* Posts by John Brown (no body)

6574 posts • joined 21 May 2010

China's Great Firewall to crack down on unofficial VPNs – state-approved net connections only

John Brown (no body)
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Based on her time as Home Sec, it really doesn't surprise me.

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Make America, wait, what again? US Army may need foreign weapons to keep up

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Military-industrial 101

"The encryption that makes eCommerce possible was pioneered by us during WWII when we cracked the German enigma cipher."

Erm...wot?

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John Brown (no body)
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Well, they still give a Fokker.

(yeah, yeah, I know, but they *started* in Germany and who cold forget the Red Baron and his Fokker Dreidecker?)

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Plump Trump dumps TPP trade pump

John Brown (no body)
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Re: HOLY CRAP!

"I have to give him one hell of a high five for this move."

Why? Whoever won, both said they'd withdraw from TTIP. It 's not as if Clinton and Trump were on opposite sides of that issue. That was a done deal, no matter the election result and probably the easiest promise to keep.

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We've found a ‘vaccine’ for fake news. Wait! No, we really are Cambridge researchers

John Brown (no body)
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Re: None of this is real...

"It's too bad that most news tends to be "fake news" these days. All the big news sources would want you to believe that fake news is something spread by a few niche sites, but really, most of what they post is also heavily-biased and poorly-researched nonsense designed to manipulate people into falling in line with their their ideals."

I must admit, I do take issue with the hijacking of the term "fake news" to mean any story that's not "the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth". We've all grown up knowing that most mews sources are biased in one direction or another and have learned to take that into account. But there has been a marked increase in actual "fake news" since the WWW arrived, most especially in recent years. Conflating editorial or political bias with outright lying is not helping.

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John Brown (no body)
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"In 1984, the commercial passenger vessel MS Explorer became the first cruise ship to navigate the Northwest Passage."

It got that far without crashing? Must've AdBlock and NoScript installed!

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John Brown (no body)
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"Will that work on people who does not believe in any kind of vaccines?"

Yes, but you have to dilute it. Many times. Many, many, many times.

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Head of GCHQ Robert Hannigan steps down for 'personal reasons'

John Brown (no body)
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Re: "terrorism, crime and many other national security threats."

"dog fouling is a national security threat"

Well, duh, yeah. All those IoT dog feeders get hacked and feed the dogs the whole days food at once. Then all those IoT pet-flaps open and millions of dogs are out shitting on the streets of the nation and people are slipping, falling and breaking limbs, left right and centre. It's a Dogageddon I tell ya!

Every threat must be taken seriously and acted on!!!

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Microsoft's Linux love-in continues with SUSE support in SQL Server

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Installing Spotify on Linux Mint.

"Forgetting one really *big* difference between MS and Linux:"

Apart from what you said, the other big difference is you don;t have to do a web search to find your app. You get 99.9% of apps from the distros repositories where there's a decent chance it's not a hacked version that's been trojanised from whatever site appears in a Google/Bing search (or even from a "reputable" download aggregator who packages apps with added browser tool-bars or who has "fake" download buttons that are adverts)

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Chevy Bolt electric car came alive, reversed into my workbench, says stunned bloke

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Properties of a Parking/Emergency Brake

"Anyway, you can't push-start a car with a flat battery (no way to bootstrap the alternator to kick off the charging cycle)."

Maybe I should have mentioned I was in the UK. Manual gearbox is by far the norm.

Having said that, I've not had to do a bump start in many years. The pleasures of a company car :-)

The alternator was driven of a belt from the engine and starting a car with a flat battery was definitely something I did in the past. (petrol though. Never tried with diesel.) The battery would not turn the engine over, but may have had a little life in it. ISTR the dash instruments/bulbs working, so if that's required for the alternator, then maybe there was enough.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Properties of a Parking/Emergency Brake

1. No matter how automated and electrically controlled the vehicle may be, the brake of last resort must be fully manual with no dependency on anything except a good physical effort."

Agreed. Sadly, some newer cars, manual and auto, come with electrically operated push button "hand" brakes. I'm not sure how they work in the event of an electrical failure or even just a flat battery. Will you just keep rolling along, if driving? Can it be disengaged to do a push/bump start?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Not surprised the parking brake is so mysterious to Americans

"Parking a manual on a hill I always put the car in reverse just in case the handbrake fails or doesn't hold like it should."

There's a certain rather hilly town in Derbyshire I visit sometimes and the area I need to park in absolutely REQUIRES both the hand brake AND leaving it in gear opposite to the slope. Either alone simply won't hold the car in place.

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GDS chap: UK.gov is better off on public cloud than its own purpose-built network

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Out of US control

"Did you guys tell the US that you shot a Trident missile towards Florida?"

