to come. The UK has already had surveillance laws ruled illegal by the ECJ. Certain parts of the EU have too much relatively recent experience of surveillance societies. I'm not surprised at all that the Aussies are the test case. It might have been New Zealand, but the US and Canada both seem to be better at grass roots protests than our antipodean friends.

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John Brown (no body)
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"They are making it illegal to reveal the existence of interceptions."

"Revealing the existence of a TCN can get you up to five years in prison."

January: This company has not received any TCNs this month.

February: This company has not received any TCNs this month.

March: This company has not received any TCNs this month.

April:

May: This company has not received any TCNs this month.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Australian Privacy

All the 5-eyes are pushing for this in their own jurisdictions. It looks like Australia is the test case so once implemented, the others can point to it in support of their own local laws and demand the same for themselves.

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COPPA load of that AOL! $5m fine for targeting kids with ads

John Brown (no body)
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Re: A real punishment or not?

I came here to say the same thing. Billions of ads across 100's of websites. Even at a 1c per ad, and "only" 2 billion ads, that's an income of $20 million. "Billions" could be many more than just 2B. Anyone know what sort of income is actually generated by ad brokers per ad?

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Tumblr resorts to AI in attempt to scrub itself clean from filth

John Brown (no body)
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"Van Clomp's The Fallen Madonna with the Big Boobies is Art I tell you, Art!"

It just sold for more than most genuine "old masters", 15 grand! Not bad for a stage prop!

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: But...

""short form blogging" apparently

What? Tumblr is Twitter?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: "All of these images are both porn (at least to me)"

"I'd like to know your rationalisation. Why is non-sexual nudity pornographic?"

Different strokes for different folks is the answer. Some people get off on the strangest of things that many others would not consider sexual or porn at all. Look what happened when the UK tried to legislate what is meant by porn.

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BT pension scheme will stay on RPI interest rates for now

John Brown (no body)
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I came here...

..expecting a story about how BT manage their pension scheme on a Raspberry Pi.

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YouTube fight gets dirty: Kids urged to pester parents over Article 13

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Isn't it bad?

"Article 13 will require Google to watch and vet every video before it can be put on Youtube, that is impossible for Google to do, they simply can't afford to hire enough people to do that."

Using that same logic, the police should just leave organised crime alone because forcing them to go legal would be too difficult and affect their profits so much that they can't really afford to do it?

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Space policy boffin: Blighty can't just ctrl-C, ctrl-V plans for Galileo into its Brexit satellite

John Brown (no body)
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Re: 92 million?

The exception that proves the rule? :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: @codejunky A minority

"So either it was a majority vote to leave or you guys need a math lesson."

I suspect he was simply countering the commonly stated "fact" (at least by leaver politicians) there is an "overwhelming majority", a "huge mandate" etc, by pointing out that the difference between remain and leave was a minority, ie a bare majority rather than an "overwhelming" majority. Anyone can play with words. Just look at how many definitions a word has in a dictionary. Some of those definitions sometimes even describe a word as having the opposite meaning to one of the other definitions.

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Tesla autopilot saves driver after he fell asleep at wheel on the freeway

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Time for a firmware update?

"there's nothing close to the level of confusion and general intellectual mayhem that passes for US road signage in the UK"

I've heard similar from friends and family who have driven in the US. A sat-nav with lane guidance is essential if you don't know the roads. They tell me that it's not uncommon for the *only* signs relating to a junction to be actually at the junction itself, no advance warning signs at all.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Easy to Spot

"Hmm, if Musk has them set to not speed, then it will actually create a hazard, as any Cali driver or cop will attest."

From a cops perspective, that sounds like a perfect catch-22. Not speeding? Get ticketed for causing and obstruction. Speeding? Get a speeding ticket. Either way, they get to pull pretty much anyone over at any time and maybe find "cause" to search the car etc too.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: The elephant in the back seat

"So, if there is no driver giving signs of life, how the feck does the car manage to carry right on as if there is?"

I was wondering that too. Is it possible to fall asleep while holding the steering wheel and not not let go? If this is one of those edge cases Tesla didn't consider, then they need to add some extra sensors to check. The "black box" should indicate if the steering wheel sensors where properly activated by the drivers hands.

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Millennials 'horrify' their neighbours with knob-shaped lights display

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Worthless without pictures

"Otherwise I hear the internet's full of them."

Do tell! Link or it didn't happen. (I thought t'internet was all kittens?)

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