* Posts by veti

1452 posts • joined 25 Mar 2010

FCC's Pai: I am going to kill net neutrality in US

veti
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The one thing they know, that they're not telling us, is the very simple truth about their own jobs. As Trump would put it, if he had enough fundamental honesty in him: "Who knew that running a government was so hard?"

(Well, everyone who's ever tried it, of course. But the big selling point about Trump was that he refused to listen to those assholes.)

Seriously, read a few books about politics. A biography or two, perhaps. All the venom we hurl at politicians is basically the Dunning-Kruger effect writ just as large as it can be.

(Sidenote: this is why referendums are a stupid way of making political decisions.)

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A very Canadian approach: How net neutrality rules reflect a country's true nature

veti
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Re: Shurely shome mishtake?

In journalese, "schnapps" is simply "generic strong liquor". Can't expect the New York Times to alienate its readers by forcing them to learn furrin words.

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Re: there aren't any derogatory terms used by Canadians to describe their continental cousins

@JoeCool: I've always preferred "USAliens".

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Brit behind Titanium Stresser DDoS malware sent to chokey

veti
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Re: Mistaken character

Autism can cause similar behaviour. But it's not the same thing. If an autistic person can be persuaded to see that what they did was wrong, they'll feel genuine remorse.

The problem is that they don't see it naturally, they need to have it spelled out to them, and too often no-one bothers to do that.

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High Court hands Lauri Love permission to appeal extradition to US

veti
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Re: UK law ought to apply, surely?

@Commswonk: I agree, but you can't expect Love's lawyers *not* to throw everything they have into the pot, regardless of how good they think it is in general, if there's a chance it might tip the balance.

Support of 141 British MPs? Yeah, that plus $5 will buy you a glass of beer.

In all seriousness, I think his best hope here is to pay for someone to go up to Trump and say "You want to cut immigration? - well, here's one bad guy we don't need. PS: Getting him this far was a personal diplomatic triumph for Obama."

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Uber engineer's widow: Stress and racism killed my husband ... Uber: Let's make flying cars!

veti
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The job at Apple may have been a better environment, but there's no reason to suppose it would have paid more. It may have been a significantly lower level job. We don't know.

Anyway, even if it was (in retrospect) a mistake to turn that down - bad career choices should not be subject to a death sentence. Well, except in a very few edge cases.

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Alaska dentist 'pulled out patient's tooth while riding a hoverboard'

veti
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Re: My takeaway from this..

Just guessing, but my first thought was that it's not so much "riding a hoverboard" as "filming and sharing the video" that's the real crime here.

Looking at the complaint, it seems that the actual crime was "unnecessarily sedating the patient and billing Medicaid for it". Trust Alaska to reduce the whole thing to "unlawful billing". Presumably if you want to play silly buggers with a patient in this way, sedation becomes... more desirable.

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Trump's lips sealed on surveillance, complains EU privacy chief

veti
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Re: A mad idea.

Because they said they'd call us! We don't want to look desperate here.

Trump trumpets (pun intended) his l337 skillz as a Master Negotiator. If you go to him cap in hand, you should expect to be spanked until your buttocks fall off.

The only language he might even pretend to respect is hardball. Declare Safe Harbor finished, give all EU companies six months from today to show that they've repatriated all their data and, so far as possible, destroyed all copies within reach of US authorities. Start the clock ticking. That's the next move.

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veti
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Re: I think EU's bluff has been called

As an aside- whatever happened to Microsoft and the case the US government brought against them- for e-mails stored on a server in Ireland?

Microsoft won. Eventually.

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Computer games to become medal sport at Asian Games

veti
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Late breaking?

This has got to be an April Fool.

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Oh snap! UK Prime Minister Theresa May calls June election

veti
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Re: This goes to show one thing

"The SNP has 56 of 59 Scottish seats already" - yes, despite getting only 50% of the Scottish vote, because they have the same swingy winner-take-all constituency system as England & Wales. And guess what's the one aspect of their constitution that the SNP doesn't propose to change?

Sidenote, there's a popular Scots myth that the country voted solidly against Brexit. If that were true, then Brexit wouldn't be happening. The fact is that 38% of Scots - and 40% of Londoners, and 44% of Northern Irish - voted Leave. Moral: opinion was, and is, divided everywhere. (Except Gibraltar.)

