* Posts by Roland6

3722 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

Bad data and new IT system bugs help knock 66% off Provident Financial share price

Roland6
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Re: Nondeterministic polynomial time algorithms? In Bradford?

Was this an on premises system or a cloud system?

I'm sure the cloud vendors will tell you that elastic cloud where you only pay for what you use, is the ideal platform for NP-Hard problems...

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German court reveals reason for Europe-wide patent system freeze

Roland6
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Re: So, in other words..

@Big John - re: Voters...

I suggest as time goes by, it is becoming clear that those who actually want to go through with Brexit - at any cost, are only a vocal minority of those who voted leave...

However, it would seem that the government's biggest problem, having committed to "honour the referendum result" and delivering 'Brexit', is defining a strategy that will enable them to stand up and say the UK has left the EU, whilst retaining all the advantages of membership...

Given the content of the positional papers and such things as the UPC bill, it would not surprise me if the UK effectively renews it's membership immediately following the Brexit declaration, so business and life can continue as normal... Thus my rationale for saying Brexit is nonsense...

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Roland6
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Re: So, in other words..

@Mark 110

What exactly is wrong with getting together to deal with patents. Theres economies of sale.

Nothing!

I'm all for it, along with remaining in the EEA, Customs Union, Eurotom and the EU, in part because of the economies of scale!

Can we cancel this Brexit nonsense please - it doesn't add up.

It would be nice! Unfortunately T.May et al are giving the impression they are fully committed to Brexit...

But I fully agree with you, Brexit is nonsense. Clearly some in government realise this and hence why they are attempting to get Parliament to ratify something that is at odds with the government's publicly stated direction of travel... What is going to be the icing on the cake is when one or other Brexit monkey stands up and supports the ratification of the UPC. Which brings us back to the discussion point "sanity, in politics" :)

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Roland6
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Re: So, in other words.. @AC

What is being ratified is the EU Unified Patent Court, which for the UK to agree to be subject to, requires the transfer of some 'sovereignty' to the EU.

The laugh is that Brexit is all about the taking back of 'sovereignty' from Brussels by the very same organisation (ie. Westminster politicians) that gave 'sovereignty' away to Brussels...

Secondly, all three major Westminster political parties gave assurances that no further 'sovereignty' would be given away without a referendum..

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Roland6
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Re: So, in other words..

"sanity, in politics" WTF?!!

"it was necessary for there to be a specific vote in the German Parliament (Bundestag) to approve the divestment of sovereign powers."

So obviously the UK couldn't possibly ratify it, since firstly we're leaving and secondly, it would involve the further transfer of 'sovereignty', agreed? well no T.May and here Brexit monkeys fully intend to ratify the UPC ! :O

"The UK is pressing on with legislation that is required for the ratification of the UPC Agreement by the UK; secondary legislation in the form of an Order on Privileges and Immunities for the Unified Patent Court were laid in Parliament under the International Organisations Act 1968 today (26 June 2017).

Separate legislation will be laid in the Scottish Parliament in due course. This is the final legislative step in the UK’s ratification procedure and once it has been passed the UK will be able to formally ratify the UPC Agreement."

[ http://www.hgf.com/updates/news/2017/06/uk-presses-on-with-ratification-of-the-upc-agreement/ ]

It does look like business as usual at Westminster; the politicians haven't learnt from the rap on the knuckles they received in the In/Out referendum...

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IT reseller Misco UK shutters warehouse and distie centre

Roland6
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Re: Model error.

When you just want THAT... that product THERE... they are invaluable. Especially if you want it quick.

Disagree, I've often turned away from Amazon (eBay and Dell) at the point I actually order something, only to discover the particular variant I want isn't available on prime/next day delivery as it will be directly shipped from China...

Irritatingly, several UK high street retailers have broken the connection between their store and web stock systems. Hence when ordering online you can no longer confirm an item is in stock at a convenient store before you press click-and-collect, thereby greatly reducing the value of the click-and-collect service...

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Disbanding your security team may not be an entirely dumb idea

Roland6
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Re: Got to Gartner...

