* Posts by Roland6

4636 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

Do UK.gov wonks understand sci-tech skills gap? MPs dish out Parliamentary kicking

Roland6
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Re: So many issues...

The suggestion that we should just train our own is a bit like saying Barcelona or Real Madrid should just train their own...

The trouble is that the UK establishment has interpreted this as meaning it is pointless training our own when it is so much cheaper to import people...

We've seen this just recently with the UK governments decision over nurses, where it has simply exempted nurses from it's immigration caps and no mention of any additional funding etc. of local training and capability development...

To succeed in a knowledge-based economy, you have to have the means of producing workers who can work in a knowledge-based economy. Hence education becomes very important; so we don't have a 1000 power engineers today sitting around waiting for a job, can you wait six months while we upskill a bunch of power/electrical engineering graduates?

It is because the UK establishment hasn't understand such matters that life post-Brexit will be much harder than they need to be.

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Roland6
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>For example there is a huge shortage of power engineers as car manufacturers move to electrical propulsion.

I think you will find there isn't really a huge shortage of power engineers, the problem is that employers want graduates with current industry knowledge and experience, just as they did with Computing graduates in my day, because they didn't want to make the investment in people...

Additionally, I expect 'industry' doesn't want to pay premium salaries to such graduates...

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Buttonless and port-free: Expect the next iPhone to be as smooth as a baby's bum

Roland6
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>A happy compromise is phones with external nubs for receiving power,

It is notable that Apple haven't decided to equip the iPhone and/or iPad with magnetic connectors like the MacBook.

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How a tax form kludge gifted the world 25 joyous years of PDF

Roland6
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Re: Format of choice for immediate offline reading, easy sharing or simple portability

>And that jump from the bottom of one page to the start of the next as I scroll. Not the PDF standard's fault, just the idiots who created the documentreader.

I don't get that jump with Foxit Reader when it's displaying in 'continuous' mode.

>or even worse, print in a font too small to read..

The worst part about this one, is that often it isn't possible to adjust printer settings to enlarge text. Sometimes having an A3 printer is helpful, but wasteful as it does permit the enlargement of an A4 source into an A3 hardcopy.

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Roland6
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>I view PDFs on Okular and that has a zoom control.

This caused me to do a little research...

The image chosen to illustrate Okular's capabilities on Wikipedia made me smile. It nicely illustrates how narrow and limited many commenters experience is; you wouldn't use Word to write a musical score, however, PDF allows those without the relevant application to read your score.

Which reminds me of other uses of PDF and history!

We forget just how painful Word was before the rise of PDF; yes Word allowed you to do object embedding, only problem was anyone else wanting to read your Word document and view all those Visio diagrams, etc. that you had so carefully embedded, had to have the relevant applications installed on their system. Obviously, you could paste-as-picture/image but that made updating a pain. However, print as PDF and everyone could view your document as you intended - okay that might have made feedback harder, but generally many people simply printed off the document, annotated it by hand and handed it back.

Similarly for MS Project plans, want to ensure everyone can read the current plan, just print to PDF (using a sensible page size).

Interestingly, I've never received a document that used or a request for documents to be sent in, Microsoft's "PDF killer" XPS format. [Aside: I don't understand why MS haven't killed this off yet.]

Picking up on archival and OCR comments, one aspect of PDF not commented upon is it's ability to contain document layers, so for imaging and workflow applications, PDF was an ideal format, paper could be scanned to TIFF, OCR'd and the two files combined into a single PDF file. This meant that you could search on the OCR'd text and if it didn't read well (ie. it contained scan errors) you could view the original TIFF image.

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Roland6
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>how to "stop people stealing our pictures out of PDFs" (and also website images).

Well this goes back to considering the intended purpose. As PDF's are really intended to be printed, there is generally no reason to have pictures/images that are of a higher resolution than is necessary to print the page. Similarly with websites, do you really need a high resolution image when most people will be viewing the content on a 1366x768 laptop display or a 3~5-inch mobile phone display.

Doesn't stop people stealing the pictures, just ensures the copy taken isn't take good.

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Roland6
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Re: PDF has its uses I suppose

Not just for print outs, communication.

So you want to do away with a standard, so when I refer you to page 404 of the HTML status code manual, you get something totally different because in your rendering of the manual the relevant material is on page 418 or even 1415...