I for one welcome the election. Either the Tories will be returned with a thumping majority, in which case fine, they can get on with Brexit in their own way (and they'll be cripplingly unpopular by the time of the next election, because of all the promises they'll have to break, but that's their problem) - or the Lib Dems will stage a big comeback, in which case equally fine, maybe they can reverse the whole thing. Either way I see a net gain on the present position.

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Trump signs exec order signaling foreign H-1B visa techie crackdown

veti
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Grandstanding on both sides

Chuck Schumer makes a fool of himself again. Of course it's going to create some jobs. Now that they're commissioned, someone is going to have to research and write the reports. That's probably, like, 100 employee-years' worth of work at the Dept of Labor.

Trump could shortcut the whole process by simply abolishing the H1B program entirely. Of course he's not going to do that, because it would interfere with the ability and/or willingness of people to give him money. But that's what he promised.

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That apple.com link you clicked on? Yeah, it's actually Russian

veti
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Re: Why is this difficult?

If you routinely browse in multiple languages, then you're sufficiently unusual that it's not unreasonable to expect you to be the one who has to do something different.

Like, maintain a separate browser window for each language. To me that doesn't sound too big an imposition. Note that you could still read Russian pages in your English-language browser window, except for the Cyrillic URLs. If you want to read those, you'd have to switch the native language in your current session.

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NASA agent faces heat for 'degrading' moon rock sting during which grandmother wet herself

veti
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Entrapment?

She "emailed NASA for advice on how to sell the trinkets" - but instead of being told "you can't", she got this whole elaborate "sting" runaround?

That sounds like entrapment to me. (I mean: if she had intended to break the law, she presumably wouldn't have told NASA, of all people, about it beforehand.)

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'Nobody's got to use the internet,' argues idiot congressman in row over ISP privacy rules

veti
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Re: That's not an option.

They don't use porn. When the urge gets too much, they might use a prostitute, but mostly they just repress.

Think how much time they save that way. This also explains a lot of why they don't see why people get so worked up about online privacy.

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veti
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Re: Benefit of the doubt? "Notas Badoff" might not be American?

Is there any reputable evidence - by which I mean, published by people who are willing to attach their real names, their statistical methodology, and their actual results - that shows "multiple voting and voting by non-citizens" is a major issue anywhere in the USA?

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'Tech troll' sues EFF to silence 'Stupid Patent of the Month' blog. Now the EFF sues back

veti
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Re: Aussie Judges

Australia is famously luddite toward technology as a whole. They were a pioneer in censoring the internet at a national scale, they're the only major country in the world with higher per-capita CO2 emissions than the USA, and they're proud of it.

In this case, I would guess that the EFF simply didn't defend the case, so this is a default judgment. It's hard to see how, even under Australian law, calling something "stupid" could be actionable.

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Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

veti
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Re: A funny thing happened...

Huh? Nobody has any business to be running IE8. Windows 7 supports up to IE11, which is an infinitely better browser than 8. (Personally I even prefer it to Chrome.)

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veti
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The thing is, the people who react with hostility are a relatively narrow set. They're people who: (a) currently use Windows, (b) know what a "version" is, (c) don't like the changes in W10.

That's quite a small minority of Windows users. Then, this particular change only affects the even smaller subset who are trying to upgrade their hardware.

Microsoft probably figures they can afford to offend that group, because the upside is that it removes a lot of confusion and conflicting information for the (much larger) group who are interested in upgrading their hardware, or who are buying a new computer, possibly for the very first time (and always remember: at a conservative estimate, approximately 30,000 people created their very first Windows login yesterday), but don't have any strong opinion on the merits of Windows versions. It's MS's business decision to make, and I for one think it's reasonably likely that they do know what they're doing.

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Hasta la Windows Vista, baby! It's now officially dead – good riddance

veti
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Re: Haters gonna hate

What made UAC particularly annoying in Vista was that every time it activated, it demanded that you click through precisely the same dialogue *twice*.

I have no idea why. By the time Windows 7 came around MS had apparently noticed this behaviour and fixed it, but it remained true in Vista for as long as I used it, which was a few years.

