* Posts by Roland6

4907 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

Shortages, price rises, recession: Tech industry preps for hard Brexit

Roland6
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Re: Ha Ha

>I'm not sure how I'll work it once the planes are grounded but we'll see.

Ryanair is an Irish company, so expect them to continue flights that don't need UK airspace: so that looks like you'll be able to fly Dublin-Cork, but not Dublin-Paris...

Otherwise, there are the ferries...

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Roland6
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>usually ends with dead members of the government

Yes, I do think we should have had a few MP's heads on poles outside Westminster; it would most probably very quickly sobered MP's up and got them to focus.

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Roland6
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Re: And all we can do...

re: ironically, the people who are going to be most effected negatively are the ones who wants BREXIT.

The trouble is that those who want Brexit and are in a position to influence matters just can't agree on what sort of Brexit they actually want. From yesterday evening's news, I got the distinct impression the only area of agreement is an absolute terror of there being the slightest chance of remaining or the transitional arrangements becoming business as usual normal.

When 60+ Brexit supporting Conservative MPs can't agree on Brexit and Rees-Mogg is scared to publish "his" plan because it would be ridiculed (highly likely given the ridicule handed out over his plans for the Irish border conundrum), yet continue to jockey for political points, you know things will end badly...

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300,000 BT pensioners await Court of Appeal pension scheme ruling

Roland6
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Rock and a hard place...

Fundamentally, the problem is that the then government called the new index CPI, rather than change the way RPI was calculated. Subsequent governments have for various reasons not bothered to fix the problems that have arisen.

Given the HoL Equitable Life judgement, I expect the Court of Appeal will tell BT that they can't alter the pension terms. Forcing BT to pay more into the pension fund leaving less money to invest in service improvement eg. FTTP. Naturally, Ofcom et al will complain that BT isn't investing enough into FTTP...

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Roland6
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Re: Barrister BS

>That was only 18 years ago!

The writing was on the wall in the early 1990's, before the events of 1993 which resulted in the House of Lords ruling in 2000 and near total collapse of what then remained of Equitable Life.

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Don't make us pay compensation for employee data breach, Morrisons begs UK court

Roland6
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Re: Morrisons vicariously liable but not at fault

>so yes, my personal mobile goes into a locker before I go onto the trading floor.

Right now understand where you are coming from...

When I started work (pre-mobile phones) making private phone calls whilst at work was a hassle, I'm not sure if we can easily get back to this state of affairs or whether it is desirable.

As an external consultant, since the mid 1990's I have nearly always turned up at client sites with my personal phone and laptop (ie. my tools which are owned by my business) - only leaving them in the bag/car/at home when the client provides 'tools' and specifies non-use of third-party equipment on their premises.

However, for the probably the vast majority of enterprises it is now a well established practise for people to carry around their own personal mobile phone/tablet, which may or may not be connected to the corporate IT (whether on the guest network or in many cases directly on the corporate network!!).

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Roland6
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Re: For those against Morrisons

>...but you can have systems in place which record who access the data and what they accessed and maybe even flag up when one person access large amounts of data.

Yes, however these systems don't stop one person accessing large amounts of data.

Today I was on a client site, the FD was doing the payroll. For whatever reason, they had to take an extract from the DB and populate an Excel spreadsheet, which then got forwarded to the company that ran the payroll.

So in your example system, it would have flagged that FD had accessed the data and even that they had accessed a large amount of data, only issue is their access was 100% legitimate. However, once the data had been extracted it would be out of sight of the data access monitor and thus copied without oversight.

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Roland6
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Re: Morrisons vicariously liable but not at fault

>Why does the employee need a personal device in the workspace?

Remember BYOD?

Also I presume you have (successfully) lobbied your employer to ban employees having personal devices in the workplace and thus you yourself don't carry a personal mobile phone....

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Roland6
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Re: I don't have any sympathy for Morrisons

>Morrisons are fools for pursuing this case

Err no. You do realise that if Morrisons lose, JMW will have opened the door wide for all the other ambulance chasers...

Remember this case isn't about the data breach as such but "compensation for the distress caused". Given Morrisons was awarded £170,000 in compensation, it would seem that a cup of coffee from the Morrisons in-store cafe for every employee is about the right level of compensation...

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Roland6
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>I've worked close to these systems, and even had work machines contaminated with unnecessary personal data - but as I wasn't dodgy nothing bad happened. But it shouldn't have been possible.

