* Posts by Roland6

3559 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

Why Microsoft's Windows game plan makes us WannaCry

Roland6
Silver badge

And yet Microsoft's patience had run out...

And yet Microsoft's patience had run out and it marked April 8 2014 as the date when it would stop writing security updates for the desktop operating system.

An interesting choice of words. Because with whom did MS lose patience with?

It wasn't the fault of anyone outside of Microsoft that Microsoft failed to deliver a suitable successor to XP. MS only had themselves to blame for the failed delivery of Longhorn, the poor reception of Vista, the lukewarm reception 7 got.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: It's a systemic problem with humans.

More important, did anyone in the industrial supply chain buck the pressure and move their products to BSD despite the competition touting their easy-to-run Windows systems?

Back in the 1980's I worked on a product that was originally intended to run on Unix, we decided given the way the market was going, we would be well advise to port the product to the PC (MS-DOS) and save the Unix version until such time as there was real money to be made out of Unix ie. people were prepared to pay for Unix software; the company never did release a Unix version...

I suspect that as you indicate, many companies simply rode the Windows bandwagon, even though they knew BSD or some other platform would have been better, because commercial pressures and living to fight another day were more important.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

No, if anything good comes from WannCrypt it'll be a whole new emphasis on how OSs are designed and built

But perhaps more importantly, how OS and software in general is supported and maintained.

Whilst MS have been clear they only intend supporting their products for 10 years, with W10 they have caveated this to only cover platforms that the OEM also supports, which effectively means the duration of the OEM's extended warranty.

So once again the question must be whether MS really are a suitable enterprise IT partner...

However, as others have noted elsewhere, various Linux and proprietary OS distributions aren't necessarily any better Microsoft, so at the present time, it would seem enterprise IT is between a rock and a hard place.

3
0
Roland6
Silver badge

"Would you really want a hospital where the many different machines ran many different OS's?"

A question that was effectively answered back in the 1980's - remember a basic premise of Open Systems was Standard interfaces and file formats, hence the importance of full stack Open Systems Interconnect and the various profiles (eg. GOSIP, MAP/TOP) that arose to solve real-world problems of connecting systems from a comparatively large selection of vendors, each with their own (predominantly proprietary) OS and machine architecture.

There really is no real reason why my phone needs to run the same OS, as my tablet, as my PC - in fact that is the case today: Android, iOS and Windows respectively. Similarly, I don't need desktop Word for example on a sub 8-inch screen tablet/phone, it isn't usable.

Likewise in hospitals does the MRI scanner really need to run the same OS as the bedside vital functions monitor? No they don't, they simply need to be able to use Standard protocols and interfaces such as the UK 3-pin mains power supply and either an RJ45 or multimode SC fiber port LAN connection.

In fact it is useful to compare and contrast the WannaCrypt attack with Richard Morris's Internet Worm (1988), to better understand why the widespread usage of a single OS, CPU and hardware platform (ie. Windows and the x86 PC architecture) is not a good thing.

12
0

Dyson celebrates 'shock' EU Court win over flawed energy tests

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Is this the same Dyson who has no time for the EU ?

@AC + Putters - "Only with Brexit, Dyson will no longer have access to the EU court...

Of course he will. Courts are there to rule on issues that are in their jurisdiction, the location of the plaintiff is not relevant."

Yes you are totally correct with respect to what I wrote, however in being glib I omitted the real point, namely:

Dyson's claim only had merit because the UK is inside the Single Market and thus subject to it's rules, thus the basis of Dyson's claim was that the Single Market rules didn't create a level playing field. Once the UK is outside of the Single Market, it no longer plays by the rules for members of the Single Market, it plays by the rules as defined by the EU/Single Market-UK trade agreement. Thus effectively after Brexit, the case Dyson (UK) put before the European courts would be without merit. And as another AC noted for his case to have merit, Dyson (EU) would need to bring the case.

0
1
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Is this the same Dyson who has no time for the EU ?

