* Posts by Roland6

3925 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

Windows Fall Creators Update is here: What do you want first – bad news or good news?

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Windows 7 ... missing features

>But Windows 7 doesn't have many of the advanced security and mitigation features of Windows 10 and never will have.

Just install EMET and a decent third-party firewall/security suite, remember with Win10 MS have, in the main, simply integrated EMET - hence why EMET is no longer supported on Win10 and the Fall update will uninstall it if found...

As for new features, I'll skip on the not-ready-for-primetime VR stuff and all the rest.

A typical business desktop/laptop is running Windows and Office: what new features in Win10 (and specifically the Fail update) improve the operation of Office?

1
1
Roland6
Silver badge

Device support any better than build 1703?

MS finally delivered the 1703 update for my canary Win10 tablet in September, until then it had been on 1605 since March 2017.

I wonder if it will receive this update (1709) before Christmas or it will be receiving it in March again...

2
0

Qualcomm takes 5G to spooky millimetre land

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Attenuation sometimes a good thing

>Downside - we're back to holding the phone up in the air to get a signal.

I knew we would find a real use for Selfie sticks and bluetooth connected headsets.

0
0

uBlock Origin ad-blocker knocked for blocking hack attack squawking

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: No thanks...

CSP reports don't fix busted webpages...

I thought their intent was to flag to webmasters that their site contains broken/compromised pages, so enabling them to do their job.

Obviously, the implementation of this useful service may have resulted in the original intent being forgotten or simply written out of the specification...

0
1

Google isn't saying Microsoft security sucks but Chrome for Windows has its own antivirus

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: 450MB/sec, 1GB/sec?

@big_D The way I read it, it doesn't scan Windows per se, it is just scanning the Chrome environment and removing dodgy plug-ins.

Given one of the main infection vectors is the browser either visiting malicious websites or accidentally downloading compromised scripts, I would assume that Google with Chrome are doing similar to what Yandex are doing with the Agnitum security suite, namely improving the security within the browser by incorporating features that, currently are provided by freestanding third-party security suite/products such as Kaspersky and MalwareBytes Anti Exploit, or browser plug-ins/extensions such as NoScript, uMatrix.

What is different (currently) is that Yandex took out Agnitum totally, so they now only produce the security extensions for Yandex products - so bye bye Outpost Firewall and Security Suite. Whereas Google have jus ensured that ESET's browser security technologies are tightly integrated into Chrome.

1
0

Future of Misco UK hangs in the balance – sources

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Advice to staff

"Having been through a corporate insolvency, I have some advice for Misco employees: Get out as fast as you can."

Given how long things have been going on, you've probably left it too late to not be adversely impacted.

I would anticipate the company has in at least the current financial year and if not the previous year:

1. Not paid NI contributions to HMRC (but will have deducted them from your pay).

2. Not paid contributions into your pension scheme.

The absence of NI payments will directly impact your entitlement to state benefits - such as Statutory redundancy pay - and will also mean the months when you thought you were paying NI but weren't, do not count towards your state pension entitlement.

The missing payments into your pension scheme, will have a varying impact:

1. If it is a defined benefits scheme, well the scheme will be even more underfunded than it probably already is - there is a government-backed scheme that may help to cover this shortfall.

2. If it is defined contribution scheme, you've lost a few months contributions.

3. If you have payroll deducted FSAVCs then you've probably also lost these contributions.

By joining the queue of creditors you might be able to recover some of these monies down-the-road, but given the odds against recovery, I would treat any monies recovered as a lottery prize.

Word to those not about to be made redundant: Do your FSAVCs as direct debits from your bank account as that way you know if they have or have not been paid and whether tax rebates from HMRC have or have not happened.

As for PAYE, just as long as you have your payslips showing tax has been deducted, HMRC will not ask you for the unpaid tax...

6
1

Remember how you said it was cool if your mobe network sold your name, number and location?

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Bring on GDPR - Vive l'Europe

>Unfortunately I can't image that those across the big pond are ever going to come close to establishing honest GDPR laws.

Unfortunately, I can't see the current crowd at Westminster implementing honest GDPR laws either.

Yet, you can be sure they will want to be 'in' the European data market, in a deep and meaningful way, but not held to the rules...

4
1

It's 2017... And Windows PCs can be pwned via DNS, webpages, Office docs, fonts – and some TPM keys are fscked too

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: " I'm pretty certain that x64 has executable and non-executable page flags.."