I'm not, completely, sure whether Vista was genuinely awful or whether it was merely ahead of its time, but I'm still inclined toward "genuinely awful". This opinion is largely formed of the time when I tried to include in my library a generated document called "security", and discovered that Vista actually treated otherwise-identical documents differently based on the filename. My software failed absolutely (and without warning or error messages of any kind) to save the document with the name "security".

Changing the document name to "Permissions" fixed the issue. But it left me boggled and incredulous, and really it still does.

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How's that for a remote login? NASA puts New Horizons probe to sleep 3.5 billion miles away

veti
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"Send a test tweet back to mission control"?

Kudos to NASA, for incorporating that feature on a probe launched six months before Twitter itself.

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Machine vs. machine battle has begun to de-fraud the internet of lies

veti
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Re: Consider the source(s) of your beliefs about Syria and Assad

I did that search, and it led me to gosint.wordpress.com.

Which is a very interesting blog, and thank you for bringing it to my attention. But I don't see any indication that it's, itself, a trustworthy source. Retired military officers, analysts, diplomats etc. have a valid point of view, and I'm sure it's worth listening to them - but they don't have a hotline to absolute truth.

What gets my suspicions up slightly is that the whole blog has a distinctly pro-Putin slant. It doesn't wear it on its sleeve, but you can detect it in, e.g., the uncritical reporting of Putin's own statements, as opposed to the deeply sceptical view of everyone else's. (For instance: check out this story about "the Kremlin's information war". Note how it leads off with a Russian government statement, and every specific allegation against the Russians is followed by a parallel counter-allegation against someone else. That's - a lot of trouble someone is going to, to present the Russian point of view "fairly".)

I would urge scepticism, even when reading sceptics.

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veti
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Re: When trust verification is automated, it WILL NOT work as expected..

"A statement coming out of the White House" should give rise to the following news story:

"The White House today issued a statement that..."

See the form? "X said Y". All the algorithm has to do is look at the White House news page (here, if you're interested) and see if the statement is there or not. If it is, then it's Real.

Determining the veracity of 'Y' - that is a whole different project, and the algorithm shouldn't be attempting it.

Any story that takes any form other than "X said Y" IS NOT NEWS, either fake or real. The sooner we all grasp that, the sooner we can start parsing the real news from the fake.

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veti
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Re: Choice

Possibly because reporters have a pretty shrewd idea of what would happen to them if they tried to Google "how to make sarin".

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veti
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Re: "Chaos is bad for business" - Really?

Say rather, that there are people who do very well out of chaos. But they are outnumbered, and theoretically can be outspent, by those who don't.

The quote is oversimplified, sure, but there is a truth underlying it: chaos is bad for business in aggregate, even if specific businesses thrive on it.

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veti
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Re: I have noticed an uptick in fake news last week

None of those stories are "news" at all, they are all clearly opinions.

It's the total and abject failure to differentiate between these two VERY DIFFERENT types of story that's causing at least 80% of the "fake news" hysteria. Any algorithm that fails to make that distinction - will only make matters worse.

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T-Mobile US CEO offers kid a year's supply of chicken nuggets for switching from AT&T

veti
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Re: LeGere shows how it's done

There is nothing wrong with offal. Wendy's nuggets, on the other hand... the best you can say of them is that they don't have 'Mc' in the name.

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Ex-IBMer sues Google for $10bn – after his web ad for 'divine honey cancer cure' was pulled

veti
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The saddest part?

That's not even the most expensive honey on the market.

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An echo chamber full of fake news? Blame Google and Facebook, says Murdoch chief

veti
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How's about a link? Y'know, so we can see WTF you're talking about?

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US govt ceases fire in legal spat with Twitter to unmask anti-Trump 'immigration official'

veti
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Re: assumptions

Nope. The whole point is that it's anonymous, and "proof" would kinda undermine that.

But so what?

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Twitter sues US govt to protect 'Department of Immigration employee' who doesn't like Trump

veti
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I found the story on Google, thank you very much.

It's not exactly the same. In that case, the identity of the tweeters was already publicly known. There's some rather hysterical coverage about the subpoena also applying to 637,000 followers of Wikileaks, but apparently that was fake news - the actual subpoena says nothing to that effect.

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'Evidence of Chinese spying' uncovered on eve of Trump-Xi summit

veti
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Re: Off topic but urgent.