B. Take it to court to get justice.

Additional information: You voted leave which has absolutely f*ck all to do with the above.

Only with Brexit, Dyson will no longer have access to the EU court...

7
18

Yo, patch that because scum still wanna exploit WannaCrypt-linked vuln

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: It's worth following the link in the article

>It seems that Server 2008 R2 (with only service pack 1) accounts for about half of all directly connected Windows boxes.

Shame no further information, I suspect the majority of these are Windows SBS 2008. Which would explain why they are more likely to be visible to the Internet and have SMB services enabled...

Not got a WinSBS2008 CD, but I wonder if a default install automatically opens a web facing SMB port...

Good thing WS2008 is still in support, now whether all those machines have auto-update enabled...

0
0

Do we need Windows patch legislation?

Roland6
Silver badge

@tiggity - "Your average punter has zero clue about EOL date when they buy a computer"

I think you have accidentally hit-the-nail-on-the-head!

The real problem with software and Microsoft is that MS support policy is based on the date of first release and not 10 years from the date of sale, which is the case with white goods, cars etc.

I buy a new washing machine from the high st. I don't care if the OEM has ceased production, it still comes with a 1~10 year manufacturer's/store warranty commencing on the date I purchased it.

To keep things simple, I suggest changing MS's product lifecycle so that it provides support until 10 years after the date of last official retail sale, which in the case of XP was October 22, 2010.

1
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: I'm surprised nobody's mentioned it yet ...

Why the fuck are we even thinking about using a General Purpose OS to run specific purpose equipment?

History?

Going back to the 1990's, MS was on the rise and was desperate to become more of an Enterprise IT supplier, hence the development of NT and it's successors, which resulted in the success of XP-SP2/SP3 and WS2K3. Similarly, MS made a big play into embedded, which also paid dividends in XP Embedded.

Prior to MS and to some extent prior to the consumer IT industry, it was fairly normal to pay for a licence and support and product lifecycles were more about sales than support. Hence why in the mid to late 1990's it was quite common to have businesses running mainframes and other major systems running OS's from the 60's~80's, still being maintained, but not available in the shops.

I think there was an expectation that once MS had become an enterprise supplier, it also would become more flexible about its product support lifecycle, with pre-existing customers. Instead we've seen MS deliberately take steps that have alienated it from enterprise IT such as releasing a succession of Windows versions since XP that have really been focused on the consumer market and aping Apple (badly) and only belatedly trying to retrofix W10 to the enterprise.

Which seems to support a stance I took when W8 was released, namely the time between then and EOL of W7 was the best opportunity Linux/open source had to get into the enterprise anytime soon.

1
0
Roland6
Silver badge

@Dan 55 - Glad to see you resolved your Win7 update problem [ref: https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/3178008 ]

I've added the ghacks article to my Win7 maintenance useful information file.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Poll: If so, how long should Microsoft supply patches?

Interestingly, the poll didn't ask whether MS should be able to charge for supplying patches beyond their normal product lifecycle EOL. It would seem there is an implicit assumption that MS should provide patches for free to all.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

"The NHS had 70,000 Windows XP PCs"

When and is there a reliable source for this figure?

I ask as a Google only shows the "70,000" figure surfacing in news articles released within the last 24 hours. Which would seem it is a media misrepresentation, just like the often quoted "90% of NHS Trusts still running XP".

1
0
Roland6
Silver badge

re: some versions of Windows 7 came with XP mode

No to my knowledge, MS didn't supply XP mode with Windows 7, it was a wholly separate download and so they were able to make it subject to the same EOL as XP. Remember Win7 was released in 2009, 5 years before XP went EOL and XP Mode was provided more as a way of facilitating migration than a long-term solution.

However, MS are still supporting Office 2007 on XP - last week I received a bunch of security updates through WUP; interestingly, the SMBv1 fix for XP wasn't available through WUP, it has to be manually downloaded.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: It is simply a matter of procurement

However, not a single software tender for public services had any long term maintenance clauses attached to it.