IIRC we can't fire a Trident without US permission anyway. I'm sure the US was fully aware of all of the details of the launch in real time.

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Trumping free trade: Say 'King of Bankruptcy' Ross does end up in charge of US commerce

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Bring it home

"I find it astinishing that the US and the whole of Europe have spent the last 40 years POURING money into China. We don't even like them!! We don't trust them."

"We" didn't. It was individual businesses in the main, in a race to the bottom in terms of costs while trying to maximise profits. There was no policy to do this. It's worth noting though that China was late to the party. South Korea, Malaysia, Indonesia and others are all in this game. And the race is on in Africa now.

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John Brown (no body)
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"noone stole your fucking jobs, you obnoxious, dim-witted, insufferable arseholes."

I agree with you but I and 99% of the people in "the West" object to being associated with the likes of The Trump. From "our" point of view the jobs have been stolen, but not by the countries who got them. They were stolen by the owners and boards of the multinationals in search of bigger profits.

On the other hand, as has been mentioned mush further up-thread, giving other nations a leg up and thereby reducing poverty worldwide is a good thing, even at the cost of slower "western" growth since it allows people to stay where they are instead of becoming economic migrants or illegal migrants through necessity.

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John Brown (no body)
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"We have a rather large trade surplus with the USA."

How long will that last once the EU treaty we use to trade with the USA is no longer applicable and the Hard Nosed Businessman is in charge of the trade negotiations which normally take 7 years or more and we have to get something in place in less than 2?

The UK is going to be desperate to get trade deals done ASAP and that's NOT a good place to start negotiations from. The only mitigation is that we already trade with most of those countries, but this does give them a significant edge for the near future.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Same idiocy regardless of location

"When? I'm thinking late 1940s "

I'd have said the 50's for mainly the same reasons. except by the 50's, cars were "yuuuuge" and had fins and the world of SciFi with the flying car/personal jet-pack etc were just a few years into the future :-)

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Welcome to the Wipe House: President Trump shreds climate change, privacy, LGBT policies on WhiteHouse.gov

John Brown (no body)
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"It is interesting to see so much disinformation and trolling regarding Trump, on a U.K. site."

To be fair to El Reg, the comments for and against Trump do seem to be mainly, if not exclusively, from US citizens judging by the language and knowledge content (or lack thereof)

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John Brown (no body)
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"Get used to the opposition, snowflake. It's called "Democracy".

So, when did snowflake stop being a black v white racist insult and turn into a party partisan insult? I think I may have missed that memo.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: The *people*

"Trump won the electoral college, Hillary won the popular vote. So who has been disenfranchised?"

Considering the choice the American people were given, I'd say everyone except the most rabid party partisans.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Likely

No0r forgetting the millions of bots suddenly finding they were no longer following @POTUS and having to do a sudden reset.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Likely

"they're really good and on point when they talk u.s. politics."

Yeah, bloody US El Reg journalists in the bloody US El Reg office. Fake news-mongers the lot of 'em! We should build a wall around them and make EL Reg pay for it"

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: @AC

"....when Reagan had just been elected. People were certain that it would turn into a disaster because wasn't he merely an actor? That should get ugly really soon, because the guy had 0 political experiences."

Didn't Reagan used to be Governor of California? Or does that nor count? Or are you just being ironic?

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Trump's 'cyber tsar' Giuliani among creds leaked in mass hacks

John Brown (no body)
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"He's only been in office for 2 days, after all."

He's been running an IT security business for a lot longer and that, after all, is why supposed to the reason The Donald chose him for the job. He may not be at the coal face of running said business, but he should at least be aware of it.

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All the cool kids are doing it – BT hikes broadband and TV bills

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Where are Offcom?

"I don't get why TV / analogue phones still exist"

TV? That would be for the very large number of people who don't have or want either Sky or cable.

Analogue phones? That might be the universal service obligation, access to 999 when the power is out and, most of all, because BT would have to convert everyone's lines to xDSL and provide devices so users phones would continue to work (or provide replacement mobile phones and make sure there are no "not spots", not even inside peoples houses)

VOIP takeup is still incredibly low, because most people either don't know it exists or have no clue what they need to do to set it up. And then there's a still a significant chunk of households with no internet access, mainly those who simply don't want it, but it's the first thing to go for some people when they ;lose their jobs.

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My hole is a private thing – see for yourself

John Brown (no body)
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Re: This is called...

Exactly! The bikeshed. Now, if only we could get the marketing people to convince the "business leaders" that both the "cloud" and the "bandwagon" need to properly branded with a standardised colour, that could keep both the "leaders" and the marketeers busy for months. Years, even, if we do it right. The the rest of us could get on with our jobs!