One issue is compiler have the bad habit to mix instructions and some static data (and sometimes even non-static)

Don't remember having that problem with PL/M, but then PL/M did require the programmer to have some knowledge of segmentation, thus it was the programmer's decision to mix instructions, static data and dynamic data.

I suspect the compiler problem is down to people wanting to use high-level languages and hence their compilers to solve everything, rather than accept that there are times where assembler (and hence some understanding of machine/platform architecture) is the right choice.

2
0
Roland6
Silver badge

>Windows update ... increase our productivity.

Perhaps MS have quietly gone into reverse, with all the claims that people are spending too much glued to their computers, MS, through the Windows Update service, are providing opportunities for people to take breaks and do other stuff...

8
0

Outlook, Office 2007 slowly taken behind the shed, shots heard

Roland6
Silver badge

when in fact they are merely visual distraction from the true power of the keyboard shortcut.

So, given the lack of documentation etc.etc. please explain how firstly you found out about Ctrl-Shift-F and other keyboard shortcuts and then committed them to muscle memory?

This fundamentally is the reason why the Win8 and more recent Windows UI's suck, it is almost as if MS read Donald Norman's book: 'The Design of Everyday Things' (first released as 'The Psychology of Everyday Things') and deliberately decided to reject well-founded design principles.

The Ribbon, was intended to replace keyboard shortcuts, with my children it has been easier for them to get started and produce stuff, by visually exploring the ribbon and clicking on the image of the effect they are desiring, my daughter is starting to get more fluent, but is hindered by the lack of an obvious proficient/expert user option ie. keyboard shortcut.

Interestingly, both iOS and Android also suffer from some of the same brain dead 'designer' thinking, where users have to learn (from other sources or trial and error) to swipe starting from particular parts of the screen in particular directions to achieve certain actions.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: No more security fixes from Microsoft

I see in today's (10-Oct-17) update bundle a couple of security updates for Office 2007.

2
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Quite rightly

Personally I'm still crying over the death of Office 2003. ... My productivity rate at the weekends using that is streets ahead of in the week using....

The trouble I have is that whilst I prefer the menu UI of 2003, the 2007 versions of Excel, Outlook, Visio and Project contain some notable functional improvements...

2
0

Leaky-by-design location services show outsourced security won't ever work

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: These billion dollar surveillance phones and app companies....

>... are the retail arm of the NSA.

It is interesting to reread the thoughts of Edward Snowden on security:

https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/3/2015/11/12/snowden_guide_to_practical_privacy/

Either Ed, wasn't privy to all that the NSA were up to or they (the NSA) weren't into the collection of this type of metadata.

I get the feeling that we will see more of these accidential/unintentional leaks of metadata that permit inference about a person and their activities that they didn't intend to make public.

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Where you see conspiracy, I see a lack of demand for it.

>Ubuntu Phone

Was this ever offered for sale?

I remember seeing various incarnations demonstrated by Canonical either in-person or reviews by various tech publications, but I don't remember ever seeing an announcement that the phone was available to buy...

0
0

Boffins' bonkers fibre demo: 53 Tbps down ONE piece of glass

Roland6
Silver badge

Headline factually incorrect!

Sorry but "multi-core fibres" is not "ONE piece of glass"

The only real question is whether the technology will scale and so support the distances seen in undersea cables.

3
0

Microsoft silently fixes security holes in Windows 10 – dumps Win 7, 8 out in the cold

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: You think that's bad?

>If you guessed XP then you win a cookie.

Interestingly, MS are still issuing security updates for Office 2007 on XP. For obvious reasons, I don't expect this to continue beyond 10-Oct-2017 (today is the 7-Oct-2017), so I expect the set I downloaded last week were the last...

Reminds me to download WSUS Offline Update v11.0.2 - the last version to support Office 2007 and create a full update set.

4
0

It's 4PM on Friday, almost time to log off and, oh look, Disqus says it's been hacked

Roland6
Silver badge

Announcement not particularly clear

Users who created logins on Disqus had salted SHA1 hashes of passwords whilst users who logged in via social providers only had references to those accounts.

I received Troy's email, what bothered me about the notification is that whilst the information may be technically accurate and correct, what does the above statement mean to your average user?

1
0

Leicestershire teen admits attempting to hack director of the CIA

Roland6
Silver badge

followed by the obligatory handwringing by UK (Conservative) government saying there is nothing they can do as it is all in the UK-US extradition treaty and we must honour our treaty obligations, whilst at the same time happily renege on all the treaties the UK government signed with the EEC/EU...