Those warnings are from your browser. They mean the https:// certificate has been revoked. That in itself doesn't mean anything.

If in doubt, I suggest you phone them instead of using the webform. 020 3228 6000 (switchboard).

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Manchester pulls £750 public crucifixion offer

veti
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Re: No nails required

Look, if you're going to start arguing that the bible's not true - then fine, but what the heck are you doing even reading a story about an Easter commemoration?

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veti
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Re: No nails required

The bible very specifically mentions nails in the hands, not the wrists.

I think the only way to square this particular circle is to assume that while the weight was born by ropes, the hands may also have been nailed for effect. (The "effect" in question being pain and general gruesomeness.)

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US border cops must get warrants to search citizens' gadgets – draft bipartisan law emerges

veti
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Re: going to KiwiLand?

There are lots of ways of flying from the UK/Europe to New Zealand without going anywhere near the US. I've done it via Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Dubai+Sydney (and now, I understand, "directly via Dubai" is also an option), Seoul, Bangkok, Shanghai...

Basically, Asia is full of airports, and all of them are more comfortable and welcoming than LAX.

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veti
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Can you say

"blatantly unconstitutional"?

If it's legal for an American agent, on American soil, to do it - then the citizenship of the victim target subject makes no difference. It's either legal, or it's not.

"... nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws". 14th amendment applies to states, and by reverse incorporation also to the federal government.

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Hundreds of millions 'wasted' on UK court digitisation scheme

veti
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Re: Ooops?

I see it's been revised now - by taking out the initial figure.

So it still doesn't support the headline, but at least it doesn't actively contradict it any more.

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veti
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Re: Silly

True, but most things called "agile" depend more on user engagement.

Seems to me that, instead of overselling the product, which is what normally happens with government IT projects, here what's been oversold is the methodology. Somebody heard about "agile", went and read a book about "scrum" and assumed it was the same thing. Someone else - didn't. So as well as "no agreed product plan", there's also "no meeting of minds on project plan".

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Trump sets sights on net neutrality

veti
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Re: What happens when the 1% has all the money?

I'm pretty sure that the whole reason Trump ran was to catapult himself into that "top 1% of the top 1%" club.

So far it's working fine. The tributes - to the Trump name and family, not to America - have been rolling in from China, Mexico, and everywhere else he's targeted.

When Mubarak was finally forced out of Egypt, his family's net worth was estimated at 15% of the country's entire GDP. Trump won't have that long, but I think he's got his sights set on "at least 5%".

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veti
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Re: I suspect...

I suspect that what we're seeing is a ritual cleansing of the United States, to remove the 'taint' of Obama from the land. Everything Obama did must be reversed - not because it was particularly bad, but simply because he was the one that did it.

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veti
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Re: President Swoop and Poop

Trump is the anti-Reagan. His signature policy is to undo everything that Reagan accomplished.

NAFTA was Ronald Reagan's initiative. Reagan believed firmly in free trade, he thought that American workers and American companies could compete on a level playing field, and the discipline would make them better for it. That's diametrically opposite to what Trump believes, which is that American workers are incapable of surviving either change or competition.

Reagan passed the Emergency Medical Treatment Act, entitling anyone, regardless of insurance, citizenship or anything else, to free emergency treatment at (effectively) any public hospital.

Reagan believed in truth and democracy. No Reagan aid ever coined the phrase "alternative facts". Nor did they perpetually accuse the media of lying. When Reagan was caught out (e.g. Iran-Contra), he put his hands up and said "You got me".

Reagan oversaw the end of the Cold War and the dismantling of the Russian empire and one-party state. Trump is doing his damnedest to reverse all of that.

Reagan introduced the (current form of) the Alternative Minimum Tax, which Trump wants to abolish.

Under Reagan, the number of people living in the US who were born in Mexico - doubled. 'Nuff said.

Reagan signed the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, and pressed for further treaties that the Donald has decried as a "bad deal".

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Cambridge Analytica arrives in Australia to STEAL our democracy!

veti
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Great Barrier Firewall

While acknowledging the scepticism, I can't help but feel you're being possibly over-complacent here. Clinton and Cameron both under-estimated these fsckers, and look what happened to them.