I didn't giggle, but was a bit bemused, a major Gartner client did this circa 15 years back. Hence either Gartner have only just uncovered the memo or they've gone full cycle...

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British snoops at GCHQ knew FBI was going to arrest Marcus Hutchins

Roland6
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Re: Of course GCHQ knew about it

Well with this leak or admission, it would seem that GCHQ are volunteering to pay all Hutchins' US living expenses and legal costs...

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The sky is blue, water is wet and UK PC shipments are down

Roland6
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Re: re: the sky is blue etc

Re: CPU performance is adequate for most users already.

Seems Intel would agree with you...

"Intel has wheeled out its 8th Generation Core processors, a refresh of its Core i5 and i7 chips, and their base specs wouldn’t look out of place in a desktop PC circa 2012."

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/08/21/intel_core_i5_i7_8th_gen_processors/

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Sorry, but those huge walls of terms and conditions you never read are legally binding

Roland6
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>then surely the obvious response is the nuclear one: we should all stop and read every word and send emails querying legalise we don't understand and ask if things we don't like could be changed please

Probably the best thing is to respond in kind: send them your T&C's by snail mail giving them a 14 day cooling off period, after which your T&C's take precedence over their T&C's...

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Q: How many drones are we bombing ISIS with? A: That's secret, mmkay

Roland6
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Re: Interesting stuff

> Does it matter if we are using unmanned (piloted by a person or people still) drone, or a more traditional aircraft?

The way it was explained to me is that some groups have a concern that using drones lowers the bar for armed interventions. With piloted aircraft, we have some "skin" in the game.

So it would seem that anti-drone campaigners and others really want is a return to 'real' war where combat was hand-to-hand and opponents could see the white's of each other's eyes. I expect they would also like combatants to wear red uniforms and abide by some code of honour about what is and isn't a good death - none of this camouflage or looking like civilians...

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Roland6
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Re: Interesting stuff

>There is nothing at risk except the cost of the drone. That makes the decision of when and where to intervene merely an accounting exercise.

Problem is that drones don't solve the real problems, firstly: who and what to target? and secondly: winning the peace, both of which seem to have been overlooked to varying degrees in the various Gulf wars that the US and UK have got into in recent times.

So actually "sending in the drones" is a way of being seen to do something, but not actually having to commit to any real action or outcome.

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UK.gov is hiring IT bods with skills in ... Windows Vista?!

Roland6
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Re: It's a trick

>Asking for competency in obsolete technologies is a sneaky way of asking for a certain number of years of experience, which is legally dodgy because it can be challenged as age discrimination.

The normal charge of age discrimination against older people can only be applied if they someone with the relevant skills gets turned down because "they're too old..."

If you're wet behind the ears, I suspect any claim of age discrimination would be laughed out of court.

Interestingly, you are right this is a stealthy way to valid an applicant's experience claims: if you haven't worked with XP then it is unlikely that your years of Windows experience have been gained in large enterprise or government environments...

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Vodafone customers moan about sluggish data abroad

Roland6
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Re: "We don't throttle data"..

>That's exactly how data roaming works, all data comes back to the UK and only enters the public internet from the UK

So come September when UK residents return to the UK and the kids are back at school, we can expect "normal" roaming service to be restored.

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Major shareholder: BT CEO Gavin Patterson should step down

Roland6
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Re: Maybe not.

The comment does make you wonder, just how the "Major shareholder" expects to make a return on their BT share holding - perhaps they want a block of uninteresting utility shares that without the input of a retail er and marketeer, can only go down in value - both in terms of dividends and share growth...

Or do they think that by constantly fighting Ofcom, BT will win friends...

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Blighty’s beloved Big Ben bell ends, may break Brexit bargain

Roland6
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> if those wankers vacated Parliament and went elsewhere for a time.

Provided they don't mind moving every few months they could utilise the purpose built facilities - partially funded by British taxpayers, located in Brussels and Strasbourg...

Also it would be much more convenient for the on-going Brexit negotiations...

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Tech giants warp eco standards to greenwash electronics, rake in cash

Roland6
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Quite a lot of road space in Hobart has been allocated for cyclists' use only. This has led to greater congestion of vehicular traffic there being less space for vehicles to travel on.