Similar considerations apply when I try to refer to the same material across devices and formats.

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Roland6
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Re: "Placement and styling is important."

>try to print it any HTML page and usually you get a mess.

Even tools like Print Edit WE for Chrome have difficulty rendering HTML pages into something fit for printing to PDF/Printer.

Why do want a PDF/print out? because it enables me to read the article off line and retain a copy so that I can go back and confirm details if necessary. There is nothing more frustrating referring to a webpage, getting a client querying your point, you going back and discovering that either the webpage has changed or disappeared totally. News sites such as the BBC are very good at 'amending' articles...

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EU negotiator: Crucial data adequacy deal will wait until UK hands in homework

Roland6
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>As the only EU member of the Five Eyes alliance, won't withdrawal of EU data sharing with UK mean EU is cut off from the data that alliance delivers?

Logic wrong way round!

As it is the UK that is withdrawing from the EU, the only questions are whether the UK will continue to share Five Eyes data with the EU, however, I suspect the UK only shares data with the EU with the permission of the US - given the US is the senior partner ie. the UK is the US's proxy/poodle. Thus it will be up to the US to determine whether post-Brexit Five Eyes data is passed to the EU.

The EU, on the other hand, is limited by it's own laws as to what data it can share outside of the EU. Because it was always recognised the UK had a 'special' relationship with the US, a certain amount of fudging went on, to the UK's (strategic) benefit. Brexit changes the playing field, I suspect an outcome will be the baking up of some more fudge to allow greater EU-US intelligence co-operation, probably via Canada.

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Roland6
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Re: Requoting from another thread

>Our negociators are clearly not up to the task of getting us a good deal.

Agreed, as clearly they aren't capable of negotiating. I suspect any one who has been on a business sales negotiation course could do a better job.

>They are starting from a position of real weakness.

Agreed, however we shouldn't forget the UK government did choose the time and place...

So given the level of ineptitude being exhibited by the UK government, Mr Barnier doesn't have to do anything. In fact it might be helpful if he stopped trying to be helpful and pointing out the ball breaking obstacles, as it does seem that this is simply encouraging David Davis to bash his own balls on them,,,

>the more likely IMHO we will simply opt for a Hard Exit

I think we won't necessarily opt for it, the final whistle will go and David Davis will be left wondering what happened... Interestingly, Liam Fox is currently rubbing his hands in glee, as today's House of Commons vote has left the no deal exit option on the table...

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Roland6
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>David and Co are realists.

I assume sarcasm here, having read their various thoughts on Leaving the EU before the Referendum - none of them had a clue - it was going to be so simple: hold referendum, hand in notice, leave at end of month, sign loads of trade agreements, and have it all sewn up before the summer (2016) recess...

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Priceless: The cost to BT for bothering you with spam? 1.5 UK pence per email

Roland6
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Re: Unfortunate

>Why did Royal mail have to pay back more per spam ?

From a quick read of the two penalty notices:

ico. Royal Mail penalty notice

ico. BT penalty notice

There does seem to be a minor difference between the two cases, but it does seem as if the fine has been plucked out of the air. Even more so when you look down the list of ico. enforcement actions and see the penalties awarded to others...

Digressing, it is interesting comparing the two notices. It is clear the ico. have a proforma with some standard text, however, it does seem to be inconsistent in the way it records things, so you can't do a straight numbered paragraph to numbered paragraph comparison.

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Roland6
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Re: % of income

>with no pay increments or other rewards paid until the fine has been cleared

This is actually something that could quite easily be included in the renumeration package calculations... perhaps just need some major shareholders (pension funds?) supporting an AGM motion...

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Roland6
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>Free broadband with a 1GB monthly limit.

I expect there are a lot of people who will regard this as a bargain, pay the extra for going over the monthly data and call limits, yet refuse to commit to paying a set amount each month for a reasonable data cap or unlimited, as they fail to add up the costs and consider the total contract cost.

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UK footie fans furious as Sky Broadband goes TITSUP: Total inability to stream unfair penalties

Roland6
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>All eggs in one basket. Bad idea

It would seem that Sky didn't learn anything about backbone resilience from the 2013 fire [ https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2013/09/major-broadband-outage-northampton-uk-business-park-fire.html ] which took out service across much of Northamptonshire.