Wonder if things have changed at Network Rail... In the days of BR, for railway operational systems the standard expected working life and thus maintenance requirement was 20 years minimum. Which given in the 1980's they were still replacing Victorian infrastructure was a blessing...

1
0

Ransomware scum have already unleashed kill-switch-free WannaCry‬pt‪ variant

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: So you're blaming a commercial company for not patching a 13 year old OS?

The easiest thing would be to keep XP going and Microsoft will do that if you pay them. The next thing would be to fit each XP system with a hardware firewall. Don't expect XP to protect itself, put a packet sniffing firewall in between.

Firstly, from the way MS behaved around the time of XP's EOL, it was clear they had zero intention of keeping XP going - MS wanted to make a break with the past, even if that break could hurt them commercially. Additionally, given the size of payments they received from user organisations, such as the UK government, for the extended support service MS reluctantly did offer, I suspect given MS were already committed to maintaining XP POS until 2019, it received sufficient monies to more than cover the costs of maintaining the XP support team for 10 years; extending XP's EOL to 2024; yet they haven't.

Secondly, how would a hardware packet sniffing firewall given any protection against WannaCrypt, given the initial infection vector was believed to have been a poisoned email attachment and if you were running SMB the relevant ports would be open.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Oh FFS

It would seem that missing from your action list was a consideration of possible outcomes, thus you missed an opportunity for management to throw some money at you to do something about security: attend a few courses, gain a certificate or two, implement that new disruptive security policy etc.

I recommend adding such considerations to your management panic mitigation checklist.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

"In turn that made me think along the lines of "FFS what sort of security experts swap notes on blogs that may be / almost certainly are open to being read by the hackers" "

Agree, if the security experts haven't managed to build their own secure dark web for the exchange of security intelligence...

But then looking at all the various security researchers, it does seem that many are freelance and so need and to some extend deserve the publicity for their efforts.

1
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Experts all giving advice how how to stay secure

"Customers running Windows 10 were not targeted by the attack today."

Interesting statement/conclusion given the attack vector was an email attachment and the vulnerability being exploited was in SMBv1 that is also present in Windows 10 and my understanding is that if you hadn't applied the March updates it was vulnerable.

Perhaps MS are assuming all Win10 systems will have been patched in March and so an attack in May would have failed against these systems and thus we can conclude Win10 wasn't a target...

0
0

While Microsoft griped about NSA exploit stockpiles, it stockpiled patches: Friday's WinXP fix was built in February

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Plenty of blame to go around

Microsoft's "crime" amounts to "not giving away their code for free to people who had made a positive choice not to pay for it". Maybe it's just me, but I find it hard to fault them for that.

Well that may apply to governments and businesses who were eligible to apply for the overpriced extended support, however, your typical Windows user wasn't given a choice: for them, support for XP ended in 2014 (ie. 10 years plus a 2 year free extension after XP was first released).

Ignoring Windows Embedded/POS, it would seem that this will also be the case with Win7, 8, 10. So the takeaway, is if you have systems that you expect to outlive the MS support lifecycle either build in contingencies so that relevant MS-dependent system components can be upgraded or use a different OS platform who's lifecycle better fits the lifecycle of your product/application.

5
0

German court set to rule on legality of IP address harvesting

Roland6
Silver badge

>IP addresses often do identify an individual

But not to the same extent as a telephone number. So a question has to be to what extent can telephone numbers be harvested (in Germany). I'm immediately thinking about BT's scammer system that monitors call patterns to determine sources of scam phone calls, which obviously has to retain phone numbers and associated call data.

1
0

Microsoft to spooks: WannaCrypt was inevitable, quit hoarding

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: orphan zombies moaning 'uhhhp daaytz'

@Dan 55 - so I'll just let it sit there until it's finished, even if it takes a week.