Perhaps it hasn't occurred to you, that one of purposes of reducing the allocation of road space to car drivers is to encourage said drivers to switch to cycling...

Mind you the best incentive I've witnessed to get cars out of cities must have been the summer when petrol was scarce (tanker driver strike) - it was wonderful being able to cross roads and walk up roads in central London - just had to watch out for the occassional taxi and bike rickshaw...

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Salesforce sacks two top security engineers for their DEF CON talk

Roland6
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Re: Its a big problem

Suspect the issue was 'marketing'!

If we are to believe things, the intent was to open source the tool. Hence it would not surprise me if it dawned on someone that these guys presenting a paper at DEFCON would preempt the intended big marketing splash of releasing the tool to the world...

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Roland6
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"Salesforce owned the code and therefore no employee is allowed disclose or distribute the company's property without permission."

From the article, this was a presentation about MEATPISTOL not a disclosure and/or distribution of the code that forms MEATPISTOL.

So having looked through the slide deck which reveals no real design details about MEATPISTOL, it would seem that senior executives at SalesForce had a last minute change of heart and didn't want the existence of MEATPISTOL be to publicly known; at the present time; unless they only got to know about the presentation at the last minute...

A decision left to last minute that obviously wasn't that important as no steps were taken to ensure the intended recepient(s) of the text actually received the text before they went on stage...

Finally, I note one of the employees job title includes the word 'director' - in the UK that is a legally significant word to have in your job title.

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HMS Queen Lizzie impugned by cheeky Scot's drone landing

Roland6
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Re: "to defend against this"

>trained eagle ?

It's an aircraft carrier, perhaps the military need to start training seagulls...

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Firmware update blunder bricks hundreds of home 'smart' locks

Roland6
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>Ever gone away and not been sure if you remembered to lock it?

A colleague once came back from a week long conference to find his front door wedged closed with a piece of paper. He subsequently discovered that his neighbours seeing the front door open and him obviously out, kindly latched the Yale lock just in case he had left his keys inside, then wedged the door closed with paper.

So unless your door has an auto closer, having a Yale lock etc. isn't a guarantee your door has actually locked as you pull it behind you in your rush to catch that taxi...

Personally, having had mortice locks for a few decades, I;ve got into the habit of checking the door has locked behind me.

Interestingly, the IoT potentially will create more stress: there you are in some far flung place that happens to have Internet and you take a look at your home and discover the front door is showing a status of not closed... Currently, I have a nice holiday and only have to worry about the front door when I get home and discover it unlocked.

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Infosec eggheads rig USB desk lamp to leak passwords via Bluetooth

Roland6
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Re: and this is why I'm wary of public USB chargers!

and only supports _very dated_ USB 1.0

Which is a very pertinent point!

What is interesting is that the researchers in the article don't mention which version of USB they have been using - suspect it is USB 1.0...

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Ukrainian man, 51, cuffed on suspicion of distributing NotPetya

Roland6
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Ukrainian police

At least it was the Ukrainian police, Sergey would be well advised to delete the USA from his list of countries to visit and probably all other countries with extradition arrangements favourable to the US...

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Official: Windows for Workstations returns in Fall Creators Update

Roland6
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Re: 4 CPU's - That's a lot!

> it is 4 socket not 4 cpu.

Yes very interesting, just thinking about those new Xeon E7's especially the one with 24 cores and threading, giving as far as old versions of Windows are concerned 48 cpu's per physical socket.

However, I suspect just as with XP x64, most workstations will be 2 socket Xeon configurations.

>... just get the server version of the OS.

I think this version is simply reproducing what MS did for XP x64: take the Standard edition of Server - hence the 4 cpu/socket limit and strip out the server functions and add in some of the desktop tools and accessories not normally shipped with the server version.

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Openreach pegs full fibre overhaul anywhere between £3bn and £6bn

Roland6
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Re: LLU - sweating the copper

>There is no LLU competiton now that the DSLAMs have been moved into the cabinets.