2
0

He's no good for you! Ofcom wants to give folk powers to dump subpar broadband contracts

Roland6
Silver badge

Nothing will change!

When I switched to EE fibre broadband a year or so back, a line test/check was done and the result said that I would get a maximum of circa 35Mps on the 38Mbps service and circa 46Mbps on the 76Mbps service. I decided on the 35Mbps service which came with a minimum guaranteed download speed of circa 14Mbps.. As yet I've not seen line speed drop below 30Mbps, although I regularly experience slow internet access.

If however, I had contracted with Zen, they would have given me a 'normal' speed of 35Mbps with an SLA that if the speed dropped below 32Mbps. I would be able to report a fault and get an engineer to investigate.

I therefore, have to question whether this latest idea from Ofcom will actually change anything, as surely the majors will simply quote a low guaranteed minimum speed.

0
0

European Commission refers Ireland to court over failure to collect €13bn in tax from Apple

Roland6
Silver badge
Happy

"Apple complied with all Irish laws."

EU law trumps Irish law.

EU law is incorporated into Irish Law - something the Irish government voluntarily undertakes as part of honouring its membership; so Apple aren't being entirely truthful...

3
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: @AC - "state aid" for Apple

"So the deal was signed before Apple became the super rich organization it is today"

I don't call a successful business with profits measured in $billions in 2000~2007 'poor'. Remember Apple was a successful company, albeit one selling alot of iPods.

Also Ireland joined the EEC in 1973 and thus has been involved in the EU since the beginning. Hence there is no excuse that Ireland didn't know the rules about state aid...

4
0
Roland6
Silver badge

>The sums involved are not like someone collecting the council tax. You can't just put €13bn in a bank account.

Don't know, depends on how large you are. I'm sure to HMRC who handle circa £740Bn of revenue a year would happily accept a cheque for the full amount (plus interest), but would probably prefer a BACS transfer. But I doubt they would accept cash given the £1M and £100M notes aren't in circulation outside of the Bank of England.

4
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Apple was never found responsible for "tax evasion"

For that to happen Apple would need to be taken to court...

If my understanding is correct, that is something (currently) only the Irish Revenue can do, the EU doesn't have jurisdiction.

However, the EU can use the avenues open to it to discipline members who don't abide by the rules of membership. Hence why the EU is interacting with Ireland over it's non-compliance with EU state aid rules.

Other than demanding that Ireland takes steps to recover the illegal state aid, namely give Apple a revised tax bill and adjusting Ireland's contribution to the EU to include the additional revenues, I'm not sure what else it can do.

What is clear, Apple aren't as innocent as they would wish us to believe. They negotiated the sweetheart deal and those involved would have known that the deal was suspect - because if publicly available taxation documents did support the deal then there would have been no need to negotiate a bespoke deal!

4
1
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: "The Register has asked Apple for a comment. ®"

>Here's the proof...

Only problem, the only source of proof a UK resident totally against the EU will accept is the Daily Mail, The Sun or the Telegraph, but even then they probably would still put more faith in what Nigel, Boris etc said about the EU...

5
8

Russian spies used Kaspersky AV to hack NSA staffer, swipe exploit code – new claim

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: The tag line

>No, I am not going to translate either, they are not translatable as each will take half a page to explain

Not one to turn down a challenge...

Google search and translate are your friends - other search engines and translation services are available. There is a rich seam of resources written by people passionate about making the Russian language more understandable and accessible to native English speakers.

From my research, I would say they are all translatable and more easily translatable than many Japanese sayings, however you are right they all need an explanation of what the literal translation means because they are local sayings or proverbs, and thus are best understood by being translated into your locally equivalent saying/proverb.

4
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: The Russians ate my homework

>The US spooks were probably testing their exploits against various AV as they have to in order to use them in the wild

You've picked up a rather important point. I discover an exploit - how do I determine if it really is an undiscovered and thus viable zero day exploit?

There is only one way, to try the exploit on other computers running various security suites. In the (recent) past, such suites used a local DB, hence if my exploit isn't blocked and/or detected then I'm potentially good to go and I've not accidentially alerted anyone to my finding and work. I may rerun the tests at regular intervals, just to confirm the exploit is still 'undiscovered'.

Today however, with online security suites, the first thing a local AV will do is to obtain a hash of my expliot file and upload it, on discovering that it is new, the next action will be to upload the complete executable for deeper inspection.