I found with these systems, simply stop the explicit user initiated update check, change the update setting to autocheck and download but inform me when ready and leave the system running. For some reason this seems to get the first set of updates, after this the system will typically tell there are further updates waiting. Also as your system is so far behind, just get the 'Important' updates - some 'Recommended' updates seem to cause conflicts with 'Important' updates causing the updater to sit there, once you're up-todate on the Important updates then enable 'Recommended' and repeat.

Aside:

1. Also whilst MS have stopped the GWX, I've also found it helpful to run GWX Control Panel (run once version) to ensure all the OS update settings are set to disabled, as this will further reduce the number of updates you will get.

2. Also turn off the customer experience programme and so avoid the telemetry/'spying' updates.

0
0

Facebook in the dock: Web giant faces trial for allegedly ripping off data center blueprints

Roland6
Silver badge

This is exactly why I love FreeBSD - use our code and ideas how ever you want.

But if you contribute to FreeBSD, you do so in the knowledge that this is what is going to happen to your contribution.

However, if you are in the business of selling your knowledge and expertise, in order to keep your family housed and fed, and subsequently to a "commercial and in confidence" meeting, a potential client produces something looking remarkably like what you showed them and claims it as "all their own work" and donates it to FreeBSD, I think you would be aggrieved, particularly if some AC off-handly dismissed your complaints because you were a "nomark business"....

4
0

Microsoft touts next Windows 10 Creators Update: It's set for a Fall

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Has anyone actually got the Creator's Update?

Well, a good question, given from a previous recent announcement MS have effectively withdrawn the "Spring" Creator's Update it from general release, while they sort out all the issues that many users have been having with it.

Certainly all my Win10 systems are still on build 1607 "Anniversary Update" and have been happily receiving updates for that builld.

1
0

Cloudflare goes berserk on next-gen patent troll, vows to utterly destroy it using prior-art bounties

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: bow and arrow - good!

The architecture described in the article is an HTTP proxy.

...

So would there be any prior art for HTTP proxies around the 2002 timeframe.

The other use of an HTTP proxy is to perform a man-in-the-middle ie. intercept attack, so another source of potential prior art will be among hackers and protocol test systems.

2
0

Well this is awkward. As Microsoft was bragging about Office at Build, Office 365 went down

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Numpties.

You should trust them because the penalty clauses in the contract make it really bad for them if you suffer any kind of outage and so they'll make every conceivable effort to deliver.

Trouble is enforcement and getting timely recompense, ie. before your business (or their business) collapses. The current HBOS fraud case gives a good idea of the time lines: 2002~2007 fraud against small business customers committed, concerns raised, Police investigation started 2010, trial of 6 people commences 2016 with convictions Jan 2017, it only now that compensation for the victims is being discussed, yet it is likely these will also involve court proceedings so it could be a few more years before victims receive any monies... Also bear in mind in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crash HBOS itself failed and only survived by Lloyds taking on all its business and liabilities...

5
0

DSL inventor's latest science project: terabit speeds over copper

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Don't tell BT...

Then there is the ISP's that support FTTP

I think you will find that the ISP's either require a BT FTTP line, because they are in dispute with Ofcom over who should be supplying the battery backup, specifically they want BT to provide the battery for the FTTP line they installed and for which BT doesn't get any service fee's from, or they expect the house to have the BT POTS over copper service for fixed line telephony (which effectively leaves the power/battery issue with BT but this time BT do get some revenue).

FTTP is occurring more on recent larger new build developments (ie. developments of 20+ homes built in 2016 and later). I don't know if the cable being used is pure fibre or also has copper cores; it would make sense for it to be pure fibre, but then copper cores can aid fault location and diagnosis.