Additionally, there is very limited sub-loop unbundling competition. Where Alt-ISP's put their cabinet next to BT's and have the cabinet-to-premise cable routed to their cabinet (and backhaul), just like BT/Openreach FTTC.

There seems to be a small opportunity to do a Be in those new developments where BT currently only supports FTTC but the cable also contains fibre.

The only locations I've seen viable alt-ISP offerings have been smaller business parks/industrial estates where the alt-ISP can differentiate by offering a greater mix of services than the standard BT FTTH service offering (see NeilF's post: https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/3258908 ) and charge commercially viable prices. In fact in my area, it is almost as if BT/Openreach worked in partnership, so BT didn't install an FTTC cabinet in business areas, leaving it to Warwicknet.

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Roland6
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> It will cost BT / Openreach 6-7 Billion and they should be using their PROFITS to fund it.

I take it that you don't really want FTTP anytime in the next 7 years?

Personally, I would rather pay a little more for a fixed period of time to enable the wholesale migration of the BT local loop (and exchanges) to fibre and thus start to benefit from the lower maintenance costs of fibre sooner than letting BT fund the project wholly out of profits (£500m~£1Bn pa ?) and have to incur the costs of maintaining the copper infrastructure for longer. And then continue paying an 'investment return' to BT for a few decades...

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Roland6
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>I'm really struggling to see why they won't go for the low hanging fruit.

Suspect they will: there are many recent developments - prossibly all those of 20+ houses within the last 10 years where the cable mandated by Openreach included a fibre core to each property, only the developer only did the minimum and connected the copper pairs - most probably because at the time that was all that the local cabinet/exchange would support (aside: for my house I dug down where the BT cable comes out of the ground next to the house and there in the pipe/duct is a coil of fibre. The house was built in 2003, we got FTTC in 2015...)

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Roland6
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>At the moment we are trying to run a 21st century network (internet) over 19th century technology (copper).

Actually, it is worse...

Once you lift the rug, you'll realise that the topography was intended to serve a very different population distribution and was limited by the (analogue) technology then available. With the fibre deployment (FTTC/FTTP), we've ossified this obsolete topography in our new digital infrastructure.

I've seen this in my area where despite the massive increase in housing, BT with the BDUK project, effectively replicated the copper topology (hub-and-spoke) rather than use the capabilities of fibre and create a new (digital) fibre loop/ring that covered the area more efficiently and effectively.

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Roland6
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Re: RE Other guesses are available...

>The only reason they are not doing this is they think the Government will pay for it.

The problem is that prices are regulated, so with this consultation, Openreach are trying to build consensus among the it's reseller ISPs so as to enable it to put pressure on Ofcom to agree to the price increase.

We've seen similar in other regulated utilities (eg. water) where the regulator had to decide the additional cost that could be included in the price to cover infrastructure renewal.

Personally, I think Ofcom need to bite the bullet and agree to there being a £7pcm levy on all BT lines for the next 7 years, as then it really can kick BT/Openreach to get on with it.

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Roland6
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Re: LLU - sweating the copper

@AC

>The point is OpenReach is a seperate entity to BT..

However, it is currently unclear as to who actually owns the physical infrastructure and who is responsible for it's fibre upgrade - my contacts seem to be of the opinion that it will remain in the ownership of BT - who will do the actual physical build out and then give Openreach the job of "looking after it"...

Also given the issues over Openreach raising capital at favourable rates, my understanding is that Ofcom et al are looking at BT to be the primary investor in Openreach for the fibre network buildout...

Hence, why at the present time until we get further clarification of just what the 'legal' separation really means in practice, I talk about BT/Openreach rather than simply Openreach on matters of network build. However, I do get your point that BT Retail (and some other parts of BT) should now just be consumers of Openreach services, rather than having privileged access.

>Lastly, both Sky and TalkTalk inherited a lot of their LLU infrastructure ... I doubt they really give a shit about the LLU investment as its now aged and already paid itself back.

I suspect they care about it to the extent that isn't costing them money, whilst allowing them to generate revenues. Once maintenance costs begin to climb they will give a shit...