Thus it would not surprise me, if it was discovered that various cloud services already contain hashes and perhaps archived example executables of "top secret" NSA exploits; just that there has been nothing to cause them to be flagged.

However, by combining metadata from the security upload, specifically IP address and system id, with metadata from other sources, I suspect it would be possible to identify through the known exploits many as yet unknown exploits and thus raise the flag on these currently hidden trojans...

I would assume that NSA would have thought of the above and more and hence it has influenced the final rationale for banning Kaspersky from government systems. Interestingly, it also means the US government can't use any security software who's cloud service is outside of the US and thus accessible to foreign agencies...

7
0
Roland6
Silver badge

And all the methods fall down in this case, as the issue as people had noted isn't necessarily a 'trojan' in the source code, but the use of a system to detect particular files and upload them.

I suspect many Cloud AV products can be commanded on seeing a particular file signature to upload the associated file and suspect that this legitimate operation can be misused by a piece of shell script in the AV Cloud to request the client to upload all files:

While Client finds files to hash Do

Client to Cloud: Here's a file hash

Cloud to Client: Please upload file for deeper inspection

Enddo

8
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Possible ???

Well given all the location tracking, I wouldn't be surprised if some companies have very good idea of who works and live where... Bring back the Nokia 6310i !

6
0

Ex-Harrods IT man cleared of stealing company issued laptop

Roland6
Silver badge

>AD will let you see where a user is logged in...

After I posted I remembered one company where the laptop had to be periodically connected to the corporate domain (not sure if it was tied to password expiry or not). Obviously if this happened when working offsite, it meant connecting the laptop to a network (LAN or modem), establishing a VPN and allowing AD to do it's stuff. However, for this to happen you had to be in possession of your company issued security access pin generator... I think also I had to visit an office 1~2 times a year and connect the laptop to the wired LAN and reboot, so that various other AD controlled stuff got updated.

I assume therefore that at some time someone in Harrods IT knew a thing or two about security to set this up and to implement HDD encryption (and BIOS password). Obviously, once such an offline system has decided a user password has expired and the user no longer has access to the corporate network and AD, it is effectively a brick - unless the user performs a motherboard jumper reset, HDD reformat etc.

Otherwise, I suspect the guy simply got the password wrong too many times and Windows barred access. Requiring the laptop to be taken to IT who would use their AD/admin access permissions to re-enable the account...

Either way, it would be interesting to know, just what security measures were in place to brick the laptop.

1
0
Roland6
Silver badge

> I've never had a system which was rendered a complete brick by being offline

This was the bit that got me to.

I suppose Harrods could be using advanced security and the laptop has a built in GSM security device, so as part of his departure, IT denies systems access which automatically sends an SMS to all devices on the system registered to him...

0
0

Foiled again! Brit military minds splash cash on killing satellites with... food wrapping?

Roland6
Silver badge

>Aluminium, titanium, copper, zinc, tin, brass, gold, silver, lead... there's a lot of stuff up there.

Shame to have it burn up in the atmosphere, perhaps someone should suggest using black bin bags and setting up a fortnightly bin collection...

13
0

Hollywood has savaged enough sci-fi classics – let's hope Dick would dig Blade Runner 2049

Roland6
Silver badge

Never got Bladerunner either, for which I apologise and will keep rewatcing.

Of the eight versions, I'd recommend Ridley Scott's Final Cut (2007)...

1
0

Microsoft shows off Windows 10 Second Li, er, Mixed Reality

Roland6
Silver badge

MS really have lost their way

"We just don't believe, right now, the state of the art in VR is such that it is an enjoyable experience,"

So why MS are you putting such immature technology into the next Windows release and showcasing it as the reason why people should use this release?

What is the value of Windows Mixed Reality to your typical Windows Home/Office user, who will using a traditional laptop/desktop with a non-touch screen, keyboard and mouse?

Given the state-of-the-art, VR and Windows Mixed Reality should be an optional feature pack.

Also given its been 5 years since MS introduced the Win8 UI/UX mashup to the world, why hasn't this been fixed? Doing stuff like this ie. support for VR/Mixed taking precendence over sorting out the UI/UX crap, just confirms that MS really have lost their way.

3
1

BBC Telly Tax petition given new Parliament debate date

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: If you have issues with the Telly Tax...

If people spent £250 a week on a weekly shop at Waitrose, would you similarly see nothing wrong with demanding that they also give £100 a week to Sainsbury even though they never enter the place?

Well if Waitrose stocked all of Sainbury's lines as well as their own, for which I only paid a handling charge within my £250 weekly bill in the expectation that I was also giving £100 a week to Sainsbury's then I wouldn't see anything wrong.