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Mozillans call for new moz://a logo to actually work in browsers

John Brown (no body)
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Re: The request is stupid

"Dancing monkeys will not be seen."

What about dancing hamsters?

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Assange reverse-ferrets on promise to fly to US post-Manning clemency

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Sweden

" I don't think he has anything to fear from the US so he can come out of hiding on Monday."

I hope he does. Then we can stop paying Police overtime to stand outside the embassy waiting for him and he can Got to Jail, Go Directly to Jail and Not Pass Go. Jumping bail is frowned quite strongly by the UK judicial systems, And once he's served time for the bail jumping, he can be sent to Sweden to face the music there! (Would ABBA be cruel and unusual punishment?) and then he can fade into obscurity.

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John Brown (no body)
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"Pretty sure he meant a pardon."

He claims to be a "journalist". If so, then words are his trade. He said clemency, so that's what he meant. He's clever enough to have said pardon if that's what he meant. Pardon is shorter than clemency too, so why use a long word with a different meaning to a claimed intended shorter word with a very different meaning when every letter is using up vital "bandwidth"?

He's a lying bag of shite who may possibly have had some good motives in the past, but that is far overshadowed by his antics of the last few years.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Sometimes 140 characters isn't enough

"Maybe a two part tweet next time?"

Or, better, don't use Twitter if you can't fit your unambiguous message into 140 chars!

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Deadly Tesla smash probe: No recall needed, says Uncle Sam

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Face it: Humans are lousy drivers

(e.g. making pedals ONLY for acceleration, or ONLY for braking).

That sounds too much like an attempt to make driving fool-proof. And we all know the adage about fools and fool-proof.

To some extent, I agree with you, but on the other hand, aged 55, I can say I spent the first half of my working life driving maybe 30 miles per day and the second half driving up to 400 miles per day (40,000-60,0000 per year currently) and I can, with certainty, state that I have never pressed the wrong pedal.

I suspect the only "fool-proof" car will be the JohnnyCab equivalent where the meatsack is merely a passenger who can state a destination and other than that has no other control over the vehicle.

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Windows 10 networking bug derails Microsoft's own IPv6 rollout

John Brown (no body)
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"Give them time, and it will work just fine."

How much longer do we need for IPv6 to "Just Worktm". It's only been 10 years or since IPv6 was unleashed on the world.

I suspect the comment about "luck" being required is that even a company as big as MS with wide ranging technical IT skills is having problems even 10 years into IPv6 being "live". That's a clusterfuck of the first order.

It really ought to be as "plug'n'play" as IPv4 by now.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: "but Android doesn't support that"

"Ummm ... isn't that exactly the process that the article describes?"

No, this is about a decade old protocol that MS already claim to support. Now they find that not only does android not support a specific function, neither do some routers and, most tellingly of all, neither is Windows in an enterprise environment supporting the features that would be expected in that situation, despite MS claiming IPv6 support. They've found a workaround for the Android issue but not for the Windows issue.

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Lord of the Dance set to deliver high kicks at Trump’s big ball

John Brown (no body)
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Joke

"It's not like they were singing for Trump, right?"

Well, even celebs have standards you know!

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Korean boffins vow 1,000km-an-hour supertrain

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Me

Where/what is LCX? An airport?

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Britain collects new naval tanker a mere 18 months late

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Fiber optic?

"All 10 IS aircraft carriers"

I assume you meant to hit the adjacent U, not I, otherwise the world is trouble. The thought of IS with 10 aircraft carriers is a little concerning!

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: What the hell

" If my local police buy a British car"

Is there such a thing? At least that the cops can afford and is practical.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: What the hell

"Our leaders - the lot of them - are traitors."

Who elected them?

In terms of our actual leaders, effectively no one. The party and maybe its members (or just it's MPs) choose their leader who may or may not still be leader after an election. The "people" elect only their own representative who then may or may go on to be a leader. Once an elected MP becomes PM, s/he then chooses the remaining leaders (ministers).

You can't blame the whole country for who ends up as the leaders because in the UK parliamentary system, the people don't get to choose the leader. For that matter, in the right circumstances, the Queen could choose an unelected person and ask them to form a government.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: purpose

"Bet the surname of the person in charge of the ship's shop is Pertwee.."

That sounds like it would be a bit of a lark!

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Maggy what have we done...

"you cannot speak sense into nutters"

Well said sir! Now try to find a well known phrase that include the words pot, kettle and black.