>Besides, Broadband (ADSL or Fibre) is not really profitable

I expect Sky and TalkTalk will continue to lobby Ofcom to ensure that this remains the case, and that BT remains the main source of investment capital for Openreach - can't have BT making a commercial return on their infrastructure investment... :)

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Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

Roland6
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Re: Hilarious!

But, what many fail to understand is that the man has 9 RFCs and 2 drafts to his name, and knows the protocol in question pretty much inside out.

However, you do assume that the said person actually understands just what exactly has been specified...

Back in the late 1980's I had cause to investigate the potential for using IEEE802.4 over a couple of new media types, operating at speeds other than 1, 5 & 10Mbps.

What was surprising was the sheer number of interdependent magic numbers contained in the specification, which naturally worked (well sort of depending upon your point of view) with the physical media types and speeds contained in the specification, but would fail when used with different media types and speeds. Naturally, the standard didn't contain the rationale behind these magic numbers and conversations with committee members seemed to indicate they also didn't know how or why these numbers were arrived at - but they were in the final standard and so they would have been agreed upon...

Conversations with colleagues building protocol test systems confirmed my experiences, with 802.4 and it's authors, weren't unique...

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Roland6
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Re: Possible or easy?

>In the days of Gopher, any documentation might have been elusive.

That's why it was always a good idea to get developers to spend time on the support desk - that way they got to hear directly how good/bad their software and documentation really was and just how 'dim' many highly intelligent, but non-IT users can be when it comes to computers.

Thus as you illustrate, back in the day, in my opinion, only a totally daft developer and manager would release a completed piece of end user software eg. a gopher client, which did not give a meaningful response to: gopher -? , gopher --help , man gopher

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Brit folk STILL not getting advertised broadband speeds – survey

Roland6
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The problem with all speed testers is that they don't actually test the real line speed.

At times I can run all sorts of speed testers from my PC and get rubbish results; however, if I monitor my router's line stat's these will show that throughout the tests my actual line speed remains stable at some figure in the range 32~36Mbps, so clearly the causes of the end-to-end data speed fluctuations I see on the PC speed tests are down to factors other than the FTTC line speed...

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Don't buy Microsoft Surface gear: 25% will break after 2 years, says Consumer Reports

Roland6
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Re: How is it unfair?

Agree, I suspect Ranjit Atwal at Gartner needs to reminded of how Lexus established itself as a quality brand from the off...

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UK mobe network Three launches legal challenge over spectrum auction

Roland6
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>I call upon OFCOM to take back all the sold off spectrum

Well there is the small matter that no one is talking about namely, the 3G spectrum auction in 2000 was originally for 20 year leases...

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Roland6
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You might find the bar chart here a useful aid:

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/about-ofcom/latest/media/media-releases/2017/ofcom-sets-rules-for-mobile-spectrum-auction

Even if three got the entire 40Mhz at 2.4Ghz they would still be a minor player behind BT & Vdf. Three's cap would mean that this holding would effectively be divided between Three and O2, giving each a significant capacity increase.

I expect that BT will aim to win 85Mhz of spectrum (17 lots) at 3.4Ghz - taking full advantage of the allowance under the cap. I expect Vdf to bid for at least 40Mhz (8 lots) and most probably will be seeking to gain 16 lots, leaving crumbs for Three and O2.

The only question mark at the present time is whether Telefonica/O2 will actually participate in the auctions, given the level of investment Telefonica has been making in O2-UK these last few years...

Also you should remember that effectively Three and O2 are mobile-only operators and neither of whom have the necessary scale of operation or spectrum to challenge BT and VDF in delivering multiplay services.

So if my assessment is anywhere close to being correct, post 2020 the UK mobile scene will be dominated by BT and Vdf with Three and O2 being bit part players. Naturally Ofcom's 4 operator market doesn't specify if the operators are equals and hence it can tick the 'success' box against the 4 player market...

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Roland6
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Re: Do 3 mean

>That no one operator can buy more than 30% of the new spectrum ...

"We call on Ofcom to apply a cap of 30 per cent on the total amount of mobile spectrum any one company can own following the auction."

Thus BT/EE would not be able to participate in the up coming spectrum auction and Vodafone would be restricted to gaining about 80Mhz of the 190Mhz being auctioned.