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No fandango for you: EU boots UK off Galileo satellite project

Roland6
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Re: Dictionary anyone?

@codejunky

>I am interested in hearing of how negotiations could be pushed better.

?! where to begin...

Given we are where we are...

Remember, the "EU are being awkward" and are sticking to the rules and thus have been very clear: the UK is leaving on 29-March-2019. So I fully expect as this deadline creeps ever closer, T.May et al will accuse the EU of "being awkward" by not being flexible about this deadline...

I suspect there are more corkers that will befuddle T.Mays Brexit monkeys, so I expect March-29 will come and go and the UK won't have a deal... then the fireworks will start as the recriminations begin...

The only real way forward is for T.May to find her backbone and sacrifice "Conservative party unity", it doesn't really matter which way she goes, the negotiations will go better; albeit not necessarily in the direction some are wanting. [Aside: As I don't see Labour being any more capable, there is a flaw in this plan... :) ]

>Not that that should be a problem as we just walk away until the EU realise they are not acting smart.

So basically, by "walking away" you are implicitly accepting the EU are right to exclude the UK from the Galileo project, because that is what the rules - as amended by the UK - say...

>To what particularly do you reference?

Well, given those who voted Leave didn't expect to 'win' the referendum, it is notable how to many (ie. those who express a public opinion) the bogeyman EU has grown in size and maleficence.

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Roland6
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Re: Dictionary anyone?

@codejunky - The referendum occurred on 23-Jun-2016; nearly two years ago, I think you do need to move on...

>Nobody could possibly clarify. Simply the vote was rigged

Your "fresh eyes" are clearly still in referendum mode...

>Is it a shock leave have a level of paranoia.

The trouble is that as Brexit has progressed, their level of delusional paranoia has markedly increased...

>I can believe that.

Good! :)

>We voted leave, expect leave and she keeps trying to offer leave soft aka remain.

T.May is clearly just an administrator, not a leader and so whatever it is she has put on the table - which has been very little, is what her Brexit monkeys have given her...

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Roland6
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Re: Dictionary anyone?

@codejunky

>I am not sure you read the points. Living in fear is not a way to live.

Yes, I did read all the points and they made me (ruefully) smile; from the emotive language being used across many forums, it would seem that many Brexit supporters are living with an unhealthy level of paranoia about the EU...

But once again you demonstrate that you don't understand what I'm saying. So let us be clear, there was the Referendum which fundamentally was about Leave-Remain and living happy ever after, and then there was after the Referendum, where the focus was on implementation and "honouring the result". I'm talking about after the Referendum.

>This mess is the result of desiring to remain.

No the mess is entirely down to the Brexiteers, remember whilst the various Brexit camps could agree that the UK should leave the EU, there were vast differences in viewpoint of just what 'Brexit' meant. The Leave camps (and specifically those in the Conservative party), in their haste to grab on to power, just didn't bother to clarify matters, probably because they thought once in a position of power they would be able to prevail over those with different ideas. Hence why T.May has repeatedly asked for people to get behind her - she wasn't talking to Remain supporters but to the various Leave camps - particularly those within the Conservative party and thus preventing the development of a coherent government stance.

>The EU could if they want....

I read this as just another outing of paranoia...

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Roland6
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Re: Dictionary anyone?

@codejunky - QED :)

All your points are reasons given out as to why you shouldn't vote Leave. In you haste to mock the Remain campaign, you totally missed the point I was making about the strategy adopted to achieve an end. It is clear the Brexit rabble-rousers became obsessed with invoking Article 50 and as soon as possible, without any regard to negotiations - well you can't negotiate with the EU so why bother, just walk away. Yet now the same people want to negotiate with the EU and are complaining about how unfair things are, whilst totally failing to see it was their own haste that got them into the current negotiating mess...

If however, the Brexit rabble-rousers had more than one brain cell between them, they would have realised that the EU couldn't force the UK to leave and thus by Remaining in the EU the UK, would automatically have a seat at the table at the next round of negotiations and for progress to be made, the UKs concerns and interests would have had to be addressed... Hence why I've always maintained that in-order to leave it may be better to remain...

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Roland6
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Re: Dictionary anyone?

The tolerance in the EU for the UK's selective pick and choose membership was seriously coming to a head.