0
0

IBM: Customer visit costing £75 in travel? Kill it with extreme prejudice

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: HP and Pencils

Re: IBM PS/2 keyboards

These were hard to come by in circa 2002, however the IBM data entry grade AT keyboards were a hidden gem: £100+ keyboard being sold for sub-£10 because they only had the 1/2-inch 5-pin DIN connector; mine are still going strong and spare is still on the shelf.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Travel costs

>Years ago, I lived about 30 minutes from Gatwick Airport. To save costs, employer insisted I travelled from Luton via Easyjet.

"Further, the GTS exec said bulk travel requests should not exceed one calendar month ahead and “should be absolutely minimised”. In addition, “all flights” need to be signed off by her."

Years ago, I worked within 30 minutes of Luton, the UK was their EMEA centre of exellence in a number of key areas. The company, HQ near Heathrow implemented a similar missive. We naturally, started submitting all our Easyjet/RyanAir travel requests to HQ - we soon got exempted as they realised it was a total waste of their time signing off sub £10 airfares to Europe and if we booked in advance the fares were often £1...

2
0

Agile consultant behind UK's disastrous Common Platform Programme steps down

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: DABLing with Architecture

DABL - Looks a bit like a waterfall to me, but then given this is Agile, it is probably more akin to a series of rapids - not as impressive as a waterfall, but a lot more exhilarating to ride down.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Agile fine until it hits the real world?

>The main difference is Agile will deliver what you need now, whereas Waterfall will deliver what you thought you needed two years ago

Not heard of change control?

From my experience, the primary difference between Agile and waterfall is in the contracted deliverables and the ownership of risk. With waterfall, I the supplier commit to delivering a complete system that satisfies the requirements within a defined timeframe. With Agile, I the supplier commit to delivering some functionality through a number of development iterations within a time period.

3
1
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: constantly testing our new systems and processes with users.

>Continuous testing with users as guinea pigs is bad.

Just the new zelgeist - Windows 10 etc.

6
1

Majority of contractors distrust HMRC's IR35 calculator, survey finds

Roland6
Silver badge

From what I can see the only reason, not to trust the answers the tool gives, is the word "BETA" on an orange background on every page.

Other than that the only reason to be sceptical is a future - after the event reassessment that uses the then current version of the tool. Hence why the best you can do is to include the results of running the tool as an appendix to your agreement, along with any clarifying remarks, and get the client to sign up to that.

0
0

Opposable thumbs make tablets more useful says Microsoft Research

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Loss of freedom

>The more the interface is going to rely on this new selection option, the less you can do while holding the tablet in your hand when you're standing.

From watching the video, it is obvious the main envisaged use case is when a person is using their fingers to prop up the tablet and so the thumb is free to move, so to some extent your concern is valid.

However, with a tablet such as the ipad when standing you hold the tablet with the fingers on the back and the base of the thumb on the surround, leaving the thumb free to either provide a third point of contact and stability control or to perform simple actions like pressing the single home button.

So I suggest, provided the thumb controls are kept very simple, like the mouse with 1~3 buttons and possibly a slider/scroll bar, I think they will add to the UX.

Additionally, the use of a handle (https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/3173028 ) through which a hand can be placed and thus enable the back of the hand to be used, would permit the fingers to use simple controls placed on the back of the tablet. This however, whilst probably useful to someone standing using the tablet, would make using the tablet on the lap possibly less comfortable.

1
0
Roland6
Silver badge

>but because other OEMs were making the devices, these ideas were never implemented.

But Microsoft were making the OS and effectively controlled the UI and hence, just as they decided to fix the locations of furniture in window frames, the position of the start button etc. they could very easily have decided to provide a set of on-screen "mouse button" controls placed so that they could be thumb driven. Only as we know one of the problems has been developing touch screens that work well with both finger and stylus input.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Why?

The only real use case for it is preliminary sketching, which is such a vanishingly small part of the job it's not worth using a device. They just use a bit of paper and a pencil, even though they have electronic sketching available.

There is the other real use, markup. For a field engineering project a touchscreen tablet is a really good way of capturing as-found and as-modifed complete with annotations and have the information directly uploaded, rather than have pen and paper and the associated workflows and quality issues that arise from having a third-party transcribe the handwritten technical notes (even if they have been written using an Anoto pen).