>It depends if Ofcom want 4 operators or just to get a short term windfall.

Both please - we want our cake and to eat it.

It would not surprise me if post auction (and post Brexit) Ofcom change their opinion and decide a competitive market can be had with three operators ....

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Jocks' USO block shock: BT's 10Mbps proposals risk 'rural monopoly'

Roland6
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>At the moment I pay BT nearly £500 per annum for sub 3Mb service (and 150Kb up)

Not had cause to look at it recently, but have you investigated satellite - I appreciate it does have latency issues, but if your requirement is to be able to transfer larger volumes of data it might give you more for your £500pa cost...

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Roland6
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Re: So...

I'm not sure if they are trying to avoid regulation, but they certainly have ulterior motives...

Just what was Ofcom hoping to achieve with the 10Mbps USO?

Once Ofcom put a 10Mbps USO in place, they cannot deny BT/Openreach investing (they say £600m) in their network to satisfy the USO, given only BT/Openreach have a USO!

So what BT have done is to put the ball squarely into Ofcom's side of the court. Ofcom cannot deny BT's request that will further entrench it's monopoly in the local loop and then impose a 10Mbps USO. Likewise if Ofcom accept BT's offer, we can expect many to complain that it undermines a competition that is largely a figment of their imagination.

From a public interest viewpoint the only option is for Ofcom to: accept BT's offer, introduce the 10Mbps USO, impose some conditions such that BT works with alt-ISP's (ie. build on infrastructure funded out of the BDUK project) and turn a deaf ear to those who want competition at any cost, even if it means more decades of poor service to consumers.

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Roland6
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Re: Get stuffed BT, give the £600M to B4RN...

I think the real opportunity for sub-loop unbundling and competition was missed with the BDUK project.

People just need to accept that only BT know which households are getting sub 10Mbps service - something they won't voluntarily disclose, just as they wouldn't disclose similar information to the BDUK project.

The best that can be achieved here is for Ofcom to impose constraints on BT so that they use and enhance existing alt-ISP services rather than compete. For example, a local village in the BDUK last 5%, finally received service from Gigaclear last year after BT had been forced to publicly say it was uneconomic for it to provide FTTC service; it would be daft - but par for the course - for Ofcom to permit BT to now deliver FTTP services to that village.)

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Horsemen of the disk-drive apocalypse will ride upon 256TB SSDs

Roland6
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Re: SSD is fine - while it works

If anything this conversation thread and the contents of the article show that what isn't happening is the introduction of consumer priced RAID disks.

With SSD's it should be possible to replace my laptop's single 2.5" HDD with a equivalent sized (or larger) SSD RAID drive.

Also isn't it about time remote sync etc. is a normal part of the OS? MS are you listening?

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Britons ambivalent about driverless car tech, survey finds

Roland6
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Re: The only way it can work

>It is the same as changing from left to right lane traffic.

Now there is a test for a driverless car: take a car intended for use on UK roads and take it to the continent and see how it's software copes...

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Roland6
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Re: Insurance Premiums

>Imagine the difference in cost of insurance for an 18 year old new driver.

I think this, new young drivers who haven't learnt to drive in the way their parents drive, are probably the main market for driverless cars, followed by those who for various reasons were unable to drive a conventional car, but - because of differing legal requirements - are able to use a driverless car.

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Roland6
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Re: Ambivalent? That's a bit optimistic.

Controlling a car with software is very easy. Acceleration, braking steering, speed maintenance, road position etc. are all simple bits of physics based code not vastly different from what you will find in the better car racing games. It's easy for them because they have hard data about where the road goes and exactly what all the other road users are doing.

So why aren't the driverless car luminaries not queuing up to run driverless car races? I mean if it is so simple, racing these cars round Silverstone et al will be a piece of cake...

Perhaps we should be promoting the concept as it will give some real feedback on where the state-of-the-art is or isn't...

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Roland6
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Re: Sunday (autonomous) driving

"Kickdown is great on a torque-convertor auto linked to a decent, torquey naturally-aspirated engine"

I can vouch for that: The only automatic I've ever owned or driven was an old Jag XJS ...