@Mark 65 - So do you wait it out and get them to make you an offer to leave, given you already have committed to a UK referendum over any treaty change, or do you leave (invoke Article 50) and then hope to get a favourable deal, having told everyone that you would be prepared to walk away with no deal?

Remain always was about a lot more than what the Leave campaign portrayed it as...

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Roland6
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Re: Well

@Codejunky re: "We do not need to apply the importing countries standards to our own country"

To some extent I agree with you that there has been some overstatement of the upcoming problems which are more to do with divergence and specifically two types of divergence:

1. Between product standards for UK customers and for Single Market customers.

2. Administration and logistics associated with imports/exports

Of the two, I'm more concerned about the added complexity of administration and logistics, because potentially UK exports to the Single Market will no longer go through the "Members Only" channel, likewise UK exports to the RoW will no longer go through the "Imports from the EU Single Market" channel...

Others will be concerned about product divergence, for example I can see T.May demanding security backdoors, whereas the Single Market demanding the absence of backdoors, likewise our exports to the RoW will (potentially) no longer be able to simply apply the standards agreed for products from the Single Market but will use the standards agreed individually with each country...

The devil is definitely going to be in the detail, which will in turn depend on just what gets agreed and with "Brexit meaning Brexit" we will probably only know whats been agreed at the last minute...

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Roland6
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Re: Working as intended

>There's also been a study on this. Patrick Minford. Revert to WTO rules

I read the report: From Project fear to Project Prosperity

Whilst he talked a lot about WTO, UFT and MFN it was clear that he was talking theoretically and not real-world - probably because real-world requires doing actual legwork and thinking rather than simply applying vastly simplified economic models and rote solutions - where markets and consumers behave in ways favourable to the model....

So Minford's viewpoint is interesting as it does try to present a different viewpoint; however, I compare it to other viewpoints and my experience and thus find it wanting...

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Roland6
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Re: In perspective, Galileo isn't important

"You need far better accuracy than 1 metre if you're going to have self-driving cars trundling around."

Wrong.

Perhaps, not entirely wrong. IF you had sub 1m accuracy, I suspect some will want to do away with the other systems and naturally with positional accuracy such cars wouldn't need white lines etc.

Yes I know its daft - as I write this I see allsorts of problems, but since we are living in the age of stupid and politicians have blind faith in AI and self-driving technology...

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Roland6
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Re: I think the UK should build its own system

>Or, the UK could start its own consortium with non EU countries who are part of NATO or the commonwealth.

Well given over the decades the UK has become increasingly dependent upon US weapons systems, for various reasons. I suspect as soon as the UK seriously tries to start a consortium, the US will intervene. So I suggest the only viable way forward will be for the UK to convince the US to join the UK's consortium and for the UK solution to be adopted by NATO. If you can wrap the whole thing up so that it puts "America first" and thus protects US jobs and gives the person in the Whitehouse overall control, it might be a goer...

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Roland6
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Re: EU Are Being Vindictive

>A clean slate approach worked from WTO is probably more efficient.

FYI, whilst the UK and the EU are members of the WTO, only the EU28 has a WTO 'slate', currently post-Brexit both the EU27 and UK will have clean WTO 'slates' - the one thing ALL the other members of the WTO are agreed on is that the EU27 and UK can't simply take the EU28 slate...

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Roland6
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Re: Brexit means Brexit

>Surprise, surprise I can no longer use that gym, unless I join again

At least you have the option to rejoin.

I and many others contributed to the building of a swimming pool at my old school, when I left I no longer had access to the swimming pool...

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Roland6
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Re: In perspective, Galileo isn't important

@YARR

Britain is a founder member of the Galileo project, the EU is not.

The EU later joined Galileo and changed the participation requirements so only EU members can have access to high precision positioning. Why did lawyers representing the original participants accept this?

Good questions, I suspect you need to ask the UK government why it and its lawyers agreed the to EU's demmands...

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Roland6
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Re: Home time

He'll need the whippet to get to the pub; without the whippet he can't say "just taking the dog for a walk"...

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Roland6
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Re: EU Are Being Vindictive

>>Did Cameron not ask to implement s temporary halt to immigration into the UK ?

I believe he did until it was pointed out that the UK wasn't using the powers already available to it to manage the movement of EU workers and people...

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Roland6
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Re: EU Are Being Vindictive

>But, wait, can you see Dacre and Rees-Mogg accepting that?