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IT team sent dirt file to Police as they all bailed from abusive workplace

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Hmm... I am currently

"The very worst job I had was in the late 70s delivering Sunday newspapers round the steepest roads in Bolton in the middle of winter under three feet of snow for a couple of quid and a packet of Wotsits. I was out at 6am in the dark, and finally finished at 4pm in the dark and that was AFTER having to call in my brothers as reinforcements."

Eeeee bah gum lad, tha' was lucky! Now, when I were a lad.....

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'Exploding e-cig cost me 7 teeth, burned my face – and broke my sink!'

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Stored Energy

"You can exhale all you want, as long as I don't have to inhale it. It's really that simple."

No, it isn't that simple. You are basing your argument on a tiny minority of vapers who make themselves highly conspicuous with home made mixes that produce large clouds of vapour. Our local news uses the same clip every time they mention e-cigs. It's three old(ish) geezers in a pub pumping out mahoosive clouds of vapour. Personalty, I have never met anyone like that. They do exist, but are rare. Most vapers produce no more vapour than you'd see someone breathing out on a cold morning and it dissipates almost as quickly as warm breath in cold air.

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Euro space agency's Galileo satellites stricken by mystery clock failures

John Brown (no body)
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Re: HARRY LIME

"Whoever built the Antikythera mechanism had engineering and mathematical knowledge far more advanced than his - and the machine was *built*, not just drawn."

Even if all his work was independently (re-)discovering "lost" information the Greeks or whoever had many, many years earlier, then that's not his fault. It was lost and he deserves full credit for his discoveries.

On the other hand, if he had access to earlier books and just regurgitated them with a some new discoveries, then maybe there's a case for calling him a "pop star"

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John Brown (no body)
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Happy

Re: HARRY LIME

"Perhaps Renaissance Man?"

An English phrase?

From French renaissance, from re- back, again + naissance birth (from Latin nascentia, from nasci be born).

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Why not just leave the satellites on the ground, where you can go and fix them in a van...

"If you need "that little arrow" to tell you where you are on a map, I respectfully suggest that your inability to understand how to read a map will make "the little arrow" fscking useless."

Different use case. Having a paper map and knowing how to use it will tell you where you are. You can then use it to find out where you want to be and then calculate how to get there. Great for hiking, or planning a driving/touring holiday trip. Using a SatNav, it's doesn't matter where you are. It's only use is to tell it where you want to be and then let it tell how to get there.

TL'DR

Paper maps - for when the journey is part of the fun.

SatNav - for when you just want to get somewhere without hassle.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Why not just leave the satellites on the ground, where you can go and fix them in a van...

"Comes to that, why not just learn to read a flippin' map?"

Because they are usually, at least a year or two out of date by the time they are printed. And none show actual addresses or postcodes, let alone the nearest pub!

On a slightly more practical note, in my case, I travel a lot so a years worth of paper maps would cost nearly as much as a cheap satnav, ie general Road Atlas + street maps of the various towns and cities + OS maps to find the smaller roads/villages that the road atlas "helpfully" ignores to make the maps "clearer"

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: It's not a GPS-alike it's a GPS!

"I think you will find that Joe Public has never heard of GNSS, and whilst he probably thinks the US are the only providers, he doesn't actually care as long as his smartphone can tell him where the nearest pub is."

That same Joe Public probably doesn't have a smartphone. He has an IPhone. He may have bought it from Samsung or some other vendor, but it's still his iPhone, And GPS is that device he sticks on the dashboard to tell him where to drive (or an app on the phone) Either way, he probably doesn't ever think about how it works and may have heard the word "satellite" at some point in his life.

But thumbs up for using all available tech to find the pub!

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You know how online shops love to keep tabs on you? Now it's coming to the offline world

John Brown (no body)
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Re: I think the next revolution in supermarkets will be...

"...electronic shelf price indicators."

I think I may have seen those on Tomorrows World in the 70's or 80's. They were touted as a use case for small cheap e-ink display some years ago too. As another poster said earlier, they are yet to be seen in the wild in any real sense (at least here in the UK)

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John Brown (no body)
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"There's no reason why they couldn't work out everything you linger in front of - suggesting you either want or could be persuaded you need."

If I spend time lingering in front of a product, it's because I'm trying to work you which is cheaper. Fruit and veg in particular. 90p/lb loose or 5 for a £1 in a bag. (or whatever), which is cheaper. Yes, I will take the time to take a bag over to the scales. Bananas, especially, can often be half the price bough loose. With many fruit/veg, one week the bagged are cheaper, other weeks the loose are cheaper but invariably the bagged will be sold by number and loose by weight if the numbers are small, eg bell pepper, apples, pears while spuds and carrots are bagged by weight.

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