It is surprising how many IT people throw their toys out of the pram when you limit their access to systems, many seem to think that it is okay that they can access ALL systems and ALL data because "they ain't doing anything dodgy".

In the new world, I wonder how many IT people realise that having such access now puts them at the top of any list of suspects when an unauthorised data disclosure happens...

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Roland6
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Re: You shouldn't be able to get to there from here.

>There is no reason for a finance computer to ever need access to ... anything apart from a few dedicated, preferably hard-wired, connections.

There speaks someone who has never worked in or observed an accounts/financials department...

You are also assuming the guy was accessing the (compromised) database from a finance department designated PC...

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Roland6
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Re: We are missing one important question...

>If he was just able to post it to Dropbox then yes there might be a case,

You only need a web browser with public internet access to achieve a file upload, so the question is whether it is reasonable to have a web browser installed on a company PC...

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Your pal in IT quits. Her last words: 'Converged infrastructure...' What does it all mean? We think we can explain

Roland6
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Re: The new mainframe?

>Yep, but without all of the high priests preening and primping it into glorious life.

Once you start running Unix, Windows or Linux at datacenter scale, you'll discover they also have their own priesthoods...

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Roland6
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The new mainframe?

"Taking the converged approach to its logical conclusion is Hyper Converged Infrastructure (HCI), where everything is integrated into a single, highly virtualized appliance-like node, and storage is provided by pooling the direct attached resources across a cluster of these nodes. "

Sounds suspiciously like a mainframe being described in current lingo...

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HMRC rapped as Brexit looms and customs IT release slips again

Roland6
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Re: TL;DR

>You mean, like when the UK pushed Australia, New Zealand, Canada and other commonwealth countries out of a free trade block when it entered the EEC?

Pushed?

I thought the UK effectively left the Commonwealth trade block. Now I appreciate that many members of the Commonwealth trade block suffered because of many of the trade flows involved the UK, but that is different to being 'pushed'.

>Euro

I suspect many of the problems with the Euro will be solved by the EU becoming a fully fledged state. However, ignoring the UK, I suspect there are many in the EU27 who would not be happy with this change, so it won't happen anytime soon. Thus the "ever closer union" remains an aspiration that won't be realised on the ground anytime soon...

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Roland6
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Re: no surprise

>Instead the jingoistic racists* just wanted to exit ASAP.

Careful there!

It seems France is coming to the conclusion that a no deal Brexit aka UK exit ASAP on 29-Mar-2019 is actually in it's interest. It only needa a couple of EU members to think similarly and a no-deal Brexit is what it will be.

The (ironic) laugh will be watching the Brexiteers complaining that a no-deal Brexit is the EU 'punishing' the UK.

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Roland6
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Re: Scale of Challenge

>She did, however, end her letter by emphasising that the committee was aware of the scale of the challenge.

Given the nature of their repeated complaints about the progress, HMRC are making, I suspect they don't really appreciate the scale of the challenge. I recommend the PAC take a day trip (or two) and familiarise themselves with the scale of the systems and the changes they are wanting to be effected in such short timecales.

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Send up a satellite to zap space junk if you want Earth's orbit to be clean, say boffins

Roland6
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Re: Consider:

>And yet, after a few years on-orbit, the average set of solar panels look like the good ole' boys have been out with their shotguns and got bored.

Given all the meteor showers, passing comets and their tails, I wonder whether part of the problem is that we assume space to be a clean vacuum and not a rather dirty place with lots of small particles whizzing by on their various trajectories.

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Roland6
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Re: Centrifugal force?

>Having said that, the basic principle of using balanced beams to hold satellite A in place while knocking satellite B out of orbit works

It works better by having the hunter-killer satellite in a slightly higher orbit than the junk as then the beam would be working with gravity to hasten the junk's descent.

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Roland6
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Re: It all seems a bit far fetched, to me

The article suggests the impulse being applied for less than half a minute. Given that the device uses a balancing plasma beam suggests that the designers don't see a need to follow the target over this period of time.

@Doctor Syntax - think about it, both cleaning satellite and junk will be moving at high speed. So for anything more than a very short burst/shot, the cleaning satellite would need to follow the junk, in fact given the aiming problem, it would need to predict the course of the junk and effectively lead the junk down.

Given the size of much of the junk, it might be better to drift net stuff - either having your net run slightly faster than the junk or marginally slower. Obviously, with a carefully chosen orbit the net will automatically take the collected junk down, to be burnt up in the atmosphere.

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NSA dev in the clink for 5.5 years after letting Kaspersky, allegedly Russia slurp US exploits

Roland6
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Re: Nobody else see the elephant in the room?