However, cost is a big factor. The problems are firstly being able to justify having an 'expensive' device to do only part of the job and secondly for that device to be sufficiently robust for usage in the field environment at a reasonable cost. This problem in my experience has bedevilled Panasonic Toughbook sales - clients want 'Toughbooks' until they see the price premium and then ask whether similar results could be achieved with cheaper mass market laptops...

I think also in the use cases we describe, the capabilities of the technology both in the device and behind the device play a major part in the utility. Thus being able to sketch on a tablet is of little value if the sketch isn't easily and quickly available (ie. with little if any user intervention) on another device eg. CAD station - available to either that user or a relevant colleague; this is a fundamental part of ubiquitous computing. Unfortunately, neither the Apple or MS cloud visions really support full functional ubiquitous computing as demonstrated back in the 1980's at Palo Alto Research Labs and given their current trajectories I don't see either of them massively improving their offering in the next 5 years...

1
0

Michael Dell? More like Michael in-Dell-nial: No public cloud, no future

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: What doesn't Dell have? A public cloud

>Clouds do need client equipment and there will still be a market for that,

Clouds also need server equipment and there will be a market for that...

So the real question is whether Dell see's itself as being a major player in the cloud infrastructure market. Which basically says to what extent does and will Dells involvement in cloud datacentre projects such as OCP contribute to future revenues and profits.

0
0

'Crazy bad' bug in Microsoft's Windows malware scanner can be used to install malware

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: So now we can only hope...

re: Oh?

Agree, I suspect ShelLuser doesn't actually use Win7 or 8 and so is unaware that since last year MS stopped the Get Windows 10 Free offer and removed it from Windows Update.

Certainly, since then, none of my Win7/8 systems has either flagged the presence of an OS upgrade or offered any inducement to upgrade. However, it did take a little effort and assistance from GWX Control Panel to avoid the forced free upgrade.

2
0

ISPs must ensure half of punters get advertised max speeds

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Annoyed... The rather pathetic progress continues...

Useful coverage map, click on link in this page:

http://www.superfastnorthamptonshire.net/Pages/working-with-gigaclear.aspx

Basically, if you are not in a blue/purple area - in which case you are either already getting BT FTTC or Gigaclear FTTP, hope you are in a Gigaclear area (pink area's on map) and so will at some stage in the future be getting 100mbps FTTP. If you are in a light blue area then you may get something in a decade or so... given the purple/blue area represents the combined effort since 2008 of BT and Virgin commercial deployments and Superfast Northamptonshire's BDUK contribution...

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Annoyed... The rather pathetic progress continues...

> I live in Northamptonshire.

Where in Northamptonshire?

In my part of rural Northamptonshire, we got the community together and had the Parish Council arrange a public meeting involving: Superfast Northamptonshire, BT, our MP and relevant District and County Councillors. Whilst my village got BT, Gigaclear now provide service to the surrounding villages that BT deemed not to be commercially viable. The laugh I have is that having kicked BT to deliver to my village (insufficient demand etc.), a few months back BT installed a second FTTC cabinet next to the one it installed a couple of years back...

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: ISPs?

Are we going to get motor manufacturers to change the speedometers fitted as they may offer speeds up to 140 mph when the car can only get to 110mph, with a struggle

I always thought that was the case. Certainly, none of my cars including the various performance cars have had an engine capable of taking the speedo needle off the scale.

Zen failed by offering all options including "up to" 76Mb

Zen like many ISPs will give a 'teaser' result, something you only discover when you click "buy" and go to the next stage. Additionally, you do have to be careful as on a previous broadband article I noted that the different BT checkers returned different results, with investigation confirming that both results were correct. (A few months back, for my area, BT retail weren't offering FTTC because they had used up their allocation of terminal blocks, but going to the 'right' BT Wholesale reseller you could get FTTC.)