But Australia has a good option at this point: block Facebook from the whole country. Don't wait, do it now and watch national productivity surge.

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Home Office accused of blocking UK public's scrutiny of Snoopers' Charter

veti
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The gummint is supposed to custard the tarts.

They're elected, so answerable to the electorate. But in the past 40 years or so, we've gruesomely undermined that accountability by looking over their shoulders all the time. When we put so much work into micromanaging the buggers, it becomes that much harder to blame them for fucking up.

Hell, look at Brexit. That's completely our mess. And we got it by "not trusting our politicians".

Not that it's, generally, a good idea to trust politicians too far. But it's also not a good idea to distrust them too much, because then they can't do their jobs, even if (outside chance) they're genuinely, honestly trying to. Just look at the US, anytime in the past 15 years, to see what comes of that.

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Robots are killing jobs after all, apparently: One droid equals 5.6 workers

veti
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Re: jobs aren't entitlements

I mean, as a contractor, I deal with that ALL of the time. Why can't EVERYONE ELSE deal with that, too?

What do we call it, when people demand EVERYONE ELSE should be exactly like them? Whatever it is, it's the opposite of what I've always thought of as "American".

Many people don't want to be contractors. They don't have the temperament, the inclination or the skills to "market their skills". And what does "being responsible for your own situation when it comes to jobs etc." mean? "You picked the wrong industry, sucks to be you"?

No, a job is not an entitlement. "Life", however, is - at least according to the founding document of the US. It follows that the one should not depend on the other.

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veti
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I can see how "robots improve productivity", in the conventional sense of "economic output divided by input".

How they raise wages, however? They will raise *total* income, because rising productivity implies that much - but as far as I can see, approximately all of that income will go to the people owning the robots. So they will - buy more robots, I guess?

It seems to me that the NBER's research is flawed in that it focuses on certain "sectors" in isolation, without taking into account how they interact with the rest of the economy. But Steve Mnunchin's analysis is even more flawed because it's not an analysis, just a dismissal, and not, so far as we know, based on anything that could actually pass for research or rational thought of any kind.

"Labour market adjustment assitance" sounds like something that gov'ts have been talking about since at least the 1980s. It sounds nice, but in practice it means the government has to identify where (i.e. in what industries) new jobs are going to be created, and they're crap at that kind of prediction.

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How UK’s GDPR law might not be judged 'adequate'

veti
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Who are you?

If you're going to publish an article with extensive use of the first person singular pronoun -

Is it really asking too much for your own name, rather than that of a company, to be attached to said article?

Doesn't have to be your real name, you can use a pen name if you're shy. But "Amberhawk Training" doesn't sound like anyone I'm likely to meet in a pub.

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Oracle doing due diligence on Accenture. Yep, you read that right

veti
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Re: Whats this GUI thingy?

A lot of big companies with Oracle systems need auditing.

It'd be nice if the auditor was someone who was willing to work through an Oracle database.

That's your synergy right there.

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UK digital minister Matt Hancock praises 'crucial role' of encryption

veti
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Re: Left hand, right hand

To look at it another way, different ministers have different jobs.

Hancock's job is to encourage businesses to do stuff. Businesses like privacy.

Rudd's job - isn't.

This is how cabinet government works, different people have different priorities and they argue it out between them. In Rudd's case, specifically - she's pushing exactly the same line that has been pushed by every home secretary for at least the last 20 years, so I assume she's just saying what her staff tells her to say.

The Home Office permanent staff have a lot of experience of telling ministers what to say.

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After London attack, UK gov lays into Facebook, Google for not killing extremist terror pages

veti
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Re: the Guardian is polarizing

Oh yeah? Here is a Daily Mail story about the Cumbria shooter, who killed way more people than this loon in Westminster. Here is what it has to say about Harold Shipman, easily the biggest mass murderer in modern UK history. Here is its discussion of Pavlo Lapshyn.

Strangely enough, in all three of these articles, I don't see any discussion of the murderer's religious beliefs.

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veti
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If I wanted to kill people, I wouldn't hire an ix40 or any other kind of family car. I'd hire a pickup truck, or at least a Ford Transit.

It's a real shame the murderer was killed. It would be nice to know something about what he was thinking. Did he really plan this at all, or was it a spur-of-the-moment thing?

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