>Nobody else see the elephant in the room?

Yes wet wear of all ages and abilities can do dumb things.

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Roland6
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GDPR only applies to personal information. So your antivirus doesn't need your permission to automatically upload viruses it finds on your PC to a server to be analysed.

However, as the AV uploads an infected file, there is nothing to say that file doesn't or couldn't contain personal information. I think when I installed the latest edition of Kaspersky it did ask for permission to upload files.

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HP Ink should cough up $1.5m for bricking printers using unofficial cartridges – lawsuit

Roland6
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Re: The 'Trust' Factor: Toxic Patches / Firmware Updates

>most major brand laser drivers are based off the HP laser jet 3 and 4 driver...

I thought with business class lasers, if you didn't want the fancy stuff, they were either PCL3 or PCL5 (HP) or PS (Applewriter) compatible and thus the generic OS drivers were generally good enough.

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Roland6
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Re: When do we get compensation in the UK?

Re: A3 printer with continuous ink supply system:

Epson & Canon, using third-party inks:

https://www.cityinkexpress.co.uk/cheap-printer-bundles

Although their ink systems do support various Brother A4 with "occassional A3" printers. suggest you email.

If you can afford the US shipping costs, take alook at: https://adaptiveink.com

Basically, I would start by searching for CISS and then find resellers who are prepared to sell a printer+CISS bundle and thus prepared to take on the compatibility and support issues.

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Roland6
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Re: On the other hand...

>Had a friend in college who would buy a new printer, whatever was on the best sale, when his ran out of ink.

Bet the local reseller loved this guy! Many printers only come with "get you started" cartridges that are intended to fill the printer with ink and print 10~50 pages.

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Never mind Brexit. UK must fling more £billions at nuke subs, say MPs

Roland6
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Re: "The Astute problems all stem from not building any subs at all for a long time,"

> Why rely on the predictability of an (expensive) solid welding jig

Well with a jig you could set up a production line: 50? 100? 2? what! it will cost more to build the jigs than it would having them coach built.

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Roland6
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Re: Need quick cash? Sell the old subs to CANADA!

So? Just retrofit the old leaky subs with oil-burning diesel engines... We ARE CANADIAN! Hewers of wood

Doesn't quite go, perhaps if we made them wood burning then Canada would have a use for all that wood hewing

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Roland6
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Re: This is going to cause a war

>How many wars could have been avoided if England had no weapons. Sure maybe they would have lost the war to Germany, but maybe Germany wouldn't have had to go to war if England wasn't invading everyone.

Interesting twist on history, pray tell us the untold truth about the English invasions that precipitated WWI and WWII.

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Roland6
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>No, his suggestion was worse.

Agree, particularly if you remember that no one actually could or would confirm or deny whether the nuclear missiles deployed to Greenham Common did or didn't possess nuclear warheads...

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Roland6
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>Who knew introducing university fees would cause a drain on skilled people?

I suggest you take a look at Germany, where University is free, but they also have a problem retaining skilled people...

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Roland6
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Re: Simplistic solution to two problems

>Historically costs have excluded decommissioning and processing waste because if they did private industry wouldn't touch it.

But part that problem was down to politics.Back in the 50's and 60's scientists were seemingly making huge strides, so there was natural expectation that they would also be able to resolve the decommissioning and waste problem, however, this viewpoint failed to take account of politicians and their need to be popular if they are to get re-elected. Thus with the rise of the anti-nuclear movement, they couldn't be seen to invest in nuclear and so nuclear research got under-funded, which has resulted in the current mess.

I think with our society being addicted to energy, cheap'ish and plentiful, we will be making nuclear reactors; alternatively - but we might be doing this in any case, we turn the clock back a few centuries...

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Roland6
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"Even after Brexit, their expectation is that the UK taxpayer will dig into his increasingly empty pockets and pay for EU defence."

<sarcasm>

Don't really why you are taking issue, as we kept being told by the Brexit nutters, the UK willingly and overwhelmingly voted for this state of affairs...

</sarcasm>

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Securing industrial IoT passwords: For Pete's sake, engineers, don't all jump in at once

Roland6
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Re: Stop using passwords

> i.e. the end device would initiate all comms and wouldn't allow any inward connections or remote logins at all. This wouldn't solve all of the problems but would remove some of them.