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: All good ideas

"So am I, but I still don't get the "up to speed"

I suspect the main difference for A&A customers is just that they understand what's going on more than most Internet users."

Similarly for Zen customers. However, when you contract with Zen they do a line test (or a calculation if the BT checker doesn't return a result due to your line being attached to a third-party LLU) and then clearly give a speed guarantee in the agreement.

From memory, the guaranteed speed was 5~10% slower than the value the BT checker returned, so the line under normal conditions always exceeded the threshold.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Money talks

>OK, not for the ISP, but for the company that provides the actual cabling

Err no. You are forgetting the LLU equipment, contention ratio's and backhaul; all of which are in the hands of the Alt-ISPs.

On one client site we moved the line over from the BE/O2 LLU to Zen/BT Wholesale and saw a 8Mbps line turn into a 10+ Mbps line (a rationalisation and upgrade of the client site cabling gave another 1Mbps down speed, a router upgrade added a further 1Mbps).

0
0

Australian Taxation Office named as party preventing IT contractors being paid

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: The tax issue may explain how they were able to do it

>How much money can they make holding onto money for say a week or two before paying, at today's interest rates?

Well it does make you wonder how companies such as topcashback.co.uk, who claim to pass on all of the commission received, can be successful. Because whilst they do have some zero commission refund links on thier website, the only time I and I suspect many others use their site is to browse and click on the commission refund links.

1
0

Microsoft says: Lock down your software supply chain before the malware scum get in

Roland6
Silver badge

Microsoft Store?!

After reading the rather informative Security Advisory, I can't help but think that MS marketing will seize this as another reason for locking things down further and insisting that all Windows software needs to be distributed and updated via the MS Store...

3
1

Fortran greybeards: Get your walking frames and shuffle over to NASA

Roland6
Silver badge

Don't quite get why this is particularly a Fortran problem - it's simply a result of floating point maths.

You are to some extent right, the problem is fundamentally the floating point maths.

However, the reason why it is a Fortran problem is typically you use Fortran on problems where the maths is critical because Fortran gives you lots of control over numbers (both integer and floating-point).

The number handling capabilities of C and C++ are rudimentary in comparison, but that is because these languages (and C specifically) were not intended to be much more than high-level assembly languages. So if you want Fortran like number handling in C you need to build the relevant libraries...

3
0
Roland6
Silver badge
Pint

Re: One small catch...

Well I was wondering what real access to the source code a challenge participant actually got. As given the small reward pot on offer, obviously NASA don't really value the code. So I'd suggest enterprising challenge participants uploading the source code to github or sourceforge...

1
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: @Ian Bush

>Can anyone confirm that the common use of the variable i in loops goes back to Fortran usage?

No, Fortran simply implemented the conventions used by mathematicians, because the Fortran language was largely written by and for mathematicians...

3
0

After years of warnings, mobile network hackers exploit SS7 flaws to drain bank accounts

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Nothing new here!

>They didn't give it out. It was stolen from their computers via malware.

and the role of SS7 in getting the malware on to the computer?

...

1
0

Post Unity 8 Ubuntu shock? Relax, Linux has been here before

Roland6
Silver badge

@AC Hence their decision to take the most mainstream desktop which has a life of its own, for better or worse, and leave the other desktop variations to the community.

From the way you describe it, it would seem that Canonical are going back to their roots, namely, take 'standard' Linux components (ie. OS, applications, utilities etc.) and integrate them into a solid and supported desktop distribution.

0
0

Microsoft plans summer CRM war opener against Salesforce

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Meh.

>If I meet someone in my profession who doesn't have a LinkedIn profile... I think MAYBE this person gets on with real work as opposed to self promotion

You can generally tell those who are into self promotion, their profile is always bang up to date and often includes details of their current project. Plus there are other activity indicators that show (to me) an excessive interest in getting their LinkedIn account out to a wider audience.

0
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017