Remember Sky doesn't pay the BBC, it is required to carry and distribute (ie. 'handle') the BBC (and the other Freeview?) channels on it's infrastructure to all of it's UK subscribers...

2
5
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: high % women?

I don't find a large proportion of those prosecuted for TV license violation being female at all surprising.

However, for some that doesn't mean TPTB shouldn't be doing something about it...

Caroline Levesque-Bartlett, an anti-Telly Tax campaigner, told The Register at the time of our investigation: “The David Perry Review brought this gender imbalance to light to Parliament in July 2015, and nothing has changed since.”

...

"Sorry madam you can't have a TV licence in your name, we've filled our quota of women holders, is there a man in the house who could hold the licence for you?..."

"Madam you don't have a TV licence, because I've already caught 14 women this week, I can only catch men for the rest of this week; I'll visit you next week"

4
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Taxes are paid, a small amount by all, to pay the large amounts for the few. That's how they work.

This is the real problem with the TV licence, it is perhaps the only form of taxation where currently all monies are collected independently of HMRC and are reinvested in TV services and specifically the BBC.

However, given the TV Licence is fundamentally a tax and government is in need of ways to increase revenue without increasing taxation. The question has to be whether the government really will abolish the TV Licence and allow the BBC to become funded by other means, or whether they will allow the BBC to be funded by other means, but retain the TV Licence revenues and bring the collection process in-house...

1
1
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: If you have issues with the Telly Tax...

Here's the thing though - with something like Sky you can record future episodes and watch them, at your leisure, skipping the adverts.

I can series link so they all download in future.

...

and once I've recorded something to my box, I can actually (should I so desire) keep it ad infinitum.

Wow! You pay Sky £25+ pcm just for that - Humax Freeview PVR's have been able to do that since circa 2003...

8
0

Tarmac for America's self-driving car future is being laid right now

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Decision matrix sorted?

Easy, hit the other vehicle head on. The chances of a serious injury or death occuring are *lower* than if you hit the child.

Reflecting on the scenario, I see we are all missing the key piece of information: "self-driving car".

The big selling point of self-driving cars is that they will have fewer accidents etc. etc. ie. safety, safety, safety. Thus I expect manufacturers/operators, particularly the new entrants eg. Uber, Google etc. to argue (successfully) that self-driving cars don't need all the safety features of our current cars, such as airbags, seat belts, head restraints, which only add weight and cost...

Thus rerunning the scenario, the self-driving car will, having determined there is no zero fatality course of action, accelerate towards the child to improve odds of a fatality and thus lower insurance payout since that course of action will potentially only result in one fatality...

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Decision matrix sorted?

Well if you have enough time to spot the car coming towards you has four people you haven't been paying attention to the road conditions right in front of you...

From experience, you stamp on the brakes and use the ABS to avoid the child and either aim for a straight head-on with the oncoming car (and hope the other driver is also stamping on their brakes and doesn't try to avoid you) or go through the hedge - the crumple zones, air bags etc. give you and the other occupants the greatest chance of survival - which you stand better than 50/50 chance of doing if the combined impact speed is less than 40mph; hit the child at any speed greater than 20mph - they are dead.

The other scenario is to have a muntjac deer run out from undergrowth in front of you: thinking/reaction time at 40mph means the deer is sub 5 metres in front of you by the time you hit the brakes ie. odds are you are going to hit it - what do you do?

NB. Whilst an elk or other large animal will go over the bonnet, the muntjac, being the size of a large dog will tend to go under the vehicle...

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: saving lives, expanding mobility and reducing congestion

Congestion - a factor in congestion is often poor driver behaviour, so there really is some potential there.

Did you see the live traffic and congestion in Florida in the days before hurricane Irma?

Do you watch the UK live traffic reports for the morning and evening rush hours?

Whilst some drivers could move their journey to another time, I suspect the numbers - particularly during school term time, would be insufficient to make a noticeable effect.

Also any benefits arising will be lost on additional vehicles/journeys arising from your second point "expanding mobility". In fact if the pixie land dreams of the self-driving advocates are to be realised, there will be significantly more vehicles on the roads and hence the congestion we experience today will be nothing like the congestion arising from self-driving cars.

4
1

Ofcom head Sharon White slams 5G hold-up in spectrum auction

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Sharon White...where is the fibre backhaul for 5G?