I think the issue isn't so much with the individual IoT device, but where several IoT devices (or a composite device) are effectively monitoring a single piece of real-world kit. So following the article example, the pump can have multiple sensors, but the pump only gets restarted once all are clear. Interestingly, this doesn't do away with the on-site engineer's physical lock - I wouldn't want to be working on a piece of heavy kit controlled from some remote CCC without having some certainty of a local override/protection from remote stupidity.

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Roland6
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Re: Stop using passwords

The article isn't really about passwords or or certificates as they don't really address the problem discussed in the article.

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In a race to 5G, Trump has stuck a ball-and-chain on America's leg

Roland6
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Lessons (not) learnt...

You would have thought that after the US sub-prime mortgage crisis and the events across the world it precipitated, people would have been more aware of just how interdependent the modern world is. It seems that whilst the 'worlds' media (okay I'm sure there are some countries not watching) focus on the UK leaving the EU, they are missing the bigger story as Trump tries and takes the US out of the World....

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UK.gov isn't ready for no-deal Brexit – and 'secrecy' means businesses won't be either

Roland6
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Re: "The UK however, is already a member of the EEA..."

>It's unclear if UK, which is part of EEA through its EU membership, will still be in EEA when it leaves.

I suggest you read the relevant treaties, it is totally clear they support continued membership; obviously, if the UK pulled this card, we can expect some to want treaties amended... But perhaps that is because I'm coming at things from a UK legal perspective: if it isn't explicitly barred then it is allowed, whereas my understanding of some other systems is that if it isn't explicitly allowed then it is barred...

The issues with the "freedoms" I suggest is more to do with the wants of the Brexit nutters and not necessarily what "Leave" meant; hence why all the discussion about differing flavours of 'Brexit'.

> is UK ready to accept it? I doubt.

I suspect this consideration applies to any Brexit deal, even the ones that Mogg et al desire. the problem is that the current generation of Conservative MPs have shown themselves to be weak and vacuous, so would you accept any 'deal' they had negotiated at face value?

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Roland6
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Re: "but on what mess they will be passing on to their grandchildren."

The hereditary system never worked well to create wealth for the largest percentage of citizens possible.

That is the challenge with all systems of representation, how to align the representative's personal interests with the interests of the country as a whole.

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Roland6
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Re: Here's my plan...

@codejunky - it is one of the reasons why I am not totally opposed to having hereditary peers (with children/grandchildren) in the HoL; their minds aren't totally on the next election and clinging on to office, but on what mess they will be passing on to their grandchildren.

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Roland6
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Re: Scenario: in April next year, Joe Public wants to

If the hassle around VAT, duties, customs red tape etc. is too onerous post Brexit they could decide it's not worth the hassle to sell to UK consumers.

See this already on many US web-retailers who only ship to US destinations, the first thing I now do when on these websites and wish to purchase is to look at the shipping options. These or the need to use a third-party accommodation address agency often wipe out any headline price advantage.

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Roland6
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Re: Hmm

>then nothing would have happened, because the Remain would have been the biggest response.

Not quite! :)

By voting Remain, the UK would have had a seat at the table at the next round of EU negotiations, due to start in 2019, meaning the UK could influence the direction of travel. Assuming all the major UK political parties kept their promises, they would have to hold a referendum on whatever treaty was negotiated...

Fundamentally, the UK referendum was held too early and poorly worded/considered.

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Roland6
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Re: "leave meant leave the EU but remain in the EEA"

@LDS - "Also, AFAIK joining the EEA is not automatic at all"

The UK however, is already a member of the EEA... The membership rules (n the relevant treaties) say lots about applying for membership, but zero about the criteria for continued membership...

But you are on the right track, as Brexit developed, the nutters went from simply leaving the EU, to demanding that the EU had zero influence over UK affairs - deluding themselves into believing that the post-leave EU-UK relationship will have none of the attributes of the relationships between China and its neighbours...

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Roland6
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Re: Here's my plan...

re: Here's my plan...

1. Don't sign any international agreement with arbitrary rules that are intended to make withdrawal difficult or impossible.

...

Perhaps this can be simplified to when asked to write the rules, stop and think, at some future date you may wish to avail yourself of the opportunities those rules grant you...

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Now here's an idea: Break up Amazon to get more shareholder cash

Roland6
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Re: question

>At what cost does AWS provide services to the retail business?

I suspect, given the current organisational setup and oversight by tax authorities, the Retail Ltd does pay the AWS Ltd a market rate for services supplied. However, as both have the same parent shareholder there is a conduit for monies to legitimately move in the other direction.