I agree, the best automatic I had was a 1980's Audi with a carburettor and accelerator cable - kickdown, did exactly what it said on the tin.

I've found that modern drive-by-wire cars - both manual and automatics (eg. Qashqai) have real problems with the concept of a quick get away at traffic lights.

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Mediocre Britain: UK broadband ranked 31st in world for speed

Roland6
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Re: It would be interesting to see the methodologiy

"Methodology"? Getting a little ahead of yourself Phil O'Sophical :)

I would be interested to see the rationale for the study, as currently the value of the table of figures is as much value as taking the average speed of traffic across a country (such as the UK) and find that in the UK the national average speed is sub 20mph and thus conclude the UK needs more motorways!

Reading the Cable.co.uk release on the report [ https://www.cable.co.uk/news/new-broadband-league-shows-uks-average-speed-is-less-than-half--700001889/ ] it seems the primary motivation was to create a global league table - ie. provide material for marketing purposes; not to actually do a meaningful piece of research. Looking at the published data [ https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1A8LDcCLY3HN5Oqys6VxB0ug8xgroDADVIA2BeAF_tSM/htmlview#gid=0 ] we can see the study has some real problems: it only tested 354,329 distinct IP addresses in the UK, with no information on how this set was chosen and whether it can be said to be truly representative or is disproportionally weighted towards those with slower speed connections.

Likewise, thinking about the real world, we know that ADSL, FTTC and gFast services (ie. those with >50M of copper) all suffer from speed degredation over distance. Additionally, as the test is of actual line speed, it doesn't take into account the fact that people will have subscribed to different services: sub 8Mpbs ADSL, upto 18Mbps ADSL, upto 38Mbps FTTC, upto 80Mbps FTTP etc.

Finally, we have to put all this into perspective and ask the question: for the typical/average UK household what is an acceptable speed. For my household, before children and when Internet was only really used for email and browsing, 1~2Mbps was sufficient. Now with a home office, teenagers, Amazon Prime, Xbox etc. 38Mbps FTTC (with a typical line speed of circa 33Mbps) comfortably satisfy's demand.

So I think an open challenge to Dan Howdle, consumer telecoms analyst at Cable.co.uk is inorder, namely put into the public domain the full rationale, methodology and data set (*) behind the report.

(*) "This is why all of the data collected by M-Lab’s global measurement platform is openly available, and all of the measurement tools hosted by M-Lab are open source." M-Labs [ https://www.measurementlab.net/about/ ]. I note at the present time M-Labs have not obviously released the data set for this piece of work to their Google Cloud Storage [ https://console.cloud.google.com/storage/browser/m-lab/ ]

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Big question of the day: Is it time to lock down .localhost?

Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Is localhost even needed?

>MS moved localhost resolution into the local DNS client (probably to stop users messing things up by removing those names).

But you can have fun by adding a localhost entry to the hosts file with an IP address other than 127.0.0.1 ... :)

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Roland6
Silver badge

Re: Is localhost even needed?

Re: does anyone not have

::1 localhost

127.0.0.1 localhost

as the first two lines in /etc/hosts?

Been there as standard since the mid 1980's and probably earlier, since host look up predates DNS...

Hence I don't really understand West's claim:

"That has resulted, West claims, in people hardcoding localhost to 127.0.0.1 in their system configurations to ensure an external resolver doesn't hijack localhost."

I suggest if you are relying on an external resolver to resolve localhost then you haven't really understand the real purpose of localhost and why you should have an explicit entry for it in your IPv4/IPv6 hosts file.

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HMS Queen Liz will arrive in Portsmouth soon, says MoD

Roland6
Silver badge
Joke

Re: wrongo

>There ain't no such thing as a 'USS George W. Bush'

But I'm sure if it facilitates matters with getting funding sign off there will be a "USS Donald Trump"...

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Microsoft dumps mobility from its Vision

Roland6
Silver badge

"LinkedIn faces competition from online recruiting companies..."

Preparing the ground for either a massive (HP sized?) writedown or setting revenue expectations as very low.

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