We could resurrect the traditional English custom of Hanging, drawing and quartering of such people and put their remains (and those of other 'traitors') on display beside roads across the country...

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Roland6
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Re: EU Are Being Vindictive

@Shadmeister - your argument falls apart as soon as you remember the default position of the Brexit nutters was for the UK to walk away with no deal; this option is still on the table as T.May et al like to remind everyone when things aren't going their way...

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Roland6
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Re: If not doing something because it was "inconvenient" was the ciriteria for Brexit..

@Hans 1 Re: a full refund (with interest) would be well in order. Hm, right!

Absolutely! :)

You are overlooking human nature, whilst it wasn't that long ago that hard-Brexiteers were refusing to pay the "divorce bill" because "we owe the EU nothing" and should "just walk away", because they saw no value in the UK-EU relationship. However, now the 'junk' is being sorted, they are beginning to realise that the 'junk' has value and so now are loudly demanding their share...

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Roland6
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Re: Well

>Computer manufacturing has been gutted, with Silicon Glen in Scotland being a shadow of its former self.

Even at it's height, Silicon Glen was a shadow of the M3/M4 tech corridors... But I suspect that even now it is bigger than Silicon roundabout...

PS. I'm not knocking Silicon Glen and the efforts made to establish it, just that the UK government's track record in successfully investing in the UK isn't that good...

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Roland6
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Re: Dictionary anyone?

>So when when voting for BREXIT which part of the EXIT the voters didn't get?

That they would only get the Brexit that certain influential and unelected sections of the Tory party wanted. The Referendum wasn't about the people getting a say but giving the Tory party carte blanc to pursue its own hobby horses...

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Roland6
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Re: @david 12

@Prst. V.Jeltz re: "No Brexit means leaving everthing according to the Remainers in order to convince us that its suicide"

So are you suggesting that Nigel Farage, Rees-Mogg, David Davis etc. are closet Remainers? Or are you referring to the reputedly closet remainer who said "Brexit means Brexit"?

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It's time for TLS 1.0 and 1.1 to die (die, die)

Roland6
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Re: Needing TLS 1.0 is not a surprise

>Modern OS aren't the problem, embedded kit is.

This will become even more of an issue with IoT.

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Roland6
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>This is a bit like saying ALL cars must pass current standards and so most over a few years old are then automatically off to the scrappers.

My understanding that was (still is?) the case in Japan.

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Roland6
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>I wonder if Microsoft is going to update Internet Explorer . . .

Probably not if you are still running IE6....

Interestingly, it does seem that it is the security updates (protocols, certificates and such like that support secure communications) that are forcing XP systems off the Internet(*) and I expect they will do similar to Win7 post 2020.

(*) Firefox on XP/Vista goes EoL this month.

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Sir, you've been using Kaspersky Lab antivirus. Please come with us, sir

Roland6
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Re: Я невиновен, товарищ!

>We'll download the source code, we'll compile it, and we'll compare our resulting binaries with the binaries downloadable from Kaspersky Labs' site. They better be identical.

You had better be running exactly the same compiler, libraries, signing certificates etc. on your system as used by Kaspersky.

But all your little exercise will do is to provide that the binaries came from the source. It doesn't prove the presence or absence of 'backdoors', for that you will have to read the code. However, I doubt that will reveal anything, as if what has been published is correct and I have seen evidence to think otherwise, the code did exactly what the CCC told it to do - just like the telemetry module in Win10 - which can also upload your entire HDD and connected drives to MS - you consented to this by accepting the EULA.

Basically, ANY AV product that uploads 'suspicious' stuff to a CCC, where 'suspicious' is defined by the CCC can be misused by any party having access (authorised or not authorised) to the CCC.

I do think ST you are barking up the wrong tree.

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Roland6
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Re: Я невиновен, товарищ!

@ST "Why don't your friends at the FSB Kaspersky open source Kaspersky AV? Just open source it. Let's all have a look at what that code really does."

You obviously didn't read about the original complaint against Kaspersky...

The problem wasn't in the source code, as the code was doing exactly what it was supposed to do, the problem was that according to an Israeli security outfit that they and the FSB had gained access to Kaspersky's command and control centre and so could look at what the client software had passed back for inspection and secondly direct targeted clients (ie. those that have uploaded 'interesting' stuff) to upload additional material...