I suspect that part of the incentive for 'investors' to call for a breakup is where Amazon as a business is now. It has grown big in a market known for slim margins and is now successfully entering new markets which traditionally have better margins. Thus I suspect that what is wanted is to break the internal money loop so that AWS profits for example, get publicly declared and investors getting their dip before monies get moved to subsidise less profitable parts of the business or get invested in new business opportunities...

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Roland6
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Re: Controversial?

>There may be some financial advantages in keeping the warehousing and distribution parts with the digital side but it's difficult to see business advantages.

Having spent my early years working in conglomerates, there are significant business advantages, just that they are not trendy, because they are more about business costs and the long-term competitive pricing of products than the short-term enrichment of investors.

Given the size of Amazon's holding company, it perhaps better to consider it to be more of an investment house, where it only invests in and manages its own portfolio of companies. Taking this tack, it is obvious that many investment houses and their managed investment portfolios should also be broken up as they would deliver greater monies to the investors, but then we invest in managed funds to smooth the ups and downs... The last directors of GEC (UK) plc discovered this the hard way, laying waste to a blue chip company in few short years, as they blindly followed fashion...

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Microsoft pulls plug on IPv6-only Wi-Fi network over borked VPN fears

Roland6
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Re: "IPv4-only hosts are unreachable without either a dual stack or an address translator"

>I really would like an explanation for that. It seems to me (not a network guy) that all you had to do was tack on a specific IP to all 32-bit addresses and that would make them 64-bit by default.

Back in the early 1990's this was one of the migration scenarios being suggested, namely it had the potential to get IPv4 clients out there that supported 64-bit addresses.

The issues start to arise when you get a little further down the road and want to implement other protocol updates and/or permit the usage of addresses outside of the IPv4 walled garden. One little issue is protocol dependent applications such as VPN clients; it doesn't matter what you do with respect to address fudging, these applications still have to be aware of the fudges...

Whilst I do complain that the IETF/IPv6 working group didn't pay sufficient attention to interworking and migration, I do understand and accept the rationale for the dual stack solution, which is something that was quite common back in the 180's and early 1990's as host systems connected to other hosts over a variety of protocol stacks, however, more was needed and still needs to be done to make real the lighting up of the IPv6 stack and get the wholesale migration off IPv4 rolling.

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Roland6
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Re: It’s not going to happen

>That shouldn't be news to anyone.

Whilst I agree that MS (and others) should be applauded for attempting to trialing IPv6 only networks, to see what breaks and then telling everyone about it, I dsagree about this not being (tech) news.

I remember back in the late 80's and early 90's, government ITT's all included requirements around a vendors commitment to Open Systems and OSI. Naturally, we all responded positively about our commitment etc. however, not once was I cross-examined on just what this meant in practice. I suggest what we are seeing here is a company trying to put things into practice and discovering environmental gotchas...

I therefore suggest the lesson here is that if you are using a VPN solution, the time has now come when you need to get vendors to demonstrate their currently shipping products capabilities to support dynamic usage of IPv4, dual stack and pure play IPv6 (yes my dual stack client should be able to use a VPN product over whichever protocol stack is available to it, which will almost certainly vary between hotspots (eg. Office, Underground, Station Cafe, Train, .Home). I suspect that, prior to this news story, no one was actually testing the real-world IPv6 capabilities of VPN products...

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UK.gov finally adds Galileo and Copernicus to the Brexit divorce bill

Roland6
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Re: To anyone pro-Brexit

>Point to just one negotiation where the U.K. interest was served. You can’t. I worked on the Galileo programme myself.

It would seem you have answered your own question, by getting involved in Galileo, some of the work was contracted out to UK-based businesses and UK residents got jobs. If the UK had not been involved then all the work would have been contracted among the EU27 with near zero spin-off for the UK.

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Roland6
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>Can you see any MP who voted against the motion to leave the EU surviving the next election if his constituency voted to leave?

Yes! :)

Remember the last GE...

However, I suspect if the MP was a member of the Conservative party and the nutters in that party hold sway, I suspect they will be deselected...

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Roland6
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Re: TL;DR

>We're fucked.

I assume you are referring to Joe Public and those intending to remain in the country post-Brexit, as it is clear the subtext to the government position: "the government warns that now would be a good time to consider the impact" is that businesses that benefit from EU contracts and monies should relocate to an EU27 member state PDQ...

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Veeam holds its hands up, admits database leak was plain 'complacency'

Roland6
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>that's a bit of a fib since anyone can access shodan

and the search terms and criteria needed to return a results set with this specific database either on the first page or in the first couple of results pages?

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