... are you suggesting the Openreach should flood - wire the UK with fibre on the basis that what might be a small percentage of it gets rented by 5G providers?

That might be the best technical solution, but it is not one that recognises financial realities.

No, however, unless BT do get on with it and flood wire there will be no dormant "dark fibre" fibre to satisfy Sharon's other dream:

"And we see opportunities for “dark fibre”, BT’s dormant cabling that can be used by competitors."

3
0

Internet-wide security update put on hold over fears 60 million people would be kicked offline

Roland6
Silver badge
Pint

Re: The problem?

>And note some of those blacked out could be entire regions or countries.

Like the USA? Go for it?

3
1
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: To be fair to ipv6

>Please elaborate on what's wrong with ipv6.

Well...

Seriously though this issue is just another reason to establish Internet2, leaving Internet (IPv4 and all its politics etc.) behind.

2
0

Nested virtualization comes to Google's cloud

Roland6
Silver badge

Development?

Surely one of the reasons for supporting nested virtualization is to permit replication of a developer's desktop?

This approach should help solve a problem of maintaining dev/test/trial versions of multi-server enterprise systems: I build an image containing all the various servers and now I only need to start a single cloud VM to bring up that prebuilt configuration.

0
0

My name is Bill Gates and I am an Android user

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Ballmer managed one thing..

I miss the Ballmer era, under which we got Windows 7 with its original individually-avoidable updates that were actually tested by professionals prior to release.

Win7 was largely Bill Gates legacy, if Ballmer contributed anything, it was with the consent of Bill.

Win8 etc was Ballmer's. Ballmer was the one who decided it was more important to ape Apple and become consumer-oriented rather than to merely follow Apple but deliver products, enterprise customers could use...

Suspect Win10 is Satya's initial attempt to rein the mistakes of Ballmer's era in, however Satya was too timid - personally I would have burnt Win8 etc. and reverted to the archived Win7 source code (re-implementing the functional updates but not the UI/UX and privacy invading cruft). This wouldn't have caused a problem, except for those who are dedicated to being on the bleeding edge - the vast majority of MS's business customers back then were still on XP or Win7 and had little intention of migrating beyond 7 before 2020...

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Thriller

>Then Sadnad ... has absolutely no idea what to do with Windows on mobiles.

But MS had lost their way on mobile years previously; specifically when they took the decision to subsume Mobile development into Desktop development.

Given products like the XDA Pocket PC launched in 2003, it makes you wonder if the Windows Mobile developers had been given greater freedom (eg. not constrained to adhering to the Windows Desktop paradigm), whether the iPhone and iOS launch in 2007 would have been so revolutionary.

5
0

Firemen fund sues Uber for dousing shares with gas, tossing in a match

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: And who is the brilliant investment manager ...

>So in whose fevered mind does this merit a $70bn valuation

There are a series of readable articles here: http://aswathdamodaran.blogspot.co.uk/search?q=Uber

that discuss the valuation of Uber.

>why would a pension fund invest in a company that has never made a profit

Depends on the size of the fund and the size of the investment...

I can see a fund having a relatively small - say 1~2% of the fund in very high-risk investments, which may include seed funding in startups, however I would not expect all of that high-risk investment to be in a single company. Hence why I'm interested to know just how much they did invest.

0
0

UK third worst in Europe for fibre-to-the-premises – report

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Help

>I am not convinced FTTP is a useful metric

It's not!

However, it is about the only metric in the report that castes the UK situation in a bad light!

Looking around on the web, it would seem that some such as uSwitch, ISPreview & El reg have chosen to run with this spin on the EU report because it supports a bash BT/Openreach agenda.

The report, notes that the UK is still deploying FTTC, but fails to connect this with the fact that that is what the BDUK project was largely intended to deliver and that project will continue for a few more years yet. Hence why the main Openreach effort is in deploying FTTC and not FTTP...

1
0
Roland6
Silver badge

>The UK needs fast fibre to copy over the corporate data centre over to the new premises in France.

Don't need to involve Openreach - I'm sure Eurotunnel will happily provide duct space...

0
0
Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Help

Links:

IHS Markit press release:

https://technology.ihs.com/595739/growth-in-european-high-speed-broadband-availability-and-4g-lte-coverage-progress-confirmed-by-ihs-markit-and-european-commission-study

EU Report:

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/news/study-broadband-coverage-europe-2016

Whilst I've not read the report yet, although it isn't a peer reviewed scientific paper, as it is an official EU report, I would hope its data gathering and conclusions are reasonably rigorous.

0
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017