Hence why Kaspersky are now locating a CCC in Switzerland. Obviously, the only question is whether the FSB can legitimately access this, which fundamentally is exactly the same issue as the US government gaining access to data on Microsoft's servers in Ireland.

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Stern Vint Cerf blasts techies for lackluster worldwide IPv6 adoption

Roland6
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Re: But ...

And when /24s are worth $250k a pop?

Well if there isn't a functional IPv6 well before then, there will be no Internet - if consumers are complaining about paying £30 pcm now for all inclusive Internet, I doubt they will stand paying an additional £10 pcm just for an IP address.

At some point it will become viable to discard the Internet and replace it with something else ie. Internet 2

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Woman sues NASA for ownership of vial of space dust

Roland6
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Re: So... uhm...

>If you go and collect your own samples then that is a different matter.

Only if you also finance the trip.

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Microsoft pulls the plug on Windows 7, 8.1 support forums

Roland6
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Happy

Re: Looks like Windows have adopted the Linux Model.

>Might as well move over to Linux.

Given the various announcements in recent years, it does look like that is exactly what MS are doing themselves....

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Roland6
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Re: Not sure how big of a loss this is

>The only useful thing they could do is...

Well to resolve a particularly nasty problem - a system wouldn't install the monthly Win7 security update, hadn't done this since Sep 2017, but had installed all other updates. I did get a pointer from a (non-MVP) contributor to use Tweaking.com Windows Repair, which did resolve the problem, without resorting to the MVP preferred solution: wipe and reinstall...

So perhaps someone at MS has realised that its users/customers actually know more about their products than they do and hence it is a waste of company money paying employees to contribute to the forums...

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White box server makers flounder BUT big brands shine

Roland6
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Re: Do white box servers exist?

They exist, however they tend to be limited to specific markets as they tend to be made by smaller system builders - hence if you have need for more than a couple of dozen servers you may well have problems finding a supplier outside of the majors. Unless you are at the other extreme, like Facebook and others where your size and requirements justify you running your own internal whitebox assembly operation.

However, a more interesting question to ask is whether with the move to cloud there will be much of a market for whitebox cloud offerings.

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Tech rookie put decimal point in wrong place, cost insurer zillions

Roland6
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Re: Lloyds

@deadlockvictim re: " I remember being quite impressed by VAX and the by small little Macs in the labs that we used to do our statistics on"

I think this explains why you are having problems grasping things; you've not done any serious programming.

All programmers have to make decisions, especially about numbers and even more so when they represent money: the formats (ie. int/float/BCD/string) being used, the precision based on the facts presented to them, these decisions will take into account the data, the machine being used and the programming language. This also includes those who wrote the math/stats libraries you used.

I think also you overlook the massive improvement in system performance: The real reason why people were able to "downsize the mainframe" in the late 1990's was more because if you re-architected (and I did) a 1970's mainframe application to use the late 1990's hardware and computing paradigm, you could often go from needing a chunky mainframe to some relatively modest minicomputer - in one client case it was from needing a £17m(*) mainframe upgrade to a £1m(*) overspecified NUMA configuration ...

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Bad news, mobile operators: Unlicensed IoT tech rocketing ahead of NB-IoT and LTE-M – report

Roland6
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Re: Hmmm...

I think the point is whether you are in the hype of IoT where everything has to use TCP/IP over 802.11 or 3/4/5G (and client devices need to be running an OTT OS), or you been doing 'IoT' for decades...

Hence I take it that Sigfox are simply drawing people's attention to this simple fact: 'IoT' isn't new and that you don't have to use 3/4/5G or the 2.4Ghz/5Ghz bands.

However, the only problem I see is that too many people caught up in the IoT hype will dismiss anything that isn't TCP/IP-based and which doesn't use a 'mainstream' (ie. well known to consumers) communicatons platform.

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British egg producers saddened by Google salad emoji update

Roland6
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Re: More inclusive?

>Not forgetting the fish.

Or the beef!

Says he remembering the CJD/Mad cow epidemic in the UK many years back, when beef extracts were discovered in many things including 'vegetarian' foods...

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Roland6
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Re: More inclusive?

Well given my children are going through a phase where tomatos and "green stuff" is 'yuk', but will eat eggs, I don't see how this is more inclusive...

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